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MISS FARRELL

Lesson Plan

Grade 2 Science Lesson #5 (Experiment #2)

PS1 FALL 2016

Unit: Boats and Buoyancy Lesson Duration: 1 hr

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES


General Learning Outcomes:

2-7 Construct objects that will float on and move through water, and evaluate various designs for
watercraft.
2-2 Recognize pattern and order in objects and events studied; and, with guidance, record procedures and
observations, using pictures and words; and make predictions and generalizations, based on observations.
Specific Learning Outcomes:

(2.7) Assemble materials so they will float, carry a load and be stable in water.
(2.7) Develop or adapt methods of construction that are appropriate to the design task.
(2.7) Modify a watercraft to increase the load it will carry.
(2.2) Describe and explain results; explanations may reflect an early stage of concept development
(2.2) Describe what was observed, using captioned pictures and oral language
(2.3) Construct, with guidance, an object that achieves a given purpose, using materials that are provided
(2.3) Identify the purpose of the object to be constructed: What structure do we need to make? What does it
need to do?
(2.3) Identify steps followed in constructing the object and in testing it to see if it works
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Students will:
1. Students will work with materials so that they will float, be able to carry a load, and be stable in water.
2. Students will modify their construction to be appropriate to the given task.
3. Students will describe their observations and develop explanations for these results.
4. Students will edit a watercraft to increase the load it could carry.
5. Students will visually and orally describe their interpretations of scientific observation.
6. Students will build an object that fits a specific task with guidance and materials provided.
7. Students will identify the purpose of the object being built.
8. Students will list steps followed in constructing the object and in testing it.

ASSESSMENTS
Observations:
Are students applying scientific concepts of
buoyancy to their designs?
Are students making informed observations and,
consequently, informed edits of their designs?
Are students developing their scientific predictions
based on information they learned about buoyancy?
Are students being respectful to their peers and
their ideas?

Big Ideas:

Scientific method
Developing our predictions (hypothesis)
Recalling factors of buoyancy:
Shape, Size, Weight, Material
Trust it!
Hands-on experience with science concepts
Direct observation, then direct edit
Collaborative = sharing of ideas and designs

Are students being cooperative and positive even if


their designs fail to float? (trust it, learn from it)
Written/Performance Assessments:
Performance assessment (formative) : Participation and engagement in the experiment
Efficient boat design
Written assessment (summative/formative) : science lab experiment write-up/hand-out

MISS FARRELL

PS1 FALL 2016

Are their observations accurate and informative for their redesigns?

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED


Resource #1: Alberta Program of Studies
Resource #2: Buoyancy and Boats Edmonton Public Schools Resources

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

Big clear bucket


Hand-out (provided by me)
Pencils and erasers
Plasticene

PROCEDURE
Introduction (10 min.):
Hook/Attention Grabber: Is everyone excited to FINALLY build boats today??
Recall the penny/popsicle stick activity
Recall the floaters and sinkers experiment
Shape/weight/material/size = factors of buoyancy what makes an object float
Assessment of Prior Knowledge: Has anyone ever done a science experiment before?
Advance Organizer/Agenda: * I will display a template drawn on the board by me that is an imitation of their science
sheet to their page to demonstrate how to fill in the charts.
Transition to Body: Now, can everyone please bring their science lab to the back of the class at the U-table where I
have the experiment set up!
BRING YOUR PENCILS AND ERASER!
Vocabulary: prototype, blueprint

Body (40 min.): EXPERIMENT


At the U-table, I have the bucket in the center, and I will stand at the center to observe and guide the students along the experiment.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Plan
Build
Test (Observe)
Record
Rebuild
Re-test

Now students, I want you to notice the steps that we are taking in making these boats. Can anyone tell me why we are
doing this in such a way?
Yes! Thats right we are doing this because it is what real scientists do! They follow specific steps to make sure they are
being precise and scientific! We arent just putting balls of clay into waterwe are making boats from real designs, using
real science concepts, and making real observations and conclusions!
pass out the plasticene!
ensure that each portion is equal!
STEP TWO : BUILD!
So, using your plasticene, play with it in your hands and warm-it up to get a feel for the material. And, using your designs from
yesterday, you can either redraw your design or stick to it and begin to mold your plasticene!
***** Remember! A boat cant float if there are holes in it! So make sure there are no thin spots in your boat where the clay has
been stretched too thin.
3 minutes for design. Use a fun timer if possible?

MISS FARRELL

PS1 FALL 2016

STEP THREE : Times up! Time to test.


Take turns, going in order around the table to test each boat. Then encourage them/prompt them in their observations.
STEP FOUR: RECORD your observations in your science lab.
STEP FIVE: REBUILD using your observations from your last prototype.
STEP SIX: RETEST!

Closure (10 mins)


CLEAN-UP
Consolidation/Assessment of Learning: What kinds of boats floated the best? What did you notice about their
shape?
Transition To Next Lesson: Next science class, we will be taking our final boats and testing how much they can
carry in water!