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Math Lesson Plan Format

Name: Maria Franciosa

Date: 2/20/15

Subject: Math

Topic: Fractions

Grade Level: 3

Purpose: To have students practice work with creating and reading fractions, compare fractions and
find equivalent fractions.
Curriculum Standards:
3.NF.A.1: Develop understanding of fractions as numbers- Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity
formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity
formed by a parts of size 1/b.
3.NF.A.3: Develop understanding of fractions as numbers- Explain equivalence of fractions in special
cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size.
3.NF.A.3a: Develop understanding of fractions as numbers- Understand two fractions as equivalent
(equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.
3.NF.A.3b: Develop understanding of fractions as numbers- Recognize and generate simple equivalent
fractions, e.g., 1/2= 2/4, 4/6=2/3. Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g, by using a visual fraction
model.
3.NF.A.3c: Develop understanding of fractions as numbers- Express whole numbers as fractions, and
recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers.
3.NF.A.3d: Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning
about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same
whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, < and justify the conclusions, e.g., by
using a visual fraction model.
3.G.A.2: Reason with shapes and their attributes- Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express
the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole.
Objective(s):
Students will be able to organize in a chart, fractions by their numerical form, word form, part of a
whole and part of a group.
Goal: I can label and group like fractions.
Students will be able to determine where fractions fall on a number line in relation to benchmark
fractions using fraction bars as a reference tool.
Goal: I can compare fractions with benchmark fractions.
Students will be able to compare fractions with similar numerators or denominators using >, =, <
symbols.
Goal: I can compare fractions.
Students will be able to identify and create equivalent fractions.
Goal: I can create equivalent fractions.

Assessment:
Formative:
Benchmark Fractions: Teacher will observe group work, assisting where necessary; listen to thinking
processes/explanations of answers to assess overall understanding of identifying fractions and
comparing them in relation to benchmarks on a number line.
Comparing Fractions: Teacher will observe group work, assisting where necessary; listen to thinking
processes/explanations of answers to assess overall understanding of comparing fractions. Teacher will
also have sample of student work to help assess student understanding.
Equivalent Fractions: Teacher will observe group work, assisting where necessary; listening to
thinking processes/explanations of answers to assess overall understanding of equivalent fractions.
Teacher will also have sample of student work to help assess student understanding.
As this is group work, teacher will have to be mindful of students becoming passive learners and letting
other group members do the work for them, making sure to intervene when necessary.
Materials Needed for Learning Experience:
Teacher: Center materials, timer
Benchmark Fractions: Smart Notebook File, fraction tiles, worksheet backup
Comparing Fractions: Cuisenaire Rods, Comparison Worksheet, Cuisenaire rod backup sheet
Equivalent Fractions: Lego bags, exploration sheet, colored pencils, Lego backup sheet, clipboards
Students: Pencil
Anticipated Length of Learning Experience: 30 minutes, about 15min for each center (2 center
rotations)
Student Grouping: Begin whole group at desks for directions/going over centers. Split to center
groups.
Group 1: Damian, Taylor, Landon, Kilee
Group 2: Broden, Moshe, Aiden B, Justin, Richard
Group 3: Jack, Makaela, Aidan L, Wyatt, Bea
Prerequisite Knowledge:
Teacher: Background knowledge from the past fraction lessons; how each center is run
Student: Fraction knowledge from the weeks lessons.
Procedure:
Today we will be working in math centers to work on our fraction skills.
Before we begin I am going to walk you all through each center, please be engaged listeners while I go
through each center so you know what to do when you get there.
1. Benchmark Fractions:
At this center you will be using the SmartBoard and organizing fractions by their number form, word
form, fraction of a whole and fraction of a group. (show example) Then you will be organizing fractions
by how close they are to each benchmark, 0, , or 1 whole. You have fraction tiles to help you during
the comparison portion. Your group can split up and talk about the answers before deciding to move any

pieces on the board. Please make sure you take turns while using the board. [Framed
Choice/Consequence]
2. Comparing Fractions:
At this center you will be using Cuisenaire Rods to create and compare fractions. When you get to this
center each of you should take a worksheet from the folder, you can work individually or in pairs/groups
of 3. The sheet starts off with an exploration of the rods, asking you how many of each color create one
whole and then you will construct fractions and compare them. There is an example for each section at
this center as well. When you are done this center, please make sure all materials go back in their bags
and your worksheet goes into the completed work folder. [Framed Choice/Consequence]
3. Equivalent Fractions:
At this center you will be exploring equivalent fractions with Legos. When you get to this center each of
you should take a worksheet from the folder, you can work individually or in pairs/groups of 3. The
sheet goes over our Lego vocabulary- bricks vs studs, and how we reference our bricks. The sheet asks
you to take certain bags in order to complete the question, please take the bag and when you are done
with it, ensure that all of those pieces get back into the bag before you move on to the next question.
When you are done this center, please make sure all materials go back in their bags and your worksheet
goes into the completed work folder. [Framed Choice/Consequence]
Now, think back to the beginning of the year when Mrs. B told you everything is a choice. Today you
have a lot of choices and temptations to play instead of learn. We want to remember that everything we
are using today during this time is a tool. I am putting a lot of trust and responsibility in all of you to
make the right choices today. I believe that each and every one of you can make responsible and good
choices today and that we can have some great, engaged math learning today.
When we work in centers what should we do?: Whisper voices, taking turns
Transition to first center: On your desk you have a colored square of paper with a fraction on it. If you
have the fraction 1/2 (red paper) please carefully and quietly move to center 1, have a seat and wait to
begin. If you have 1/3 (blue paper) please carefully and quietly move to center 2, have a seat and wait to
begin. If you have 1/4 (yellow paper) please carefully and quietly move to center 3, have a seat and wait
to begin. I am going to set a timer, when you hear the timer go off, please quietly put away your
materials and wait for the instruction to transition to the next station.
Set timer and start! try and divide remaining time as equally as possible so they can have as much
time possible at each station.
Further transitions: Make sure all of your materials are away and the center looks just the way you
found it. When you are done put your hands on your head. Quietly move to the next station (1-2, 2-3, 31) and begin.
Final transition from last station: Please make sure all of your materials are put away and the center
looks exactly the way you found it. When you are done put one hand on your head and one hand on your
belly. Now show me one last awesome transition back to your desks and have a seat quietly.

Wrap up: I was really impressed with how well we worked in centers today. I saw a lot of engaged
learning and really great conversations about math and fractions. Thank you for all of your hard work
this morning! If transitions and center work went well- move 10yrds
Transition to snack.
Child Guidance:
Attention getting strategies: 54321 quiet coyote
Transitions: Timer goes off, silently put materials back to where they should be, quietly and calmly
move to the next station and begin work.
Early finishers and those who take longer: Each center should have enough work to fill the full 10min
if not more. If students do not finish it is okay- the goal is to do as much as you can correctly, not speed
through to finish first.
Framed Choice and logical consequences:
Benchmark Center: Working with the SmartBoard can be fun and engaging, but we need to be safe
and careful. You have a choice you can work cooperatively with your group and be engaged in what is
happening through conversation and discussion, interacting with the board gently. If you cannot work
cooperatively and are being unsafe with the SmartBoard you can sit at your desk and complete a
worksheet with benchmark fractions independently.
Comparing Center: It is very tempting to build towers with the Cuisenaire Rods, but they are to be
used as tools in comparing fractions. You have a choice, to use them as tools and complete your work or
you can use this reference sheet to complete your work if using the rods as toys instead of tools.
Equivalent Center: I know many of you have played with Legos before, as have I, however today we
are using them as math tools and not toys. I am putting a lot of trust and responsibility on you to work
with them as tools today, and I know you can do it. However, if you start building and playing with
them instead of using them as fraction tools, I have a reference sheet you can use to complete your work
instead of using the Legos.
Differentiation:
In this center plan I tried to fill in with the skills students needed the most work on from the week. In the
benchmark center, I tried to bring it back to fraction basics and then move it up to applying them to
benchmark fractions, which they struggled with during the week. The comparing fractions center allows
for students to take it to the manipulative level, as well as draw it themselves so they not only have felt it
but have written it out themselves, hoping to reinforce the concepts. In equivalent fractions, I tried to be
mindful of how challenging of a concept this was for them to grasp and think that the Legos give a good
concrete way for them to see how equivalent fractions work, from piece to stud. Some students prefer to
work alone as opposed to groups and in both the equivalent and comparing centers they have the option
to work on their own or with a small group.
Resources Used:
Billstein, R., Libeskind, S., & Lott, J. Rational Numbers as Fractions. In A Problem Solving Approach
to Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers (10th ed., pp. 341-408). Boston: AddisonWesley.
Foreman, S., & Wesley, A. (2011). Topic 12 Understanding Fractions. In EnVisionMATH (Teacher ed.,
pp.247-289). Pearson Education

Newton, N. (2013). Guided Math in Action: Building Each Students Mathematical Proficiency with
Small Group Instruction. New York: Routledge-Taylor.
Phillips, E. (Director) (2012, June 8). Structure of Number Systems. Math 171-01C. Lecture conducted
from Keene State College, Keene, NH.
Smith III, J. (2002). The Development of Students Knowledge of Fractions and Ratios. In B. Litwiller
& G. Bright (Eds.), Making Sense of Fractions Ratios, and Proportions: 2002 Yearbook (pp. 317). Reston, Va.: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.