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Master 2.25

Date

Extra Practice 1

Lesson 1: Exploring Large Numbers


1. Write each number in standard form.
a) 2 million 186 thousand 23
b) 4 000 000 000 + 6 000 000 + 900 000 + 60 000 + 5000 + 400 + 80 + 4
c) 50 000 000 + 5 000 000 + 70 000 + 2000 + 9
d) six billion two hundred seventeen million three thousand eleven
2. Write each number in expanded form.
a) 184 267 317
b) 4 300 627 803
c) 17 652 425
d) 85 697 304 281
3. Write each number in words.
a) 1 856 374 021 356
b) 85 609 327 004
c) 2 000 351 246
4. Write the value of each underlined digit.
a) 184 267 317
b) 4 300 627 803
c) 17 662 425
d) 55 247 361 401
5. Use the digits from 1 to 8. Use each digit only once.
Make an 8-digit number as close to 17 000 000 as possible.
6. Explain the difference between the two 4s in the number 546 347 658 123.
7. Write the number that is:
a) 10 000 less than 987 624 325
b) 100 000 more than 2 325 678 141
c) 1 000 000 more than 865 272 424 850

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Name
Master 2.26

Date

Extra Practice 2

Lesson 2: Numbers All Around Us


Use a calculator when you need to.
1. Use the data in the table.
a) Find the total population of the 3 territories
in 2006.
b) How much greater is the population of
British Columbia than the population of
Alberta?
c) What is the combined population of
Manitoba and Saskatchewan?
d) Find the total population of all the
provinces and territories in the table.

2006 Population Counts


Province or
Territory
Manitoba

Population
1 148 401

Saskatchewan

968 157

Alberta

3 290 350

British Columbia

4 113 487

Yukon Territory

30 372

Northwest
Territories

41 464

Nunavut

29 474

2. Nadias property is 937 m long and 641 m wide.


What is the perimeter of Nadias property?
3. Cecil planted 744 maple trees in 24 equal rows.
How many trees were planted in each row?
4. Twenty-seven nuts and bolts are needed to assemble a picnic table.
How many nuts and bolts are needed for 256 picnic tables?
5. One package of sugar-free gum has 14 pieces.
How many packages can be made with 3680 pieces?
6. The population of Nunavut was 26 745 in 2001 and 29 474 in 2006.
By how much did the population increase from 2001 to 2006?

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Name
Master 2.27

Date

Extra Practice 3

Lesson 3: Exploring Multiples


1. List the first 10 multiples of each number.
a) 4
b) 9
c) 6

d) 25

2. Find the first 3 common multiples of each pair of numbers.


a) 6 and 8
b) 3 and 7
c) 9 and 10
d) 4 and 7
e) 2 and 9
f) 5 and 8
3. Find the first 2 common multiples of each set of numbers.
a) 3, 4, and 6
b) 2, 4, and 5
c) 4, 6, and 8
d) 2, 3, and 4
4. Draw a large Venn diagram with 2 overlapping loops.
Label the loops Multiples of 3 and Multiples of 4.
Sort these numbers in the Venn diagram:
48, 15, 24, 33, 60, 73, 56, 40, 42, 21, 16, 28
5. Draw a large Venn diagram with 3 overlapping loops.
Label the loops Multiples of 2, Multiples of 3, and Multiples of 5.
Sort these numbers in the Venn diagram:
20, 12, 21, 8, 9, 15, 29, 25, 30, 36
6. Kimi saw 13 animals in the barnyard.
Some were chickens and some were sheep.
Altogether there were 36 legs.
How many chickens and how many sheep did Kimi see?

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e) 12

Name
Master 2.28

Date

Extra Practice 4

Lesson 4: Prime and Composite Numbers


1. Tell if each number is prime or composite.
a) 73
b) 48
c) 23
d) 59

e) 39

2. Copy the table.


Sort the numbers from 20 to 40 in the table.

Even
Prime
Composite

3. Write 3 numbers less than 50 that have exactly 4 factors each.


4. Write 3 numbers less than 50 that have exactly 2 factors each.
5. Which numbers below are factors of 35?
How do you know?
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
6. Lemons are packaged in bags of 6.
Which of these numbers of lemons can be packaged in full bags?
How do you know?
96, 46, 42, 60, 63, 72, 85
7. Chioke goes to the gym every 4th day.
He works at the soup kitchen every 3rd day.
Chioke went to the gym and worked at the soup kitchen today.
When will he next do both on the same day?

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Odd

Name
Master 2.29

Date

Extra Practice 5

Lesson 5: Investigating Factors


1. List all the factors of each number.
a) 24
b) 36
e) 84
f) 48

c) 50
g) 51

d) 19
h) 16

2. Draw a factor tree to find the factors of each number that are prime.
a) 32
b) 60
c) 42
3. Use division to find the factors of each number that are prime.
a) 80
b) 32
c) 48
4. Find the common factors of each pair of numbers.
a) 12, 18
b) 16, 32
c) 21, 35

d) 45, 60

5. Draw 2 different factor trees for each number.


a) 66
b) 90
c) 48

d) 24

6. List 3 different numbers that have exactly 2 factors.


What are these numbers called?
7. Draw a Venn diagram to show the factors of 12 and 30.
Where did you place the common factors of 12 and 30 in the diagram?
8. List the factors of each number that are prime.
a) 38
b) 40
c) 85
9. a) Is 42 a perfect number? Explain how you know.
b) Is 32 an almost-perfect number? Explain how you know.

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Name
Master 2.30

Date

Extra Practice 7

Lesson 7: Order of Operations


1. Evaluate each expression. Use the order of operations.
a) 24 y 6 u 7
b) 38 16 y 4
c) 55 + 15 y 3
d) 7 u (4 + 8)
e) 28 y (16 9)
f) 50 16 + 4
2. Use a calculator to evaluate.
a) 1256 57 u 8
c) 96 342 (573 u 29)

b) 684 u 23 y 4
d) 4094 y 89 + 318

3. Use brackets to make each number sentence true.


a) 15 6 y 3 + 7 = 20
b) 50 6 u 6 = 14
c) 60 + 14 y 2 = 67
d) 100 + 44 y 12 = 12
4. Use mental math to evaluate.
a) (70 u 2) y 7
c) 500 + 250 u 2
e) (3000 + 2000) y 50

b) 10 000 3000 u 3
d) 2500 y (50 u 2)
f) 180 y (2 u 9)

5. How many different answers can you get by inserting one pair of brackets
in this expression?
15 + 9 y 3 + 6
Write each expression, then evaluate it.
6. Danny bought 6 shirts for $26 each and 2 pairs of pants for $55 a pair.
Which expression shows how much Danny spent, in dollars?
a) 6 u 26 2 u 55
b) 6 u 26 + 2 u 55
c) (6 + 2) u (26 + 55)
7. Callie bought 3 packages of drinking boxes.
Each package has 6 drinking boxes.
Callie shared the drinking boxes equally among 9 children.
How many drinking boxes did each child get?
Write a number sentence to show the order of operations you used.

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Name
Master 2.31

Date

Extra Practice 8

Lesson 8: What Is an Integer?


1. Write an integer to represent each situation.
a) The temperature is 8 below 0C.
b) The valley was 700 m below sea level.
c) Victor spent $89 of his savings.
d) The plane flew at an altitude of 20 000 m.
e) Chucks golf score was 5 under par.
2. Write the opposite of each integer.
a) +7
b) 4
c) +8

d) 17

3. Describe a situation that could be represented by each integer.


a) 73
b) 14
c) 450
d) +845

e) +32

e)

4. A photo of a close finish of a race showed:


Jan 3 m before the finish line
Simon 1 m before the finish line
Bryn 2 m after the finish line
Nikki 4 m after the finish line.
Suppose 0 represents the finish line.
Use first initials to show the position of each racer on the number line.

5. Draw red or yellow tiles to model each integer.


a) +4
b) 7
c) +1

d) +6

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e) 3

Name
Master 2.32

Date

Extra Practice 9

Lesson 9: Comparing and Ordering Integers


1. Order the integers in each set from least to greatest.
a) 0, +6, 6, 10, +9
b) +25, +17, 23, 8, +12
c) +4, 9, +16, 25, +1
d) 52, +45, +76, 30, 121
2. Order these elevations from highest to lowest.
Caspian Sea Shore:
28 m below sea level
Elbrus, Russia:
5642 m above sea level
Lake Assal, Djibouti:
156 m below sea level
Eurasia Basin, Arctic Ocean: 5450 m below sea level
McKinley, Alaska:
6194 m above sea level
3. Copy and complete by placing < or > in each box.
a) 8 7
b) +9 +20
c) 12 + 4
d) 0

11

e) 23

32

f) +15

4. The data show the temperatures in different cities on one day in March.
Use these temperatures to answer the questions below.
Victoria: +10C
Calgary: 6C
Regina: +5C
Winnipeg: 3C
Toronto: +7C
Quebec: 8C
Moncton: +2C
Halifax: 2C
St. Johns: 7C
Charlottetown: 0C
Iqaluit: 35C
Whitehorse: 12C
Yellowknife: 31C
a) Which city has the highest temperature?
b) Which city has the lowest temperature?
c) Which cities have temperatures greater than 1C?
d) Which cities have temperatures between 6C and +6C?
e) Which cities have temperatures that are opposite integers?
f) Which cities have temperatures less than 0C?
g) Which cities have temperatures less than 5C?

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Name
Master 2.33

Extra Practice Answers

Extra Practice 1 Master 2.25


b) 4 006 965 484
d) 6 217 003 011

2. a) 100 000 000 + 80 000 000 + 4 000 000


+ 200 000 + 60 000 + 7000 + 300 + 10 + 7
b) 4 000 000 000 + 300 000 000 + 600 000
+ 20 000 + 7000 + 800 + 3
c) 10 000 000 + 7 000 000 + 600 000 +
50 000 + 2000 + 400 + 20 + 5
d) 80 000 000 000 + 5 000 000 000
+ 600 000 000 + 90 000 000 + 7 000 000
+ 300 000 + 4000 + 200 + 80 + 1
3. a) one trillion eight hundred fifty-six billion
three hundred seventy-four million twentyone thousand three hundred fifty-six
b) eighty-five billion six hundred nine million
three hundred twenty-seven thousand four
c) two billion three hundred fifty-one thousand
two hundred forty-six
4. a) 80 000 000
c) 7 000 000

6. 2729

Extra Practice 3 Master 2.27

Lesson 1
1. a) 2 186 023
c) 55 072 009

Date

Lesson 3
1. a)
b)
c)
d)

4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40


9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81, 90
6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 54, 60
25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 175, 200,
225, 250
e) 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120

2. a) 24, 48, 72
c) 90, 180, 270
e) 18, 36, 54
3. a) 12 and 24
c) 24 and 48

b) 21, 42, 63
d) 28, 56, 84
f) 40, 80, 120
b) 20 and 40
d) 12 and 24

4.

b) 600 000
d) 5 000 000 000

5. 16 875 432
6. The first 4 is in the ten billions place.
It has a value of 40 billion.
The second 4 is in the ten millions place.
It has a value of 40 million.
7. a) 987 614 325
c) 865 273 424 850

5.

b) 2 325 778 141

Extra Practice 2 Master 2.26


Lesson 2
1. a) 101 310
c) 2 116 558

b) 823 137
d) 9 621 705

6. 8 chickens and 5 sheep

2. 3156 m

Extra Practice 4 Master 2.28

3. 31 trees

Lesson 4

4. 6912 nuts and bolts

1. a) prime
d) prime

b) composite
e) composite

5. 262 packages with 12 pieces left over


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c) prime

Name
2.

Even

Odd

Date
4. a) 1, 2, 3, 6
c) 1, 3, 7

b) 1, 2, 4, 8, 16
d) 1, 3, 5, 15

23 29 31 37

Prime
Composite

20 22 24 26 28 30
32 34 36 38 40

21 25 27 33
35 39

5. a)

3. 10, 21, 35
4. 17, 23, 47
b)

5. 5, 7
6. 96, 42, 60, 72
7. In 12 days

Extra Practice 5 Master 2.29


Lesson 5
1. a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
g)
h)

1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24
1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, 36
1, 2, 5, 10, 25, 50
1, 19
1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 12, 14, 21, 28, 42, 84
1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 48
1, 3, 17, 51
1, 2, 4, 8, 16

c)

2. a) 2
d)

b) 2, 3, 5

6. 23, 37, and 73 are prime numbers.


7.
c) 2, 3, 7

3. a) 2, 5
b) 2
c) 2, 3

The common factors of 12 and 30 are shown in


the overlapping part of the diagram.
8. a) 2, 19

b) 2, 5

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c) 5, 17

Name
9. a) The factors of 42 are:
1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 14, 21, and 42.
If I add all the factors except 42, I get 54.
So, 42 is not a perfect number.
b) The factors of 32 are: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32.
If I add all the factors except 32, I get 31.
So, 32 is an almost-perfect number.

Extra Practice 7 Master 2.30

Date
5. a)
b)
c)

d)

e)

Extra Practice 9 Master 2.32

Lesson 7
1. a) 28
d) 84

b) 34
e) 4

2. a) 800
3. a)
b)
c)
d)

b) 3933

c) 60
f) 38
c) 79 725 d) 364

15 (6 y 3) + 7 = 20
50 (6 u 6) = 14
60 + (14 y 2) = 67
(100 + 44) y 12 = 12

4. a) 20
d) 25

b) 1000
e) 100

Lesson 9
1. a)
b)
c)
d)

10, 6, 0, +6, +9
23, 8, +12, +17, +25
25, 9, +1, +4, +16
121, 52, 30, +45, +76

2. 6194 m, 5642 m, 28 m, 156 m, 5450 m


3. a) <
d) >
c) 1000
f) 10

5. (15 + 9) y 3 + 6 = 14
(15 + 9 y 3) + 6 = 24
15 + (9 y 3) + 6 = 24
15 + (9 y 3 + 6) = 24
15 + 9 y (3 + 6) = 16
6. 6 u 26 + 2 u 55
7. (3 u 6) y 9 = 2

b) <
e) >

c) <
f) >

4. a) Victoria
b) Iqaluit
c) Victoria, Moncton, Toronto, Regina,
Charlottetown
d) Winnipeg, Moncton, Halifax, Regina,
Charlottetown
e) Moncton and Halifax, Toronto and
St. Johns
f) Winnipeg, Calgary, Halifax, Quebec,
St. Johns, Yellowknife, Iqaluit, Whitehorse
g) Calgary, Quebec, St. Johns, Yellowknife,
Iqaluit, Whitehorse

Extra Practice 8 Master 2.31


Lesson 8
1. a) 8
d) +20 000

b) 700
e) 5

c) 89

2. a) 7
d) +17

b) +4
e) 32

c) 8

3. a)
b)
c)
d)
e)

I earned $73 babysitting.


It was 14C outside.
The submarine travelled at 450 m.
The mountain is 845 m above sea level.
My golf score was 2 under par.

4.

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