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Republic of the Phillippines

City of Taguig

Taguig City University


Gen. Santos Ave., Central BicutanTaguigcity

SEMI- DETAILED LESSON PLAN


I.

Objective: At the end of the lesson the students should be able to:
a. acquire clear understanding of what is curriculum evaluation
b. explain the need to evaluate the curriculum and how its being done; and
c. compare and contrast the different models of curriculum evaluation.

II.

Subject Matter
a. Topic: Curriculum Evaluation and the Teacher
b. Materials:
b.1 Cue Cards
b.2 PowerPoint Presentation
b.3 Projector and Laptop
b.4 Whiteboard Marker
c. Reference:

III.

Procedure
a. Preliminary activities
a.1. Greetings
a.2. Prayer
a.3. Attendance and Cleanliness
a.4. Review or Recall
b. Motivation

The teacher will present a game called Whispering Game or Message


Relay. (Have that student explain the message to the next person by whispering it in their ear.
They cannot pass on or show the message; that must go back to the person organizing or
monitoring the game.)
c. Lesson Proper
Curriculum Evaluation and the Teacher
Curriculum evaluation is a new idea for many teachers, not knowing that every day, the
teacher is involved in several components of evaluation. There are two ways of looking at
curriculum evaluation:
1. Curriculum Program Evaluation may focus on the overall aspects of a
curriculum or the curriculum itself. More often it refers to a big curriculum program.
Examples of these programs that may undergo a curriculum program evaluation are the K
to 12 Curriculum, the Integrated Science Program, the Teacher Approach in Mathematics

Republic of the Phillippines


City of Taguig

Taguig City University


Gen. Santos Ave., Central BicutanTaguigcity

Curriculum, the Outcomes-Based Curriculum in Teacher Education, or Experiential


Teacher Education Program are some of the big curriculum programs

2. Curriculum Program Component Evaluation. A curriculum component may


include separate evaluation of (a) Achieved learning outcomes (b) curriculum process
(teaching-learning methods/strategies) (c) instructional materials (i.e. books, modules,
models)

Curriculum Evaluation: A Process and a Tool


As a process it follows a procedure based on models and frameworks to get the desired
results. As a tool, it will help teachers and program implementers to judge the worth and merit of
the program and innovation or curricular change. For both process and a tool, the results of
evaluation will be the basis to IMPROVE curriculum
Persons
Ornstein, A. &
Hunkins, F. (1998)

McNeil, J. (1977)

Gay, L. (1985)

Oliva, P. (1985)

Definition
Curriculum evaluation is a process done in order to gather data
that enables one to decide whether to accept, change, eliminate
the whole curriculum of a textbook.
Evaluation answers two questions: 1. Do planned learning
opportunities, programmes, courses and activities as developed
and organized actually produced desired results? 2. How can a
curriculum best be improved?
Evaluation is to identify the weaknesses and strengths as well as
problems encountered in the implementation, to improve the
curriculum development process. It is to determine the
effectiveness of and the returns on allocated finance.
It is a process of delineating, obtaining and providing useful
information for judging alternatives for purposes of modifying,
or eliminating the curriculum

Reasons for Curriculum Evaluation


Here are some of the specific reasons.
a. Needs Assessment
Curriculum evaluation defines the strengths and weaknesses of an existing
curriculum that will be the basis of the intended plan, design or implementation.
b. Monitoring

Republic of the Phillippines


City of Taguig

Taguig City University


Gen. Santos Ave., Central BicutanTaguigcity

When evaluation is done in the middle of the curriculum development, it will tell
if the designed or implemented curriculum can produce or is producing the desired
results.
c. Terminal Assessment
Based on some standards, curriculum evaluation will guide whether the results
have equaled or exceeded the standards, thus can be labelled as success.
d. Decision Making
Curriculum evaluation provides information necessary for teachers, school
managers, curriculum specialist for policy recommendations that will enhance achieved
learning outcomes.
Curriculum Evaluation Models
Curriculum specialists have proposed an array of models which are useful for classroom
teachers and practitioners.
1. Bradley Effectiveness Model
In 1985, L.H. Bradley wrote a handbook on Curriculum Leadership and Development.
This book provides indicators that can help measure the effectiveness of a developed or written
curriculum. For purposes of the classroom teachers, some of the statements were simplified.
First, you have to identify what curriculum you will evaluate. Example: Elementary
Science Curriculum, Teacher Education Curriculum, Student Teaching Curriculum, Field Study
Curriculum. Then find out if the curriculum you are evaluating answers YES or NO. Answering
Yes to all the questions means, good curriculum as described by Bradley.
Bradley Effectiveness Model for Curriculum Development Indicators
Indicators
Descriptive Questions
Yes or No
Vertical
Does the curriculum reflect the format (i.e. K to 12, OBE,
Curriculum
Inquiry, etc.) that enables teachers quickly access what is being
Community
taught in the grade/year levels below or above the current
level? (Example: If you are looking at Science 5, below means
Science 4 and above means, Science 6)
Horizontal
Does the curriculum reflect provide content and objectives that
Curriculum
are common to all classes of the same grade level?
(Example: All English 101 for all 1st year college students)
Community
Instruction
Based on
Curriculum
Broad
Involvement

Long Range

Are lesson plans/syllabi/course design derived from the


curriculum and strategies? Are materials used correlated with
the content, objectives and activities?
Is there evidence of involvement of the different curriculum
stakeholders in the planning, designing and implementation
and review of the curriculum?
Is review cycle followed within the period of planning and

Republic of the Phillippines


City of Taguig

Taguig City University


Gen. Santos Ave., Central BicutanTaguigcity

Planning
Positive
Human
Relations

implementation of the curriculum?


Did the initial thoughts about the curriculum come from
teachers, principals, curriculum leaders and other
stakeholders?

Theory-Into
Is there clarity of vision, mission, graduation outcomes,
Practice
program philosophy, learning outcomes in the curriculum?
Planned
Are there tangible evidence to show that the internal and
Change
external publics accept the developed program?
If any of the indicators is answered with a No, actions should be made to make it Yes.

2. Tyler Objectives Centered Model


Ralph Tyler in 1950 proposed a curriculum evaluation model which until now continues
to influence many curriculum assessment processes. His monograph was entitled Basic
Principles of Curriculum and Instruction
In using the Tylers model, the following curriculum components and processes are
identified in curriculum evaluation.

Curriculum Elements
1. Objectives/Intended
Learning Outcomes
2. Situation or Context

3. Situation or Context

4. Utilization of Tool

5. Analysis of Results

6. Utilization of Results

Evaluation Process
1. Pre-determine intended learning
outcomes or objectives.
2. Identify the situation/context
that gives opportunity to develop
behavior or achieve objectives.
3. Select, modify and construct
evaluation instruments or tools.
Check its objectivity, reliability
and validity.
4. Utilize the tools to obtain
results.
5. Compare the results obtained
from several instruments before
and after to determine the change.
5. Analyze the results obtained to
determine strength and
weaknesses. Identify possible
explanation about the reasons for
the particular pattern.
6. Use the results to make the
necessary modifications.

Action Taken: Yes or No

Republic of the Phillippines


City of Taguig

Taguig City University


Gen. Santos Ave., Central BicutanTaguigcity

Using all the steps to evaluate the curriculum and obtaining all YES answer would mean
the curriculum has PASSED the standards. Tylers model of evaluating the curriculum is
relatively easy to understand which many teachers can follow.
3. Daniel Stufflebeam Model- Context, Input, Process Product Model (CIPP)
The CIPP Model of Curriculum Evaluation was a product of the Phi Delta Kappa
committee chaired by Daniel Stufflebeam. The model made emphasis that the result of
evaluation should provide data for decision making. There are four stages of program operation.

Context Evaluation-assess needs and problems in the context for decision makers to
determine the goals and objectives of the program/curriculum.
Input Evaluation-assess alternative means based on the inputs for the achievement of
objectives to help decision makers to choose options for optimal means.
Process Evaluation-monitors the processes both to ensure that the means are actually
being implemented and make necessary modifications.
Product Evaluation-compares actual ends with intended ends and leads to a series of
recycling decisions.

For all the four stages, the six steps are suggested.
Stages of CIPP Model

Steps Taken in All the Stages

1. Context Evaluation

Step 1: Identify the kind of decision to be made.


Step 2: Identify the kinds of data to make that decision
Step 3: Collect the data needed.
Step 4: Establish the criteria to determine quality of
data
Step 5: Analyze data based on the criteria.
Step 6: Organize needed information needed for
decision makers.

2. Input Evaluation

3. Process Evaluation

4. Product Evaluation

4. Stake Responsive Model-Responsive model is oriented more directly to program


activities that program intents. Evaluation focuses more on the activities rather that intent or
purposes.
Robert Stake (1975) recommends to the curriculum evaluator the following steps.
The curriculum evaluator follows the steps below:
Step 1
Meets with stakeholders to identify their perspectives and intentions regarding
curriculum evaluation
Step 2
Draws from Step 1 documents to determine the scope of the evaluation
Step 3`
Observes the curriculum closely to identify the unintended sense of
implementation and any deviations from announced intents.

Republic of the Phillippines


City of Taguig

Taguig City University


Gen. Santos Ave., Central BicutanTaguigcity

Step 4
Step 5
Step 6
Step 7
Step 8
Step 9

Identifies the stated real purposes of the program and the various audiences.
Identifies the problems of the curriculum evaluation at hand and indentifies an
evaluation design with needed data.
Select the means needed to collect data or information.
Implements the data collection procedure
Organizes the information into themes.
Decides with stakeholders the most appropriate formats for the report.

5. Scriven Consumer Oriented Evaluation-Michael Scriven, in 1967 introduced this


evaluation among many others when education products flooded the market. Consumers of
educational products which are needed to support an implemented curriculum often use
consumer-oriented evaluation. These products are used in schools which require purchasing
decision. These products include textbooks, modules, educational technology like softwares
and other instructional materials. Even teachers and schools themselves nowadays write and
produce these materials for their own purposes.
Consumer-oriented evaluation uses criteria and checklist as a tool for either formative
or summative evaluation purposes.
As an example of an Instructional Material Review Form by Marvin Patterson of Florida
State University is adapted for better understanding.
Preliminary Information
Title:
Author(s)
Publisher:
Copyright date:
Material Evaluator:

Recommendation
____ Return for further review
____Reject
(Comments)

Use the following codes to rate the material


+ means yes or good quality

- means no or poor quality

O means all right but not of good quality

NA means not applicable

Criteria
1. Content covers a significant portion of the course
competencies
2. Contents are up-to-date.
3. Reading level is appropriate for most students who will
use the material.
4. Intended learning outcomes, competencies are stated.
5. Formative and summative assessments are included.
6. Activities are varied to meet the needs of students

+
Yes
Or
Good

O
all right
But not
So good

no
or
poor

NA
not
applicable

Republic of the Phillippines


City of Taguig

Taguig City University


Gen. Santos Ave., Central BicutanTaguigcity

7. Teachers guide is included with management


suggestions.
8. Materials are presented in logical manner.
9. Learning outcomes, competencies and/or tasks.
10. Degree of match between learning activities and
intended learning outcomes.
11. Quality of test items and degree of match with intended
learning outcomes
12. Quality of direction on how students will process
through the materials.
13. Quality of drawings, photographs, and/or other
materials.
14. Overall design of the learning activities for individual
instruction.
15. Quality of management procedures for teachers (TGs)
16. Optional (List course map competencies covered by the
instructional material)
A Simple Way of Curriculum Evaluation Process
For a very simple and practical way of curriculum evaluation, responding to the
following questions will provide an evaluation data for curriculum decision. Just ask the
following questions and any NO answer to an item will indicate a need for a serious curriculum
evaluation process.
1. Does the curriculum emphasize learning outcomes?
2. Does the implemented curriculum require less demands?
3. Can this curriculum be applied to any particular level? (kindergarten, elementary,
secondary, tertiary levels)
4. Can the curriculum aspects be assessed as (a ) written (b) taught (c)supported (d)
tested and (e) learned?
5. Does the curriculum include formative assessment?
6. Does the curriculum include summative assessment?
7. Does the curriculum provide quantitative methods of assessment?
8. Does the curriculum provide for qualitative methods of assessment?
9. Can the curriculum provide the data needed for decision making?
10. Are the findings of evaluation available to stakeholders?

In summary, whatever models of curriculum evaluation to be used ASCD, 1983 suggests


the following steps.

Republic of the Phillippines


City of Taguig

Taguig City University


Gen. Santos Ave., Central BicutanTaguigcity

Steps in Conducting a Curriculum Evaluation


Steps
1. Identifying primary audiences

2. Identifying critical issues/problems

3. Identifying data source

4. Identifying techniques for collecting data

5. Identifying established standards and criteria

6. Indentifying techniques in data analysis

7. Preparing evaluation report

8. Preparing models of display

What to Consider
Curriculum Program Sponsors,
Managers and Administrators, School
Heads, Participants (Teachers and
Students) Content Specialist; other
stakeholders.
Outcomes (expected, desired, intended)
Process (Implementation) Resources
(Inputs)
People (teachers, students, parents,
curriculum developers) Existing
documents; Available records;
Evaluation Studies.
Standardized Test, Informal test;
Samples of Students Work; Interviews;
Participant Observations, Checklist,
Anecdotal records.
Standards previously set by agency
(DepEd, CHED, Professional
Organization)
Content Analysis, Process Analysis,
Statistics, Comparison, Evaluation
Process
Wtitten; Oral; Progress; Final;
Summary; Descriptive, Graphic,
Evaluative and Judgment; List of
Recommendations
Case studies; Test Scores Summary;
Testimonies; Multi media
representation; Product Display
(exhibits); Technical Report

d. Application
(Students will have a graded recitation that will conduct by teacher.)
e. Generalization
(Somebody from the class will summarize the topic for today.)
f. Evaluation
(Students will have their quizzes that compose of 20 questionnaires.)
IV. Assignment:
(Teacher will give homework to the students that related to the next topic.)
Class dismiss ..

Republic of the Phillippines


City of Taguig

Taguig City University


Gen. Santos Ave., Central BicutanTaguigcity

Republic of the Phillippines


City of Taguig

Taguig City University


Gen. Santos Ave., Central BicutanTaguigcity