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Ms.

Lilys Vision Statement for Her Classroom


I want you to leave my class with many valuable skills that they take with them for the
rest of their lives. I want you to develop critical thinking, problem solving and communication
skills. On top of this, I want you to leave my class a better human being. Lastly, I want you to
gain a passion for history like I do. I will have many diverse students and each class will not
learn in the same way.

The content is always important but I believe to get you to take interest in the content
like I have, you first will need to know that I am someone you want to learn from. Building
relationships with you is just as important to me as helping you make connections to learning and
forming ideas.
I believe that having a relationship with you by showing interest in your lives and valuing
your own interests is important to have as a teacher. I will always make myself available to you
for any reason and I vow to always listen to what you have to say and with the best of my
professional ability, I will support you in any way I can, whether it is just being someone to
vent to, to give advice or taking steps with administration and your family to face any issues
occurring.
From there, when it comes to content learning I believe my presentation is what really
helps you grasp what Im putting out. I refuse to just teach from the front of the room. I will
take advantage of the entire classroom and work it to the best of my ability. I will make what I
teach both entertaining and interesting. I will do this by trying to instill more learning
activities, group work and project based learning.
As for the critical thinking, problem solving and communication skills, I will address these
in a few ways. Every day I will start discussions and allow for discussions. I believe this is a
crucial way of learning and helps develop critical thinking skills. When it comes to activities and
assignments, I will ask the important questions and encourage you to do the same. I will teach
you processes that will help you answer these questions in organized, well thought out ways. I
always try to instill problem solving processes in to my students. For example, understanding the
task at hand and what is required, setting priorities and having a strategy. As for
communication skills, I try to push some shyer students out of there comfort zones and develop
valuable oral communication skills that you will need.

Summary

Enthusiastic and devoted undergraduate studying Secondary Education and History with prodigious subject
knowledge, organizational and motivational skills seeking a student assistant position at the School of Historical,
Philosophical and Religious Studies at Arizona State University.

Education
Bachelors Degree in Secondary Education (History)
Arizona State University Tempe, AZ Fall 2015-Spring 2017
iTeachAZ Teacher Preparation Program (3.8 GPA)
Associates Degree in Arts
Paradise Valley Community College Phoenix, AZ Class of 2015 (3.5 GPA)

Internships
Maryvale High School
12 Grade Government Fall 2016
Highland Lakes School
th
7 Grade R.T.I. & 8th Grade Renaissance SS Spring 2016
Metropolitan Arts Institute
th
10 Grade World & 11th Grade U.S. History Fall 2015
Performed the essential functions of teaching by examining and becoming familiar with the school & district
curricular materials, assisted with planning & preparation of lessons/assessments, and implemented instruction
through differentiated support, tutoring small groups & whole class lessons
Learned the roles & responsibilities of school support staff, sat in during important meetings such as an IEP and
attended special events
th

Related Experience
Student Assistant
PVCCs Buxton Library Phoenix, AZ 2013-2016
Allowed for in depth exposure to a higher education environment while becoming well versed in information
literacy and gaining a professional communication skill set

Awards & Certifications

Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College Deans List Fall 2015 Spring 2016
Distinguished Honors Society Member at PVCC Fall 2014 Spring 2015

Presidents Honors List at PVCC Spring 2014

Fingerprint Clearance Card State of Arizona

Volunteer Work
Mountain Ridge High School Future Teachers Academy
Multiple Schools - 2009
Festival of Tales
Paradise Valley Community College 2013-2014
National History Day
Westwood High School Spring 2016

References
Tara Ferguson ferguson.tara@rocketmail.com
Intern Mentor Teacher Metropolitan Arts Institute
Kirsten Harder (623) 512-2822
Intern Mentor Teacher Highland Lakes School
Barry Nitschke nitschke@phoenixunion.org
Intern Mentor Teacher

Maryvale High School

Lily E. Gonzales
Phoenix, AZ
Mobile: (602) 568-9813 E-mail: lilyegonzales@gmail.com

Tuesday, October 4, 2016


Dear Parent or Guardian,
I just wanted to take the opportunity to introduce myself to you and relay my excitement to have your child in
my class this year. My name is Lily Gonzales and I graduated from the iTeachAZ program through the Mary
Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University in 2017. I got my bachelors degree and certification in
secondary education and American/World History, government and economics. I have taken great pride in
teaching American History and you and your child will see I wear it as a badge of honor. I think learning about
history in general is of the utmost importance for current and future generations. I believe that by looking at the
past and connecting it to now is the best way to learn, grow and develop in to critical thinkers and become
valued members of communities. In my class, your child will be learning everything from the indigenous people
that first populated this continent all the way to the contemporary United States we live in now.
I have attached the years syllabus which includes all my guidelines for how I run my class and my expectations
of all my students. Please read through it and sign the last page indicating your understanding and support of the
school and specifically my classrooms system. I include an area and encourage you to leave me any concerns,
comments and questions regarding the syllabus. Please return this signed portion with your child to me.
Additionally, if you would like to talk with me personally I am available via e-mail, phone and in person before
and after school. If you would like to meet in person please set up a time with me via the first two lines of
contact. Please also be aware that I do like to stay in touch with you consistently about your childs progress.
I look forward to working with your child and making the most out of our time together! Thank you for your
time.
Sincerely,
Mrs. Lily Gonzales
11th U.S. History
lilyegonzales@gmail.com
(602)569-9813

Tuesday, October 4, 2016


Dear Principal Smudde,
My name is Lily Gonzales and I graduated from the iTeachAZ program through the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers
College at Arizona State University in 2017. I got my bachelors degree and certification in secondary education
and American/World History, government and economics.
I greatly appreciate the opportunity you and the district have given me to teach in such a great educational
institute. All that Ive worked for in my study of education and history has gotten me to this place finally and I
cant wait to embark on this new chapter of teaching my own classroom.
I started my journey studying education early, while I was still in high school, and it has still remained my
passion many years later. I have also consistently known that I would like to work with secondary students,
especially high school, and I would most like my content to be concentrated in history. I believe that the
education of young people is both an important job for teachers and the students to ensure we have the very best
future generations leading us. I also believe that knowledge of history is of the utmost importance to really
connect to the past to make a better future.
My expectations remain high for both myself and my students. My goal is to have my students gain problem
solving, critical thinking and communication skills. I plan to take advantage of all the technology and
community resources provided to me to do so. I want my students to gain a passion for history like I have and I
plan on doing this through having the most interesting and engaging lesson plans I can come up with. I make it
my mission to create an atmosphere that is not only comfortable and safe but that will produce lifelong learners.
When it comes to content I will make use of primary sources as much as possible and really focus on the main
ideas of history. I will include as much time for discussion and inquiry based lessons as possible. I want to
instill research and literacy skills in my students that they will carry with them long after they leave my
classroom. To also ensure this, I will enact frequent and positive communication with parents to always keep
them in the loop with their child.
Whatever you need from me, please feel free to ask. I have attached the syllabus I have created for my class that
will be given to students and parents to view at any time. I would love your feedback on it. I will also be trying
to keep in contact with you as much as possible to make sure that I am fulfilling all I can do in the school and its
community. Thank you so much for you time.
Sincerely,
Lily Gonzales
lilyegonzales@gmail.com
(602)568-9813

Lily E. Gonzales
Phoenix, AZ
Mobile: (602) 568-9813 E-mail: lilyegonzales@gmail.com

Tuesday, October 4, 2016


Dear Parent or Guardian,
I am writing in regards of Billy and some events that have taken place in our class. Overall, Billy has been a
great addition to my classroom and is very bright but unfortunately, I have witnessed Billy taking part in verbal
bullying of a classmate. I did speak with Billy privately about what I saw and what the classmate being bullied
told me. I told him that was not tolerated in my class at all but the incidents have continued even after giving
what seemed like a heartfelt apology after the first incident.
I have set up a meeting for Billy with myself, the principal and a counselor to get to the root of the problem. If
you would also like to sit in or even speak to me one and one feel free to contact me by phone or e-mail. The
meeting will take place during Billys homeroom class on Monday at 12:30 PM.
Our school has zero tolerance when it comes to bullying but we do not like to assume that there is ultimately
something wrong with the student doing the bullying but there is most likely more below the surface. Billy is
not the only one that has demonstrated this behavior at the school and as an Administration as a whole we are
setting up interventions with the entire school to explain what bullying exactly entails (physical, verbal and
cyber) and how to become a safe and inviting learning environment as a whole. If bullying does persist, some
consequences we have in place are detention and worst case scenario, suspension or explusion.
Other than this, Billy has been a joy in my class and does very well when it comes to participation and his work.
I do believe these incidences could hinder him from this but that is why I am doing my best to be proactive with
this situation.
Thank you for your time.
Sincerely,
Mrs. Lily Gonzales
11th U.S. History
lilyegonzales@gmail.com
(602)569-9813

World History
Course Syllabus
Ms. Lily Gonzales
602.568.9813
legonza8@asu.edu

Office Hours: Monday-Thursday


2:15pm 3:15pm
**please let me know in advance if you plan on coming during
office hours**

Course Overview
World History is a year long course. This class will teach students how to understand the modern
world by looking at past cultures, civilizations, and peoples. Throughout the year students will
analyze past cultures growth and development by studying their; geography, government, religious
beliefs, social structure, as well as their human nature.

Course Objectives: Students will:

Master a broad body of historical knowledge


Demonstrate an understanding of historical chronology
Interpret and apply data from maps, tables, graphs, as well as charts.
Effectively use analytical skills of evaluation, cause and effect, compare and contrast.
Work effectively with others to produce products and solve problems
Develop an appreciation for the study of history
Develop a respect for the great accomplishments made by previous generations.

Grading Scale
90-100 = A
80-90 = B
70-80 = C
60-70 = D
59 and below = Failing

Tests/Projects=40%
Quizzes=20%
Class work (+participation)/Homework=20%
Semester Exam=20%

Grading Procedures
Grades will be determined by a combination of assignments, projects, and tests.

**Parents: I will send students grades out bi-weekly or whenever requested**


Re-Testing Policy
If a student performs poorly on a test, they have the opportunity to re-take any unit exam up to 1 week
after the original exam was given. However, the student must make an appointment with me to take
the re-take exam upon successful completion of study materials. Finally the questions may not be the
same on the retest. The highest grade will be taken.

Class Materials - You should bring all of the following to class each day:

Pen/pencil and highlighter.


3 Ring Binder with loose leaf paper or a separate spiral notebook for
History notes.
A positive attitude and a willingness to work hard. What you will achieve
in this class will be directly related to the effort you give.

Assignments/Make-ups
Assignments are due on the designated day.
LATE WORK will only be accepted at half credit after grading and only until the unit/ chapter
assessment for the applicable assignment.
Students have five school days to make up missed tests or quizzes after school by appointment
only. This is only for excused absences.

Tardies/Absences
Unexcused tardies and absences are not allowed. Tardy students who do not have a pass from the
office or another teacher will not be allowed to make up bell work, or any other activities that are
missed due to tardiness. Unexcused absences will result in a grade of 0 for any classwork, homework,
projects and/or tests given that day.
o First offense results in department detention and parent notification.
o Repeated offences will be determined by administration

Class Expectations
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Follow all school rules and policies.


Be respectful of all persons and their belongings in this classroom.
School policy dictates NO CELL PHONES OR IPODS DURING CLASS!
Profanity will not be tolerated.
Quiet during tests! If you have questions raise your hand. Anyone talking during a test or
caught cheating will be given a 0.

Cell phones must be away during class unless they are being utilized for instructional
purposes as permitted by the teacher. Cell phones may be confiscated and turned into
administration if students fail to comply with this request.

Lunch time extra help students who wish to meet with teachers during lunch must procure a
pass prior to tutoring.

Classroom Discipline Plan


To assist in the pursuit of a quality education, the district and school have established guidelines for
student behavior. The following steps will be taken if an infraction occurs.
1st offense = Conference with student
2nd offense = Alternative Learning Environment/Parent Communication
3rd offense =Parent Conference
4th offense = Administrative Referral

THINGS PARENTS CAN DO TO HELP STUDENTS AT HOME


1.
2.
3.
4.

Check e-mail for students grades bi-weekly.


Check students binder for work completion.
Check students homework weekly to insure understanding.
Discuss academic concerns with student and myself (if needed).
5. Discuss current historical events and ask students to compare them with historical events
learned in class.

Agreement and Understanding/ Parent Contact


I have read and understand the syllabus for World History and agree to abide by all of the
course requirements classroom rules and classroom procedures as stated above.
__________________________________________
Print Student Name

_______________
Date

__________________________________________
Student Signature

_______________
Date

Should the occasion arise that parent contact is needed please provide contact information.
________________________________________________________________
Parent Email
___________________________________________
Parent Contact Number

_________________
Best time to call

___________________________________________
_________________
Parent/Guardian Signature

Date

I prefer contact to be contacted via

Email

Phone

Notes/Comments:___________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________

Lily Gonzales
Professional Growth Plan
SED 322
I hope to achieve a lot my first year of teaching. My first goal is to really prepare before
the first quarter starts. I want to have as much as possible already planned and set up before the
quarter even begins. Id like to plan the entire first quarter or further if possible. Even if the
school gives me a lot of material to deliver, I want to try to make it my own. I want my
classroom to be completely set up and made inviting to all those who will enter, including
myself. My first year I want to really make relationships with my students at the top of the list. I
want to create a learning community that is welcoming, safe and fun. I would be happy to do this
with a few students, even just one. Id also accept as much feedback the students are willing to
give me so I can improve my class and teaching. I also want to establish friendly and strong
relationships with my colleagues and administration. I want to get involved in whatever I can,
like sports, clubs, organizations, etc., as long as it doesnt deter me from really being able to
focus on my class and students. I want to make a habit to read and learn as much as I can my first
year of teaching so each year following I will have prior knowledge and be more comfortable
with my content. I want to take chances and really put myself out there. I want to try new things
as much as possible so I can really see all the options that can work in my teaching. Overall, I
want to submerge myself in to my teaching and learn ways to love it more than I do now.
My five year plan is to continue my first year teaching goals with acquiring as much
knowledge as I can about my content. Id also like to see myself progress in my teaching and
possibly start teaching more advanced courses. Id love to start my own club or organization in

the school or community and Id want my students to be the biggest part of it. Id love to get
more acquainted with special education and English language learning. Id also like to start
continuing my own education and hopefully start obtaining a masters degree in either education
or history. All in all, I want to become that teacher that students and even other teachers and
administration come to for guidance or even just a friend.
I plan on joining these organizations during my teaching career:

Arizona Council for History Education


National Council for History Education
Arizona Council for the Social Studies
National Council for the Social Studies
Organization of American Historians

Institutes and seminars Id like to join:

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History


National Endowments for the Humanities
Bill of Rights Institute
Ashbrook/Liberty Fund
Fords Theater, National Archives, Valley Forge, Mount Vernon, colonial

Williamsburg, USHMM
Fulbright, Goethe, Korea Academy

Early 20th Century Unit Plan Outline


11th Grade
American History
Lily Gonzales
HISTORY 480
2/23/16

STAGE I GOALS
Unit Overview:
Students will be learning about the causes of World War I, who exactly was
involved and the turning points during the war. They will learn about new
technologies that developed and the outcomes and effects of the end of the
war. The students will also study social developments that were occurring on
the home front during the early twentieth century such as mass media,
immigration patterns, urbanization and social reform, and the roaring
twenties.
Enduring Understanding:
Broad: Due to new kinds of warfare, alliances, revolutions, propaganda and
mass media, the United States would transform economically, politically and
socially during WWI. Other transformations would develop economically and
socially with immigration, mass production, immigration, urbanization,
consumerism, social reform policies, and even the Harlem Renaissance.
Narrow: WWI would introduce the world to new kinds of warfare and the
events caused and following WWI would instill themselves into the American
people. Many different revolutions would start worldwide that would push
people to unite against enemies with opposite ideals, Americans being one
group. This would allow for alliances to be made. Propaganda and mass
media would become a tool to include and exclude groups and to also
influence things like consumerism. Learning to compromise would be
something that many groups would be forced to do. Emigration and
immigration, especially in the United States, would impact the entire
country, socially, economically and politically. This would also cause more
urbanization. New movements would develop like the Harlem Renaissance
and social reform like health care and child labor laws. The creation of the
assembly line would also become the forefront of industrialization and give
rise to mass production. These effects from WWI would influence a
transformation in the U.S. when it came to warfare and world relations. It
would also be a factor in some of the social developments that came about
during and after World War I.
Essential Question:
How did WWI and its effects force a transformation in the United States?
What other transformations would develop socially in the United States?
Key Concepts:

Revolution: Isolationism, Zimmerman Note, Bolshevik Revolution Isolationism is a category of foreign policies institutionalized by leaders
who asserted that their nations' best interests were best served by
keeping the affairs of other countries at a distance. (cause) The
Zimmermann Telegram (or Zimmermann Note) was an internal
diplomatic communication issued from the German Foreign Office in
January, 1917 that proposed a military alliance between Germany and
Mexico in the event of the United States' entering World War I against
Germany. The proposal was intercepted and decoded by British
intelligence. Revelation of the contents enraged American public
opinion and helped generate support for the United States declaration
of war on Germany in April of the same year. (cause)
Alliances: Allied and Central Powers - French Republic, British Empire,
United States, Italy, Japan. The Central Powers, consisting of Germany,
Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman Empire and Bulgaria hence also known
as the Quadruple Alliance was one of the two main factions during
World War I (191418).
Types of warfare - (submarine, chemical, trench) Submarine warfare
consists primarily of diesel and nuclear submarines using torpedoes,
missiles or nuclear weapons, as well as advanced sensing equipment,
to attack other submarines, ships, or land targets. Submarines may
also be used for reconnaissance and landing of Special Forces as well
as deterrence. In some navies they may be used for task force
screening. Chemical warfare (CW) involves using the toxic properties of
chemical substances as weapons. This type of warfare is distinct from
nuclear warfare and biological warfare, which together make up NBC,
the military acronym for nuclear, biological, and chemical (warfare or
weapons), all of which are considered "weapons of mass destruction"
(WMDs). Trench warfare is a type of land warfare using occupied
fighting lines consisting largely of trenches, in which troops are
significantly protected from the enemy's small arms fire and are
substantially sheltered from artillery.
Propaganda and mass media - Propaganda is a form of biased
communication, aimed at promoting or demoting certain views,
perceptions or agendas. Propaganda is often associated with the
psychological mechanisms of influencing and altering the attitude of a
population toward a specific cause, position or political agenda in an
effort to form a consensus to a standard set of belief patterns. The
mass media is a diversified collection of media technologies that reach
a large audience via mass communication. The technologies through
which this communication takes place include a variety of outlets.
Compromise: Treaty of Versailles, Fourteen Points and Paris Peace
Conference and the League of Nations - The Treaty of Versailles was
one of the peace treaties at the end of World War I. It ended the state
of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28

June 1919, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz
Ferdinand. The other Central Powers on the German side of World War I
were dealt with in separate treaties. Although the armistice, signed on
11 November 1918, ended the actual fighting, it took six months of
negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to conclude the peace
treaty. (effect) The Fourteen Points was a statement of principles for
world peace that was to be used for peace negotiations to end World
War I. (effect) The League of Nations was an intergovernmental
organization founded on 10 January 1920 as a result of the Paris Peace
Conference that ended the First World War. It was the first international
organization whose principal mission was to maintain world peace.
(effect)
Emigration and Immigration - Emigration is the act of leaving one's
resident country with the intent to settle elsewhere. Conversely,
immigration describes the movement of persons into one country from
another.
Harlem Renaissance - The Harlem Renaissance, a cultural, social, and
artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, spanned the
1920s. The Movement also included the new African-American cultural
expressions across the urban areas in the Northeast and Midwest
United States affected by the Great Migration (African American), of
which Harlem was the largest. The Harlem Renaissance was considered
to be a rebirth of African American arts.
Urbanization and social reform - Urbanization is a population shift from
rural to urban areas and the ways in which each society adapts to the
change. A reform movement is a kind of social movement that aims to
make gradual change, or change in certain aspects of society, rather
than rapid or fundamental changes.
Mass Production: Assembly line - An assembly line is a manufacturing
process in which parts are added as the semi-finished assembly moves
from workstation to work station where the parts are added in
sequence until the final assembly is produced. By mechanically moving
the parts to the assembly work and moving the semi-finished assembly
from work station to work station, a finished product can be assembled
faster and with less labor than by having workers carry parts to a
stationary piece for assembly. Mass production or flow production is
the production of large amounts of standardized products, including
and especially on assembly lines.

Standards:
Arizona Standards for Social Studies:
S1C7-PO3: Analyze events which caused a transformation of the United
State during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries:

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
b.

a. World War I (e.g., League of Nations, Isolationism, propaganda,


Great Migration)
Who was involved?
Causes (e.g., submarine warfare, Zimmerman Note)
Turning points (Bolshevik Revolution)
Technology (chemical warfare, planes, tanks, trench warfare)
outcomes/effects (e.g., Treaty of Versailles, alliances, Fourteen Points)
Red Scare/Socialism (e.g., Sacco and Vanzetti, Xenophobia, KKK)

S1C7-PO2: Assess how the following social developments influenced


American society in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries:
a. changing patterns in Immigration (e.g., Immigration Act of 1924
Nativism, National Origins Act 1924,1921 Emergency Quota Act)
b. urbanization and social reform (e.g., health care, housing, food &
nutrition, child labor laws)
c. mass media (e.g., political cartoons, radio) (covered in WWI)
d. consumerism (e.g., advertising, standard of living, consumer credit)
e. Roaring Twenties (e.g., Harlem Renaissance, leisure time, jazz, changed
social mores, prohibition)
[National Standards for U.S. or World History or Common Core Standards]:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.2
Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex
concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing
them in simpler but still accurate terms.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific
words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical
context relevant to grades 11-12 texts and topics.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.7
Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse
formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to
address a question or solve a problem.
RH.9-10.1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and
secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the
information.
Objectives: (add numbers as needed; should have 10-12 total)
1. SWBAT define the Allied and Central powers and distinguish between
them

2. SWBAT characterize the three different types of new warfare


technologies that developed in WWI
3. SWBAT deduce the causes of WWI (revolution)
4. SWBAT illustrate a form of propaganda or mass media that developed
during WWI
5. SWBAT classify the outcomes and effects of World War I (essay)
6. SWBAT describe difference between emigration and immigration and
trace the changing patterns in immigration from Europe to the United
States (immigration law)
7. SWBAT summarize urbanization in the early 20th century
8. SWBAT review and construct the framework of social reform during the
early 20th century
9. SWBAT categorize the elements of the Harlem Renaissance
10.
SWBAT demonstrate an assembly line and infer its impact on
mass production

STAGE II ASSESSMENTS
Formative Assessments:
Quizzes: Students will take a total of three quizzes throughout this unit to
assess their knowledge and understanding of the content being delivered to
them through lectures and activities. The quizzes will be administered to
students usually at the beginning of class and cover content from last class
meeting and homework. Each quiz will cover two objectives each. Some
objectives will not be quizzed on due to other forms of assessments. Each
quiz will be a sufficient amount of questions to at least cover each aspect of
each concept and objective. Quizzes will have a combination of selection and
supply items like multiple choice, matching, fill in the blank and short
answer.
Writing Responses: Students will be required to do writing responses in the
form of summaries for any notes they take on a day-to-day basis, any writing
portions on quizzes and tests, some bell work and exiting class writing
responses and also in writing assignments like letters, speeches and essays.
Students take Cornell notes and are required to write a summary for them at
the end. Students will have short answer and essay questions to respond to
in their quizzed and achievement test/final. Some of these will include
analyzing political cartoons and primary source quotes. Students will have a
few admitting and exiting activities that will mostly act as free writes for
them to reflect on what theyve been learning in class. They will be mostly
opinion based questions that will require critical thinking. Students will also
have a few writing assignments where they will have to write a speech
regarding WWI, a letter to a government official or popular movement leader,
and a research paper with a position aspect on an event that either caused
or effected WWI. In all writing responses, students must display both what
theyve taken from class lessons, as well as their own feedback. (All
objectives)
Informal Discussion: Regularly, teaching will enact an informal class
discussion on any topics being covered in instruction. These discussions will
take many forms like class discussions as a whole, pair-share and small
group. The purpose of these discussions will be to assess that all students
are comprehending the content in a way that keeps them engaged.
Observations of all students need to be made by the teacher to correct any
misunderstanding or misconception about the topic.
Achievement Test Description:
A final unit test will be administered to the class on the last day of the unit.
The test will evaluate each students success of meeting each objective

which includes understanding concepts and analyzing specific events. The


final will refer back to many of the quiz questions the students have taken on
the unit previously so it is easier for them to review for this final and a study
guide isnt necessary. The questions may not appear in the same format they
were in the quiz although. For example, a multiple choice question could
appear as a short answer in the final. The final will have a combination of
selection and supply items like multiple choice, matching, fill in the blank
and short answer. There will also be an essay question. The final will be
broken in to three parts. This test will count as 25% of the overall grade for
the unit.
Part 1- Selection Items (Multiple Choice, True-False, Matching)
The first part will be at least 40-50 questions long with a combination of all
selection items. Multiple choice and true false questions will be dedicated to
specific facts and events students will be required to recall. Matching will
focus on the key vocabulary words students will be expected to be able to
define. Some examples of events would be the Zimmerman Note and the
Treaty of Versailles. Some vocabulary would be the types of warfare and what
isolationism is. This would count for 50% of the final grade. (All objectives)
Example multiple choice question:

6. What major change in German policy contributed to the United States entering the war?
(A) An end to diplomatic relations with the United States
(B) The declaration of unrestricted submarine warfare
(C) Economic sanctions against the United States
(D) An anti-British propaganda campaign in the American media, paid for by the German
embassy
Part 2- Supply Items (Short Answer & Essay Question)
Short answers would be direct questions about content. Some concepts or
vocabulary would be put in the form of IDs for students to explain. This is an
assessment strategy used in college. It would require students to define the
term and also explain its historical significance like the Bolshevik Revolution
for example. Short answers would also be used for the analyzing of political
cartoons and an excerpt from a primary source students previously studied
in the unit like a firsthand experience from a European immigrant. Short
answers will be 25% of the final grade. There will be one essay question at
the end where students will be presented with a question and sub questions.
An example question would be what were the causes of WWI or the effects of
World War 1. Another example would be comparing and contrasting concepts
like isolationism, communism or socialism. The essay question would also be
25% of the final grade. (All objectives)

Example short answer question:

7. a) What major change in German policy contributed to the United States entering the war b)
and why? c) Give an example of the damage submarine warfare caused.
Performance (Authentic) Assessment Description:
The performance assessment would be a unit wide project students would
work on inside and outside of class. There will be three parts. Each part will
build on a specific skill like speech, letter and essay writing. They will also
focus on a specific topic in class so not all but most objectives and concepts
will be covered. The project will require students to answer the essential
question for this unit and then demonstrate it through their work. This
project will ultimately access students understanding and knowledge of WWI
and its impact, especially socially. It will allow students to put themselves in
the shoes of someone that was active during World War I and following. It
allows student to be creative, especially in the first two parts. All parts of
this project will be completed individually. Each part will be given an allotted
time to complete before the next part is assigned. These projects will count
as 50% of the grade for the unit.
Part 1- Letter or Speech
Students will be given the option to either write a letter to a government
official like the president for example on their opinion on entering WWI. The
students will be taught proper and professional letter writing formatting and
skill beforehand. The students will have a rubric to follow that will include
content references, ideas, organization and formatting/grammar. The
students will have the second option to write a speech addressing Americans
on whether the U.S. should or should not enter the war and why. They will
also be given some speech writing instruction and given a similar rubric as
the letter to follow. This will allow students to demonstrate their knowledge
and understanding of the concept/term covered in the objective. It will also
help students improve writing skills. (Objective 1-3)
Part 2- Propaganda Poster or TV/Radio commercial + explanation/summary
Students will have to come up with an original propaganda poster
demonstrating a concept we have learned in the unit like isolationism,
communism and socialism or immigration. Students could even react to an
event. The poster must be done on 11 x 17 paper or larger. The students
must use color. The poster must have an original slogan. The students also
have the option to record a TV or radio commercial to demonstrate mass
media. The commercial must be at least one minute long and also include an
original slogan. The students would be graded on creativity/originality,

content references and presentation. Students will also have to include a one
paragraph explanation of their item and its relevance to the unit. This will let
students demonstrate their understanding of a specific concept/term they
found interesting. (Could include all objectives but especially 4)
Part 3- Research Essay with Position Aspect
Students will be required to choose a specific concept or term that can be
described broadly from the entire unit. The students will include knowledge
and sources they gained from class instruction but will also be required to
include at least one primary source they find out of class and two secondary
sources they find out of class. The paper will need to be at least three pages
long, not including the reference page. Essay writing skills and format will be
gone over after its assigning. The students will also be following a similar
rubric from part one plus a part on correct use of sources and references. At
the end of the paper, the students will be asked to take a stance on their
essay topic and lend their opinion on it and its significance/impact on the
United States. This essay will allow students to demonstrate their knowledge
and understanding of content, plus lend their personal opinion and reflect. It
will also help students improve writing skills. (All objectives.)

STAGE III LEARNING ACTIVITIES


Unit Calendar:
Day

Unit Objective(s)

Activities

Assessments

Day 1

SWBAT define the


Allied and Central
powers and distinguish
between them (Obj 1)

Cornell Notes on
who was involved
in WWI

HW Ten questions and


summary for Cornell
notes

Day 2

Day 3

SWBAT characterize
the three different
types of new warfare
technologies that
developed in WWI
(Obj 2)

SWBAT deduce the


causes of WWI
(revolution)
(Obj 3)

Finish notes from


day 1 if needed.
Group
presentation
assigned
Class time for
Group research for
each kind of
warfare and
preparation for
presentation
(rubric)
Begin if possible.
Quiz
Three warfare
types group
presentations
Cornell notes on
WWI causes

Day 4

SWBAT illustrate a form


of propaganda or mass
media that developed
during WWI
(Obj 4)

Ticket out the door


(distinguishing)
Check off sheet for
project/participation in
group work

Beginning quiz (obj 1&2)


Audience attention
points, Check off sheet
for project/participation
in group work

WWI causes DBQ

HW - Ten questions and


summary for Cornell
notes
DBQ

PowerPoint
presentation on
WWI propaganda
examples

HW Finish propaganda
product and
Explanation/summary on
propaganda product

Remainder of
Class time to
Create
Performance
Assessment
Propaganda Poster
or TV/Radio
commercial

Day 5

SWBAT classify the


outcomes and effects
of World War I
(Obj 5)

Performance
assessment Letter
or Speech
assigned
Cornell notes on
outcomes and
effects of WWI
Instruction on how
to annotate
(handout)

Day 6

SWBAT describe
difference between
emigration and
immigration and trace
the changing patterns
in immigration from
Europe to the United
States
(Obj 6)

Annotation of
Treaty of Versailles
and Fourteen
Points
Class discussion
on difference
between
emigration and
immigration
Cornell notes on
emigration and
immigration and
trace the changing
patterns in
immigration from
Europe to the
United States
immigration law.
Video clip on
immigrants
landing on Ellis
Island.
Annotation of

HW - Five questions and


summary for Cornell
notes
HW - Finish annotations

Participation points for


group discussion
HW Five questions and
summary for Cornell
notes
HW finish annotations

Day 7

Day 8

Day 9

SWBAT summarize
urbanization in the
early 20th century
(Obj 7)

SWBAT review and


construct the
framework of social
reform during the early
20th century
(Obj 8)
SWBAT categorize the
elements of the Harlem
Renaissance
(Obj 9)
SWBAT demonstrate an
assembly line and infer
its impact on mass
production
(Obj 10)

Immigration Acts
Cornell notes on
urbanization in the
early 20th century

Cornell notes on
framework of
social reform
during the early
20th century

Beginning quiz
(obj 5&6)
Ten questions and
summary for Cornell
notes
HW - five questions and
summary for each
objective covered in
Cornell notes
HW- finish annotations

Start Annotation of
Harlem
Renaissance
primary document
Quiz
Finish notes from
day 8 if needed
Assembly Line
reenactment

Beginning quiz (obj 7,


8&9)
Participation in group
discussion
Ticket out the door

Class Discussion
Research Essay
with Position
Aspect assigned

Day 10

All objectives 1-10

Final exam (all obj)

Final exam (all obj)

Catalog of Lessons:
Day 1
Unit Objectives: SWBAT define the Allied and Central powers and distinguish
between them through a lecture and Cornell notes (Obj 1)
Activities: Cornell Notes on who was involved in WWI. Ask prompting
questions, allow for discussion. Try to refer to past learning as much as
possible.

Assessment: HW Ten questions students have regarding notes and a short


paragraph summary for Cornell notes
Written Ticket out the door (distinguishing)
Day 2
Unit objectives: SWBAT characterize the three different types of new warfare
technologies that developed in WWI through a group project that will include
a research and presentation component.
(Obj 2)
Activities: If needed, class notes from previous day will be completed. A
quick recap of previous content will be discussed. The students will then be
assigned a group project. There will be three groups and each will focus on
one type of warfare technology that emerged during WWI: trench, chemical
and submarine. The student groups will have directions and a rubric to follow
for the presentation requirements (see attachments) and will be given time
in class to start researching and creating presentation. They will be required
to present the next day (day 3).
Assessment: For presentation, students will have to all equally participate
and contribute in the research and presentation of their warfare technology. I
will have a check off sheet to assess this while I observe group class time
research/preparation and final presentations on day 3. The students will have
to include a thorough explanation of their technology, why it was so
impactful at this time, give five examples of the technology and then a
comparison to that warfare technology today. They must include visuals. The
presentations must be at least three minutes and no more than five minutes.
Day 3
Unit Objectives: SWBAT deduce the causes of WWI (revolution) through a
lecture and Cornell notes (Obj 3)
Activities: Three warfare types group presentations (see day 2)
Cornell notes on WWI causes. Ask prompting questions, allow for discussion.
Try to refer to past learning as much as possible.
Assessment: Beginning quiz (obj 1&2)
Audience attention points, Check off sheet for project/participation in group
work

HW - Ten questions students have regarding notes and a short paragraph


summary for Cornell notes
Day 4
Unit Objectives: SWBAT illustrate a form of propaganda or mass media that
developed during WWI by creating their own example piece of propaganda
(Obj 4)
Activities: WWI causes DBQ (see attachments)
PowerPoint presentation on WWI propaganda examples. Ask for student
observations.
Remainder of Class time to Create Performance Assessment Propaganda
Poster or TV/Radio commercial
Performance assessment Letter or Speech assigned
Assessment: DBQ
HW Finish propaganda product and Explanation/summary on propaganda
product
Day 5
Unit objectives: SWBAT classify the outcomes and effects of World War I
through Cornell notes and the annotation of primary source documents
(Obj 5)
Activities: A quick recap of previous content will be discussed. Students will
follow along with me while I lecture and project Cornell notes on outcomes
and effects of WWI for whole class to copy. The students will then be
instructed that for homework they will have to add ten questions they had on
the notes and then a paragraph summary of the notes. From there I will
instruct students that they will be annotating primary documents from WWI. I
will pass out a handout with annotation text instructions (see attachments). I
will do an example annotation demonstration using the Italian Entry into the
War, 23 May 1915 primary document (see link). The students will have their
own copy that they will annotate along with me.
Assessment: Along with Cornell notes responses for homework, students will
either be assigned the Versailles Treaty primary document or the Fourteen
Points primary document to annotate on their own (see links). My example
will demonstrate what a thoroughly annotated document will look like,
including a summary.

Primary Source Document links:


http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/italiandeclaration.htm
http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/versailles.htm
http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/fourteenpoints.htm
Day 6
Unit objectives: SWBAT describe difference between emigration and
immigration and trace the changing patterns in immigration from Europe to
the United States through discussion, Cornell notes, a video clip and
annotating immigration acts.
(Obj 6)
Activities: A quick recap of previous content will be discussed. The class will
begin with another discussion. I will prompt this discussion by asking
students what they think the difference between emigration and immigration
is. I will write student responses on the board. From there students will follow
along with me while I lecture and project Cornell notes on changing patterns
in immigration for whole class to copy. I will also include a short video clip on
footage and accounts from immigrants landing at Ellis Island in the early 20th
century (see links). I will then instruct students that they will be annotating
immigration acts from the early 20th century and demonstrate one using the
Immigration Act of 1924 (see link). There will be a variety of others assigned.
Assessment: All students must be actively engaged and participate during
class discussion and video clip. They will be given points for this. The
students will be graded on Cornell note responses which must include ten
questions and a paragraph summary. My example will demonstrate what a
thoroughly annotated document will look like, including a summary.
Primary Source Document Links:
http://legislink.org/us/pl-68-139
Video links:
http://www.history.com/topics/ellis-island/videos/arrival-at-ellis-island
Day 7

Unit Objectives: SWBAT summarize urbanization in the early 20th century


through a lecture and Cornell notes (Obj 7)
Activities: Cornell notes on urbanization in the early 20th century. Ask
prompting questions, allow for discussion. Try to refer to past learning as
much as possible.
Assessment: Beginning quiz
(obj 5&6)
Ten questions students have regarding notes and a short paragraph
summary for Cornell notes
Day 8
Unit Objectives: SWBAT review and construct the framework of social reform
during the early 20th century through lecture and Cornell notes
(Obj 8)
SWBAT categorize the elements of the Harlem Renaissance by analyzing and
annotating primary sources (Obj 9)
Activities: Cornell notes on framework of social reform during the early 20th
century. Ask prompting questions, allow for discussion. Try to refer to past
learning as much as possible.
Start Annotation of Harlem Renaissance primary document
Assessment: HW - five questions students have regarding notes and short
paragraph summary for each objective covered in Cornell notes
HW- finish annotations
Day 9
Unit Objectives: SWBAT demonstrate an assembly line and infer its impact on
mass production through reenactment and class discussion
(Obj 10)
Activities: Quiz
Finish notes from day 8 if needed
Assembly Line reenactment
Class Discussion

Research Essay with Position Aspect assigned


Assessment: Beginning quiz (obj 7, 8&9)
Participation in group discussion
Written Ticket out the door What are some problems you can see with the
assembly line?
Day 10
Unit Objectives: All Objectives (1-10)
Activities: Final exam
Assessment: Final exam

CITATIONS
Arrival at Ellis Island. (n.d.). Retrieved April 20, 2016, from http://www.history.com/topics/ellisisland/videos/arrival-at-ellis-island
Firstworldwar.com. (n.d.). Retrieved April 20, 2016, from
http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/index.htm
Immigration Act of 1924. (n.d.). Retrieved April 20, 2016, from http://legislink.org/us/pl-68-139

ATTACHMENTS
Warfare technology group presentation handout
Directions: As a group you will be researching a specific warfare technology
that emerged during World War I. Through a multimedia presentation
program of your choice, you will present your research. You must include a
thorough explanation of the technology, why it was so impactful at the time,
give five examples of the technology and then a comparison to that warfare
technology today. You must include visuals. The presentations must be at
least three minutes and no more than five minutes. You will also be graded
on individual participation and contribution in the research and presentation.

Mini-DBQ: The Causes of World War I


Introduction
This mini document based question assignment will occur relatively early in the unit plan
which will be administered to an 11th grade American history class. This mini-DBQ will focus on
World War I and its causes. From previous content instruction, the students will have previous
knowledge and an understanding that there are many different causes for World War I. With the
use of primary source documents from the multiple countries involved in the war, they can
deduce for themselves what they think was the largest and most important cause for the war. This
will relate well to the unit because it will include information regarding unit concepts such as
revolutions (Isolationism, Zimmerman Note, Bolshevik Revolution), alliances (Allied and
Central Powers) and even types of warfare (submarine, chemical, trench). It complies with
objective number 3 (SWBAT deduce the causes of WWI) completely.
Grading Criteria - 50 points total
Mechanics (well-thought out and structured thesis statement, solid conclusion, spell and
grammar) - 10 points
Use of sources - 10 points
Description of documents used, not summary - 5 points
Consideration of authors point of view - 5 points
Students well-argued opinion on what they believe caused WWI using comparison to
other documents - 20 points
Directions: The following question is based on the attached primary source documents 1-6.
(The documents have been edited for the purpose of this exercise.)
Write an essay that
Has a relevant thesis that structures the rest of the essay with supporting evidence from
the documents
Uses at least 4 of the 6 documents
Describes each document thoroughly without summarizing them all as a whole
Consider and refer to the authors point of view/bias in your writing

Uses previous knowledge and understanding that is historically relevant to support


argument
Prompt: Using the following documents, deduce what countrys actions you believe were the
main cause for the start of World War I.

Document 1: The Crime of the Ages. Who did it? By John Tinney McCutcheon
John Tinney McCutcheon (18701949) was a cartoonist on the staff of various Chicago
newspapers including the Chicago Tribune where this cartoon is taken from. The use of political
cartoons were widely used as propaganda during World War I.

Document 2: Official Austrian Report by Austro-Hungarian government (June 1914)


Reproduced below is the official Austrian report established to investigate the assassination of
Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914.
[...]

Gavrilo Princip, Nedeljko Cabrinovic, Trifko Grabez, Vaso Cubrilovic and Cetres Popovic
confess that in common with the fugitive Mehemed Mehmedbasic they contrived a plot for the
murder of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand and, armed with bombs and in the case of some of them
with Browning pistols, laid wait for him on June 28, 1914, on his progress through Serajevo for
the purpose of carrying out the planned attack.
Nedeljko Cabrinovic confesses that he was the first of the conspirators to hurl a bomb against the
Archduke's carriage, which missed its mark and which on exploding injured only the occupants
of the carriage following the Archducal motor car.
Gavrilo Princip confesses that he fired two shots from a Browning pistol against the Archducal
motor car, by which the Archduke Franz Ferdinand and the Duchess Sophie of Hohenberg
received fatal wounds.
Both perpetrators confess that the act was done with intent to murder.
These confessions have been fully verified by means of the investigations which have taken
place, and it is established that the deceased Archduke Franz Ferdinand and the deceased
Duchess Sophie of Hohenberg died as a result of the revolver shots fired at them by Gavrilo
Princip.
The accused have made the following declarations, which are essentially consistent, before the
examining magistrate:In April, 1914, Princip, during his stay at Belgrade, where he associated with a number of
Serbian students in the cafes of the town, conceived the plan for the execution of an attempt on
the life of the late Archduke Franz Ferdinand. He communicated this intention to his
acquaintance, Cabrinovic, who also was in Belgrade at the time. The latter had already
conceived a similar idea and was ready at once to participate in the attempt.
The execution of an attempt on the Archduke's life was a frequent topic of conversation in the
circle in which Princip and Cabrinovic moved, because the Archduke was considered to be a
dangerous enemy of the Serbian people.
[...]
Document 3: The Murder of Archduke Franz Ferdinand at Sarajevo Account by Borijove Jevtic
(June 1914)
A terrorist who was part of the Serbian Black Hand plot to assassinate Ferdinand writes his
description of what happened on the fateful day of 28 June 1914.
A tiny clipping from a newspaper mailed without comment from a secret band of terrorists in
Zagreb, a capital of Croatia, to their comrades in Belgrade, was the torch which set the world

afire with war in 1914. That bit of paper wrecked old proud empires. It gave birth to new, free
nations.
I was one of the members of the terrorist band in Belgrade which received it and, in those days, I
and my companions were regarded as desperate criminals. A price was on our heads. Today my
little band is seen in a different light, as pioneer patriots. It is recognized that our secret plans
hatched in an obscure caf in the capital of old Serbia, have led to the independence of the new
Yugoslavia, the united nation set free from Austrian domination.
The little clipping was from the Srobobran, a Croatian journal of limited circulation, and
consisted of a short telegram from Vienna. This telegram declared that the Austrian Archduke
Franz Ferdinand would visit Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia, 28 June, to direct army maneuvers
in the neighboring mountains.
It reached our meeting place, the caf called Zeatna Moruana, one night the latter part of April,
1914 . . . At a small table in a very humble caf, beneath a flickering gas jet we sat and read it.
There was no advice nor admonition sent with it. Only four letters and two numerals were
sufficient to make us unanimous, without discussion, as to what we should do about it. They
were contained in the fateful date, 28 June.
How dared Franz Ferdinand, not only the representative of the oppressor but in his own person
an arrogant tyrant, enter Sarajevo on that day? Such an entry was a studied insult.
28 June is a date engraved deeply in the heart of every Serb, so that the day has a name of its
own. It is called the vidovnan. It is the day on which the old Serbian kingdom was conquered by
the Turks at the battle of Amselfelde in 1389. It is also the day on which in the second Balkan
War the Serbian arms took glorious revenge on the Turk for his old victory and for the years of
enslavement.
That was no day for Franz Ferdinand, the new oppressor, to venture to the very doors of Serbia
for a display of the force of arms which kept us beneath his heel.
Our decision was taken almost immediately. Death to the tyrant!
Document 4: Germany's 'Blank Cheque' to Austria-Hungary (July 6, 1914)
A telegram sent by the German Chancellor, Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg, to the German
Ambassador at Vienna.
Confidential - For Your Excellency's personal information and guidance
Berlin

6 July 1914
The Austro-Hungarian Ambassador yesterday delivered to the Emperor a confidential personal
letter from the Emperor Francis Joseph, which depicts the present situation from the AustroHungarian point of view, and describes the measures which Vienna has in view. A copy is now
being forwarded to Your Excellency.
I replied to Count Szagyeny today on behalf of His Majesty that His Majesty sends his thanks to
the Emperor Francis Joseph for his letter and would soon answer it personally.
In the meantime His Majesty desires to say that he is not blind to the danger which threatens
Austria-Hungary and thus the Triple Alliance as a result of the Russian and Serbian Pan-Slavic
agitation.
Even though His Majesty is known to feel no unqualified confidence in Bulgaria and her ruler,
and naturally inclines more toward our old ally Rumania and her Hohenzollern prince, yet he
quite understands that the Emperor Francis Joseph, in view of the attitude of Rumania and of the
danger of a new Balkan alliance aimed directly at the Danube Monarchy, is anxious to bring
about an understanding between Bulgaria and the Triple alliance.
[...]
His Majesty will, furthermore, make an effort at Bucharest, according to the wishes of the
Emperor Francis Joseph, to influence King Carol to the fulfilment of the duties of his alliance, to
the renunciation of Serbia, and to the suppression of the Rumanian agitations directed against
Austria-Hungary.
Finally, as far as concerns Serbia, His Majesty, of course, cannot interfere in the dispute now
going on between Austria-Hungary and that country, as it is a matter not within his competence.
The Emperor Francis Joseph may, however, rest assured that His Majesty will faithfully stand by
Austria-Hungary, as is required by the obligations of his alliance and of his ancient friendship.
Bethmann-Hollweg
Document 5: Austria-Hungary's Declaration of War with Serbia (July 28, 1914)
The following telegram sent by Count Leopold von Berchtold (Austro-Hungarian Foreign
Minister) at 11.10 am to M. N. Pashitch (Serbian Prime Minister and Foreign Minister), who
received it at 12.30 pm.
Vienna
28 July 1914

The Royal Serbian Government not having answered in a satisfactory manner the note of July
23, 1914, presented by the Austro-Hungarian Minister at Belgrade, the Imperial and Royal
Government are themselves compelled to see to the safeguarding of their rights and interests,
and, with this object, to have recourse to force of arms.
Austria-Hungary consequently considers herself henceforward in state of war with Serbia.
Count Berchtold
Document 6: Triple Entente 'No Separate Peace' Agreement (September 4, 1914)
With the war underway there was concern among the Entente Powers that none among them
should attempt to negotiate a separate peace with the Central Powers, thus gravely weakening
the ability of the remaining belligerents to continue the war.
Declaration
M. Delcasse, Minister for Foreign Affairs, to the French Ambassadors and Ministers abroad.
Paris, September 4, 1914
The following declaration has this morning been signed at the Foreign Office at London:
"The undersigned duly authorized thereto by their respective Governments hereby declare as
follows:
"The British, French, and Russian Governments mutually engage not to conclude peace
separately during the present war.
The three Governments agree that when terms of peace come to be discussed, no one of the
Allies will demand terms of peace without the previous agreement of each of the other Allies."

DBQ Works Cited


"Firstworldwar.com." First World War.com. Accessed April 12, 2016.
http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/blankcheque.htm.
"Firstworldwar.com." First World War.com. Accessed April 12, 2016.
http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/autrohungariandeclarationofwar_serbia.htm.
"Firstworldwar.com." First World War.com. Accessed April 12, 2016.
http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/tripleentente_noseppeace.htm.
John Carey, ed., Eyewitness to History (New York: Avon Books, 1987), pp. 441-4.
John McCutcheon, The Chicago Tribune; H.H. Windsor, Cartoons Magazine (adapted)
Source Records of the Great War, Vol. I, ed. Charles F. Horne, National Alumni 1923.

ANNOTATING TEXT INSTRUCTIONS


1. Number paragraphs.
2. FIRST READ: Do quick read to determine purpose and flow of piece
(5). Note in margin the purpose of each paragraph/section (e.g.,
problem, cause, effect, description, case study, example, solution,
comparing, contrasting, claim, evidence, reason, warrant, alternative
view).
3. SECOND READ: Begin second read slowly. Fully annotate text.
4. Circle vocabulary with which you are unfamiliar. Place brackets
around contextual clues, which come before words or phrases and
provide clues about the meaning (4).
5. Underline things you think are important or interesting. Put
exclamation point in margin and write why you think it is important
or interesting.
6. Put question mark where you find something confusing.
7. Write in margins:
a. Write questions about confusing text
b. Write extension questions you have not been answered in
text, like Who, What, When Where, Why, and How
c. Note Author's Purpose (Explain, Inform, Argue, Persuade).
d. Note organization pattern: Chronological Order, comparison,
cause and effect, problem and solution.
e. Note connections in text to self, world, or other text or subjects.
f. Note Big Idea in margin
8. Circle key words that provide meaning or describe who, what, when,
where etc. They are words you'd usually find in a summary.
9. Write summary (2)
10.
THIRD READ: Cite evidence from text (1), analyze main
ideas and details (2), evaluate or create argument (8), note
how ideas interact/develop (3)
Key:
1. Number paragraphs
2. Annotating within the text
3. Annotating in the margins
Circle unfamiliar vocabulary
Place brackets around vocabulary
contextual clues
Circle key words
Underline important
Question mark near something confusing
Exclamation point near something you

Note structure of paragraphs/sections to


determine flow
Write questions about confusing text
Note Author's Purpose (Explain, Inform, Argue,
Persuade).
Note organization pattern: Chronological Order,
comparison, cause and effect, problem and
solution.

find interesting

Note connections in text to self, world, or other


text or subjects.
Note Big Idea in margin
Write extension questions not answered in text,
like Who, What, When Where, Why, and How

1,2,3

[ ]

Inquiry Based Lesson Plan

Teachers:Lily Gonzales

Subject:10th grade world history

Standard:

Strand 2; concept 2; PO 1. Describe the development of early prehistoric people, their agriculture
and settlements.

Objective (Explicit):

SWBAT compare and contrast the people in the Paleolithic era to their own life and community in
while in groups on a t-chart.

Evidence of Mastery (Measurable): SWBAT list at least ten differences and ten similarities on each side of the t-chart.
Sub-objectives, SWBAT (Sequenced from basic to complex):

What: Paleolithic people had a hunter-gatherer economy and had a nomadic lifestyle.
How: When we compare and contrast we describe ways in which two groups are the same and
different.
Why: This will be important for students to do because it is preparing them for a bigger project they
will be working on by giving them comprehension of the content that they will need to proceed

Key vocabulary: stone, hominids, paleoliths, bands,


homosapian, Paleo-Indians, cave art

Materials/Technology Resources to be used: t-chart


handout, pen or pencil

Explain

Explore

Engage (Make content and learning relevant to real life and connect to student interest): connecting the lifestyles of
Paleo-Indians to the lifestyles of people in this day and age.
Teacher Will: briefly remind students on key
concepts of the Paleo-Indians and ask students to
contribute any concepts they can think of to add.

Student Will: participate and add their own thoughts


of Paleo-Indians.

Co-Teaching Strategy/Differentiation: have students refer to their cornel notes they previously took on the
Paleolithic era.
Teacher Will: pass out t-chart and explain that in
groups they must think of ten similarities and ten
differences between Paleo-Indians and people now.

Student Will: get in groups with table mates and


begin discussing and filling out their t-charts
together.

Co-Teaching Strategy/Differentiation: co-teacher will walk the room and help any groups that need help or
get off topic.

Elaborate

Teacher Will: have group discussion come to a close


and start a class discussion on some of the
similarities and differences they found. They will
also be given time to add anything to their t-chart.

Student Will: participate in class discussion and will


be given extra time afterwards to fill in and add any
similarities/differences they may have not listed.

Co-Teaching Strategy/Differentiation: advanced learners have to find 15 similarities and differences instead
of just ten.

Evaluate
10-15 well thought out similarities and differences plus a summary.

Appendix A
Lesson Plan Templates for Signature Assignment and Mini-Teach
Choose the template that best fits your lesson
Direct instruction
Subject: 10th Grade Humanities World History

eek and Roman contributions and their impact on later civilization : a- development of concepts of government and citizenshi

pts of Roman government and citizenship by filling out the Roman Roles worksheet. SWBAT compare and contrast the gover

s and duties of Roman authorities within the given class time by completing the Roman Roles worksheet. Students will a comple
ican Republic for homework.

c to complex):

ment and citizenship and Compare and contrast the government then and the government we have now

t and a writing a summary

ortance of ancient government principles on the government that is in place in the United States today.

ns, tribunes, patricians, magistrates, senate, assembly, dictator, emperor

Materials/Technology Resources to be Used:

Roman Roles worksheet, pen or pencil, textbook, pre

earning, and make relevant to real life)

w we just went over Ancient Greece and how Rome would take many Greek influences in their own empire, including some govern
ulers for each of the seven hills along the Tiber River, before they became a republic. Mention that these ways of government hav

o clip that portrays a senate assembly in ancient Rome.


h?v=gLjgrFciJhE

Student Will:

Watch the video clip and then participate in class dis


people of Rome have on later civilizations including
government concepts.

extra input. Ask students, what do they already know about the Romans
and apply to the world today? Then ask, what about government? What
s way of government to the way government is in our own country?

iation:

lect data on which students participate or dont and their understanding of the questions asked in discussion. Co-teacher can poin

e and checklist they will be following throughout this unit.

with poor eye sight will already have assigned seating at the front of the class room to accommodate them while viewing the vid

et to all students. Teacher will then project the blank worksheet on the
he content while filling out the worksheet for students to copy and

Student Will:

Students will follow along and copy notes the teacher

iation:

ning accommodations will receive the worksheet either blank, fill in the black or already completed for them to follow along wit
and projecting notes on overhead projector.

teacher or co-teacher lecturing the content while the other writes down content in projected roles worksheet which could allow
n to the content presented.

rculating, observing, collecting data and making sure students are on task. Co-teacher can also address any questions.

man Roles worksheet to list 3-5 similarities and 3-5 differences between
merican Republic they live in now on separate piece of paper.

Student Will:

Students will use Roman roles worksheet and list 3-5


Roman Republic and the American republic they live

iation:

ed to have five similarities and differences instead of just three for each.

estions students may have. Teacher or co teacher can take time while students are working on their assignment to work with stud
.

ns:

ment set up like the Romans or one that is set up like present day America and why for an exit ticket from class.

xcept for finished list of similarities/differences and summary.

of the Roman Republic next.

Civil War Photography


Mini-Teach
Direct instruction

Subject: 11th grade Humanities

ncept 6:Civil War, PO2: Analyze aspects of the Civil War, a: changes in technology

he developments of photographic technology in the years leading up to the American Civil War.
uss orally their own reactions and what they think were the reactions people had to images during
able to complete the civil war photography worksheet with 80% accuracy.

ocess, daguerreotype, tintype

Materials/Technology Resources to be Used: civil war pho


interactive worksheet, pen or pencil, paper, binder

ing, and make relevant to real life)

n that class has been learning about the civil war recently and that photography advances would go on to revolutionize the documenting of

likes photography?

n teacher will state the objectives in a kid friendly way while first slide is being shown. This mini lesson will be going over pre-Civil War pho

nt presentation on the board and start a class discussion by asking students


e in slide 2 evokes. Then with slide 3, ask students what they think were the
war?

Student Will: participate in discussion with a show of han


the pictures in slides 2 and 3.

cher will instruct class that they will be required to fill out the civil war
as I go through the remaining slides. Teacher will make sure to give enough
write down answers on their worksheet. Once slide 12 in being projected,
ussion by asking students Does the sketch elicit the same kind of emotional
or why not?

Student Will: fill out the civil war photography interactiv


content. Students will participate in discussion over slide 1

regarding information on their worksheet

rtance of photography to the Civil War.

Student Will: n/a

Sample Co-Teaching Lesson Plan (Direct Instruction)


Teachers: Lily Gonzales

Subject: Government

Standard:

PO 2. Examine how the Constitution guarantees due process of law through Constitutional
mandates and Amendments. c. protection provided by the Fourteenth Amendment
Objective (Explicit):
AZ State Standards
SWBAT describe the significance of landmark U.S. Supreme Court case Brown V. Board of Education
and identify and apply the 14th amendment & its Equal Protection clause to address the individuals
freedom in the case by filling out a KLW chart as a class, engaging in multiple discussions, reading
background summaries and answering questions on worksheets.
Common Core Standards
1112.RH.1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, con
necting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
1112.RH.2. Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an
accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
1112.RH.3. Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation be
st accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.
1112.RH.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text
NETS-S
4. Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking
skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informal
decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. a. Identify and define authentic problems
and significant questions for investigation
Evidence of Mastery (Measurable):
Include a copy of the lesson assessment.

Provide exemplar student responses with the level of detail you expect to see.
Assign value to each portion of the response
SWBAT give multiple examples of discrimination and ways to treat individuals equally in
different scenarios during discussion. Students will help fill out the KLW chart throughout
the lesson. SWBAT complete both work sheets with 80% accuracy and completion.
Sub-objectives, SWBAT (Sequenced from basic to complex):
How will you review past learning and make connections to previous lessons?

What skills and content are needed to ultimately master this lesson objective?
How is this objective relevant to students, their lives, and/or the real world?
What: Students will be learning about how court decisions have defined the constitution and
the civil liberties of individuals.
How: Students will be participating in multiple discussions between reading a background
summary and completing two worksheets with questions.
Why: To understand the fundamental individual rights the constitution guarantees to
citizens.
Key vocabulary: appellate, civil liberties,
Materials: 3 handouts, writing utensil,
indictment, jurisdiction, segregation,
highlighter, binder
desegregation
Opening (state objectives, connect to previous learning, and make relevant to real life)
How will you activate student interest?
How will you connect to past learning?
How will you present the objective in an engaging and student-friendly way?
How will you communicate its importance and make the content relevant to your students?

Guided Practice

Instructional Input

I will first mention to students that we have been learning a lot about due process
and specific landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases that have defined the constitution.
I will go over objectives for the days lesson on the board. The objectives will be
written as 1. What is discrimination? 2. Is treating people equally mean treating
them the same? 3. The 14th Amendment and the Equal Protection Clause 4. Brown v.
Board of Education. I will then mention that the decisions made from this case affect
the classroom the students sit in currently.
Teacher Will:
Student Will:
How will you model/explain/demonstrate all
What will students be doing to actively capture and
knowledge/skills required of the objective?
process the new material?
What types of visuals will you use?
How will students be engaged?
How will you address misunderstandings or
common student errors?
How will you check for understanding?
How will you explain and model behavioral
expectations?
Is there enough detail in this section so that
another person could teach it?
I will have a blank KLW chart on the board and as a
Students will hold teacher accountable to objectives.
class we will fill it out before, during and after the
Students will engage in the discussion by responding to
lesson is being completed. This will be the main
questions and providing examples for each orally to be
visual used.
included in the KLW chart.
I will fill out the What I Know section of the chart
by starting a discussion with the whole class by
asking them what they think discrimination is. After
receiving a few responses I will record them on the
board and then I will tell students the definition of
discrimination. I will then ask them if they think
discrimination is bad. If the students answer yes
and/or no I will explain that discrimination is not
always bad and give them some examples when it
is okay. From them I will ask them if they think
treating people equally means treating them the
same. This will lead in to the guided practice.
Co-Teaching Strategy
Which co-teaching approach will you use to maximize student achievement?
One teach/One Assist: While I instruct students about objectives and through the discussion, co-teacher will be
assisting by walking around class to make sure all students are on task and answer any individual questions so
the time for lesson is not hindered.
Differentiation Strategy
What accommodations/modifications will you include for specific students?
Do you anticipate any students who will need an additional challenge?
Some worksheets given will already have the definition of discrimination on them. Some students will
have KWL charts to fill out individually. Some background summary reading worksheets will already be
highlighted.
Teacher Will:
How will you ensure that all students have
multiple opportunities to practice new content
and skills?
What types of questions can you ask students as
you are observing them practice?
How/when will you check for understanding?
How will you provide guidance to all students as
they practice?
How will you explain and model behavioral
expectations?
Is there enough detail in this section so that
another person could facilitate this practice?
With the Does treating people equally mean
treating them the same? worksheet I will start by

Student Will:
How will students practice all knowledge/skills required
of the objective, with your support, such that they
continue to internalize the sub-objectives?
How will students be engaged?
How will you elicit student-to-student interaction?
How are students practicing in ways that align to
independent practice?

Students will give their input for the example scenario


as a class. They will need to list at least two ways for

Independent Practice

going over the first scenario as a class. I will read


each scenario individually. Students will collaborate with
the scenario aloud and then the students will tell
classmates and share ideas on each scenario. Students
me what they think. Once we figure the scenario
will share answers with entire class.
out as a class and answer the question I will
instruct the class to read the rest of the scenarios
and give some examples of how the individuals
depicted will be treated equally. As the students
work I will ask some questions to get them thinking
like are you guys starting to see that treating
people equally doesnt always mean the same?
and Are all the scenarios the same? Are there
instances when treating people equal mean
treating them the exact same too? I will constantly
remind students how much time the students have
left to read and answer the scenarios. I will
encourage the students to work together and see
what someone nearby has written down for each
scenario. As I walk the classroom I will make sure
the students are working on the worksheet only
and staying on task for the time allotted. Once time
is up, as a class we will go over each scenario and
students will share what they wrote down.
Co-Teaching Strategy
Which co-teaching approach will you use to maximize student achievement?
One teach/One Assist: While I instruct through the guided practice, co-teacher will be assisting by
walking around class to make sure all students are on task and answer any individual questions so the
time for lesson is not hindered.
Differentiation Strategy
What accommodations/modifications will you include for specific students?
Do you anticipate any students who will need an additional challenge?
How can you utilize grouping strategies?
Some worksheets will have example problems already answered for student to refer to. Some students
will only have to include one way to treat people equally for each scenario and some will have to do
less scenarios.
Teacher Will:
How will you plan to coach and correct during this
practice?
How will you provide opportunities for remediation
and extension?
How will you clearly state and model academic and
behavioral expectations?
Did you provide enough detail so that another person
could facilitate the practice?

Student Will:
How will students independently practice the knowledge
and skills required by the objective?
How will students be engaged?
How are students are practicing in ways that align to
assessment?
How are students using self-assessment to guide their own
learning?
How are you supporting students giving feedback to one
another?

Once students finish with the guided practice, I will


instruct them to the second worksheet which is a
background summary reading on the Brown v.
Board Case. I will have a picture slide show with
important pictures from the time of the case
playing during this part. I will instruct the students
that while they read independently they need to
underline, highlight and annotate important parts
of the reading. Students get ten to fifteen minutes
to do this. I will also prompt them to think of things
they would like to know about the case. They are
constantly reminded of how much time is left and
when it gets to minute nine I will ask if they need
more time. Once they are done reading and
annotating their worksheet, they will refer to the
third worksheet which is questions to go along with
the reading. They will answer these individually, in
complete sentences and have another ten minutes

Students will need to underline, highlight and annotate


important parts of background summary reading they
read independently. Once they are finished, they need to
complete the reading questions worksheet. They need to
answer each question in complete sentences.

to do this. If they do not finish reading questions,


this will be for homework.

Co-Teaching Strategy
Which co-teaching approach will you use to maximize student achievement?
One teach/One Assist: While I instruct the students through their independent practice and they are
reading and working on questions individually, co-teacher will be assisting by walking around class to
make sure all students are on task and answer any individual questions so the time for lesson is not
hindered.
Differentiation Strategy
What accommodations/modifications will you include for specific students?
Do you anticipate any students who will need an additional challenge?
Some background summary reading worksheets will already be highlighted and underlined. Some
reading questions will be differentiated for easier understanding. Some students will have less or more
questions than others.
Closing/Student Reflection/Real-life connections:
How will students summarize and state the significance of what they learned?
Why will students be engaged?

For closing, as a class we will fill out the What I Learned and What I Want to
Learn section of the KLW chart.

Problem Based Enhanced Language Learning


Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University

Author Name:
Lily Gonzales, Lauren Spintig, Max Leaf

Program:
BLE

Class:
12th Grade
Government

Title of Experience:
Youve Got Rights!
Problem or Situation for Teacher Candidates to Identify Problem:
How can we as American citizens design a plan to ensure our rights will not be violated in
the future?
Time Frame: (number of sessions and length of sessions)
Three 50 minute class periods
Standard(s):
PO 4. Analyze how the new national government was created: e. creation of the Bill of
Rights
Academic Discourse:
Students will further their understanding of the first ten amendments by looking at
Supreme Court Cases involving the ten amendments.
Students will work collaboratively together to deepen their understanding of the Bill of
Rights.
Goals or Learner Outcomes:
SWBAT: analyze the individual rights guaranteed by the Bill of Rights and research how
they have been violated in the past by color coding Supreme Court cases, using Cornell
notes, and learning the memorization hand gestures.
Students will be able to cite and explain the Bill of Rights by articulating the
amendments in their own words and many ways of interpretation.
Students will be able to a analyze basic individual rights and freedoms
guaranteed by first ten amendments and laws through examining landmark
Supreme Court civil rights cases.
Students will be able to develop a trifold poster that summarizes their
solutions to the unit problem of How can we as American citizens design a plan to
ensure our rights will not be violated in the future? and applying it to their Supreme
Court case they researched.
Skills practiced:
Comprehension (Reading & Writing)
Language Acquisition
Vocabulary
Communication (Speaking & Listening)
Research

Materials:
Copy of the Bill of Rights
Dictionary
Writing Utensil
Paper
3 different colored highlighters
Computer and printer
Tri-fold poster
Crayons, colored pencils or markers
Any other art supplies
Tape and glue

Operational Vocabulary
Vocabulary needed for the experience,
introduced prior to when it is needed.
1. law
2. prohibit
3. consent
4. rights
5. jury

Conceptual Vocabulary
Vocabulary that will be developed as a result
of the experiences.
1. Amendment
2. Assemble
3. Petition
4. Infringe
5. Quartered
6. Discrimination
7. Segregation

Engage: How will this Problem Based Enhanced Language Learning experience be
introduced to the TCs?
Anticipatory set/Prior knowledge:
DAY ONE: As soon as students walk into class and are seated, I will instruct them to take
out a piece of paper and write non-stop for two minutes about what it means to be
American. For example, what is the American Dream? What makes the American Dream
possible?
After the non-stop writing activity, students will share their ideas with a partner. Then, we
will have a whole class discussion about what it means to be American. Hopefully one
student remarks something about freedoms or individual rights. If not, I will prompt them
on it. The teacher will redirect the conversation and pose a new question to the class, So
what exactly are our freedoms/rights in this country? List and write down as many as you
can think of in the next two minutes with your partner. Again, we will then open up this
partner activity to a whole class discussion where each student must share a freedom or
right. Lastly, the teacher will ask students, Well where do these rights come from? How
do we know we have this rights/freedoms? What guarantees them to citizens? Hopefully
one student will mention or the teacher will introduce the Bill of Rights. That is when the
teacher will pose the question, So what are they exactly? Why should we as American

citizens know or understand the Bill of Rights? Ultimately asking students why is the
Bills of Rights essential to know? The teacher should allow at least 5 students to ask
these questions and explain how the Bill of Rights guarantees us our rights as American
citizens so if we dont know what they are then they can be violated.
Introduction/Adding on to prior knowledge:
DAY ONE: The teacher will then pass out the Bill of Rights. Students will read each of
the 10 amendments in the Bill of Rights independently. Students will be asked to create
Cornell notes on these 10 amendments. On right side of the Cornell notes the students
will rewrite what each amendment says but in their own words. Then on the left side of
the Cornell notes students will illustrate a way to remember what that amendment
means. Once students have completed that, they will get into groups of 4 to share their
personal definitions and drawings.
Then the teacher will put on this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=82DnWqNKqiI
that gives each amendment a hand gesture using the corresponding number of the
amendment and what it entails. After the video, the teacher will have students get out of
their seat to practice as a class the different hand gestures for each amendment.
Students will pair up with whoever they like and the teacher will randomly call out an
amendment and the students must tell their partner what right that amendment
guarantees citizens and show their partner the corresponding hand gesture for that
amendment. For example, if the teacher calls out amendment two the student would
tell their partner, amendment two is allowing citizens the right to own a gun and then
the student would make the hand gesture which is using two fingers to make a gun. The
partners will take turns. Once the teacher has allowed pairs to practice each amendment
then the students will take their seat.
Introducing the problem:
DAY ONE: The teacher will then introduce the problem for this unit to the students,
How can we as American citizens design a plan to ensure our rights will not be violated
in the future? The teacher will explain that before we worry about our rights being
violated in the future, we must look at past events and laws that have taken place
already that have violated our rights. We are looking at the past to better understand our
current situation and learn from the past to prevent this from occurring again. Now the
teacher will ask students to think and write down for two minutes about a time in history
or a current event that could be violating our rights guaranteed to us by the Bill of Rights.
For example, students could write about slavery, segregated schools based on race or
Japanese Internment Camps. The teacher will call on 5 individual students to share their
ideas with the class. The teacher will then explain that many times these events or laws
go all the way to the Supreme Court to see if that branch of government considers the
law unconstitutional.
Towards the end of the day, the teacher will allow students to get into groups of 3 to 4.
The teacher will instruct them to begin researching landmark Supreme Court cases that
involved a violation of the rights listed in the Bill of Rights from the list on this website:
https://www.billofrightsinstitute.org/educate/educator-resources/landmark-cases/. An
example students could choose is Miranda v. Arizona in 1966 which dealt with criminal
procedure and the Fifth Amendment. By the end of the day, each group will tell the
teacher what court case they found and would like to do their project on. Once the
teacher gives them the okay then they may begin researching their court case for

remainder of class and as homework. It is important to note that the teacher must
explain to students that the court case is half of the project and the other half if having
students create a solution to the overarching problem which is: How can we as American
citizens design a plan to ensure our rights will not be violated in the future? Additionally,
as homework students must create graphic organizers for each one of the five conceptual
vocabulary words. This will include the word, its definition, a definition in the students
terms, and a picture that represents the word. Once they have created these charts the
exploration process can begin.
Explore: Description of methods students will likely use to explore problem and
potential solutions. Note that this may not be a linear progression and not all students
may use all methods.
There are a variety of ways that students will be able to explore this problem. These
solutions can range from simple to complex and if done properly students will be able to
use a variety of techniques to find the most concrete solution.
DAY TWO:
Brainstorming - Instruct the students to individually think of as many different possible
solutions to this problem within ten to fifteen minutes. Make sure that the students are
actually writing down these ideas, and not just storing them in their minds. The point of
this method is to have students create quality ideas and elaborate on different ones that
they think might be the best solution. Students will also have to access their prior
knowledge during this portion to create foundation for this project.
Group/Partner Share - This involves the students sharing their solutions with their
group mates. This method opens up the students mind to other perspectives other than
their own. By sharing with other people it can help the students create a better well
rounded solution that can be more beneficial to a wider variety of people.
Research - Research will be done in groups. The groups will research about their
Supreme Court Cases. They will need to talk about which constitutional right was
violated. The students will use the website provided above as a resource to identify key
characteristics of the Supreme Court Cases. They must print off the information from the
website so they can color code the text. Therefore, they must include when/where it
happened, what amendment was in question, as well as the outcome. They must include
the three different colors in a legend and include what color goes with each fact. Then,
students will conduct research about the problem and how to create a solution so that
our constitutional rights are not violated again in the future. First they are learning about
the problem at hand, and secondly they are starting to create possible solutions from the
information they have gathered. When researching students will be using cornell notes in
order to better understand the problem. This will help organize the students thought
process and allow them to access key points throughout their research. They will conduct
research using the internet, textbooks, and their Supreme Court case research. Research
is an essential method that will have to be covered by students when trying to solve, How
can we as American citizens design a plan to ensure our rights will not be violated in the
future?
Classifying - As a class each group with a different Supreme Court Cases will discuss

which amendment was violated, and compare and contrast similarities and differences
between them. This allows the students to connect potential patterns of rights being
violated. On day two students will start making their poster board that presents their
Supreme Court case and their solution to the unit problem: how can we as American
citizens design a plan to ensure our rights will not be violated in the future?
Explain: Description of methods for moving from exploration to understanding through
discussion. Enhanced Language Learning methods will be prominent here but also will
be used in other sections. methods may be layered throughout the Explore section.
In order for the students to create a solution for this problem they first have to be able to
identify what their rights are, and how they can be violated. Throughout the explore
section the students are thinking and researching about rights, and how to protect your
rights. So throughout the lesson the students will stop and discuss with their
partners/groups on their findings and how their solutions are coming along. During these
times the students will be asked to point out possible flaws with each others solutions.
This will allow the students to create multiple drafts of their solutions, with each draft
building on the previous drafts revisions. This means that students will be providing
feedback to one another on what they can improve on for their final version. This
feedback is vital to ensure understanding for both students because it gives students
different perspectives to look at. During this time the students will have conducted some
independent research, as well as read about the Supreme Court cases with their groups.
Students can use the same graphic organizers that they used for the conceptual
vocabulary, or they are welcome to use other organizers if they desire. The significance
of these organizers is to ensure student understanding of vocabulary so they can
effectively create a solution to this problem. Without the understanding of the language
the students will struggle to fully understand the concept at hand, which in turn hinders
their critical thinking skills.
Sharing Strategies: How will students share their solutions to the problem?
DAY THREE: Students in their groups will have created a trifold poster about their
historical Supreme Court case and the solution to the unit problem: how can we as
American citizens design a plan to ensure our rights will not be violated in the future? The
poster will be presented in class the on Day three. The poster must include the outcome
of the court case. Additionally, students will be asked to explain what amendments
and/or rights were being violated. On the poster, student must explain their solution to
the unit question and explain how their solution would prevent American citizens from
having their rights violated in the future. Students will share their poster to classmates in
a gallery walk so that students are learning about different landmark supreme court
cases from peers.
DAY THREE AFTER SCHOOL: The teacher will invite all the students, their parents, and
community members on this specific night where all groups from all class periods will
have their poster board up and displayed for everyone to see. Therefore, students will
create a poster board that will display their solution to the unit problem and share their

unique opinions to their peers, other teachers, their parents, and community members.
This sharing strategy will teach students that their viewpoint is important/valued,
therefore it should be heard and shared throughout the community. Of course attending
this event would be strongly encouraged but would not affect students grades if they
could not attend this event after school hours.
Day three after school was a suggestion by another group in our feedback
forms.
Elaborate: How will students take the learning from Explore and Explain and apply it to
a new circumstance or explore a particular aspect of this learning at a deep level?

Everything the students just learned can be applied to each and every ones own life
since they all live in the United States. It is important that we educate young people on
their rights so they can always be aware of what they can and cant do, especially when
they are not in the classroom and they dont have a teacher to always guide them. This
lesson in itself will help students have this awareness and in any situation that may arise
around them, they will know their rights. They will also have background to these rights
and examples of when they were violated for others through the analyzation of landmark
Supreme Court Cases. On top of that, they get a chance to take past cases and apply
them to new circumstances so that violations do not occur again. This lesson can give
each and every student a sense of Americanism also and what it truly means to be an
American citizen.
Evaluate: How will TC achievement of goals or learner outcomes be evaluated?
The TC will evaluate the achievement of goals and the learner outcomes in many ways.
First, we will evaluate the student's participation throughout the lesson. The students will
receive participation points for every part of the lesson. This includes participating in
discussion, group work and being engaged throughout. Secondly, the students will be
graded on their work for each activity. They will be given points on their non-stop write,
the lists they make of freedoms and rights, their cornell notes, their demonstration of the
bill of rights hand gestures, their quick write on violations, their research of the case, and
their vocabulary graphic organizer. The biggest of chuck of points they will receive will be
their tri-fold poster and its presentation. They will need to have information on the
amendment being violated, background on the case and most importantly, a solution to
make sure the violation does not occur again. When students can demonstrate their
knowledge of the bill of rights and the history behind it, this will show the TC achievement
of goals.

THE BILL OF RIGHTS FULL TEXT


Amendment I
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or
prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or
of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to
petition the government for a redress of grievances.
Amendment II
A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the
right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.
Amendment III
No soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the
consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by
law.
Amendment IV
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and
effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated,
and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or
affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the
persons or things to be seized.
Amendment V
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime,
unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases
arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in
time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same
offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in
any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life,

liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be
taken for public use, without just compensation.
Amendment VI
In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and
public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime
shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously
ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the
accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have
compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the
assistance of counsel for his defense.
Amendment VII
In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty
dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a
jury, shall be otherwise reexamined in any court of the United States, than
according to the rules of the common law.
Amendment VIII
Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel
and unusual punishments inflicted.
Amendment IX
The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed
to deny or disparage others retained by the people.
Amendment X
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor
prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to
the people.