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Cheyenne, Wyoming ❍ July 22-31, 2016 FRONTIER DAYS
Cheyenne, Wyoming ❍ July 22-31, 2016
FRONTIER DAYS
YOUR FULL Events CFD GUIDE Full calendar with locations and times for all events at
YOUR FULL
Events
CFD
GUIDE
Full calendar with locations
and times for all events at
Frontier Park and around town
and times for all events at Frontier Park and around town Nightlife Read about CFD musicians
Nightlife
Nightlife

Nightlife

Read about CFD musicians Florida Georgia Line, KISS, Kenny Chesney and more!
Read about CFD musicians
Florida Georgia Line, KISS,
Kenny Chesney and more!
Rodeo Everything you need to know about rodeo, with details about each event
Rodeo
Everything you need to
know about rodeo, with
details about each event
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Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 5

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 5 INSIDE 6 All things rodeo Bareback bronc

INSIDE

6
6

All things rodeo

Bareback bronc

7

Bullfighters

10

Behind the scenes

12

Rookie saddle bronc

13

Dandies

14

Barrel racing

15

Saddle bronc

16

Bobby Welsh feature

18

Bull riding

20

Team roping

23

Wild horse race

24

Tie-down roping

25

Steer

roping

26

Cinch

Shootout

27

Steer

wrestling

28

30 36
30
36

Night

shows

Music act capsules

Sam Hunt Maddie & Tae Fall Out Boy Rooney Billy Currington Ned LeDoux Championship Bull Riding Kenny Chesney Courtney Cole Jake Owen Old Dominion KISS Aaron Watson Florida Georgia Line Cole Swindell

32-35

32

32

32

33

33

33

33

33

34

34

34

35

35

35

35

More to do

Museums

38

Fashion

43

Parades

44

Capitol construction

45

Thunderbirds

46

Who’s running things?

48-49

Life in Cheyenne

50

Frontier Days royalty

52

History of Cheyenne

53

History of CFD

54

Outdoor adventures

56-58

Things to do

61-67

Helpful terminology

68-69

Events calendar

70-72, 76

Frontier Park map

76

Cover: Sydni Blanchard of Albuquerque, New Mexico, competes in the barrel racing event during the third performance of the 119th annual Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo on July 20, 2015, at Frontier Park Arena in Cheyenne. Blaine McCartney/Wyoming Tribune Eagle

The Frontier Days Souvenir Edition is a publication of the Wyoming Tribune Eagle. © 2016. All materials contained in this news magazine are the property of the Wyoming Tribune Eagle and may not be reprinted without the express consent of the publisher. We welcome your comments and suggestions. Contact us in person or by mail – Wyoming Tribune Eagle, 702 W. Lincolnway, Cheyenne WY 82001. The main number for the WTE is 307-633-3117; advertising’s number is 307-633-3151. Outside the Cheyenne area, call us toll-free at 800-561-6268. You may fax us at 307-633-3189 or send an email via our website at www.wyomingnews.com.

6 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

6 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition RODEO Riley Krassin of Lander, Wyoming, in

RODEO

Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition RODEO Riley Krassin of Lander, Wyoming, in action during

Riley Krassin of Lander, Wyoming, in action during steer wrestling competition on July 18, 2015, at Frontier Park for the Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo. WTE/staff

Big changes after pro shakeup

By robert gagliardi

WyoSports senior editor

The 120th annual Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo won’t feature a lot of changes from previous ver- sions, but there will be a few. The biggest change is the person in charge of the rodeo and his title. Mitch Carter takes over as the chair- man of the CFD Rodeo Committee. In past years, the rodeo was operated by CFD’sContestantsCommittee. “We came to the realization a cou- ple of years ago that what we do now is we put on the rodeo, so it makes a lot more sense and causes a lot less confusion than to be called the

Contestants Committee,” Carter said. More than 1,200 rodeo athletes will compete in nine events for a prize purse of just over $1 million. Each of the nine events will have a cash purse of $49,000. That makes CFD one of the top five most lucra- tive rodeos in the world in terms of prize money alone. With so much money on the line, CFD has attracted the best of the best in professional rodeo. But this year may be different in that regard. Some of rodeo’s biggest stars broke away from the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association – the governing body of pro rodeo – to form their own

group, called the Elite Rodeo Athletes circuit. That means fans likely won’t see some of rodeo’s biggest names at CFD this year, such as 23-time world champion roper Trevor Brazile of Decatur, Texas; four-time world champion bareback bronc rider Bobby Mote of Culver, Oregon; and tie-down roper Tuf Cooper of Decatur, Texas. “It should be a concern because they are your top cowboys, but maybe what that does is open up the door for some other folks to come in and have a better chance of winning or placing,” Carter said.

See Pro shakeup, page 8

bareback bronc

STEADY RiSE TO THE TOP

Bareback rider Aus focuses on making each year a bit better – and it shows

By david watson

WyoSports staff writer

Tanner Aus couldn’t wait until he turned 9 years old so he could start riding bucking horses in the Little Britches circuit in his home state of Minnesota. Since then, the bareback rider from Granite Falls, Minnesota, has only gotten better at his craft, with the help of two really good teachers – his father, John, and Wayne Herman. “They taught me the fundamentals, and I car- ried that with me,” Aus said. “I also took advice from anyone willing to give it and used what I could. The fundamentals got me started on a good foot. From there, it was always looking forward and al- ways trying to be better than the year before.” Herman is well-known to

most of the rodeo world, especially bareback rid- ers. He has qualified for the National Finals Rodeo 11 times and won the world championship in 1992. Herman was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 2014. And Aus always had the benefit of everyday in- struction from his father. “My dad grew up with horses, started in the ranks of high school rodeo when he was younger, and also rode professionally,” Aus said. “He retired in 1998, and then the next summer I turned 9 years old and was old enough to start riding.” Aus soaked it all in to become the Minnesota high school bareback champion in 2008 and also placed fifth at the National High School Finals that year.

He then took his talents to the collegiate level, with each season ending a little better than the previous season. First competing for Iowa Central Community College in Fort Dodge, Iowa, he placed 10th as a freshman and improved to third place as a sophomore at the College National Finals Rodeo in Casper. After transferring to Missouri Valley College in Marshall, Missouri, he was runner-up as a junior when Cowley, Wyoming, native J.R. Vezain won the CNFR title in 2011. Aus finally claimed the CNFR bare- back title in 2012. A steady ascension to the next level has continued since competing solely in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, with last year being his best so far.

See Rise, page 8

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 7

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 7 Tanner Aus of Granite Falls, Minnesota, hangs

Tanner Aus of Granite Falls, Minnesota, hangs on during bareback competition on July 18, 2015, at Frontier Park for the Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo. WTE/staff

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8 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

8 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition Pro shakeup RiSE ceiling, thinking of the

Pro shakeup

RiSE

ceiling, thinking of the finals.” Aus was last year’s overall CFD champion, with a com- bined score of 248 points to finish two points ahead of a three-way tie for second by Matt Bright, Clint Cannon and Seth Hardwick. “It is so rich in tradition and a dream come true,” Aus said. “It may sound like a cliché, but (Cheyenne) is a place young cowboys and cowgirls dream about. At that time, I was 25th or 26th in the standings, and after that, it launched me back into the top 10. So it was really piv- otal for my season.” Aus later placed sixth at the NFR, which bumped him up to finish sixth in the PRCA world standings. “I expected to do a little bit better,” Aus said. “I had the

Continued from 6

Continued from 7

“No matter what, there is always someone else to take your place. (Rodeo athletes) still want to win Cheyenne, no matter what. They covet that buckle so much. It’s unbelievable when you talk to people that haven’t won it. They want to be part of our rodeo,” Carter said. Rodeo action begins at 12:30 p.m. during each of the nine regular rodeo performances, with the grand entry starting at 12:15 p.m. For the third consecutive year, the Cinch Rodeo Shootout will be held on the Friday before the start of the regular rodeo. This year it will be on July 22. The format of that event will change for the third straight year. This year, local sponsors will have teams consisting of rodeo athletes in bareback and saddle bronc riding, bull riding, steer wrestling and women’s barrel racing. If a local sponsor’s team wins, CFD will donate money back to the local charity of that sponsor’s choice. The event has attracted some of the top rodeo athletes in their respective events. And many of them will likely be part of the first two days of the regular rodeo performances Saturday, July 23, and Sunday, July 24. During the last few years, CFD has made a big effort to include entertainment during the rodeo, and that is no different in 2016. Rider Kiesner returns with his American and charro-style trick roping, horseback trick roping, gun spinning and whip artistry acts. CartersaidtheNavyLeapFrogswillreturnfor the first five days of the rodeo. They will fly through the sky on parachutes and land in Frontier Park Arena prior to the start of each rodeo. And there are tentative plans for the Leap Frogs to do a night jump before the start of the Championship Bull Riding events as part of CFD’s night show acts on Monday, July 25, and Tuesday, July 26.

Aus credited two big rodeo paychecks for propelling him to his first National Finals Rodeo qualification – winning Cheyenne Frontier Days and being runner-up at the Justin Boots Championships in Omaha, Nebraska. “Qualifying (for the NFR) was tough with the competi- tion,” Aus said. “It came right down to the wire and the cutoff for me in September. I remem- ber I didn’t sleep at all that night before I headed home from Omaha. I just laid there with my eyes wide open, staring at the

 

What you need to know

 

Scoring: The cowboy must stay on the horse for eight seconds and grasp the rigging (a handhold made of leather and rawhide) with one hand. Half the points are scored from the cowboy’s spurring technique and “exposure” to the strength of the horse. The other half is by the buck strength of the horse. A cowboy is disqualified if he touches his equip- ment, himself or the horse with his free hand.

J.R. Vezain was a three-time National Finals Rodeo qualifier from 2012-14. The Cowley cowboy was in 19th place in the PRCA world standings in early June. … Jake Brown, who qualified for the NFR for the first time last year since joining the PRCA in 2009 and placed 15th at the rodeo, had a torrid start to this season. Brown was at the top of the standings in early June with seven rodeo wins, including the large National Western Stock Show and Rodeo in Denver. … Right behind Brown in the standings in second place was Orin Larsen, who won the San Antonio (Texas) Stock

Equipment: Horse, rigging and glove.

Watch these guys: Wyoming’s own

mentality of what it would take to be a world champion. I maybe let my mind outrun my body, and it took me a little bit to get started, but it ended up being a good finals for my first time.” This year, Aus is trying not to be on the NFR qualification bubble. He was ranked fourth in the PRCA world standings in early June. And he’s always had that mental drive to one day be- come a PRCA champion, ever since Aus first started riding barebacks. “It’s a great way to make a living,” Aus said. “We love to be able to do what we do, and it makes it 10 times better when people take the time to pay at- tention and understand the sport. I couldn’t think of a better way to make a living.”

Show & Rodeo earlier this season. He also qualified for the NFR for the first time in 2015, placing 12th at the rodeo.

Past winners

2015

– Tanner Aus

2014

– Richmond Champion

2013

– Taylor Price

2012

– Will Lowe

2011

– Casey Colletti

2010

– Steven Dent

2009

– Will Lowe

2008

– Cimmaron Gerke

2007

– Scott Montague

2006

– Forest Bramwell

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10 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

Bullfighters

GLAMOROUS? NO. WORTH iT? ABSOLUTELY

it takes a special kind of person to face off with an angry beast. As bullfighter dusty tuckness says, “we hope for the best.”

By Scott nulph

WyoSports assistant editor

Dusty Tuckness said he was born into rodeo and the life of a profes- sional bullfighter. Tuckness grew up in Meeteetse, and his family was always involved in rodeo in one form or another. Now, at the age of 30, Tuckness is one of the top bullfighters in the coun-

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try. He’s been named Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association Bullfighter of the Year five times and National Finals Rodeo Bullfighter of the Year an additional six. So what makes someone want to willingly stand in an arena, knowing that an angry, 1,500-pound bull is about to do everything in its power to throw a cowboy off and come after whoever is left? “It’s something that God’s kind of instilled in my heart and given me a passion for,” Tuckness said. “It’s a very unselfish job, and there’s very few that do it for a living. “We do it because we love what we do, being able to be out there protect- ing the rider if things go wrong.” Tuckness will again be one of the bullfighters during Cheyenne Frontier Days. He’ll be joined by Cody Webster, giving the bull riders the best protection possible. Tuckness said no bullfighter gets into the profession for the limelight. Nor do they do it for the money. According to CareerSearch.com, the average salary of a bullfighter who works year-round ranges right around $55,000. The same website said the average pay is from $100 to $500 per performance. But for a guy like Tuckness, it’s that moment right before the bull is re- leased that makes his job special.

“You step out there in unknown ter-

ritory and unpredictable situations

and be able to react as it unfolds right in front of you,” he said. “It’s a differ-

ent adventure every day; it’s not the

same old, same old, for sure.” And while bull riders will try to

keep a scouting report for each bull, which way they like to come out of the chute, what they do after the first big jump, etc., Tuckness said it’s best for the bullfighters simply to be ready for anything and everything. “There’s a lot of different bulls, and there’s a lot of different personalities

with both the bulls and the bull rid-

personalities with both the bulls and the bull rid- Bullfighter Dusty Tuckness distracts a bull during

Bullfighter Dusty Tuckness distracts a bull during Cheyenne Frontier Days bull riding competition on July 25, 2015, at Frontier Park Arena. WTE/staff

ers,” he said. “We always prepare for the worst and hope for the best. We don’t try to write up too much of a game plan. “We have an idea of some different bulls that have some tendencies, but

with our job, it’s so unpredictable that we can’t really predict anything.” Tucknesswas

quick to add that the job of a bullfighter reallystartswhen theridestartsgoing bad. “When a guy gets in a bind, the main

thing is don’t over- think it,” Tuckness said. “You just have to stay calm. We understand the concept of our job and what it consists of and just fall in place when things don’t go perfect. That’s when we earn our money. “There’s certain times in an arena that can be rough and test you, but that’s why we have this job.”

busy part of the season. That busy part certainly includes Cheyenne Frontier Days, a rodeo that’s at the top of his list.

Webster replaces longtime CFD bullfighter Darrell Diefenbach this year in Cheyenne, but the change

likely won’t affect anything inside the arena. Tuckness and Webster have worked together now for the past few years, and even share a house with other rodeo performers and bull- fighters during the

“it’s a different adventure every day; it’s not the same old, same old, for sure.”

dusty tuckness | CFD bullfighter

“There’s prob- ably 10 to 12 times a year I pass through Cheyenne and by the fair- grounds, and every time I drive by it, whether it’s winter or summer, I think that it won’t be too long before I get to go play in that arena,” Tuckness said. “It’s definitely a big mark in anybody’s career who com- petes there or works there.”

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12 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

Behind the scenes

rodeo more than just cowboys

By Jeremiah Johnke

WyoSports editor

Andy Stewart has no problem de- scribing the way he felt when he an- nounced his first Cheyenne Frontier Days performance last summer. “I was more excited than nervous,” Stewart said. Stewart had already called the action at CFD, announcing the inau- gural Cinch Rodeo Shootout. That event is an invitation-only rodeo held the day before the main performanc- es start. It was a good introduction to CFD for Stewart, but that’s not why he wasn’t nervous. “I felt like part of the Cheyenne family immediately,” the Monroe, Louisiana, resident said. “Any kid

who grows up in rodeo dreams about the ‘Daddy of ’em All.’ So stepping out on that perch in front of those people for the first time and being the man behind the mic is a milestone in my life and career. “It was unbelievable.” The 45-year-old has a schedule of 42 rodeos lined up this year. That sounds like a loaded slate, but it’s just right for Stewart because it leaves plenty of time for another passion. “I’m fortunate to live in a part of the country where waterfowl hunting is magnificent,andIguideforafive-star lodge in Arkansas when I’m not call- ing rodeos,” he said. “I get to meet interestingpeoplefromallaroundthe country, and I don’t have to go any- where to meet them. They come to me. “That’s pretty good for me because

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Barrelman

Cody Sosebee, a 44-year-old from Charleston, Arkansas, will be CFD’s

barrelman for the seventh time since

2006.

He stumbled into the job by filling in for an absent rodeo clown as a favor for a friend who was organizing the rodeo. “He asked me if I could fill in for the clown,” Sosebee told WyoSports last

Cheyenne

Frontier

Days

Rodeo an-

nouncer

Andy

Stewart,

right,

talks with

Wyoming

Gov. Matt

Mead on

July 22,

2015, in

Frontier

Park

Arena.

WTE/staff

year. “I thought, ‘No way; that’s em- barrassing. All those guys do is go out there and act stupid.’ He was a friend who was in a bind and really begged me to do it. “So I got out there and acted silly and stupid, and when the rodeo was over, they gave me a big old check the other guy was supposed to get.” Before he knew it, Sosebee had a new business and career. It’s one he thoroughly enjoys. “There might be less than 50 rodeo clowns in the (Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association), so it’s not a job everyone can do,” he said. “I’m just thankful that I’m one of them.”

Stock contractors

Stace Smith Pro Rodeos will pro- vide the bucking horses and bulls for CFD. The Athens, Texas, company has sent stock to the National Finals Rodeo every year since 1999. Lee Lancaster of Bennett, Colorado, will supply steers for steer roping, steer wrestling and team roping. Lanham Mangold of Giddings, Texas, will provide calves for tie-down roping.

Medical personnel

Justin Sports Medicine will have a trailer staffed with doctors under Frontier Park Arena’s east stands.

Rookie saddle bronc

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 13

What you need to know

Scoring: Cowboys must stay on the horse for eight seconds and grasp the rein with one hand. The person with the most points wins. Half the points are scored from the cowboys’ spurring technique and “exposure” to the strength of the horse. The other half is by the buck- ing strength of the horse. A cowboy is disqualified if he touches his equipment, himself or the horse with his free hand.

Equipment: Saddle, bronc rein, glove and horse.

Watch these guys: Entries are limited to contestants generally in their first year of competition who have yet

to earn $1,000 in sanctioned rodeos. That means those who compete here, as well as the horses, may be the next big names in the sport. Last year’s winner, Audy Reed of Spearman, Texas, earned nearly $4,000.

Past winners

2015

– Audy Reed

2014

– Wyatt Kammerer

2013

– Will Shaffer

2012

– Cody Anthony

2011

– J.D. Johnson

2010

– Dustin Moody

2009

– Wayne Kogianes

2008

– Cort Scheer

2007

– Jace Garrett

2006

– Brad Pierce

Reed using momentum from last year’s rookie bronc win

By robert gagliardi

WyoSports senior editor

It was an accomplishment Audy Reed won’t soon forget.

The Spearman, Texas, cow-

boy won the rookie bronc riding

event at last year’s Cheyenne

Frontier Days Rodeo. Reed won the first and second go-rounds

and the aggregate. His scores of

80 and 75 were the top two in the

event.

Reed won nearly $4,000 and is

now a rookie in the Professional

Rodeo Cowboys Association this year as a saddle bronc rider.

Through early May, Reed was 28th in the world standings with $10,657 in earnings. The top 15 earn a spot in the PRCA’s sea- son-culminating event – the National Finals Rodeo – in Las Vegas. “It was really special just to ride in a rodeo that big, but to win it made it that much better,” Reed said. “It gave me a little extra confidence. It made it easier to go, having a little extra money.” There are two types of saddle bronc riders in the PRCA: per- mit-holders and cardholders.

Permit-holders often are young cowboys getting their start professionally. They must earn $1,000 in PRCA-sanctioned rodeos before they can be card- holding members. Not only are the cowboys usually young and somewhat inexperienced in rookie bronc riding, so are the horses. That makes for unpredictable action. “You can kind of guess close to what the horse will be like, but you don’t always know for sure what they’re going to do, but that’s part of rodeoing,” said

See Rookie, page 15

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Dandies

Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition Dandies FINE & DANDY For the high school-age girls

FINE & DANDY

For the high school-age girls who perform with CFD’s equestrian drill team, the last 10 days in July race by

By Jeremiah Johnke

WyoSports editor

Savannah Messenger wanted to be part of the Dandies for as long as she can remember. The graduate of Cheyenne’s Central High School has always been into horses, and her family raises Percheron draft horses that they drive through parades. Being part of the equestrian drill team that helps pro- mote Cheyenne Frontier Days was a natural fit for Messenger. “It was a lot differ- ent than I expected,” she said. “I thought

a lot differ- ent than I expected,” she said. “I thought Messenger my days would be

Messenger

my days would be a

lot crazier and the summer would be a lot busier. It was really busy, but it was still a whole lot of fun. “The days are long, but they go really quickly because we’re always doing something. It’s just like boom, boom, boom, and it’s over before you

know it.” The Dandies are high school-age girls who perform during each after- noon’s CFD Rodeo performance, carry the sponsor flags into Frontier Park Arena, and participate all of the parades and pancake breakfasts, as well as the CFD night shows. They also promote the CFD brand at other rodeos and parades.

Their days typically start at 7 a.m., when they arrive at the stables to wash and feed their horses. “We also have Dandy duties around the park,” Messenger said. “We have to walk around, sign auto- graphs, interact with people and answer any questions they might have about Frontier Days.” This summer, the Dandies are traveling to Cody, Wyoming; Sheridan, Wyoming, and Estes Park, Colorado. This summer’s Dandies also in- clude: Sarah Batson, Sarah Bennecke, Lexi Children, Keturah Cowan, Mackenzie Faircloth, Caitlin Garcia, Maria Grogan, Jean-Marie Hess, Hannah Jankovsky, Jordan Johnson, Kelci Lovercheck, Taylor Stults, Jenna Tast, Tyler Trissel and Taylor Wilson. Michelle Hess is in her third year as the Dandies director, and she is being assisted by former Dandy Emily Breeden.

“the days are long, but they go really quickly because we’re always doing something. it’s just like boom, boom, boom, and it’s over before you know it.”

Savannah Messenger | Member of the Dandies equestrian drill team

Barrel racing

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 15

Texas cowgirl hopes CFD return pays off

What you need to know

Scoring: The rider enters the arena at full speed on an American quarter horse. The race includes a cloverleaf pattern around three barrels and then a race out of the arena. Contestants can touch and move barrels, but they receive a five- second penalty for knocking a barrel down. The fastest time wins.

Equipment: Horse and saddle.

Watch these gals: Mary Burger of Pauls Valley, Oklahoma, led the world standings in mid-June. The 67-year-old won the 2006 world title and led the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association’s world standings with nearly $88,000 in earnings as of mid-June. She was nearly $20,000 in front of ivy Conrado of Hudson, Colorado, who sat second. … Gillette, Wyoming, cowgirl Cassidy Kruse qualified for her first National Finals Rodeo in 2015 and was fifth in the world standings back in June.

Past winners

2015

– Lisa Lockhart

2014

– Brenda Mays

2013

– Christy Loflin

2012

– Mary Walker

2011

– Kim Schulze

2010

– Lindsay Sears

2009

– Tiffany Fox

2008

– Lindsay Sears

2007

– Brittany Pozzi

2006

– Kelly Maben

Rookie

Continued from 13

Blaze Cress, who was runner-up to Reed last year at CFD and also won some money in the event in 2014. Cress is a graduate of Cheyenne’s East High School and is from Hillsdale, just east of Cheyenne. His younger brother, Brody, placed second in rookie bronc

By Jeremiah Johnke

WyoSports editor

first time wasn’t daunting enough, Collier also had to learn how to best work with her new horse. “We were both so nervous, and we weren’t quite together,” Collier said. “You have to have your minds togeth- er to do well at a place like Cheyenne. There’s a lot of places you can make mistakes in a run there, so you have to stay focused and try to keep things together. “We didn’t have our minds togeth- er like we should have. I tried to keep things in perspective last year and get my feet wet and learn everything I could everywhere I went. “I plan on going back (to CFD)

this summer and doing a whole lot better.” That would be a bold statement coming from some cowgirls, but not Collier. She sat 13th in the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association standings in mid-June. The top 15 riders in the standings make the year-end National Finals Rodeo. Collier and her mare are in sync now. “It took us a while to click together,” she said. “This horse is really quick and runs really hard, and we were blowing by the first barrel. Once we got that down, everything else kind of fell into place and took care of itself.”

Kellie Collier had heard about how running at Cheyenne Frontier Days was different. The Hereford, Texas, barrel racer had heard about the size of the Frontier Park Arena and how the position of the third barrel played tricks with depth perception. She had heard about how the dirt was differ- ent and made it hard for some horses to keep their footing. Collier heard a lot of things about the “Daddy of ’em All,” but she knew she wouldn’t truly know anything about Cheyenne until she experi- enced it for herself. “It was kind of overwhelming,” the Texas Tech University sophomore said. “It was my first time there, it was a

big arena, and all of the big names

were there. It was an experience that

I didn’t want to miss. But it went a lot

like the rest of my rookie year – it was

a big learning experience.” Collier struggled in her first CFD

run, posting a 19.28-second time on a

new mare she had gotten a little more

than a month before. As if being out on the road for the

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riding at CFD in 2014. Blaze Cress and Reed are rodeoing together, and, along with Brody, plan on competing in the regular saddle

bronc event at CFD this year. “It’sjustlikeany

otherrodeo,butChey-

enne is always fun,” BlazeCresssaid.“They drawsomegoodhorses. “It’s cool because it’s a hometown rodeo for us. It’s pretty neat. There’s a big crowd

there. People were screaming when they announced I graduated from East High. It was pretty fun.” The rookie bronc riding event is set up as a futurity and includes competition among stock contractors to determine who pro- vided the best horses. The event is held during the first eight days of the regular rodeo. The overall champion is crowned on the final Saturday.

16 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

Crawley still seeks elusive first CFD win

Souvenir Edition Crawley still seeks elusive first CFD win Cody Wright of Milford, Utah, hangs on

Cody Wright of Milford, Utah, hangs on during saddle bronc competi- tion on July 18, 2015, at Frontier Park for the Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo. WTE/staff

Saddle bronc

After finiShing third lASt yeAr, he SAyS A victory thiS yeAr iS hiS ultiMAte goAl

By Sisco Molina

WyoSports staff writer

Jacobs Crawley has been on the top of the saddle bronc world since winning his second National Finals Rodeo average title and first world championship last December. Themomentumfromlast year’s title run seems to have

carriedoverinto2016forthe

cowboyfromStephenville, Texas, as he has amassed numerouswinsduringthe early stages of the season and is currently ranked atop theProfessionalRodeo CowboysAssociation saddlebroncridingworld standings. “After December and winning that, a guy can just kind of relax. Not that our jobs are stressful, but if there was any sort of hesita- tion or anything like that, it was certainly gone after that,” Crawley said. “I have nothing left to prove. I’m just having a great time riding bucking horses and enjoying what I do. When you start having fun and

relaxing that much more, things just kind of start to fall into place. “All I’ve done this season is ride the horses they draw for me, and it’s been work- ing out.” Sift through his long list of accomplishments and feats since joining the PRCA in 2006, though, and you’ll see there is still one major rodeo where Crawley has yet to come away with a win:

Cheyenne Frontier Days. “(Winning at) Cheyenne Frontier Days is at the top of the list of things I have left to do. It’s a huge goal of mine. I won the short go last year and came up just a couple points short,” Crawley said. “I’ve had success at Cheyenne; it’s just one of those deals that, for one reason or the other, those little things happened and I haven’t quite been able to come out in first. “I’m excited for all of the summer rodeos, but to win at the prestigious Chey- enne Frontier Days – it would definitely be a huge accomplishment.”

The closest Crawley has come was last year, when he finished third. After making it to the finalswithacombinedscore

of 156, Crawley turned in an 87-point ride on Stace Smith Rodeo’s Hickok to jump all thewayintothirdplacewith

243points–justthreepoints

behindwinnerBradley

Harter,whofinishedwith

246.

Having been close to winning, only to fall a few points short, has only heightened the desire to win at CFD and reap the ben- efits that follow. “Cheyenne Frontier Days is definitely one of the fa- vorite rodeos of the regular season, just from the crowd, the stage – the arena is awe- some – and the history that’s there,” Crawley said. “There’s a lot of money at stake, too. If a guy can win Cheyenne, not only does he have that title for the rest of his life, but he just got a pretty big kick as far as the season and winning a world title. “It’s a big one.”

What you need to know

Scoring: Each cowboy must ride the bronc for eight seconds. Points are awarded based on a spurring motion with the bucking horse. The rider must have the spurs over the point of the horse’s shoulders (called “marking out”) when the horse’s inside shoulder breaks the plane of the chute. The rider cannot touch the horse or saddle with his free hand or have a foot fall out of the stirrup. Highest possible score is 100.

Equipment: Saddle, bronc rein and horse.

Watch these guys: Jacobs Crawley from Stephenville, Texas, was the saddle bronc cham- pion at the NFR last year for the second time and also won his first world championship. Crawley is currently ranked atop the PRCA world standings in saddle bronc, but has never won at Cheyenne Frontier Days. … CoBurn Bradshaw from Beaver, Utah, was the 2015 PRCA Saddle Bronc Riding

Rookie of the Year and finished in second place in his first National Finals Rodeo, as well as fourth in the world standings. The 21-year-old wunderkind currently sits second in the PRCA saddle bronc riding world standings.

Past winners

2015

– Bradley Harter

2014

– Chad Ferley

2013

– Wade Sundell/Chad Ferley

2012

– Cody DeMoss

2011

– Jesse Bail

2010

– Cody DeMoss

2009

– Billy Etbauer

2008

– Dusty Hausauer

2007

– Taos Muncy

2006

– Dan Mortenson

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18 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

Bobby Welsh

Bull rider seeks one last run

A FAMILY MAN FIRST AND A RODEO ATHLETE SECOND, BOBBY WELSH SAYS THIS IS LIKELY TO BE HIS LAST SUMMER IN THE ARENA

By robert gagliardi

WyoSports senior editor

Bobby Welsh’s success as a bull rider is impressive. The 32-year-old Gillette, Wyoming, product has earned more than $1.2 million since he joined the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association in 2003. Welsh qualified for seven con- secutive National Finals Rodeos from 2005-11 and fin- ished in the top four in the world standings four times. Welsh has not been back to the NFR since 2011, but is on pace to get there this year. He ranked in the top 10 in the world as the busy summer season was set to begin. The top 15 qualify for the NFR. Age hasn’t affected Welsh’s bull riding. Nor has his health, even though he suffered a compression fracture to two vertebrae in his back last August that kept him out until January of this year. Welsh said that’s been the most serious injury of his career. Prior to that, he said he was never out more than a week due to other injuries during his professional career. Welsh finished 26th in the world standings in 2015. “My back is 100 percent, with no pain at all,” Welsh said. “I feel like I’m riding as good as I ever have before. The hardest part I have to deal with is my ‘want-to.’” That’s because Welsh is a family man first and a professional rodeo athlete second, and has been for some time now. He and his wife, Sunny, have four children: Madison, Colt, Hayden and Aftyn Jade. All of the kids are grow- ing up and participating in their own activities – including rodeo.

“To me, the only reason Bobby hasn’t won as many world titles as he wanted is because he is a family man, and that’s what he cares about most,” said 21-year-old bull rider Sage

Kimzey of Strong City, Oklahoma, who is the two-time defending world bull riding champion and led the world standings through the first half of 2016. Welsh got off to a strong start this year by winning the PRCA’s Xtreme Bulls event at the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo, as well as the PRCA Championship Rodeo in Bismarck, North Dakota. Welsh said he’s going to rodeo hard this summer to try to make one last

NFR and go after his first-ever world title. “This will probably be it as far as chasing my NFR dream,” Welsh said. “I don’t know if I’m going to quit. I will probably do some circuit rodeo- ing, and my wife wants to get back into pro rodeo (in barrel racing). “It will be nice to go with her and run some barrels, ride some bulls and take in some junior rodeos with my kids in the middle.”

Bobby Welsh of Gillette, Wyoming, is bucked off his bull in the bull riding event during day 5 of the Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo on July 23, 2014, at Frontier Park Arena in Cheyenne. Blaine McCartney/ Wyoming Tribune Eagle

Frontier Days Rodeo on July 23, 2014, at Frontier Park Arena in Cheyenne. Blaine McCartney/ Wyoming

Bobby Welsh

This year’s Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo will be one of Welsh’s stops. He has never won a bull riding title here, but he lists CFD as one of his favorite rodeos. He recorded a 92-point ride here in 2004.

the early years

Welsh was born in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. His father, Robert, was the first rodeo cowboy in the fam- ily. Welsh said his dad won the first rodeo he entered riding calves as a kid. Robert Welsh competed in rodeo professionally, and he came close to making the NFR one year, but a groin injury stopped him. Bobby Welsh rode bronc horses and team roped as a kid, but he al- ways wanted to ride

bulls. He was 7 years old when he got on his first bull, and he said he re- members it “like it was yesterday.” “It weighed about 1,000 pounds and was one of the more gentler bulls in the pen,” Welsh

recalled. “I was about a foot shorter than the other kids who were getting on them (Welsh is listed at 5-foot-5 today). “He came out of the chute and stumbled a little bit. But he got to his feet and just kind of jumped and kicked real easy down the arena. I remember sitting up there and think- ing how cool this is.” Welsh was a four-time high school state bull riding champion before graduating from high school in Gillette. His first 80-point bull ride came at the age of 15. When he was a freshman in high school,Welshsaidhisfatherdidn’tlet him compete in the fall part of the season because he wasn’t 5 feet tall yet. “My dad said, ‘I can’t let you on those big bulls because I feel like I’m going to be your murderer,’” Welsh recalled. Welsh rode in the spring that year, and at one point scored points on 17 consecutive bull rides. He said he won the state title that year by 80 points. “It was then I realized my dream of beingaprofessionalbullridermight come to pass,” Welsh said. “I made it a goal to win all four years of high school, and I did. My ultimate goal

was to win the national high school finals, and as a senior (in 2002), I did.”

Professional highlights

Welsh said winning the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo in 2011 and this year’s event in San Antonio are among his biggest accomplish- ments in bull riding. Welsh has won six rounds at the NFR and placed in 22 rounds. “When I first made the NFR, I thought I was going to have to go to 100 rodeos a year and be gone all the time,” he said. “I ended up going to 75 to 80 rodeos the first time I made the NFR, and I thought I was stuck in a rodeo tornado, but I was having fun. “The next year, I went to 65, and the third year I went to 55.

I’ve gradually slowed down and found the balance between rodeo and family. I still go to enough rodeos to make a full-time living and still be around enough for my kids. “My goal this year is to make 40 rodeos. For

“(Bobby is) one of those guys you root for because he’s always there for everybody else.”

Sage Kimzey

Bull rider

me and sharing time with my family, that’s a lot.” Welsh may not be at as many ro- deos as in the past, but he still garners

the respect from his peers. “I think he’s one of the rankest bull ridersgoingdowntheroad,”said Clayton Savage of Yoder, Wyoming, who was a freshman in high school whenWelshwasasenior.Savagehas been competing on the PRCA circuit

since2007.

“He was kind of the big deal around high school rodeo when I was getting started, and I’ve been looking up to him ever since. I think today, if he went to 70 to 75 rodeos, I bet he would be a world champion. But he has different priorities. He knows what his path is, and he’s taking it.” Added Kimzey: “He’s a top-notch bull rider and has been for a decade. His fundamentals are flawless. He does all the basics extremely well, and that’s what it takes day in and day out. You’ll never see him make a stupid little mental error that some- body else will. “Bobby is one of the guys I grew up wanting to ride like and idolizing. He’s a special person and a great bull rider.”

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 19

family first

Recently, Welsh’s two sons, Colt and Hayden, qualified for a junior regional bull riding event in Helena, Montana. Hayden won, and Colt rode well. “That was the first time I threw my

hatsince2006,andIdidn’tevenknow

I threw it until it was coming down out of the air,” Welsh said with a laugh. “There is no 95-point ride that could come close to the feeling I had for my boys.” Family is Welsh’s most rewarding occupation. Sure, he’d like to make it to the NFR one last time. Welsh said he will sacrifice some family time this summer, and miss some of his kids’ events, to try to make that happen. “We discussed it as a family, and they want me to go back (to the NFR) and watch me ride,” Welsh said. “If we make it, we make it. If we don’t, we don’t. It’s not going to make the hap- piness meter go up or down. “In 2012, the first year I didn’t

make the NFR after going seven straight years, it was pretty disturb- ing. I was praying one day, and God said, ‘Just because you didn’t make the NFR doesn’t mean I stopped being God.’ That right there told me all is good, and we’ll be all right.” But Welsh also has another family – his rodeo family. In bull riding, and rodeo in general, athletes may be competing against each other, but they also are support- ive. Welsh has been one of the main guys providing that support. “Every time I see him at a rodeo, he’s helping someone,” Savage said. “You don’t get to see him very much, but when you do, you’re glad to see him.” Kimzey added: “Bobby doesn’t flap his gums as much as most of us bull riders do, but he’s there to help. He just loves the sport of bull riding and everybody that’s around him. “Bobby loves people, and he’s al- ways there for people. He’s one of those guys you root for because he’s always there for everybody else.”

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20 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

Bull riding

KiMZEy sTiLL sHinEs As WorLD’s ToP BULL riDEr

By robert gagliardi

WyoSports senior editor

Sage Kimzey said he has reduced his schedule through the early part of the year. The Strong City, Oklahoma, bull rider knows it’s a long year and doesn’t want to get burnt out. As the two-time defending world

champion, Kimzey

Kimzey

knows what he’s doing. Through the early part of this season, he was atop the world stand-

ings with nearly $50,000 in earnings. “I’m really focusing on making every single bull I get on count, and it’s been paying off so far,” Kimzey said. “I’m just pacing myself, for the most part. It’s pretty tough to be on the road for 300 days out of the year and still enjoy what you do. I’m get- ting ready for the summer run.” The run Kimzey has been on since he turned pro in 2013 has been impressive. In his first year, he set a Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association record for money earned on a permit with $47,726. He followed that up with back-to-back world ti- tles, where he won between $324,000

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and $327,000 in each of those years. Kimzey’s 2016 started well with a win at the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo. “Each year is definitely way differ- ent, with new challenges and obsta- cles,” Kimzey said. “The only thing that stays the same is that I actually know where I’m going when I show up to the rodeo.” With success comes pressure, but for Kimzey, the only pressure he feels is what he puts on himself. “I hold myself to very high expecta- tions, and the outside expectations don’t really affect me too much be- cause my expectations for myself are higher than anybody else’s could be,” he said.

“There’s a lot of stuff that comes

with being the two-time reigning world champion. People look at me like I’m supposed to show up and win. The only pressure that affects any- one, I feel, is the self-induced pres- sure. If I try my hardest, that’s all I can do and all that’s in my control.”

Kimzey, who turns 22 on Aug. 26, said the best part of being one of the biggest names and brightest stars in professional rodeo is interacting with the fans. “In rodeo, we have the best fans in the world. They’re knowledgeable. They’re passionate about every- thing,” he said. “Getting to meet all the fans that come out and support us has been really special. You hear so many stories and find out how much rodeo means to the outside world. I absolutely love that.” Kimzey will be at this year’s Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo, where he has won money in the past, but has yet to win a title. “The feeling you get when you pull into the park is a feeling you don’t hardly get anywhere else,” Kimzey said. “It really is hallowed ground. The feeling is like a kid at Christmas time for a professional cowboy. “It’s an awesome atmosphere to get to come there and do what we love.”

What you need to know

Scoring: The cowboy must stay on the bull for eight seconds. Judges watch for numer- ous factors, such as body position, use of the cowboy’s free arm and spurring action. Although not required, spurring will add points. Half of the score is determined by the cowboy’s performance, the other half by

the animal’s efforts. The cowboy will be

disqualified for being bucked off within eight seconds or touching the bull with his free hand. The highest possible score is 100. The rider with the most points on three rides is the overall winner.

Equipment: Bull rope, glove, bull, protec- tive vest and helmet (optional).

Watch these guys: Sage Kimzey of Strong City, Oklahoma, is the two-time defending world champion and was leading the world through the spring. … Joe Frost of Randlett, Utah, has been on Kimzey’s heels through-

out the first half of the year. … Also watch for last year’s CFD champion, Aaron Pass of Kaufman, Texas, and 2011 champion Shane Proctor of Troutman, North Carolina. … Wyoming bull riders to keep an eye on include Bobby Welsh of Gillette and Clayton Savage of Yoder.

Past winners

2015

– Aaron Pass

2014

– Austin Meier

2013

– Cody Whitney

2012

– Cody Whitney

2011

– Shane Proctor

2010

– Wesley Silcox

2009

– Brad Pierce

2008

– Steve Woolsey

2007

– Clint Craig

2006

– Dustin Elliott

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Team roping

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 23

Brown “will do whatever it takes”

By david watson

WyoSports staff writer

season-culminating NFR, finishing first in the average. “We prepared more than we did the year before and had a new game plan, and it all worked out,” Brown said. That propelled Brown to

second in the PRCA world standings, just $3,000 short of his first world title. Brown also won the NFR average in 2010 and 2013.

In the last eight years that team-roping header Luke Brown has qualified for the

Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s National Finals Rodeo, he has benefited from two high-quality heeling partners. First was

Martin Lucero, who Brown roped with until 2013. Since then, it was Kollin VonAhn, who Brown teamed with to win last year’s Cheyenne Frontier Days

Rodeo with an overall average time of 28.7 seconds. “Thatwasadreamcome true,” Brown said. “Because it doesn’tmatterhowgoodyou are or how hot you are or how badyouareroping,things have to go your way to win Cheyenne. That is a rodeo you can’t prepare for – you have to ropegreat,drawgreat,and some luck has to go your way. It’saonce-in-a-lifetimething to win Cheyenne.” Brown and VonAhn contin- ued their hot streak at the

“one day, i just decided to live in texas and get good enough to rope for a living.”

luke Brown

Team-roping header

VonAhn now ropes as part of the Elite Rodeo Athletes, so Brown turned to longtime friend and heeler Jake Long. The pair won the Wrangler Champions

Challenge in Rapid City, South Dakota, earlier this season.

“Weonlyliveabout5miles

apart, so we practiced a lot togetherandhavethesame plans and goals to be a world champion,”saidBrown,who now lives in Midland, Texas.

“I’ve known him for a long time and roped with him quite a bit. He was my top pick to work with, and it seemed like a good fit.” Brown is originally from Rock Hill, South Carolina, about a half-hour south of

What you need to know

Scoring: Steers are given a 30- foot head start. The header must charge out horseback and rope the steer with one of three legal catch- es: around both horns; around one horn and the head; or around the neck. The header must turn the steer to the left, giving the heeler on horseback a chance to rope the steer’s hind feet. The clock stops when there is no slack in the ropes and the horses for both ropers face each other on opposite sides. if the header breaks the barrier, a 10-second penalty is assessed. if the heeler ropes only one hind foot, a five-second penalty is assessed. The fastest time wins.

Equipment: Horses, ropes and tack (tack is saddle, bridle and other gear used for riding horses).

Watch these guys: Header JoJo LeMond was runner-up at Cheyenne Frontier Days last year with heeler Dakota Kirchen- schlager. LeMond, who also steer ropes, placed second in the all- around, seventh in team roping and sixth in steer roping in 2015. He also placed third in team roping at the National Finals

Rodeo. LeMond was 10th in the PRCA world standings in early June. … Heeler Jim Ross Cooper, who won here in 2014 with head- er Brandon Beers, was 15th in the standings in early June. Cooper finished 2015 20th in the stand- ings. … Heeler Paul Eaves was at the top of the standings, with header partner Clay Smith sitting in second in early June.

Past winners

2015

– Luke Brown, Kollin VonAhn

2014

– Brandon Beers, Jim Ross

Cooper

2013

– Clay Tryan, Jade Corkill

2012

– Trevor Brazile, Patrick

Smith

2011 – Jake Barnes, Walt

Woodard

2010 – Derrick Begay, Cesar

de la Cruz

2009 – Chad Masters, Jade

Corkill

2008

– Logan Olson, Broc Cresta

2007

– Travis Tryan, Michael

Jones

2006

– Colter Todd, Cesar

de la Cruz

Charlotte, where his par- ents, Luke Jr. and Debbie, own a construction com-

pany. Luke Brown’s broth- ers, Jay and Cody, also work for that company.

Our highest priority is our customers each individual customer.

highest priority is our customers each individual customer. Luke Brown started com- peting in rodeo when

Luke Brown started com- peting in rodeo when he was about 13 years old and quali- fied for the National High School Finals Rodeo twice in steer wrestling, tie-down roping and team roping. He won six South Carolina state titles, with two in all-around, team roping and tie-down roping. “From there, it was college rodeos, then amateur rodeos back east,” Brown said. “One day, I just decided to live in Texas and get good enough to rope for a living.” “Back home (in South Carolina), those who roped also worked,” Brown said. “To see a guy who woke up every day with roping as his job – he roped like everybody else would work.” That experience planted the seed that roping would become Brown’s career of choice then, now and in the future. And he has already made more than $1.4 million doing what he loves – roping in the PRCA. “The years have been up and down, but since I was little, this is what I knew I wanted to do,” Brown said. “This is the living I chose, and I will do whatever it takes to continue doing it.”

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24 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

Wild horse race

By Scott nulph

WyoSports assistant editor

Ever wonder who would volunteer to be part of a wild horse race? So do most of those in attendance at Cheyenne Frontier Days who see a wild horse race for the first time. It’s often times chaotic, disorganized and downright unruly. But for those who compete in the event, it’s certainly far more than that. “It’s the adrenaline,” said Denver’s Bob Biggart, who has either com- peted in or been in charge of the event at CFD since 1982. “It’s the biggest adrenaline rush I’ve ever had. I played rugby in college, and this is just incredible. For me, nothing comes close.” The wild horse race teams consist of three members – a shank man, a mugger and a rider. The shank man is responsible for holding the one rope attached to the animal while the mugger attempts to hold the horse as steady as possible

Keeping CFD wild

until the rider is aboard. Cheyenne’s David Marker is inti- mate with all three positions. He was mainly a shank man and rider on teams at CFD for nearly 20 years before retiring to take over as direc- tor of the race for six years. He even took a turn as a mugger once, but he joked that was merely by accident. “All three have to work great to- gether,” Marker said. “It’s like any team sport – if one person isn’t doing their job, you’re more than likely going to fail. Your shank man and mugger have to work as one, and then you want a fast, speedy rider to get on. “And he’s got to be able to ride. I’ve seen people who can ride bulls, but can’t ride these horses. It’s a very different event that takes practice.” “The Daddy of ’em All” – as it does for all rodeo events – offers a unique

aspect to the wild horse race. While almost all other rodeos run the race inside the arena, where the teams and horses come out of chutes and only need to make it around a barrel at the opposite end of the arena, CFD’s race consists of the rider needing to get his horse com- pletely around a track that encircles the main arena. And despite all the planning and expertise the CFD teams have, the end result can simply come down to whether the horse is a fighter or a runner. “If you’ve got a horse that comes up raring and kicking, that depends on how your mugger gets to the horse,” Biggart said. “We always wanted a good rider because this is definitely a rider’s race for Cheyenne Frontier

Days.” Added Marker: “Those horses, if they don’t want to go, they’re not going, no matter who’s on their back. If you get a horse that wants to run and notfight,you’llmakesomemoney.” There will be 44 total teams at this year’s Frontier Days, with 11 teams competingduringeachperformance. The entry fee for all teams is $400, with a total prize purse of $8,500. Last year, the Joe Applebaker Team won first place to collect just over $1,000. So why do these teams take on the challenge of trying to get on and ride a horsethat’sneverbeenriddenbefore? It’scertainlynotallaboutthemoney. “It’s about the competition and the challenge of it all,” Biggart said. “These teams fully respect these horses and what they can do. It’s a win just to get one around the track. “It’s like any rodeo event. If you finish in the money hole, you’re pret- ty elated. If you didn’t do too well, you just come back the next day.”

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Tie-down roping

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 25

MoorCroFt’s robinson takes a swing at tie-Down roping

25 MoorCroFt’s robinson takes a swing at tie-Down roping Jesse Clark of Portales, New Mexico, chases

Jesse Clark of Portales, New Mexico, chases down his calf in the tie-down roping event during the eighth performance of the 119th annual Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo on July 25, 2015, at Frontier Park Arena. Blaine McCartney/Wyoming Tribune Eagle

By Scott nulph

WyoSports assistant editor

When the top names in tie-down rop- ing come up, they’re usually cowboys from Texas, Oklahoma and California, with a few from Louisiana sprinkled in. And there’s a reason why. Those cowboys have good weather year-round to compete and practice in.

Moorcroft, Wyoming’s Cole Robinson hopes to change that. Robinson, competing in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association for the first time at the age of 23, has had a solid start to the tie- down season, leading the rookie stand- ings for most of the summer, while also being ranked in the top 50 of the world rankings.

The Wyoming cowboy said he’s been working on the goal of being a pro rodeo cowboy since he can remember. “My dad roped calves and what-not when he was younger, and it was just something that I’ve always liked,” Robinson said. “He got me started in it, and I just really like the event. It’s fun and challenging.

See Swing, page 29

What you need to know

Scoring: The calf gets a 30-foot head start, one of the longest in professional rodeo. The cowboy must rope the calf, get off his horse, and after “flanking” the calf (picking it up and dropping it to the ground on its side or back), he must tie three of its legs together. After doing that, the cowboy throws his hands in the air to alert the timekeeper and judge. if the calf frees itself in six seconds or less, the cow- boy is disqualified. A 10-second penalty is added if the cowboy breaks the barrier too soon. Fastest time wins.

Equipment: Pigging string, rope, horse and saddle.

Watch these guys: The race for world standings leaderboard has been tight all spring and sum- mer, with Ryan Jarrett, Hunter Herrin, Marcos Costa and Ryle Smith all taking turns challeng- ing for the lead. … Marty Yates is the defending champion after totaling 32.4 seconds on three to earn $19,553. Yates was first in the first go-round, second in the second go and second in the short go. … Jarrett finished third at last year’s CFD to earn $8,715.

Past winners

2015

– Marty Yates

2014

– Trevor Brazile

2013

– Scott Kormos

2012

– Beau Marshall

2011

– Jerrad Hofstetter

2010

– Clint Arave

2009

– Cody Ohl

2008

– Todd Brown

2007

– Houston Hutto

2006

– Clint Robinson

26 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

Steer roping

Family, rodeo tied together

teXAn ShAy good hAS A long hiStory in rodeo, And eSPeciAlly cfd.

By david watson

WyoSports staff writer

In much the same way Shay Good was raised, his family comes first, and it is rooted in rodeo. When Good is not on the road tak- ing his son, Sage, or daughter, Bradi, to regional and state junior rodeos throughout Texas or around the country for junior rodeo national finals, he oversees his oil field service companies in their hometown of Midland, Texas. After those commitments, then and

only then does Good hit the trail to compete for himself as a Professional Rodeo Cowboys

Association steer roper with what little time he has left. Good joined the PRCA in 1989 when he was in college and quali- fied for the College National Finals Rodeo three times in

calf roping. His father, Billy, is a former steer roper, and he has an uncle, Charles, and a cousin, Gary, who are past steer rop- ing world champions.

“I roped for about eight years or so

before I took a sabbatical and worked for five or six

years and started

a

Good said. “Then

I

roping back up,

and actually won

go-round in

Cheyenne and made the short round twice. Then I started roping steers about three or

a

family,” Shay

picked calf

four years ago.” Some of Good’s earliest memories include being an awestruck kid every year with his father at Cheyenne

“you don’t know how many times when i was a child roping a dummy in the backyard, we would play like we were in cheyenne and we just won it. So it was kind of neat to actually win it last year.”

Shay good | Steer roper

Frontier Days. “It’salwaysbeenthebiggestand bestrodeo,withareputation,”Good said. “If you were to compare it for

someonewhodoesn’tknowrodeo,it’s like The Masters in golf. It’s one of our

majors,andI’vebeencomingthere since I was a little kid with my dad.” So it was fitting after so many years

that Good became a part of CFD Rodeo lore when he won the steer roping here last summer with a top run of 16.7 seconds in the final round and was the overall winner with a time of 52.3. “You don’t know how many times when I was a child roping a dummy in the backyard, we would play like we were in Cheyenne and we just won it,” Good said. “So it was kind of neat

See Tied together, page 29

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Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 27

Shootout

Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 27 Shootout One thing won’t change in Cinch Shootout: action

One thing won’t change in Cinch Shootout: action

By robert gagliardi

WyoSports senior editor

This is the third year of the Cinch Rodeo Shootout at the Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo. And for the third consecutive year, there are changes to the one-day event.

Two years ago, winners or partici- pants at some of the major rodeos in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association made up teams in five events:

bareback and saddle bronc riding, bull riding, steer wres- tling and barrel

racing. Last year, there were teams, but some were divided up into travel part- ners among rodeo athletes. This year, local sponsors will repre- sent the teams, and

for those who win, CFD will donate money back to the local charity of the sponsor’s choice. “I think it will bring a little more flavor for the local people, and actu- ally involves some local business, which is even better,” first-year CFD Rodeo Committee chairman Mitch Carter said. There is still a lot at stake for the rodeo athletes. Winners of each event receive $10,000, while second- through fourth-place finishers also get paid. None of the money won at this event counts in the PRCA world standings, but that doesn’t bother those who participate and win. “When you’re a family man like me, have a job at home, and you can

Bright

ragatz

man like me, have a job at home, and you can Bright ragatz If you go

If you go

What: Cinch Rodeo Shootout

When: 12:15 p.m. Friday, July 22

Where: Frontier Park Arena

Tickets: From $17 to $30, available at www.cfdrodeo.com

What is it: Select professional rodeo athletes compete in bareback and saddle bronc riding, bull riding, barrel racing and steer wrestling. The top four in each event advances to the finals – or shootout round – where the winner gets $10,000.

come somewhere and win $10,000, you get there,” said Jon Ragatz of Cassville, Wisconsin, who won last year’s steer wrestling event after a 6.6-second ride in the finals. Last year’s event featured some impressive performances. Matt Bright of Stafford, Texas, won the bareback with a 91-point ride. And eight of the 12 qualified rides in that event went for 80 points or more. The winning scores in bull riding and saddle bronc riding were 89 and 89.5 points, respectively. The format of the shootout remains the same. The top four in each event advance to the finals, or shootout round. The event begins at 12:15 p.m., Friday, July 22, before the start of nine regular rodeo performances at CFD, which run July 23-31. Fans can get involved via text mes- sage by voting on which stock those contestants ride in the finals. They also get to see winners crowned that day. During the regu- lar rodeo and CFD’s back-to-back days format for the first and second go-rounds, go-round winners are not crowned until the final Friday and Saturday of the rodeo.

for the first and second go-rounds, go-round winners are not crowned until the final Friday and
for the first and second go-rounds, go-round winners are not crowned until the final Friday and
for the first and second go-rounds, go-round winners are not crowned until the final Friday and

28 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

28 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition Jabe Anderson iii tries to bring down

Jabe Anderson iii tries to bring down his steer in the steer wrestling event during the third performance of the 119th annual Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo on July 20, 2015, at Frontier Park Arena in Cheyenne. Blaine McCartney/Wyoming Tribune Eagle

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Steer Wrestling

cowBoy-horSe teAM SeeKing rePeAt At cfd

By Sisco Molina

WyoSports staff writer

When it comes to the success he’s

had, Nick Guy gives most of the cred- it to his horse, Tucker. The cowboy from Sparta, Wisconsin, bought Tucker in 2006 while he was still in college at Northern AmericanUniversity in Rapid City, South Dakota. It was a piv- otal point in his ca- reer, where he need-

ed a horse to get him to the next level. Enter Tucker, a registered quarter horse Guy bought from Ryan and Jane Melby in Minnesota. The two enjoyed a heightened run of success soon afterward – one that led to Guy’s first appearance in the National Finals Rodeo in 2010 in Las Vegas. “After I graduated college in 2008, I went and coached in Chadron (Nebraska), and I took Tucker with me. When I would rodeo him there,

Guy

I took Tucker with me. When I would rodeo him there, G u y he was

he was just so honest, and he gave me

a chance to place on everything I

caught,” Guy said. “He got me to my first NFR when I was really early in my career.” Tucker just turned 20 years old,

but is still as reliable as ever for Guy

– just utilized less often due to his age. “Tucker is just the type of horse

that gives you an honest chance there (at Frontier Days),” Guy said. “He’s getting older, so I don’t use him all the time, but I’ve always got him for these bigger rodeos, where I know he works well. “Hopefully he’s got a couple more Cheyennes left in him.” “The Daddy of ’em All” most cer- tainly classifies as one of those “big- ger rodeos” Guy alluded to, and it’s a rodeo where Guy and Tucker have had sustained success. After placing well the last few years, finishing as high as third place, Guy finally broke through for

a win last year – edging out Dakota Eldridge of Elko, Nevada, by one- tenth of a second.

See Repeat, page 29

What you need to know

Scoring: Steers are given a 30-foot head start, one of the longest in pro rodeo. The cowboy wrestles the steer to the ground by riding his horse up the side of the steer, reaching down, grab- bing it by the horns, twisting its head and getting it to fall to the ground. Cowboys have help from hazers riding on the other side of the steer. The clock stops when all four of the steer’s legs are pointed in the same direction. Breaking the

barrier too soon results in a 10-second penalty. The fastest time wins. The world record is 2.4 seconds.

Equipment: Horse, saddle and hazer.

Watch these guys: Dakota Eldridge from Elko, Nevada, placed second by the slim- mest of margins last year to eventual champion Nick Guy from Sparta, Wisconsin. Both will be back this year – Guy to defend his title, and Eldridge to try to get his

first CFD victory.

Past winners

2015 – Nick Guy

2014 – K.C. Jones

2013

– Matt Reeves

2012

– Gabe Ledoux

2011

– Olin Hannum

2010

– Cody Moore

2009

– Jake Rinehart

2008

– Dean Gorsuch

2007

– William Beierbach

and Jason Miller

2006 – Linn Churchill

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 29

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 29 Tied together Continued from 26 to actually

Tied together

Continued from 26

to actually win it last year.” The big payday helped Good qualify for the National Finals Steer Roping rodeo for the first time in his career. The steer roping finals was at the Kansas Star Arena in Mulvane, Kansas, south of Wichita, in November. He placed sixth at the finals and finished 11th in the PRCA world standings. Good is off to a solid start this season, sit- ting in seventh place in the PRCA standings as of early June. That, and a few more wins along the way, could be just the cushion he may need later in the season to make it back to the steer roping finals. After all, his rodeo life now centers more around his son and daughter. “It’s just like when I was a kid – them going with me and being around rodeos,” Good said. “Then them being with the other kids and parents at the rodeos – it was a snowball effect in that I couldn’t keep both my kids away from rodeos.”

What you need to know

Scoring: Steers are given a 30-foot head start. A cowboy must first complete a legal catch around the horns, which are pro- tected by horn wraps. After making the catch, the roper tosses the slack rope over the steer’s right hip, bring- ing the steer to the ground. When the steer is lying on its side, the roper gets off his horse and runs to tie three of the steer’s four legs together. The steer must remain tied for six seconds after the clock has stopped. The fastest time wins.

Equipment: Rope, horse and saddle.

Watch these guys:

Scott Snedecor finished runner-up at last year’s Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo. Snedecor, who won world titles in 2005 and 2008, finished fourth in the National Finals Steer Roping standings and was fifth in the PRCA world standings in 2015. The 2009 CFD champion had a good start to this year, ranked sixth in the PRCA standings in early June. … Jess Tierney always seems to be in the thick of competition at the CFD Rodeo. Tierney was fifth here last year, and was just outside the PRCA top 10 at 11th place in early

June. … JoJo LeMond, who also is an accom- plished header in team roping, was fourth at CFD last year. He fin- ished 2015 second in the PRCA all-around, seventh in team roping and sixth in steer roping.

Past winners

2015

– Shay Good

2014

– Jarrett Blessing

2013

– Trevor Brazile

2012

– Jay Pixley

2011

– Rocky Garnett

2010

– Chance Kelton

2009

– Scott Snedecor

2008

– Tim Abbott

2007

– Neal Wood

2006

– Neal Wood

rePeAt

Continued from 28

Both seem to be well acquaint- ed with Frontier Park and com- peting on the big stage in the unique atmosphere. And with Tucker striding toward the end of his timeline as a competition horse, Guy is hoping to continue his string of strong performances in Cheyenne – and to maybe come away with another title. “Every time I walk by the buck- le or the saddle, it reminds me of winning it last year. To win Cheyenne is a great honor and everycowboy’sdream,”Guysaid. “I’m going to try to be one of those guyswhohavemultiplewins, whether it’s repeating this year or afuturechampiondowntheroad. “I feel like my style, my horse and my experience at Cheyenne will give me an advantage this year when I get there.”

swing

Continued from 25

“I’ve been planning on this my whole life,” Robinson said. “I went to college to keep practicing and get better, and I’ve felt like I’ve done that.” Robinson,aCollegeNationalFinals Rodeoparticipantthelastthreeyears out of Central Arizona College, may be young to tie-down roping, but he knows the key to the sport: practice. “Themoreyoupractice,thebetter you get; it’s really that simple,” he said. “You have to have a lot of drive to be a calf roper. It’s not like a lot of the other events.Thepersonthatworksthe hardest at it is the one that will have the most success most of the time. “Some of the others (events), if you’re bigger and stronger, it helps. In calf roping, the more you work, the better it is.” Robinson has spent the last three years attending as many rodeos as he can with his PRCA permit. But that only went so far. Rodeos like Cheyenne Frontier Days, as well as most of the other major events, don’t

allow cowboys to compete without their pro rodeo card. That changes this summer for Robinson, who will be part of the pro rodeo “cowboy Christmas” list of top rodeos from Texas to Oregon to California to Wyoming. “Over the summer, if I can get on kind of a roll, I feel like I could have a pretty good chance of doing well,” Robinson said. “I’m home for about 10 days, and I’ll be gone to rodeos through the month of August.” Robinson wants to represent what he calls the “northern” cowboys when it comes to tie-down roping. Of the top ropers, Nebraska’s Riley Pruitt and Michigan’s Cody McCartney have been the only non- warm-weather ropers to crack the top 20. “There’s getting to be a few more ‘northern’ guys in calf roping lately,” Robinson said. “It’s tough, because those guys get to practice all winter in a nice environment, and up here it’s cold and snowy and hard to work at it. “It’s going to be different going to the bigger rodeos and going against the top ropers in the world every day. That’s going to be a change, compet- ing against the best of the best when you nod your head.”

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30 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition AFTER SUNDOWN This year’s concert series will

AFTER

SUNDOWN

This year’s concert series will be bigger and better than ever

By ellen fike

Wyoming Tribune Eagle staff writer

Cheyenne Frontier Days doesn’t just mean afternoon rodeos. It also means nine days of jam-packed live music and bull riding in the evenings. For the night shows this year, the CFD staff and volunteers are plan- ning for the biggest concerts yet,

bringing in a mix of old and new faces for everyone to enjoy. “Most of the new people we have will bring just fantastic shows,” CFD Contract Acts Committee chairman Scott Fleming said. “All these open- ing acts are all over the radio, so there won’t be anything unfamiliar for the audience.” Since the tickets went on sale in

January, nearly 65,000 have been sold for the concerts. Currently, final night headliner Florida Georgia Line is the biggest seller, with around 14,000 tickets sold. Around 200 to 300 tickets are sold every week, Fleming said. As every year at the “Daddy of ’em All” continues to be bigger and better,

See Sundown, page 31

said. As every year at the “Daddy of ’em All” continues to be bigger and better,
said. As every year at the “Daddy of ’em All” continues to be bigger and better,
said. As every year at the “Daddy of ’em All” continues to be bigger and better,

KiSS.

Courtesy

said. As every year at the “Daddy of ’em All” continues to be bigger and better,

74273

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 31

Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 31 SUNDOWN Continued from 30 Fleming said this year

SUNDOWN

Continued from 30

Fleming said this year is particularly special, with the addition of an up- graded stage and acoustic panels to helpabsorbthesoundbetterduring liveshows. CFDofficialsbeginworkingmore than a year in advance to plan for the concerts, making a list of who they would like to see. Then they begin look- ingintotheact’sscheduleandrouting, in order to see if a date will line up. The first three nights of this year’s concert series are ripe with newcom- ers to CFD, including rock group Fall Out Boy. “Fall Out Boy, as far as a pop act, was a really good pick for us,” CFD President and CEO Tom Hirsig said. “They have a local following.” Fleming agreed, saying that CFD has always tried to offer a “rock night” during the concerts, and he feels Fall Out Boy will draw in a younger crowd. The band started in the Chicago suburbs back in 2001, but became radio heavy hitters in 2005, with the release of their second album, “From Under the Cork Tree.” After taking a hiatus in 2009, the band regrouped in 2013, putting out two albums in two years. Their most recent, “Save Rock and Roll,” was released in 2015. Other new acts this year will in- clude country duo Maddie & Tae and Old Dominion. Maddie & Tae have become famous with their smash single “Girl in a Country Song.” Old Dominion released their debut album, “Meat and Candy,” last year, which featured the number one sin- gle, “Break Up With Him.” One of the most exciting night shows this year will be the legendary Kenny Chesney. This will be Chesney’s fourth time on the CFD stage; his last time performing in Cheyenne was in 2009. One of the biggest names in country music, Chesney is known for a cata- log of hits, including “She’s Got It All,” “Summertime” and “She Thinks My Tractor’s Sexy.” He has won numerous awards, including four Entertainer of the Year awards from both the Country Music Association and the Academy of Country Music. He has sold more

CFD Night show lineup

Friday, July 22: Sam Hunt, with Maddie & Tae

Saturday, July 23: Fall Out Boy

Sunday, July 24: Billy Currington, with Ned LeDoux

Monday, July 25, and Tuesday, July 26: Championship Bull Riding World Finals

Wednesday, July 27: Kenny Chesney, with Courtney Cole

Thursday, July 28: Jake Owen, with Old Dominion

Friday, July 29: KiSS, with Aaron Watson

Saturday, July 30: Florida Georgia Line, with Cole Swindell

All shows begin at 8 p.m. at Frontier Park Arena. Party Zone tickets get viewers close to the stage in a standing-room-only area, and general admission through one of four portal entries. Fast Pass tickets will include a Party Zone ticket, fast pass for early admission to the Party Zone area through designated portals, a rodeo ticket voucher for the same day’s rodeo and a coupon redeemable for a CFD souvenir program.

than 30 million albums worldwide. Other returning acts include Jake Owen and KISS. Like Chesney, Owen last performed at CFD in 2009, as an opening act. KISS’ last time in Cheyenne was in 2012. But even with bringing in acts who have performed here more than five years ago, Fleming said they’re still able to draw a crowd. “Afteraboutfiveyears,Kenny Chesney and Jake Owen are still on top of the charts,” he said. “They’re still being played on the radio every day.” While many of the CFD volunteers are excited for the Chesney and Sam Hunt concerts, Fleming said he per- sonally is most excited for Cole Swindell’s opening for Florida Georgia Line. “His music just really appeals to me,” he said. “He’s got a new song, ‘You Should Be Here,’ out right now, and I just lost my dad about six months ago, so I can really relate to it.”

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32 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

Night shows

Days 2016 Souvenir Edition N i g h t s h o w s Fall Out

Fall Out Boy. Courtesy

Concert acts bring a bit of everything

sam Hunt

When: Friday, July 22, 8 p.m.

Tickets: $40, $48, $64 (Party Zone) or $94 (Fast Pass). Visit cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Bio: Hailing from Georgia, Sam Hunt is one of the fastest-growing stars in country music. Hunt had been working Nashville for several years before earning national attention with songs like “Come Over,” which was picked up

by Kenny Chesney, and “Cop Car,” which was picked up by Keith Urban. Hunt co-wrote all of the songs on his debut studio album, “Montevallo.” Featuring several number one singles, including “Take Your Time,” the album was eventually certified platinum.

Official website: www.samhunt.com

Top singles: “Leave the Night On,” 2014; “Take Your Time,” 2014; “House Party,” 2015; “Breakup in a Small Town,” 2015; “Make You Miss Me,” 2016

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Maddie & tae

When: Friday, July 22, 8 p.m. (opening for Sam Hunt)

Tickets: $40, $48, $64 (Party Zone) or $94 (Fast Pass). Visit cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Bio: Maddie Marlow and Taylor Day met in 2014 and quickly found chemistry together, recording the single “Girl in A Country Song.” That song would go on to form the backbone of their 2015 debut, “Start Here,” and was praised by a diverse group of outlets, including National Public Radio.

Official website: www.maddie andtae.com

Fall out boy

When: Saturday, July 23, 8 p.m.

Tickets: $40, $48, $64 (Party Zone) or $94 (Fast Pass). Visit www.cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Bio: Making their debut appear- ance at Cheyenne Frontier Days, Chicago-based alternative rock band Fall Out Boy has been making waves

in the music industry for more than a decade. They made a name for themselves in the

Billy Currington. Courtesy
Billy
Currington.
Courtesy

Night shows

Night shows Maddie & Tae. Courtesy mid-2000s with the release of the platinum- selling album “From

Maddie & Tae. Courtesy

mid-2000s with the release of the platinum- selling album “From Under the Cork Tree.” Since then, they have been nominated for a Grammy, won plenty of other awards and even taken an almost four-year hiatus, com- ing back in 2013 to release the album “Save Rock and Roll.” The band released their latest album, “American Beauty/American Psycho,” in January 2015. They will also be featured on the soundtrack of the upcoming “Ghostbusters” remake, covering the theme song made famous by Ray Parker Jr.

Official website: www.falloutboy.com

Top singles: “Sugar, We’re Goin’ Down,” 2005; “Dance, Dance,” 2005; “My Songs Know What You Did in the Dark,” 2013; “Centuries,” 2014; “Uma Thurman,” 2015

rooney

When: Saturday, July 23, 8 p.m. (opening for Fall Out Boy)

Tickets: $40, $48, $64 (Party Zone) or $94 (Fast Pass). Visit www.cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Bio: Rooney is a California-based rock group founded in 1999 by actor and musician Robert Schwartzman, brother of actor Jason Schwartzman and son of actress Talia Shire. This will be the band’s debut appearance at Cheyenne Frontier Days. Releasing its self- titled debut album in 2003, Rooney has toured with bands such as Weezer and Queens of the Stone Age. Their latest album, “Washed Away,” was released in 2016.

Official website: www.rooneymusic.com

Top singles: “i’m Shakin’,” 2003; “Blueside,” 2003; “When Did Your Heart Go Missing?” 2007; “i Can’t Get Enough,” 2010; “My Heart Beats For You,” 2016

billy Currington

When: Sunday, July 24, 8 p.m.

Tickets: $27 (Party Zone), $31 or $57 (Fast Pass). Visit www.cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Bio: Billy Currington began gaining popularity in 2003 with his single “Walk a Little Straighter,” but it was his duet with Shania Twain on “Party for Two” that really got things going. His self-titled debut was released in 2003, but he’s well-known for his songs released in the mid-2000s, including the smash hit “Good Directions.” His sixth album, “Summer Forever,” was released June 2, 2015.

Official website: www.billycurrington.com

Top singles: “Must Be Doin’ Somethin’ Right,” 2005; “Good Directions,” 2006; “People Are Crazy,” 2009; “Don’t it,” 2014; “it Don’t Hurt Like it Used To,” 2015

ned LeDoux

When: Sunday, July 24, 8 p.m. (Opening for Billy Currington)

Tickets: $27 (Party Zone), $31 or $57 (Fast Pass). Visit www.cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Bio: Son of the late musician and former rodeo star Chris LeDoux, Ned LeDoux started out performing as the drummer in his father’s band, Western Underground. After his father passed away in 2005, Ned wasn’t sure if he’d continue in music, but he has picked up where his father left off, performing his popular songs, and even finishing a few songs Chris started before he died. This will be Ned’s

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 33

Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 33 Kenny Chesney. Courtesy/Danny Clinch first time performing

Kenny Chesney. Courtesy/Danny Clinch

first time performing on the Cheyenne Frontier Days stage, joined by former mem- bers of Western Underground as his backing band. He will perform his father’s work, but will include a few of his original songs, as well.

Official website: www.nedledoux.com

Championship bull riding

When: Monday, July 25, and Tuesday, July 26, 8 p.m.

Tickets: $29 or $39. Visit cfdrodeo.com or call 800-227-6336.

About: Championship Bull Riding (CBR) will return to Cheyenne Frontier Days to crown the 2016 World Champion. This event fea- tures the best riders and bulls in the world, and is the culmination of the year-long 2016 “Road to Cheyenne Tour.” At the end of Tuesday night, nearly half a million dollars will be paid out, making it one of the richest competitions in the world. The tour will be televised in prime time on Fox Sports Networks, with these two

shows acting as the capstone to the season.

kenny Chesney

When: Wednesday, July 27, 8 p.m.

Tickets: $45, $53, $69 (Party Zone) or $99 (Fast Pass). Visit cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Night show capsules continue on page 34

Sam

Hunt.

Courtesy

34 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

34 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition Old Dominion. Courtesy TWOMBLY PERFORMANCE HORSE SALE

Old Dominion. Courtesy

TWOMBLY PERFORMANCE

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Continued from 33

Bio: Kenny Chesney is one of the most suc- cessful artists going in country music. The singer has 14 gold or better certified albums to his name and more than 40 top 10 singles, not to mention the numerous awards he has received through the years. Chesney is tour- ing in support of his new album, “Some Town Somewhere,” which was released in early July. it is his 17th studio album. The first single from that album was “Noise,” which reached number 14 on the U.S. country charts.

Official website: www.kenny chesney.com.

Top 5 singles: “When the Sun Goes Down,” 2004; “Summertime,” 2006; “Don’t Blink,” 2007; “The Boys of Fall,” 2010; “American Kids,” 2014

Courtney Cole

When: Wednesday, July 27, 8 p.m. (opening for Kenny Chesney)

Tickets: $45, $53, $69 (Party Zone) or $99 (Fast Pass). Visit cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Bio: Courtney Cole is currently touring in support of her self-titled EP, which features the single “Ladylike.” She was selected in 2015 as one of the Huffington Post’s Country Artists to Watch, while CMT named her to their list of Next Women of Country.

Official website: www.courtneycole music.com

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Jake owen

When: Thursday, July 28, 8 p.m.

Tickets: $40, $48, $64 (Party Zone) or $94 (Fast Pass). Visit www.cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Bio: Jake Owen will be returning to the Cheyenne Frontier Days stage after nearly a decade, with his last performance being in 2009. He released his first album, “Startin’ With Me” a decade ago, with the single “Yee Haw” breaking into the top 20 on the country charts. His real success came with his second album, “Easy Does it.” Now, Owen is preparing to release his next album, “American Love,” which will be released July 29 – the day after his headlining show at Cheyenne Frontier Days.

Official website: www.jakeowen.net

Top 5 singles: “Barefoot Blue Jean Night,” 2011; “Anywhere With You,” 2013; “Beachin’,”

Night shows

2014; “Real Life,” 2015; “American Country Love Song,” 2016

old Dominion

When: Thursday, July 28, 8 p.m. (Opening for Jake Owen)

Tickets: $40, $48, $64 (Party Zone) or $94 (Fast Pass). Visit www.cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Bio: Old Dominion hasn’t been around long, but they’re working to make their name in Nashville. The group formed in 2007, but didn’t release their first extended play until 2012. Their debut album, “Meat and Candy,” was released in November and spawned the number one single “Break Up With Him.” The band’s latest single, “Snapback,” was released in January.

Official website: www.olddominion band.com

Cole

Swindell.

Courtesy

Night shows

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 35

Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 35 Jake Owen. Courtesy Florida Georgia Line. Courtesy kiss

Jake Owen. Courtesy

Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 35 Jake Owen. Courtesy Florida Georgia Line. Courtesy kiss When: Friday,

Florida Georgia Line. Courtesy

kiss

When: Friday, July 29, 8 p.m.

Tickets: $45, $53, $69 (Party Zone) or $99 (Fast Pass). Visit cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336

Bio: Legendary rock group KiSS returns to Cheyenne Frontier Days this year in all their glory. Formed in 1973, the rock group is known for their over-the-top stage shows, which feature plenty of pyrotechnics, smoke machines, costumes and much more. That shouldn’t marginalize their talent for creating rock anthems that still resonate today – nos- talgia or no. Songs like “Detroit Rock City” have stood the test of time, and front-man Gene Simmons’ ever-growing cult of person- ality has helped to keep the group relevant.

Official website: www.kissonline.com

Top 5 singles: “i Was Made for Lovin’ You,” 1979; “Rock and Roll All Nite,” 1975; “Detroit Rock City,” 1976; “Beth,” 1976; “Heaven’s on Fire,” 1984

aaron watson

When: Friday, July 29, 8 p.m. (Opening for KiSS)

Tickets: $45, $53, $69 (Party Zone) or $99 (Fast Pass). Visit cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336

Bio: if Aaron Watson isn’t the hardest work- ing man in country music, he is surely in the discussion. Pulling inspiration from honkey- tonk and outlaw country, Watson has made a career as an independent artist, thanks most- ly to relentless touring. His latest album, “The Underdog,” features the single “That Look.” While that is his only charted single in his

career, he is also known for the song “July in Cheyenne,” which chronicles the life and death of Lane Frost.

Official website: www.aaronwatson.com

Florida georgia Line

When: Saturday, July 30, 8 p.m.

Tickets: $45, $53, $69 (Party Zone) or $99 (Fast Pass). Visit www.cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Bio: Florida Georgia Line is one of the most popular country duos of the 2010s, achieving massive success in 2012 with their single “Cruise.” A remix version of the song featur- ing rapper Nelly was also released that year and received heavy airplay on pop stations. Their debut album, “Here’s to the Good Times,” was one of the best-selling albums in 2012. in April, the duo released their latest single, “H.O.L.Y.” Their third album, “Dig Your Roots,” is expected to be released in late August.

Official website: www.floridageorgia line.com

Top 5 singles: “Cruise,” 2012; “Get Your Shine One,” 2013; “This is How We Roll,” 2014; “Anything Goes,” 2015; “Confession,” 2015

Cole swindell

When: Saturday, July 30, 8 p.m. (Opening for Florida Georgia Line)

Tickets: $45, $53, $69 (Party Zone) or $99 (Fast Pass). Visit www.cfdrodeo.com or call

800-227-6336.

Bio: Before he began making a name for himself as a country singer, Cole Swindell was

busy making hits for other artists, including for Cheyenne Frontier Days headliner Florida Georgia Line. He began receiving attention after his independently released single “Chillin’ it” made it to satellite radio. He

released his self-titled debut in 2014. Swindell won the Academy of Country Music Awards’ New Artist of the Year award last year.

Official website: www.coleswindell.com

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36 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition MORE TO DO Mary Ogg of Arvada,

MORE TO DO

Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition MORE TO DO Mary Ogg of Arvada, Colorado, hangs

Mary Ogg of Arvada, Colorado, hangs up recently washed laundry on a line during a living history demonstration on July 17, 2015, at F.E. Warren Air Force Base as part of Fort D.A. Russell Days. WTE/file

CFD doesn’t just happen

By Matt Murphy

Wyoming Tribune Eagle staff writer

After more than 100 years of repeti- tion, preparing for Cheyenne Frontier Days runs like clockwork. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t take a huge amount of effort. Planning for each Frontier Days

starts more than a year out from the event, and staff members have already started preparations for the 2017 edi- tion – even before the 2016 event has started. Each year, staff members go over the event’s financial information after Frontier Days ends, with a report ready for the General Committee by

the fall, said Frontier Days President and CEO Tom Hirsig. A budget is prepared by the end of the year, and the next year’s event kicks into gear. All of that work really ramps up in the 45 days right before Frontier Days begins.

See Happen, page 38

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Museums

hiStory BuffS, reJoice

If you’re keen on the history of the Old West, look no further than Wyoming’s Capital City. Several museums throughout the city offer a wide range of exhibits that detail the rich history of Cheyenne, Frontier Days, Wyoming and the heritage of the Old West that CFD seeks to honor.

Cheyenne Depot Museum

The museum includes exhibits about the history of the Union Pacific Railroad and its intimate ties to the history of Cheyenne itself. 121 W. 15th St. Free for children ages 12 and younger, $8 for adults, $7 for seniors and military. Hours: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. July 25-29; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. July 23 and 30; 11:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. July 24 and 31. 307-632-3905.

Cheyenne Frontier Days old west Museum

The museum offers exhibits and activities that celebrate the heritage and pioneer spirit of Wyoming and the American West. Frontier Park, 4610 Carey Ave. Free for children ages 12 and younger; $10 for adults; $9 for seniors and military. Hours:

8 a.m.-8 p.m. July 22-30; 8 a.m.-6 p.m. July 31. 307-778-7290.

Cowgirls of the west Museum

The Cowgirls of the West Museum features information and exhibits about the pioneer women who helped settle the American West. Gift shop is at 203 W. 17th St.; museum is at 205 W. 17th St. Free. Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. July 22-30; Closed July 31.

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Historic governors’ Mansion

The rooms in this onetime home to Wyoming governors and their families have been restored to dis- tinct periods of their use during the 20th century. Free. 300 E. 21st St. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. July 22-31.

307-777-7878.

Messengers old west Museum

The Messengers Old West Museum features Western displays, a carriage owned by Buffalo Bill Cody and saddles and pistols dating back to 1810. Nationway and Crook Avenue. Free admission, though donations are accepted. Hours:

Happen

Continued from 36

“It’s a never-ending thing,” Hirsig joked. The General Committee of Frontier Days leads 10 subcommittees respon- sibleforspecificaspects,likerodeo,

security or concessions. Each of those

committeeshasdesignatedvolun-

teers to help with its purpose. This year, about 200 more volun- teers will join the crew at Frontier Park, bringing the total number of volunteers to 2,500. “As we grow, we need more volun- teers,” said Bill Berg, the general chairman of Frontier Days. Those people work with the event’s handful of staff members to make the “Daddy of ’em All” a success. For the most part, planning is rela- tively the same year to year – volun- teers need to be trained, and the park needs to be prepped for visitors. However, new hurdles can always come up. This year, for example, a wet

8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday. 307-635-8959.

nelson Museum of the west

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9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 307-635-7670.

wyoming state Museum

Includes artifacts and collections from throughout Wyoming’s his- tory. Gift shop features souvenirs and a collection of Wyoming books. 2301 Central Ave. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

307-777-7022.

spring with late snowfall in Cheyenne meant it took a little longer for the annual sprucing up of Frontier Park. It also took longer to build some of Frontier Park’s new capital invest- ments, like the new Frontier Town and gardens. In addition, the park’s new mov- able stage for Frontier Nights had to be installed, set up and tested well before the event. Berg said the new stage should eliminate about 35 to 50 minutes of prep time for the night concerts, translating into “hundreds of hours of volunteer time.” Other newer aspects of Frontier Days have also made the event run even more efficiently. The Cowboy Triangle shuttle ser- vice, for example, started last year with the hope of making parking and transportation easier. The service forms a triangle between park-and- ride lots near Interstate 25, Frontier Park and downtown Cheyenne. Visitors park at a lot off Happy Jack Road and pay $10, which covers parking, admission to Frontier Park and transportation between the park and one free trip between downtown and Frontier Park. Additional rides between downtown and the park will cost $1.50.

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Western fashion

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 43

FrinGe, lace and BlinG:

How to dress the part for CFD

By Sarah Zoellick

Wyoming Tribune Eagle staff writer

lacy camisoles designed to be worn under a shorter shirt or with a vest or cardigan to create a longer, layered look. “It’s more of an accessory than it is a garment to wear by itself,” Brinkerhoff said. Pairing an extender and shirt or vest with leggings can be a great way to beat the summer heat while still wearing an outfit that pulls from Western fashion. “Jeans tend to be really hot when it’s really hot outside, so

leggings are still really popular,” Brinkerhoff said. Many shirts in the Western wear market right now feature feather or arrow designs, as well as messages such as “live free” or “be free.” “You’re still casual, but you’re not in a T-shirt,” Brinkerhoff

said of the light, breath- able fabric such designs and mes- sages are printed on. The fringe and bling trend carries into the boot market, where Emerson said one-of-a-kind designs are the current rage. While men pick out a pair of boots based almost solely on comfort, women are reaching for “the flashy, dashy ones.” “You want to have that boot that everybody loves, that everybody compliments,” Emerson said. Emerson said a stand-out pair of boots can be paired with jeans for the rodeo during the day, as well as a skirt or lace shorts for the night concerts. While men don’t have nearly as many Western wardrobe options, getting a boot that fits right is key to dressing up like a cowboy. “If you wear too big of a boot, you’re

For the most part, Western wear basics stay the same from year to year: boots, blue jeans, long-sleeve

shirts and a well-worn cowboy hat. But there’s much more fun to be had beyond the basics, especially for women. “Fringe tends to dominate the market still,” said Virginia Brinkerhoff, owner of Just Dandy, located at 212 W. 17th St.

And “the bling is still strong.” Brittany Emerson, a sales associate at Boot Barn in downtown Cheyenne, said the same. “Fringe is really, re- ally in right now. You see fringe boots, fringe vests and everything like that,” she said. This year, vests, peas-

ant dresses, graphic T-shirts and skinny jeans are flood- ing the market as well. “Skinny jeans are coming in be- cause a lot of people are liking to wear shorter (ankle) boots right now or, you know, they like to have the taller, kind of blinged-out boots,” Emerson said. “Boot cut’s still in, it’s just skinny jeans are really making a comeback; they’re a huge thing, that’s all I see.” And there’s another item that’s growing in popularity. “The biggest thing that’s really kind of in right now is headbands – it’s like a really, really big deal,” Emerson said, adding chunky and

beaded jewelry to the list of trending accessories. Brinkerhoff said at her shop, gar- ments called “extenders” are gaining popularity. They’re long, frilly or

“fringe is really, really in right now. you see fringe boots, fringe vests and everything like that.”

Brittany emerson

Sales associate,

Boot Barn

going to get blisters,” Emerson said. “We call it a sloppy fit – you’re going to be slopping around in there. If it’s too tight – you can’t stretch front to back – your feet are going to be killing you by the end of the day.” And there isn’t much of a wardrobe change needed for men to go from the rodeo during the day to a concert at night. Trade in your long-sleeved shirt for a T-shirt, and you’re ready to go. Just make sure to always wear your jeans over your boot, not tucked in, Emerson said.

Welcome To Cheyenne Frontier Days !

For men in the cowboy hat market, straw is a better material for summer than felt. Straw is breathable, doesn’t show dirt as much, and won’t be af- fected by the late-afternoon rain showers that are common during Frontier Days. “Straw hats are a huge thing for rodeo season,” Emerson said. “Felts are good for winter time.” Women currently are attracted to colorful, unique hats with pops of bling or designs on the underside of the flipped-up brim.

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44 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

Parades

HisTory in MoTion

By James chilton

Wyoming Tribune Eagle staff writer

Cheyenne Frontier Days is often a feast for the eyes: whether it’s the frenetic action of the rodeo itself, the showmanship of the bands at Frontier Nights or the sight of hun- dreds of people chowing down on thousands of pancakes all at once. But few spectacles of the week can compare to the four CFD parades, where more than 600 volunteers come together to demonstrate the history and heritage of the Old West in a single, giant, mobile exhibit that is open and free to all. Members of the CFD W-Heels group play a large role in recruiting the many volunteers who take part in each year’s parades, helping to col- lect, sew and remake period-appro- priate costumes to go with the many historic wagons that will roll down the city’s streets. The parades have also grown expo- nentially since they first began more than three-quarters of a century ago, according to this year’s Parades Committee chairman, Terry Ruiz. “The parades used to be just a bunch of guys getting on horses run- ning around town,” Ruiz said. “Then, in 1925, Teddy Roosevelt came, and they had a formal parade for him, and after that it became a regular thing.” Today, 91 years later, some of the

a regular thing.” Today, 91 years later, some of the Girls wave to the crowd along

Girls wave to the crowd along Capitol Avenue during the Cheyenne Frontier Days parade on July 18, 2015, in Cheyenne. Blaine McCartney/Wyoming Tribune Eagle

same wagons that were in that origi- nal parade can still be seen making their way down Capitol Avenue as the parades kick off. In all, Ruiz said some 125 historic wagons take part in each year’s parades, delighting tens of thousands. In fact, the parades – once a one- day affair – proved so popular that they were expanded to three days in the 1960s, then to their current four- day schedule in 1972.

Ruiz said he expects the inclusion of the “Cowboy Triangle” – a three- way connector between Frontier Park, the park-and-ride lot and downtown that was introduced last year – will continue to bolster parade attendance numbers. “You walk the route and you have to walk it at a particular time to get the best (estimate of attendance) numbers,” he said. “But we’ve had anywhere from 10,000 to 30,000 peo- ple down there.” Each of this year’s four parades will feature a different grand mar- shal. Four-star Air Force Gen. Robin Rand will take that role on Saturday, July 23. “The second parade, on Tuesday (July 26), is going to be Michael Martin Murphey, who will also sing the national anthem at the finals rodeo,” Ruiz said. “He’s a singer who’s famous for his (1975) song ‘Wildfire.’” On Thursday, July 28, a group of cancer survivors will take the grand marshal role; then, on Saturday, July 30, each of the CFD committees will put forth a volunteer of the year to serve as grand marshal.

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Tuesday, July 26

Thursday, July 28

Saturday, July 30

The free parades, which last an hour to an hour and a half, begin at 9 a.m. in down- town Cheyenne.

Attendees are discouraged from bringing large flags, balloons, noisemakers or rowdy dogs because they can startle the horses. Also, do not cross the streets without the go-ahead from a parade volunteer.

Parade route: The parade starts in front of the state Capitol on 24th Street, proceeds south on Capitol Avenue to 18th Street, turns east for one block and then continues south on Central Avenue. At West Lincolnway (16th Street), the parade travels west to Carey Avenue, then north on Carey until it ends at 24th Street.

Parking: Parking is available at the Cox Parking Garage next to the Cheyenne Civic Center at 21st Street and Pioneer Avenue and at the Jack Spiker Parking Garage between 16th and 17th streets and Pioneer and Carey avenues.

Capitol construction

Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition 45

restoration work continues at capitol

By Matt Murphy

Wyoming Tribune Eagle staff writer

GooglemaysayWyoming’s state Capitol is “permanently closed,” but that couldn’t be furtherfromthetruth. The Capitol closed to the public on Dec. 9, 2015, for about three years as workers began restoration work on the interior and exterior of the building. The multi-hundred mil- lion-dollar effort is both to make the Capitol more at- tractive and to address seri- ous infrastructure issues that have come up over time, like old wiring and plumbing, an inefficient layout for modern needs and exterior damage to

inefficient layout for modern needs and exterior damage to Blossoms frame the Wyoming State Capitol on

Blossoms frame the Wyoming State Capitol on May 19, 2015, in Cheyenne. WTE/staff

masonry and the dome. Historic details through- out the building are being restored, from windows to ceiling height to skylights originally in the building.

At the same time, modern amenities are also being added, and the building will be made compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The Capitol restoration is part of the larger Capitol Square Project, which was originally envisioned to in- clude renovations to the Capitol, the Herschler Building on the north side the Capitol, the facility’s utility plant and the underground tunnel that runs between the Capitol and the Herschler Building. However, costs have gone up to about $300 million since the project was originally announced, and state law- makers may consider scaling back parts of the work if costs become too high. Meanwhile, the Wyoming Legislature has moved to the Jonah Business Center at

3001 E. Pershing Blvd., where it met for the 2016 session and will continue to meet for the next few years. Other state offices have been moved to the Jonah Business Center as well, or have been relocated to other offices around Cheyenne. The work will take a few more years, with completion expected by 2018 or 2019. While work on the Capitol is ongoing, visitors interested in the building can visit the Wyoming State Museum at 2301 Central Ave. Visitors who have a Capitol Collection Passport book can receive the stamp for the Wyoming Capitol at the State Museum as well.

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46 Wyoming Tribune Eagle Frontier Days 2016 Souvenir Edition

Thunderbirds

Get up close and personal with military planes at cFd

By Matt Murphy

Wyoming Tribune Eagle staff writer

Those interested in seeing military planes up close and personal will get a couple of chances to do so this year. In the air, the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds aerial demonstration squad will return this year to perform on Wednesday, July 27. On the ground that same day, the 153rd Airlift Wing of the Wyoming Air National Guard will hold an open house at its facility at the Cheyenne Regional Airport. The Thunderbirds air show is a Cheyenne Frontier Days tradition dating back to 1953, when the group made its public debut here. Since then, the Air Force’s elite aerial dem- onstration team has been here every year, with the exception of 2013, when military budget cuts kept them grounded.

TheteamfeaturessixF-16Fighting

Falcon jets that are piloted by some of the top airmen in the country. The free show begins at 9:30 a.m. at LaramieCountyCommunityCollege, 1400 E. College Drive. An expected

13,000onlookerswillspreadout

along the south side of LCCC’s cam- pus,withtheaerobaticstakingplace in the sky over the empty field across CollegeDrivefromtheschool. “It’s just an amazing experience,” said Arlene Lester, LCCC’s program manager for facilities and events. “When (the planes) come up over the south of the hill, it’s just amazing.” Lester said bands will be perform- ing and concessions will be available on campus for spectators. College Drive near LCCC will be closed at 9 a.m. and for the duration of the show. Parking will be open at LCCC from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m., and

Parking will be open at LCCC from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m., and The U.S. Air

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds fly in formation during the annual Cheyenne Frontier Days air show on July 22, 2015, at Laramie County Community College in Cheyenne. Blaine McCartney/Wyoming Tribune Eagle

vehicles will be able to depart after the show ends. Additionally, LCCC officials are asking onlookers to consider using the free shuttle service to the college. The shuttle service will run between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. and will resume after the show. It will run between LCCC and parking lots at Ashley Furniture on Nationway and Hobby Lobby on East Lincolnway. Across town, the National Guard open house will begin at 10:45 a.m. at the 153rd Airlift Wing, 217 Dell Range Blvd. The open house will feature static equipment displays showing the various missions and roles of the Wyoming Air and Army National Guard.

The displays will include a C-130H “Hercules” aircraft, a UH-60A “Black Hawk” helicopter, a medical decontamination display, a Veterans Affairs mobile clinic, a mobile air

traffic control tower, Civil Air Patrol aircraft and a high mobility artillery rocket system. Due to parking restrictions, those arriving by car must use shuttle buses.Buseswillleavecontinuously fromtheFrontierMall’snorthside,

betweenDillard’sandSears,begin-

ning at 10:45 a.m. The last bus to the open house will leave at 2:45 p.m., and the open house ends at 3 p.m. The mall is located at 1400 Dell Range Blvd. Pedestrian foot traffic and vehicles equipped with handicapped stickers will be allowed to enter through the

front gate of the Wyoming Air National Guard base on Dell Range Boulevard. All visitors must bring a valid ID, and no weapons, coolers or contain- ers will be allowed on the base. Security personnel may search all bags. “We wanted to offer the Cheyenne Frontier Days crowd a chance to see the capabilities of their Wyoming NationalGuard,”saidMaj.Gen.Luke Reiner,Wyoming’sadjutantgeneral. “Community support is vital to our success; this is one way we can show ourappreciationforthatsupport.” Vendors will be selling food and drinks on base during the open house. For more information on the open house, call 307-772-6232.

WELCOME TO CHEYENNE FRONTIER DAYS First Presbyterian Church COME WORSHIP WITH US Bringing People Together
WELCOME TO CHEYENNE FRONTIER DAYS
First Presbyterian Church
COME WORSHIP
WITH US
Bringing People Together
In Christ’s Love
Visitors Welcome
Summer Worship 9:30am
Nursery Provided
Rev. Beth Wilson - Rev. Diana Hartman
22nd & Carey Avenue 638-3345
2 Blks. South of Capitol Bldg. • Barrier Free Access
firstprescheyenne.org
NORTH CHRISTIAN CHURCH “Loving GodandLoving People” Sunday Services: 8:45am Traditional Service 10:00am Coffee
NORTH CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
“Loving GodandLoving People”
Sunday Services:
8:45am Traditional Service
10:00am Coffee Fellowship
10:45am Contemporary Service
Children’s classes during both
Celebrate Recovery Service
5:00 pm Every Saturday
Pastor Matt Snyder
2015 Tranquility Rd
2015 Tranquility Rd
632-2331
632-2331

Nccheyenne.com

Nccheyenne.com

St. Andrew’s Anglican Church A traditional Anglican service using the 1928 Book of Common Prayer
St. Andrew’s
Anglican Church
A traditional Anglican service using
the 1928 Book of Common Prayer
Bible Study 9:00am
Holy Eucharist 10:30am
2 nd , 4 th , 5 th Sundays
Morning Prayer
Monday-Friday 8:00am
Children’s Sunday School and Nursery
Rev. Dr. Timothy G. Davies
Rector
Rev. David A. Ivester
3325 McCann
778-7709
WELCOME, JOIN US… Cathedral of St. Mary 2107 Capitol Ave. 307-635-9261 www.stmarycathedral.com Sunday Mass Schedule
WELCOME, JOIN US…
Cathedral of St. Mary
2107 Capitol Ave.
307-635-9261
www.stmarycathedral.com
Sunday Mass Schedule
Saturday - 5:15 pm
(Anticipates Sunday liturgy)
Sunday - 7:30, 9:00 and 10:30 am,
12:00 noon and 5:15 pm
Weekday Mass Schedule
M, T, W, TH, F - 6:45 am and 5:15 pm,
Saturday - 7:30 am
Reconciliation Schedule
Monday - Friday - 4:30 - 5:00 pm,
Saturday - 3:00 - 5:00 pm and 6:30 - 7:30 pm
Faith United Methodist Church “Just south of downtown” Your Hometown Church in the City Worship
Faith United
Methodist
Church
“Just south of downtown”
Your Hometown
Church in the City
Worship 10:30am
Pastor
Leah Coleman
522 E. 6th St., 638-3184