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Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity

Two-Week Unit Plan


Kerry Farnum
SPE322
May 4, 2016

Goals: 3-LS4 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity


3-LS4-1: Analyze and interpret data from fossils to provide evidence of the organisms
and the environments in which they lived long ago.
Students will understand what fossils are and why the information they provide is
important.
3-LS4-2: Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in
characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in
surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
Students will understand that some individuals are better suited for their
environments than others because of their traits or characteristics.
3-LS4-3: Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some
organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
Students will understand that individuals make adaptations in an effort to be better
suited for survival in a particular environment.
3-LS4-4: Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the
environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.
Students will understand that environmental changes can affect an individuals
ability to survive, leading to an endangered species or extinction.
Knowledge/Understandings and Skills:
Students will understand that:
Fossils are preserved remnants of a once-living individual
Fossils tell us how the individual lived (how it walked, how it grouped, its
strength, etc.)
Many animals live in groups for survival (protection, raising young, gathering
food, etc).
Natural selection determines an individuals ability to survive and reproduce in an
environment.
An individuals characteristics and traits determine its ability to survive and
reproduce in an environment.
Changes in an individuals environment affect its ability to survive and reproduce.
Individuals make adaptations to a changing environment in an effort to survive.
Human intervention has effects on an environment and an individuals ability to
adapt
Key termsfossil, grouping, best suited, natural selection, biome, adaptation,
extinction, endangered
Students will be able to:
Analyze text and data to gain information and understandings
Work collaboratively to make observations and discoveries
Organize and present their ideas
Participate in a Socratic discussion
Think analytically
Use technology to support research
Use models and simulations to deepen their understandings

Construct and present arguments with evidence

Guiding/Essential Questions:
How can information about an individual and/or an environment be used to
understand how it lives?
How does an individuals ability to adapt affect its ability to survive and
reproduce?
How can we use research to learn about an individual and its ability to survive in
an environment?
Performance Tasks:
Research Grouping (2/3): Students will choose an animal to research, and use a variety of
tools to research how this animal groups and record it on a research note sheet. Students
will use this acquired research to participate in a Socratic discussion with their peers.
Creating/Adapting an Individual (4/5): Students will create a fictional individual that can
survive in a given environment. They will then adapt this individual given a set of
changing environmental conditions.
Other Evidence:
Work Sample (1)Students will analyze a set of lyrics about fossils.
Centers (3)Students will complete natural selection online simulations and physical
modeling games, completing accompanying worksheets.
RAFT writing sample (6)Students will research an animals characteristics/traits as a
group and complete and present a RAFT writing assignment.
Honeybee decline simulation (7)Students will model as a class how the use of
pesticides is affecting the honeybee population.
Graph/journal questions (8)Students will construct a bar graph from a data table and
answer a series of questions in their science journals.

Lesson One
Title: Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
Topic: Introduction to Fossils, Grade 3
Essential Question: What are fossils, where can they be found, and what information
can they give us?
Standards:
NGSS:
3-LS4-1
Analyze and interpret data from fossils to provide evidence of the organisms and the
environments in which they lived long ago.
LS4.A
Some kinds of plants and animals that once lived on Earth are no longer found anywhere.
Fossils provide evidence about the types of organisms that lived long ago and also about
the nature of their environments.
Scientific and Engineering Practices: Constructing explanations and designing
solutions in 35 builds on K2 experiences and progresses to the use of evidence in
constructing explanations that specify variables that describe and predict phenomena and
in designing multiple solutions to design problems.
Scale, Proportion, and Quantity: Observable phenomena exist from very short to very
long time periods.
Learning Objectives & Assessments
Objectives
Learners will be able to observe a fossils
characteristics.
Learners will be able to analyze lyrics to
find facts about fossils.

Learners will be able to summarize new


information gathered.

Assessments
As a class, we will complete a KWL chart
with K being what we think we know, W
being what the teacher wants us to know,
and L being what weve learned.
Students will work with their groups to
read each stanza of lyrics and determine the
main ideas the author wants them to know
about fossils.
Learners will add a post-it with a learned
fact to the L section of the KWL chart.

Materials:
For the class:
Lyrics sheets
Fossils
Post-its
For the teacher:
SMARTBoard/projector
Chart paper
Pre-lesson assignments and/or prior knowledge:
Students will have knowledge of animal bodies decomposing to bones over a period of
time. Students are not expected to know the definition of a fossil or different types of
fossils.
Lesson Beginning:
The teacher will begin by asking students, what is a fossil?, and having them record
their answers in their science notebooks. Teacher will use the information obtained at
this time as an informal assessment of student knowledge. (5 minutes)
Instructional Plan:
Timetable & Transitions:
0:05:00-0:15:00
Teacher will give each group a fossil to observe. Students will observe the fossils,
and use adjectives to describe it. Teacher will ask students to predict where it may
have come from, what it is, and why it is important. Students should record their
observations in their science journals.
The teacher will have students raise their hands and share what they think they
know about fossils, and will write these notes on the chart paper in the K
column. She will then present students with three ideas she wants students to
explore. Students can then add to the W column with a post-it of one thing they
want to know about fossils.
Transition: Teacher will read some wonders out loud as students come up to post their
ideas on the chart paper.
0:15:00-0:45:00
Students will listen to a song about fossils. Students will listen twiceonce for
enjoyment, and again for new content.
Students will then receive a worksheet with the lyrics to the fossil song. Students
will work with their groups to write the main ideas or important points they think
the author is making next to each stanza. Teacher will replay video or provide
clarification if students seem to be having trouble completing the worksheet.
0:45:00-1:00:00

Teacher will ask students to write something they learned about fossils on a postit and add it to the L column on the KWL chart. Tables will come up one at a
time, sharing their ideas with the class. Teacher will clarify any misconceptions.

Differentiation:
Groups will be of mixed ability so more able learners can assist less able learners
within their small groups.
Lyric sheets will be accessible virtually or in paper form.
Students can note observations of fossils using words or pictures, as long as
findings can be explained orally.
Zoe will be allowed to view the lyric sheet on her iPad so it can read the lyrics to
her using voice recognition technology.
Students who struggle with reading and writing should be grouped with proficient
readers and writers who can support their spelling/writing skills and read the
lyrics aloud to the group.
Anita and Kabir will be grouped together to support one anothers use of
language.
Calvin does not need any special accommodations in order to succeed during this
activity.
Wayne will be grouped with patience and more abled readers who can answer any
questions he may have. Teacher will be sure to check on Wayne frequently to
provide frequent reassurance and praise.
Universal Design for Learning
o Provide multiple means of representation
Zoe will use her voice recognition technology to read/write.
Worksheets will be available virtually and on paper.
o Provide multiple means of action and expression
Students can use an online dictionary/translator to assist with
writing.
Students can present their ideas using words or pictures, whichever
they feel more comfortable using.
o Provide multiple means of engagement
Students will work collaboratively to analyze lyrics and determine
the main ideas of the text.
Students will analyze physical examples of fossils and listen to a
song about fossils.
Questions (post-activity class discussion):
What is a fossil?
Where can they be found?
What information do they give us?
Classroom Management:

Students will watch videos and complete worksheets from their tables so that the
teacher has easy access to monitor behavior.
Teacher will group the children to avoid conflict and ensure maximum
productivity.
One teacher will lead the activity while the other circulates to provide
individualized support. Once broken up into groups, both teachers will circulate to
eliminate misconceptions and support students with reading, give praise where
needed, and ask deeper meanings of students who complete the assignment easily.

Closure:
The lesson will conclude with a class discussion from students desks for a lesson
reflection (after the modeling activity) to answer above questions. There will not be a
homework assignment relating to this lesson. (3 minutes)

Fossil Song
http://youtu.be/RNSrNT-nIDE
When life leaves us, when they die
Fossils may form in their site
Gives us info, how they lived, oh
Some easy identified
Like our plants, animals that's why
They help us tell, how life was then
When evidence is in the floor
Fossils deep from life before
We dig them out, we dig them out
Fossil records we study
The kinds of things once living
They help us tell, how life was then
We can work out how they lived
Learn about all life ancient
And how they're forming
Fossils, fossils
Animals die-leave their bones
The sediments then turn to stone
Fossils, fossils
Skelton gone now a mold
The minerals fill-cast is formed
Found years after they're gone, gone, gone
Fossils form like a statue
Not all lucky to capture
They may rot away, after decay
Right conditions may bury
Fossilize it's preserving
Record of the past, a mold and cast
The remains of once living
And sometimes from ones extinct
And how they're forming
Fossils, fossils

Animals die-leave their bones


The sediments then turn to stone
Fossils, fossils
Skelton gone now a mold
The minerals fill-cast is formed
Found years after they're gone, gone, gone
Mold of a bone
Footprints or burrowsInsects caught in amber not moving
Petrified rock
Replaced organ parts
Carbon stays making carbonization
Footprints found maybe how feet beating
How they walked maybe two or four limbs
Did they herd?
Maybe they stampeded
Found in mines, quarries, even riverbeds
Fossils, fossils
Animals die-leave their bones
The sediments then turn to stone
Fossil, fossils
Skelton gone now a mold
The minerals fill-cast is formed
Fossils, fossils
Animals die-leave their bones
The sediments then turn to stone
Fossils, fossils
Skelton gone now a mold
The minerals fill-cast is formed
Footprints found maybe how feet beating
How they walked maybe two or four limbs
Did they herd?
Maybe they stampeded
Found in mines, quarries, even riverbeds
Fossils
Found years after they're gone, gone, gone
Fossils found years after they're gone, gone, gone

Lesson Plan Two


Title: Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
Topic: Species Tendencies for Survival (part 1), Grade 3
Essential Question: Why do animals live in groups? What advantages does this provide
them?
Standards:
NGSS:
3-LS4-2
Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among
individual species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
LS4.B
Sometimes the differences in characteristics between individuals of the same species
provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
Scientific and Engineering Practices: Constructing explanations and designing
solutions in 3-5 builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to the use of evidence in
constructing explanations that specify variables that describe and predict phenomena and
in designing multiple solutions to design problems. Use evidence (e.g., observations,
patterns) to construct an explanation.
CCSS:
W.3.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information
clearly.
W.3.9
Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources;
take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.
Learning Objectives & Assessments
Objectives
Learners will be able to describe the
benefits of animals living in groups.

Learners will be able to collect evidence to


support a claim related to the benefits of
animals living in groups.

Assessments
Select students will demonstrate how
animals protect one another in a group.
Students will record benefits in their
science journals.
Students will select an animal to research,
and record evidence on their research note
sheets to use later during Socratic
discussion.

Materials:
For the class:
Research note sheet
Science journal
For the teacher:
Projector
Internet access
Prezi
Chart paper
Pre-lesson assignments and/or prior knowledge:
Students will be familiar with how to navigate the Internet to search for information.
Students will have participated in a lesson discussing finding credible sources and will
have a basic understanding of plagiarism/paraphrasing.
Lesson Beginning:
We will begin by watching a slideshow of different animals who live in groups at the
carpet. As their pictures come up, students will call out the names of the animals. Teacher
will emphasize that all animals shown live in groups for various reasons.
(5 minutes)
https://prezi.com/qjvrtoe4jizh/animals-that-live-in-groups/
Instructional Plan:
Timetable & Transitions:
0:05:00-0:25:00
Students will watch a clip of a mongoose family being preyed upon by wild dogs.
Afterwards, the teacher will choose 6 volunteers to demonstrate to the class how the
mongooses protected one another from their predators.
Transition: Students will return to their desks by rows.
Once students return to their seats, they will discuss in groups:
Why do animals live in groups? How do groups help animals? What size/where/when?
Students will record answers in science journals. Groups will briefly share out after
discussion, and teacher will note reasons for groups on a sheet of chart paper.
0:25:00-0:45:00
Students will choose an animal individually to research.
Teacher will discuss with students definitions for claims, evidence, and reasoning.
She will model making a claim, and have students make their own claims parallel
to her own with their own animals: Mongooses live in groups. She will then

model finding evidence online to support her claim: The Caught in the Act
video showed mongooses huddling in a group. Last, she will provide
reasoning for her evidence so the wild dogs would not attack them. She will
note that evidence and reasoning are the why of researchthey should tell why
your claim is true.
In their research, they should include a claim about how that animal lives
(intended answer is in groups), and support each claim with at least 3 pieces of
evidence and reasoning as to how the evidence supports the claim (size of group,
purpose of group, location of group, etc). Teacher will go over how to cite sources
by saying In the animal planet video, it says... or According to the article from
the encyclopedia Students will begin this research in class and complete for
homework to prepare for class activities the next day in class. Students may
utilize online resources (articles, videos, pictures) or use books from the library
(students will be attending library this afternoon).
Teacher will distribute research note sheet. Students will have 10 minutes to begin
research using class resources and ask any clarifying questions.

Differentiation:
Students will shout out names of animals to reinforce and review animal names
for ELLs.
If they volunteer, Anita, Zoe, and Calvin should be chosen to demonstrate, as well
as any students who are antsy or need to get out of their seats. Calvin can
participate as a mongoose being protected by his family members if he so
chooses.
Learning contracts and assignment description will be distributed to Kabir, Anita,
Zoe, Wayne, Luther, Donald, Jason, and Kate for this assignment the Friday prior
to this lesson so they have a weekend to begin gathering information at home.
Students will have the choice of completing their research through various modes
to support a variety of able readers: via books, online articles, pictures, videos,
etc.
Universal Design for Learning
o Provide multiple means of representation
Zoe will use her voice recognition technology to read/write.
Students will apply concepts from earlier lessons in the unit to
guide them in their understandings of main ideas in this lesson.
o Provide multiple means of action and expression
Students will have the option of conducting research on an iPad or
Chromebook, library books, articles, pictures, or videos.
Students can use an online dictionary/translator to assist with
writing.
Students will have the opportunity to volunteer to model

mongooses grouping for protection.


Students will watch/dance to a BrainPop video.
o Provide multiple means of engagement
Students will have the freedom to choose which animal they wish
to research.
Some students will be given the assignment in advance so they
have more time to prepare their research.
Classroom Management:
Students will watch videos and complete worksheets from their tables so that the
teacher has easy access to monitor behavior.
Teacher will model how to complete research note sheet to maximize productivity
during research time.
Two instructors will monitor class to avoid distraction or wild behavior during
learning and clarify and answer questions.
Closure:
Students will transition into next lesson with a BrainPop video that gets them out of their
seats and moving around. Students will finish note sheets for homework. (10 minutes)

Name







What animal will you be researching?




Whats something you know about how some animals live?





Make a claim about how your animal lives.





Collect evidence to support your claim:

Evidence:
Evidence:








Reasoning:
Reasoning:

Evidence:




Reasoning:

Evidence:




Reasoning:

Lesson Plan Three


Title: Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
Topic: Species Tendencies for Survival (part 2), Grade 3
Essential Question: What effect do differences within a species have on its ability to
survive and reproduce?
Standards:
NGSS:
3-LS4-2
Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among
individual species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
LS4.B
Sometimes the differences in characteristics between individuals of the same species
provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
Scientific and Engineering Practices: Constructing explanations and designing
solutions in 3-5 builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to the use of evidence in
constructing explanations that specify variables that describe and predict phenomena and
in designing multiple solutions to design problems. Use evidence (e.g., observations,
patterns) to construct an explanation.
CCSS:
RI.3.3
Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or
concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time,
sequence, and cause/effect.
W.3.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and
information clearly.
Learning Objectives & Assessments
Objectives
Learners will be able to define natural
selection and describe how it determines an
individuals ability to survive and
reproduce in an ecosystem.

Assessments
Students will complete an online simulation
activity with accompanying worksheet.
Students will complete a physical
simulation with group members that models
how an individuals traits affect their ability
to obtain food, and complete accompanying
data table/questions.

Learners will be able to defend their claims


about how their researched animal groups
with evidence and reasoning.

Students will participate in a Socratic


discussion to discuss and defend grouping
patterns amongst different animals.

Learners will be able to research the area of


the world in which their animal is most
frequently found and determine the type of
biome in which they reside.

Students will locate a


country/continent/ocean on Google Earth
and use street/ground view to assess the
geography of the area and determine a
biome. Students may supplement findings
on Google Earth with research to determine
their animals biomes.

Materials:
For the class:
2 sets of 5 laptops, set up to appropriate websites (Simulation activity on 5, Google Earth
on 5)
Science notebooks
Natural selection worksheets (2)
Google Earth instruction worksheets
Research HW note sheet
Natural selection center: tweezers, spoon, chopsticks, marbles, pennies, toothpicks,
stopwatch
For the teacher:
Projector
Internet access
Prezi
Pre-lesson assignments and/or prior knowledge:
Students will have knowledge of vocabulary terms: habitat, ecosystem, and biomes.
Students will be familiar with how to navigate the Internet to search for information.
Students will have experience filling out data tables.
Lesson Beginning:
Students will be seated at the carpet. The teacher will review the prezi with animal names
with students as support for ELLs. https://prezi.com/qjvrtoe4jizh/animals-that-live-ingroups/ (5 minutes)
Instructional Plan:
Timetable & Transitions:
0:05:00-0:20:00
Teacher will explain each center to students and model how students should
interact in the Socratic circle. Teacher will then demonstrate how students can
navigate Google Earth.

Transition: Teacher will break students into four groups, separating Kabir and Calvin
with other extroverts, and Luther and Kate with another extroverted group. Anita,
Wayne, and Donald should be in a quieter group, and Zoe and Jason in another group
with less vocal students.
0:20:00-0:35:00
Students will participate in their first of four centers.
Center 1:
o Students will participate in Socratic discussion using their research note
sheets from the night before. One teacher will remain nearby this center to
support discussion if it dies down or does not build on itself. Students will
make a claim, then support it with evidence and reasoning from their note
sheets. When they finish giving one explanation, they will ask another
student in the group,
, what evidence do you have to support your
claim? and continue throughout the group until all students have shared
their claims and all pieces of supporting evidence.
o Teacher will interject with questions to deepen conversation if necessary,
such as:
How does the animal protect itself by doing that?
What would make one animal more likely to survive than another?
Center 2:
o Students will complete the natural selection simulation activity and the
accompanying worksheet. This activity will model how a changing
environment makes certain traits more suitable and desirable than others.
http://sciencenetlinks.com/esheets/nowhere-to-hide/
Center 3:
o Students will complete the natural selection bird beak modeling activity.
Students will use different beaks (chopsticks, tweezers, spoon) to pick
up different foods (pennies, toothpicks, and marbles). They will have 30
seconds to use each type of beak to pick up each type of food. Students
will record numbers of food picked up on their worksheet in the data table.
Students will then complete the remainder of the worksheet with their
group.
Center 4:
o Students will use Google and Google Earth to locate where in the world
their animal typically resides, as well as the type of Biome. Students will
record in their science notebooks a response to the following questions,
using either sentences or drawings:
How does this biome support your animal in its efforts to survive?
What would happen if your animal were taken out of its natural
habitat/biome?
0:35:00-0:50:00
Students will rotate to their next center.
0:50:00-1:05:00
Students will rotate to their next center.

1:05:00-1:20:00
Students will rotate to their final center.
1:20:00-1:30:00
Students will return to the carpet to discuss post-activity questions as a class.
Students will turn and talk to someone in a different group before sharing out to
the whole class.
Differentiation:
Google Earth instruction packets will include the definition of a biome, types of
biomes, and screen shots of each navigational step for ELLs and less able readers.
If students prefer, they can respond to the questions in center 4 using videos or
diagrams they find online. Students who do not have strong writing skills can
respond to this prompt with drawings, key words or phrases.
Students will be separated into groups based on ability and personality. Groups
will be of mixed ability, but similar social tendencies in an effort to promote
interactions during Socratic discussion. Groups will be of mixed ability so more
able learners can assist less able learners within their centers.
This lesson will be completed at the beginning of the day so Calvin has the most
energy in mobility to participate in the natural selection and writing activities.
Students can have access to virtual versions of the worksheets via Google
Classroom if they prefer to type their answers.
ELLs will have access to a translator on their laptop/iPad to assist them with
completing the natural selection worksheets.
Calvin, Wayne, Zoe, Kabir, Anita, Luther, and Donald will receive a
differentiated worksheet with key terms defined and which requires less writing.
Universal Design for Learning
o Provide multiple means of representation
Zoe will use her voice recognition technology to read/write.
Students will apply concepts from earlier lessons in the unit to
guide them in their understandings of main ideas in this lesson.
Students will yell out names of animals as they see them on the
screen to reinforce animal names visually and aurally.
o Provide multiple means of action and expression
Students will have the option of creating their individual on paper
on using a drawing app on an iPad or Chromebook.
Students can use an online dictionary/translator to assist with
writing.
o Provide multiple means of engagement
Students will have access to differentiated worksheets for the
natural selection activity.
Google Earth activity directions will be provided using both
pictures and words for readers of any ability.
Students will work collaboratively to determine how animals
group, how natural selection occurs, and how ones habitat

supports its ability to survive.


Questions (post-activity class discussion):
How does changing an individuals environment affect its ability to survive?
What is natural selection?
What traits determine an individuals ability to survive and reproduce?
Closure:
The lesson will conclude with a class discussion in the meeting area for a lesson
reflection (after the centers) to answer above questions. There will not be a homework
assignment relating to this lesson.

Google Earth Navigation Instructions



1. When you open Google Earth, your screen should look
like this.














2. Type the name of the country, continent, or ocean into the
search bar on the top left hand side of the screen, and
click search.











3. Google Earth will take you to your searched location. If


you click on the red marker, information will pop up
about this location.


4. Click the plus sign on the right hand side of the screen to
zoom in. Click the minus sign to zoom out. Click and drag the
person icon to a location on the map to view the location as if
you were standing on the ground.











5. Use the left and right arrow keys on the keyboard to look
around the location from ground view.

















Biome: a large area that is the habitat of plant and animal life

Examples of biomes:

Aquatic Biomes
o Freshwaterrivers, lakes, ponds, wetlands
o Saltwaterocean, coral reef
Terrestrial Biomes
o Tundravery cold, harsh conditions
o Deserthot or cold, very dry
o Foresthumid, lots of rain, tall trees
o Grasslandrich soil, usually nice weather

Name:







Natural Selection
Bird Beak Modeling Activity

Record the number of food items you were able to pick up with each beak.


Pennies
Toothpicks
Marbles

Chopsticks beak


Tweezers beak

Spoon beak



Which food was easiest to pick up?



Which beak picked up the most food?



There are two types of birds in your environment: birds with chopstick beaks and
birds with spoon beaks. If marbles were the only food available in this area, which
bird would be more likely to survive? Why?

Name:







Natural Selection
Bird Beak Modeling Activity

Record the number of food items you were able to pick up with each beak.


Pennies
Toothpicks
Marbles

Chopsticks beak


Tweezers beak

Spoon beak



Circle which food was easiest to pick up.

Circle which beak picked up the most food.


Circle the bird that would have the easiest time picking up marbles with its beak.
Talk to a partner and tell them why you chose this bird beak.

Name:







Nowhere to Hide
Natural Selection Simulation

Work with a partner in your group to answer the following questions:

1. Which bugs (orange or green) were eaten more when there was a
low level of pollution (background green)?

2. Which bugs (orange or green) were eaten more when there was a
high level of pollution (background orange)?

3. What factor determined the survival of the bug? Why?

4. If the pollution level is high for an extended period of time, does this
affect the survival of the green bugs? Yes or No.

a. Would they increase or decrease over time?

5. If the pollution level is low for an extended period of time, does this
effect the survival of the orange bugs? Yes or No.

a. Would they increase or decrease?

6. In natural selection, the organisms that are best suited to survive in


an environment have the most babies and grow in numbers, while
organisms that aren't as well suited to the environment shrink and
disappear. True or False?
True

False

7. Do you think this process occurs over a short period of time or a long

period of time?

Name:







Nowhere to Hide
Natural Selection Simulation

Work with a partner!
Key terms:

Survival: ability to live
Environment: where an individual lives
Pollution: something harmful to the environment
Suited: fit, compatible
Natural Selection: individuals have different traits that make them better suited for
survival in their environment

1. Which bugs (orange or green) were eaten more when there was a
low level of pollution (background green)?
Orange

Green

2. Which bugs (orange or green) were eaten more when there was a
high level of pollution (background orange)?
Orange

Green

3. What factor determined the survival of the bug? Why?

4. If the pollution level is high for an long period of time, does this affect
the survival of the green bugs?

Yes

No

a. Would the number of green bugs increase (get bigger) or


decrease (get smaller) over time?
Increase

Decrease

5. If the pollution level is low for an long period of time, does this effect
the survival of the orange bugs? Yes or No.
Yes

No

a. Would they increase or decrease?


Increase

Decrease

6. In natural selection, the organisms that are best suited to survive in


an environment have the most babies and grow in numbers, while
organisms that aren't as well suited to the environment shrink and
disappear. True or False?
True

False

7. Do you think this process occurs over a short period of time or a long

period of time?
Short

Long

Lesson Plan Four


Title: Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
Topic: Adaptability and Characteristics for Survival, Grade 3
Essential Question: What does an animal need to be the best suited for its environment?
What is the effect of removing the individual from that environment?
Standards:
NGSS:
3-LS4-3
Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can
survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
LS4.C
For any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less
well, and some cannot survive at all.
Scientific and Engineering Practices: Construct an argument with evidence.
Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified and used
to explain change.
CCSS:
W.3.1
Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.
Learning Objectives & Assessments
Objectives
Learners will be able to identify traits that
make an individual able to survive in a
given habitat.
Learners will be able to describe why
certain traits make individuals better suited
for an environment.

Materials:
For the class:
Printer paper
Crayons/colored pencils/markers
For the teacher:
Projector

Assessments
Students will create their own animal that
they feel would survive the best in the
given conditions.
Students will write a paragraph to describe
their animal and its characteristics/traits and
present it to the class.

Internet access
Pre-lesson assignments and/or prior knowledge:
Students will be familiar with natural selection and the idea that individuals who are
better suited for an environment are more likely to survive.
Lesson Beginning:
The teacher will show students a video of animals with interesting characteristics. As
students see different types of traits, the teacher will ask how these traits help the animal
survive. Teacher will make an example of one animal from the video, asking if I put this
animal in a different biome, would that trait still help it survive? Could that same trait
hurt the animal? Teacher will then brainstorm with students what information is
important to note about an animals ability to survive (ex. ability to find food, ability to
fly, ability to camouflage, size, diet, etc.) and make a list on chart paper for students to
reference. https://vimeo.com/132297646 (15 minutes)
Instructional Plan:
Timetable & Transitions:
0:15:00-0:40:00
Students will create their own animal that they feel would survive best in the
given biome. Animals may be drawn on paper or using a chrome book or iPad.
Teacher will provide students with characteristics of the biome in which their
animal must survive. Students will be encouraged to be creative, but realistic.
Teacher will model an acceptable, realistic character trait as well as an unrealistic
character trait. Characteristics that could not support the animal in its habitat
should not be chosen. While students are drawing, they may share ideas quietly
with their group members. The teacher should circulate, asking students to justify
their animals traits.
Given biome:
o Tropical Rainforest
Many trees, littered ground
Lots of rain
Warm and humid year-round
Shaded
Other animals: poison dart frog, jaguars, apes, lizards, small birds,
snakes
Students should provide a paragraph to supplement/justify their drawing. In this
paragraph, students should include how the animal responds to its biome, its role
in the food chain (is it predator/prey/both?) and its traits or
characteristics. Students can use the chart from the beginning of the lesson for
guidance when writing their paragraphs.
0:40:00-0:55:00
Students will briefly share their animals with their group members. Group
members should listen that their partners included all required elements in their
explanation.
0:55:00-1:15:00

Any students who wish to present their individuals to the class may come up to
share, explaining what makes their individual best suited for the given
environment. The class will provide two stars and a wish for their individuals
two things they like about the animal, and one thing their peer could add to make
their individual better suited for that biome.

Differentiation:
Groups will be of mixed ability so more able learners can assist less able learners.
Students who struggle with writing can label/caption their drawing rather than
writing a paragraph.
Students are assessed with both their written paragraph and oral presentation so
students have different methods to present their knowledge.
Students can utilize an online dictionary and/or translator to assist them with this
assignment.
Teacher will give Wayne the option to present his animal or not, and be sure to
give him praise if he chooses to present. Students may give more than two stars,
and stars should be given before and after the wish.
Students who finish early can begin working on an additional animal for the given
habitat. Students should consider which animal is better suited, and if the two
animals will compete with one another in the habitat.
Universal Design for Learning
o Provide multiple means of representation
Zoe will use her voice recognition technology to read/write.
Students will apply concepts from earlier lessons in the unit to
guide them in their understandings of main ideas in this lesson.
o Provide multiple means of action and expression
Students will have the option of creating their individual on paper
on using a drawing app on an iPad or Chromebook.
Students can use an online dictionary/translator to assist with
writing.
Students can choose to present their individuals to their group
only, or to the whole class as well.
Students can choose to present their individuals and/or provide
feedback to their classmates.
o Provide multiple means of engagement
Students will have the freedom to create any individual they
choose, so long as it is realistic and adheres to the constraints of
the given environment.
Students will write either a full paragraph explaining their choices
of traits/characteristics or label their drawings.
Questions (post-activity class discussion):

Are any traits always superior?


Why is it important for animals to have traits that are best suited to an
environment?
What will happen to an animal with adequate, but not best suited traits?

Classroom Management:
Students will complete drawings from their tables so that the teacher has easy
access to monitor behavior.
Two instructors will monitor class to avoid distraction or wild behavior during
learning and clarify and answer questions.
Teacher will give praise during presentations, especially to students who model
good presentation skills.
Teacher will circulate during drawing time to ensure that students are choosing
realistic characteristics.
Closure:
Students will gather at the carpet to discuss post-activity questions. There will not be a
homework assignment relating to this lesson. (10 minutes)

Lesson Plan Five


Title: Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
Topic: Adaptability and Characteristics for Survival, Grade 3
Essential Question: How does an individual respond to changes in its environment?
What is the effect of removing an individual from the environment for which it is suited?
Standards:
NGSS:
3-LS4-3
Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can
survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
LS4.C
For any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less
well, and some cannot survive at all.
Scientific and Engineering Practices: Construct an argument with evidence.
Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified and used
to explain change.
CCSS:
W.3.1
Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.
Learning Objectives & Assessments
Objectives
Learners will be able to determine the best
traits for an individual to have in their given
environment.
Learners will be able to recognize the
effects of a changing environment on an
individual.

Materials:
For the class:
Animal creations from previous lesson
4 Sticky notes each
For the teacher:

Assessments
Students will play a partner game in which
they decide as a team which animals have
stronger traits.
Students will write adaptations that their
individual might make in response to a
change in its environment on a sticky note,
and defend that adaptation through
discussion.

List of habitat variations


Pre-lesson assignments and/or prior knowledge:
Students will have completed the previous lesson and have a drawing with written
justifications of an individual that would thrive in a given habitat. Students will be able to
identify traits/characteristics that make an individual successful.
Lesson Beginning:
Teacher will give any students who did not have the opportunity to share the day before a
chance to come up to share their animals with the class. The class will provide two stars
and a wish as stated above. (15 minutes)
Instructional Plan:
Timetable & Transitions:
0:15:00-0:30:00
Students will gather at the carpet to discuss/ reflect on what characteristics or
traits they considered when thinking about their created individuals ability to
survive and thrive in an environment, and compare it to the list from the day prior.
Teacher will show students her created individual, and ask, What would my
individual need to survive if its habitat became very rainy? Teacher will model
noting this adaptation on a post-it, explaining how individuals adapt to changes in
their environments, and characteristics/traits change over time in new
environments.
Teacher will define adaptation for the class as a trait that evolves through natural
selection. Teacher will use visuals to support her explanation, and put these
visuals along with the written definition on the SMARTBoard for students to
reference throughout the lesson. Teacher will have students turn to their partners
and explain what an adaptation is and give an example of an adaptation.
0:30:00-1:15:00
Students will work with partners to play a game. Each student will have the
drawing they created the day prior. Students will be assigned a partner and the
pair will face off their animals, and must give three reasons to justify why their
individual is best suited for the given habitat. Students must then decide together
which animal is better suited for a given environment.
When the round finishes, the teacher will announce a variation to the habitat for
students to take into account when facing off their animals (ex. the animal is
relocated to a biome that experiences a lot of rain/ is very dry/ contains larger
predators, etc.) Students are allowed to make one variation to their individuals
traits/characteristics/ability in order to help it thrive in the new/modified habitat.
Students will add a sticky note to their paper to note the adaptation. Students will
proceed to face off their modified individuals with a new partner.
Students will repeat the process for four rounds, making four total adaptations to
their original individual.

Differentiation
Teacher will make a copy of some students original animals (Zoe, Anita, Kabir,
Calvin, and Wayne), and encourage students who struggle with writing to draw
changes in characteristics in a different color on the copy of their original animal.
Students can note changes in traits or ability using key words and an online
translator.
Anita and Kabir will be paired together in the first round in an effort to support
their use of unfamiliar language.
Teacher will meet with Wayne before the lesson/game to discuss his created
individual. Teacher will prepare Wayne and spend a few minutes practicing how
he could adapt his animal to a new environment, so he does not feel pressure or
anxiety when asked to do it on the spot. Teacher can also give Wayne the habitat
adaptations in advance so he has a chance to think about how to adapt his animal.
Teacher will present the definition of adaptation multimodally to support all
learners. The definition will be left on the SMARTBoard for reference throughout
the lesson.
Universal Design for Learning
o Provide multiple means of representation
Zoe will use her voice recognition technology to read/write.
Students will apply concepts from earlier lessons in the unit to
guide them in their understandings of main ideas in this lesson.
o Provide multiple means of action and expression
Students will be able to adapt their creations by writing adaptations
on a post-it note or drawing them on a copy of their individual.
Students will have the option of presenting their creations to the
class if they so choose.
o Provide multiple means of engagement
Students will work collaboratively to face off their individuals,
discussing why one individual is better suited than another.
Students will be able to choose what adaptations they make to their
animals to make them better suited for the changing environment.
Questions (post-activity class discussion):
Whats an example of a trait that is beneficial in the original environment but can
be deadly in a new environment?
Are any traits always superior?
What happened to your animal as its environment changed?
If an individual or species in unable to adapt to changes in environment, what
would happen to it/them?

Classroom Management:
Teacher will select the first round of partners as to pair students with strong
communication and expression skills with students who typically work
independently or more quietly. Working with an enthusiastic partner will model
for quieter students what elements of justification they should use in their
argument.
Teacher will post class list of traits in the front of the classroom for reference.
Teacher will refer to posted class chart on how to be a good listener if students
face offs become rowdy or disrespectful.
Two instructors will monitor class to avoid distraction or wild behavior during
learning and clarify and answer questions.
Closure:
Students will gather at the carpet to discuss post-activity questions. There will not be a
homework assignment relating to this lesson. (10 minutes)

Lesson Plan Six


Title: Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
Topic: Adaptability and Characteristics for Survival, Grade 3
Essential Question: How do an individuals characteristics and adaptations help it
survive in its environment?
Standards:
NGSS:
3-LS4-3
Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can
survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
LS4.C
For any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less
well, and some cannot survive at all.
Scientific and Engineering Practices: Construct an argument with evidence.
Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified and used
to explain change.
CCSS:
W.3.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information
clearly.
W.3.9
Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources;
take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.
Learning Objectives & Assessments
Objectives
Learners will be able to explain how an
individuals characteristics help it thrive in
its environment.
Learners will be able to organize and
present their research to their peers.

Materials:
For the class:

Assessments
Students will choose a plant or animal in
groups, and research the individuals
characteristics that help it thrive in its
habitat.
Students will work with a group to
complete a RAFT writing assignment
centered on their selected individual.

Research note sheets


Graphic organizers
Paper and online copies of RAFT writing assignment worksheet.
Chromebooks (2 per group, 8 total)
List of focal information to support research
Pre-lesson assignments and/or prior knowledge:
Students will have conducted research independently on how animals group, and how
grouping helps them survive. Students will be familiar with how to navigate the Internet
to search for information. Students will have participated in a lesson discussing finding
credible sources and will have a basic understanding of plagiarism/paraphrasing.
Lesson Beginning:
Teacher will review with students what an adaptation is, and have students turn to their
partners and explain why adaptations are important to survival. Students will share out
and teacher will clear any misconceptions. Teacher will assign student groups and RAFT
assignment, explaining to students that each group will present a different animal of their
choice through different means of presentation to model to the class a variety of
presentation methods. (15 minutes)
Instructional Plan:
Timetable & Transitions:
Day One:
0:15:00-0:20:00
Students will gather in their groups. They will have three minutes to select an
individual for research. Once they select an individual, one group member will
approach the teacher with the groups selection for approval.
0:20:00-1:00:00
Students will begin research. Each group of four or five will have two
Chromebooks from which to work. Students will fill out a research note sheet as a
group (one sheet per group), filling in all required areas of research. Teacher will
circulate to answer questions and support research.
Day Two:
0:00:00-0:15:00
Students will brainstorm a plan and fill out a graphic organizer to organize their
writing. Students will confer with teacher for modifications or additional ideas
before proceeding to write.
0:15:00-1:15:00
Students will work in groups to write using the RAFT writing assignment
worksheet. Teacher will circulate to answer questions, provide support, and
promote deeper thinking.
Students will be broken up into four groups: 2 groups of 4 and 2 groups of 5. Role
audience, and topic will remain the same for each of the four groups. Role:
Students will write from the perspective of their chosen individual. Audience: A

zoo. Topic: A zoo wants to relocate your individual from its natural habitat to its
zoo. Format for each group is as follows:
o Group One: letter
o Group Two: advertisement
o Group Three: skit
o Group Four: song/poem
Differentiation
Anita and Kabir will be paired together in an effort to support their use of
unfamiliar language. They will work in the advertisement group, as this uses the
most visual supports. They will have access to an online translator if they need.
Zoe will be placed in the skit group so her peers can see how she can thrive in a
nontraditional writing setting. She can use her voice recognition technology to
research and to assist her or her group in writing the script, if need be.
Calvin does not need special placement in a group to succeed in this activity.
Teacher will meet with Wayne after the lesson on day one to inform him of the
next days assignment. Teacher will inform Wayne of what his group will have to
do, so he does not feel pressure or anxiety when asked to do it on the spot.
Teacher will encourage Wayne to think about some ideas his group could use the
following day, but remind him that his ideas might not be agreed upon in the
group, and that is okay. Wayne will work in the group creating the advertisement
so he does not have to write or speak extensively.
Luther and Donald will work in the skit group because it will allow them to move
around the most and will keep them focused on the task.
Jason and Kate will work on the song/poem, as this requires the most
skill/manipulation with language.
The RAFTs activity will be tiered by processstudents will research and learn
the same material, just present it differently.
Universal Design for Learning
o Provide multiple means of representation
Zoe will use her voice recognition technology to read/write.
Students will apply concepts from earlier lessons in the unit to
guide them in their understandings of main ideas in this lesson.
o Provide multiple means of action and expression
All worksheets will be available to students in virtual form or
paper copy.
Students will have access to Chromebooks in order to conduct
research.
Students will have access to an online dictionary/translator if
needed.
Students will present information in various modes that best suit

each students learning style.


o Provide multiple means of engagement
Students will work collaboratively to research their animals and
organize/plan their RAFT writing assignments.
Students will be able to choose how to convey the information and
develop a character within their groups.
Questions (post-activity class discussion):
What is an adaptation?
What did you like about this mode of presentation?
How did this mode of presentation help you understand how this individual adapts
to its environment?
Classroom Management:
Teacher will select the groups as to group students with strong communication
and expression skills with students who typically work independently or more
quietly. Teacher will also group students of like ability to work in the format
through which they would best perform.
Teacher will post the definition for adaptation in the front of the classroom for
reference.
Teacher will refer to posted class chart on how to be a good listener if students
groups become rowdy or disrespectful.
Two instructors will monitor class to avoid distraction or wild behavior during
learning and clarify and answer questions.
Closure:
Groups will share their final products on Day 3. After each group has the chance to
present, teacher will praise students and reflect using the above questions. There will not
be a homework assignment related to this activity.

Raft Writing Assignment



Name(s):

Role

Format

Writing


Audience

Topic

Names:









What country does this individual What does it eat?
live in? What biome?

Is it a predator or prey? Both?


Explain what it hunts or what
hunts it.

How does it hunt for food?

Describe its physical


characteristics to someone who
may have never seen this animal.

How do these characteristics help


it survive?

What is the weather like? Does it


live in the water or on land?

How does it care for its young?

Lesson Plan Seven


Title: Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
Topic: Adaptability and Characteristics for Survival, Grade 3
Essential Question: What happens if an individual is unable to adapt to its environment?
Standards:
NGSS:
3-LS4-4
Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment
changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.
LS4.D
Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the
organisms living there.
Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified and used
to explain change.
CCSS:
RI.3.2
Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support
the main idea.
RI.3.3
Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or
concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time,
sequence, and cause/effect.
Learning Objectives & Assessments
Objectives
Learners will discover the impact that bees
have on flowers.

Assessments
Students will read and discuss a Newsela
article explaining the causes and effects of
pollinator decline in the US.
Learners will determine the effect of human Students will model the decline in
intervention on an individuals ability to
honeybees in the US through a whole class
adapt and the individuals fate if it cannot.
simulation.
Materials:
For the class:
Copy of Newsela article (10 at 710L, 8 at 500L)
https://newsela.com/articles/pollinator-decline/id/15379/
Yellow (9) and pink (9) bracelets

For the teacher:


SMARTBoard
Virtual foursquare vocabulary worksheet
Pre-lesson assignments and/or prior knowledge:
Students will be familiar with natural selection and how individuals make adaptations in
order to be better suited for their environments. Students will have experience marking
up a text.
Lesson Beginning:
Teacher will break students up into four random groups to define extinction. Students
will fill out a foursquare vocabulary chart on the SMARTBoard with a definition, picture,
example and non-example from their four groups. Each group will be responsible for one
of the four squares. Once they have finished, they will come to the SMARTBoard and fill
out the organizer. Teacher will review student findings and elaborate on what extinction
is and how it happens. (15 minutes)
Instructional Plan:
Timetable & Transitions:
0:15:00-0:40:00
Students will gather in assigned groups. They will read the Newsela article about
the decline of pollinators in the US. One teacher will work with groups reading
the 500L, and the other will work with groups reading the 710L. The teachers will
read the text aloud first, then encourage students to reread it independently,
highlighting unfamiliar words, underlining important concepts, and putting
question marks next to sections they dont understand.
Students will be instructed to think about the main idea of the article as they read.
Once they finish reading, students will confer with their group members to
determine what the main idea of the article is.
Groups will share out, and the teacher will clarify any misconceptions and bring
the class to a consensus about the correct main idea of the article. Teacher will
also give brief definitions to common unfamiliar words.
0:40:00-1:00:00
Students will go outside to play a game to model the declining honeybee
population in the United States. Students will be broken up into 9 honeybees
and 9 flowers, wearing a yellow bracelet for honeybees and a pink bracelet for
flowers. Of the 9 flowers, 4 will be flowers covered in pesticides. The honeybees
will not know which flowers are dangerous and which are safe.
Flowers will be instructed to spread themselves out and remain stationary. When
the simulation begins, the bees will buzz to different flowers and shake their
hands. The safe flowers will simply shake their hands and become pollinated, and
the bee is free to fly off to the next flower. The dangerous flowers will be
instructed to shake hands normally with the first two bees, but for the third bee

that approaches them, they will discreetly scratch the bees wrist with their fingers
as they are shaking hands, to represent the pesticide covered flower infecting the
bee. The bee will shake hands with one more flower, and then slowly fall to the
ground and die. The pesticide-covered flowers will continue to infect every
third bee, until all but one bee remains. This bee will be the winner.
Flowers and bees will switch places, and flowers will be assigned if they are safe
or dangerous.

Differentiation
Anita and Kabir will be grouped together in an effort to support their use of
unfamiliar language. They will work in a group reading the 500L article.
All students will have access to an online translator and/or dictionary.
Zoe will be grouped with Calvin, reading the 500L article. She can use her voice
recognition technology to have the article read to her, as the purpose of the
activity is to determine the main idea of the science article, not improve her
decoding skills.
Teacher will ask Wayne which group he prefers to be in first, flower or bee.
Teacher will answer any additional questions he has about the activity, and be
sure to call on him if he raises his hand to answer any questions or share his
thoughts. Teacher will remind Wayne that he will get to participate as both a
flower and a bee.
Luther and Donald will work in the same 500L group.
Jason and Kate will work in the 710L group.
Rather than falling to the group, Calvin will cross his arms across his chest and
yell out dramatically before closing his eyes and falling limp in his chair.
Students do not need any special accommodations to succeed in the flower/bee
activity as it is inherently differentiated.
Articles will be accessible to students either virtually on iPads/Chromebooks or
by paper copy.
Universal Design for Learning
o Provide multiple means of representation
Zoe will use her voice recognition technology to read/write.
Students will apply concepts from earlier lessons in the unit to
guide them in their understandings of main ideas in this lesson.
Teacher will use a foursquare model and jigsawed responsibilities
to define extinction.
o Provide multiple means of action and expression
Students can access/ mark up articles either virtually using
computers/iPads or use a paper copy.
Definition for extinction will remain on the SMARTBoard

throughout the lesson, and will be represented through a written


definition, examples, non-examples, and pictures.
Students will have access to an online translator/dictionary.
Students will have the opportunity to physically model how a
change in environment can affect an individuals ability to adapt.
Students can act as a flower and/or a bee. Some students will be
provided with the choice of which they choose to represent.
o Provide multiple means of engagement
Students will work collaboratively to determine the main idea of
the article.
Questions (post-activity class discussion):
What is extinction?
What happened to the bees as they traveled to flowers with pesticides?
Why didnt the bees adapt to the change in their environment?
What happens if an individual cant adapt quickly enough to a changing
environment?
Classroom Management:
Teacher will select the groups as to group students with strong communication
and expression skills with students who typically work independently or more
quietly. Teacher will also group students of like ability to work in the format
through which they would best perform.
Teacher will post the four square chart for extinction in the front of the classroom
for reference.
Two instructors will monitor class to avoid distraction or wild behavior during
learning, and clarify and answer questions.
Closure:
Students will return inside and answer post activity questions listed above. There will not
be a homework assignment related to this activity.

Lesson Plan 8
Title: Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
Topic: Adaptability and Characteristics for Survival, Grade 3
Essential Question: How can we use data to track the growth or decline of a population?
What does it mean to be endangered? What role do humans play in the decline of the
honeybee population?
Standards:
NGSS:
3-LS4-4
Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment
changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.
LS4.D
Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the
organisms living there.
Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified and used
to explain change.
CCSS:
RI.3.3
Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or
concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time,
sequence, and cause/effect.
3.MD.B.3
Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several
categories. Solve one- and two-step how many more and how many less problems
using information presented in scaled bar graphs.
Learning Objectives & Assessments
Objectives
Learners will be able to analyze a trend in
the decline of honeybees in the US over a
period of time.
Learners will determine the effect of human
intervention on an individuals ability to
adapt and the individuals fate if it cannot.

Materials:

Assessments
Students will use a data table to create a bar
graph to visualize the rapid decline in
honeybee colonies.
Students will refer back to their Newsela
articles to respond to a series of questions
in their science journals.

For the class:


Copy of Newsela article (10 at 710L, 8 at 500L)
https://newsela.com/articles/pollinator-decline/id/15379/
Science journals
Graph paper
For the teacher:
SMARTBoard
Pre-lesson assignments and/or prior knowledge:
Students will be familiar with natural selection and how individuals make adaptations in
order to be better suited for their environments. Students will be familiar with what
happens if an individual is unable to adapt to a change in its environment. Students will
have experience marking up a text, and referring back to a text for answers. Students
will have experience making bar graphs.
Lesson Beginning:
Teacher will review with students post activity questions from the day prior. Teacher will
then show students a table she created detailing the US population of honeybee colonies
over the past century, and ensure students know how to interpret the table. (15 minutes)
Instructional Plan:
Timetable & Transitions:
0:15:00-0:35:00
Students will work independently to graph the information provided in the table.
Students will create a bar graph, labeling their axes, titling their graph, and
provide a key if needed. Teacher will circulate, asking students to tell him/her
what they know about the honeybee population based on their graphs.
When they are finished, teacher will ask students to talk to the people at their
tables about what they notice about the honeybee population over time, and what
will happen if the honeybee population continues along that trend.
0:40:00-01:00:00
Teacher will ask the class the share out whether the honeybee population is
increasing or declining based on the results from their graphs.
Teacher will ask students to work as a group to analyze their pollinator articles
from the day before and answer the following questions in their science journals:
o How many bee colonies were present in 1982?
o What could have changed in the environment that caused such a decline in
the colony populations?
o What are some potential causes for the decline in the pollinator population
from your article?
Differentiation
Anita and Kabir will be grouped together in an effort to support their use of

unfamiliar language. They will work with the 500L article. They will have access
to an online translator/dictionary.
Zoe can use her voice recognition technology to have the article read to her, as the
purpose of the activity is to determine the main idea of the science article, not
improve her decoding skills. She can also use the voice recognition technology to
record her groups answers to the questions, if need be.
Calvin should not need additional supports during the graphing activity as his
processing disorder is prevalent mostly in basic math facts such as
addition/subtraction.
Teacher will group Wayne with a stronger reader and patient personality in the
class who can support him while answering questions as a group.
Groups will be of mixed abilities so more able readers/learners can support less
able readers/learners.
Groups can be mixed between 500L and 710L, as the main points remain the
same between both articles.
Universal Design for Learning
o Provide multiple means of representation
Zoe will use her voice recognition technology to read/write.
Students will apply concepts from earlier lessons in the unit to
guide them in their understandings of main ideas in this lesson.
Students will review class discussion questions from the lesson
prior to activate prior knowledge.
o Provide multiple means of action and expression
Students can access/ mark up articles either virtually using
computers/iPads or use a paper copy.
Students will have access to an online translator/dictionary.
o Provide multiple means of engagement
Students will work collaboratively to determine answers to
questions about their data.
Students will access information about pollinators via Newsela
articles that vary in reading levels.

Questions (post-activity class discussion):


Why didnt the bees adapt to the change in their environment?
What is the difference between endangered individuals and extinct individuals?
What happens if an individual cant adapt quickly enough to a changing
environment?
What can humans do to support the honeybee population?
Classroom Management:

Teacher will select the groups as to group students with strong communication
and expression skills with students who typically work independently or more
quietly. Teacher will also group students of mixed ability to allow students with
differing learning styles to work together and support one another.
Two instructors will monitor class to avoid distraction or wild behavior during
learning, and clarify and answer questions.

Closure:
Students will come to the carpet to answer the post activity questions above. Students
will be encouraged to buy local honey and plant bee friendly plants in their yards at home
in an effort to support the honeybee population. There will not be a homework
assignment relating to this activity.
Honeybee Decline, United States of America
Year
1945
1954
1964

1974

1982

1992

Approximate
5.5
5.5
4.9
4.3
4.4
3.1
population of
honeybee
producing
colonies (in
millions)
Approximations derived from USDA NASS.
http://www.yalescientific.org/2013/02/the-secret-life-of-bee-bacteria-gut-
microbiota-may-yield-clues-to-honey-bee-health/

2007
2.5