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2015

the handbook

Beijing, 19-21 May 2015


2015 519-21 -

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Photos: Ami Vitale, Brian Richter

Hydropower can be part of a sustainable energy future


if designed and operated in a manner that avoids or
minimizes impacts on people and vital river functions.

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The Nature Conservancy uses science, innovative solutions and collaborative


approaches to identify realistic development pathways that will keep thousands of
kilometers of free-flowing rivers intact and provide clean energy sources to people
around the world. Through our Hydropower by Design approach, we are collaborating
with leaders to reengineer old dams, remove or avoid others and better plan for those
that will occur in the future. We aim to create positive, lasting change that ensures
people and nature thrive together.

Learn more about The Nature Conservancys work

www.nature.org/riversandenergy

2015-04-08_GreatRivers_AD_r2.indd 1

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

4/9/15 9:43 AM

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

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IN YOUR HANDBOOK:

Download the congress app

FOREWORDS

At the 2015 World Hydropower Congress


you can navigate through the week and
connect with other participants using the
special event app.

Nur Bekri, Director, National Energy Administration of China

Richard Taylor, International Hydropower Association

The app features live updates, the full


programme, maps, interaction and more.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: THE MAKING OF THE CONGRESS 8


HYDROPOWER TODAY: GLOBAL HIGHLIGHTS 12

To download it to your phone, simply search


for World Hydropower Congress in your
phones app store and follow the instructions.

IN CONVERSATION WITH:

Alternatively, you can paste bit.ly/2015WHC


into your internet browser.
Once you have downloaded the app to your
phone, use the redeem code 2015WHC to
access your congress guide.

NETWORKING TOUR: EXPERIENCE THE GREAT WALL 31

Zhang Jiyao, President. China Society for Hydropower Engineering

15

Jin-Yong Cai, Executive Director and CEO, International Finance Corporation

19

Elham Ibrahim, African Union Commissioner for Infrastructure and Energy

23

Ashok Bhargava, Director, East Asia Division, Asian Development Bank

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IHA GENERAL MEETING 32


THE FULL CONGRESS PROGRAMME 33
Tuesday 19 May

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Wednesday 20 May

39

Thursday 21 May

55

SPEAKER DIRECTORY 70
STUDY TOURS: DISCOVER CHINA 85
INTERNATIONAL HYDROPOWER ASSOCIATION: CELEBRATING 20 YEARS 93
EIGHT WAYS TO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR CONGRESS 96
DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA: AN ETIQUETTE AND LANGUAGE GUIDE 98
GETTING AROUND YANQI LAKE: VENUE MAPS AND FLOOR PLANS 101
CONGRESS PLANNER 104
PROGRAMME AT-A-GLANCE 106

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

05

WELCOME TO THE 2015 WORLD


HYDROPOWER CONGRESS
Welcome to China and Beijing.
For the first time, China is hosting the World Hydropower
Congress. This congress is a great event for the hydropower
sector, both in China and in the world.
Representatives from governments, industries, non-governmental
organisations, the academic community and the financial sector
will gather together to enjoy the global experience and expertise
of the hydropower sector. We actively support the convening of
the congress and expect the event to be a success.
Hydropower plays an important role in world energy
supply and is significant in combating global climate change.
At present, world hydropower development has entered a
new phase and faces challenges from perspectives of
environment, water resources and others.
As the country with the largest hydropower installed capacity,
China has gathered a large amount of experience in project
design, manufacturing and construction. We have built a
complete industry chain and developed assets in technology,
capital, human resources and management. Through this
conference, we hope to discuss with stakeholders from all over
the world about the future of the sector, and to promote
sustainable hydropower development.
I wish this congress success and encourage you to enjoy
Beijing in the springtime.

Nur Bekri
Honorary Chairman of the 2015 World Hydropower Congress
Deputy Director of Chinas National Development and Reform
Commission and Director of the National Energy Administration

As a co-organiser of the 2015 World Hydropower Congress, the Chinese National Energy Administration
(NEA) is the governmental organ in charge of Chinas energy affairs, responsible for managing the
implementation, planning and strategy-making of Chinas energy development, making industrial policies
and standards for coal, petroleum, natural gas, electricity, new and renewable energy, petroleum refining,
coal fuel and fuel ether.
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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

It is an honour to welcome you to the 2015 World


Hydropower Congress in Beijing.
For the first time the congress is being hosted in China,
and it is a pleasure to see so many participants with an active
involvement in the sector: we expect a wealth of experience to
be shared, and solid knowledge to provide the foundation for
tomorrows hydropower.
We are also grateful for the tireless efforts of all of the
organising partners, and the support of all congress sponsors:
without their commitment, the event simply could not happen.
Hydropower is not just about energy. Every day, we see so
many examples of its ability to catalyse development and
alleviate poverty by providing people with access to water,
irrigation, transportation and basic infrastructure.
We look forward to hosting the discussion about the future
of hydropower and how it can contribute to the worlds
development challenges. We are pleased to welcome so many
different perspectives from around the world; the diversity
of voices represented at this congress is a reflection of the
growing number of parties that are becoming engaged in
the sustainable development of hydropower.
The congress takes place over three days, but we hope this will
be the beginning of a long and sustained conversation for
many of you. I trust you will discover insights and make new
lasting connections that will help you to achieve success in
your projects and initiatives.

Richard Taylor
Chief Executive, International Hydropower Association
World Hydropower Congress Secretariat

The International Hydropower Association has organised the World Hydropower Congress since its first
staging in 2007. Founded in 1995, the association works with a network of members and partners active in
over 100 countries to advance sustainable hydropower by building and sharing knowledge on its role in
renewable energy systems, responsible freshwater management and climate change solutions.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

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THE MAKING OF
THE CONGRESS
The 2015 World Hydropower Congress
would not be possible without the
incredible commitment and support of
all of the organisations that have been
involved. We would like to extend thanks
to everyone who has contributed.

2015 World Hydropower Congress


Under the auspices of:

Main sponsors:

Sponsors:

Partners:

National Energy Administration, China

China Datang Corporation

African Union Commission

China Association for Science


and Technology

China Development Bank

Changjiang Institute of Survey, Planning,


Design and Research, Changjiang Water
Resources Commission

China Energy Engineering Group Co., Ltd


China Guodian Corporation

Organised by:
The International Hydropower
Association
Organising partners:
China Society for Hydropower
Engineering
China Three Gorges Corporation
Chinese National Committee
on Large Dams
China Institute of Water Resources
and Hydropower Research

China Gezhouba (Group) Corporation

Asian Development Bank


ASEAN Centre for Energy
Centre for Environmental Design of
Renewable Energy

China Huadian Corporation

China Hydropower Engineering


Consulting Group Co.

China Huaneng Group

China International Water & Electric Corp.

China Institute of Water Resources


and Hydropower Research

China Pearl River Water Resources Planning,


Design and Survey Co., Ltd

China Power Investment Corporation


China Southern Power Grid Corporation

China Renewable Energy


Engineering Institute

International Institute for Environment


and Development

China Three Gorges Corporation

China Society for Hydropower Engineering

Dongfang Electric Machinery Co., Ltd

China Three Gorges International Corporation

International Renewable Energy Agency


(IRENA)

China Yangtze Power Co., Ltd

Dadu Hydropower Development Co., Ltd

lectricit de France

Hanergy Holding Group Ltd

Harbin Electric Corporation

Huanghe Hydropower Development Co., Ltd

Itaipu Binacional

HYDROCHINA International Engineering


Corporation Limited

Power Construction Corporation of China


Sarawak Energy Bhd
State Development & Investment
Corporation
State Grid Corporation of China
The Nature Conservancy
World Bank Group
WWF

Jinsha River Middle Reach Hydropower


Development Corporation
Longtan Hydropower Development Co., Ltd
Nanjing Hydraulic Research Institute
POWERCHINA Chengdu Engineering
Corporation Limited
POWERCHINA Beijing Engineering
Corporation Limited
POWERCHINA Guiyang Engineering
Corporation Limited
POWERCHINA Huadong Engineering
Corporation Limited

Hohai University
International Energy Agency Hydro
International Finance Corporation

International Union for Conservation


of Nature
International Renewable Energy Alliance
International Water Management Institute
Renewable Energy Policy Network for
the 21st Century
State Secretariat for Economic Affairs
(Switzerland)
Transparency International
UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education
UNESCO International Hydrological
Programme
UNU-FLORES
Tsinghua University
World Business Council for Sustainable
Development
World Energy Council

POWERCHINA Kunming Engineering


Corporation Limited

World Water Council

POWERCHINA Xibei Engineering


Corporation Limited

HRW - Hydro Review Worldwide

POWERCHINA Zhongnan Engineering


Corporation Limited

Media partners:
International Water Power and
Dam Construction

Sinohydro Corporation Limited


State Grid Electric Power Research Institute
(Nanjing NARI Group)
Wujiang Hydropower Development
Corporation Ltd
Yalong River Hydropower Development, Ltd
Yunnan Huaneng Lancang River
Hydropower Co., Ltd

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

09

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GREEN GUODIAN
Green Energy

China Guodian Corporation dedicates to the development


of clean energy like hydropower.

China Guodian Corporation


Tel: +86-10-58682000 / +86-10-58682727
Fax: +86-10-58553900
ADD: NO. 6-8, Fuchengmen Bei Street, Xicheng District Beijing,
China Guodian Corporation
P.C.: 100034
E-mail: gjb@cgdc.com.cn
http://www.cgdc.com.cn

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

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HYDROPOWER TODAY:
GLOBAL HIGHLIGHTS

The 2015 World Hydropower Congress is taking place against the backdrop of
an encouraging situation for hydropower development. In a new briefing,
2015 Key Trends in Hydropower, the International Hydropower Association reviews
new trends and development. This graphic shows some of the key points.
Europe
455 MW added in 2014

North and Central America


2,850 MW added in 2014
New government incentives
introduced in the USA to add
hydropower to existing reservoirs
Costa Rica operated on 100%
renewable energy for an
extended period at end 2014 /
early 2015, powered largely by
hydropower
1,724 MW commissioned in
Canada in 2014

Pumped storage remains a focus


of activity, with 182 MW
commissioned in 2014 and 8,600
MW planned or under
construction, including 2,500 MW
expected in the Swiss Alps by 2017
The Spanish Canary Island
El Hierros 11.3 MW pumped
storage hydropower and wind
system was commissioned in
2014, making the island close
to 100% renewable
In 2015, Norway and the UK
announced agreement for the
worlds longest subsea high
voltage cable (730 km, 1.4 GW),
allowing the UK to import
Norwegian hydropower,
and Norway to benefit from
excess wind power in the UK
to operate pumps

Africa
121 MW added in 2014

South America
4,959 MW added in 2014
3,312 MW commissioned in Brazil
in 2014, despite severe drought
affecting generation in the south
of the country
875 MW commissioned in
Colombia, including the 820 MW
Sogamoso project, which will
meet about 8% of the countrys
electricity demand
Development continuing on
the lower Caroni cascade in
Venezuela, with the
commissioning of Manuel Piar
(925 MW) expected in 2015

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Very low deployment, despite


significant untapped potential
and major needs for electricity
and water services

West and Central Asia


3,913 MW added in 2014
India commissioned 1,195 MW in
2014, including the 520 MW
Parbati III project. The policy
environment is shifting in
support of more hydropower in
India, with the government
considering hydropower
obligation, and encouraging
private sector investment
Regional interconnection
projects could drive further
optimisation of hydropower and
other sources in Central Asia with
the CASA-1000 transmission
project linking Pakistan,
Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and
Afghanistan
Russia completed the 3,000 MW
Boguchanskaya project, putting
its final 1,000 MW into operation
in 2014
Turkey commissioned 1,352 MW
as part of its push to rapidly
exploit its hydropower potential
by the year 2023

Continent has used less than 10% of


its technical hydropower potential

East Asia and Pacific


27,232 MW added in 2014, 80%
of which is in China
China leads global hydropower
development with 21,850 MW
installed in 2014, including the
final 4,620 MW of the 13,860
Xiluodu project the third
largest hydropower plant in
the world
Malaysia commissioned 3,344 MW
in the state of Sarawak, including
full commissioning of Bakun
(2,400 MW) and Murum (944
MW), while also announcing
plans to begin construction on
the 1,285 Baleh project in 2016
Cambodia commissioned 707 MW
and all three projects are CDM
accredited. Lao PDR (308 MW)
and Vietnam (281 MW) were also
active in 2014

Ethiopia expected to commission


1,870 MW Gilgel Gibe III in 2015,
and is well into construction of the
Grand Renaissance project which
will bring a further 6,000 MW to
the region in the coming years

In 2014, the worlds total


installed hydropower capacity
reached 1,050 GW, with 39 GW
added during the year.

You can download 2015 Key Trends in Hydropower


at www.hydropower.org/publications.
The briefing will be followed by the 2015 Hydropower Status
Report which will be published in August 2015.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

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IN CONVERSATION WITH
ZHANG JIYAO
PRESIDENT OF THE
CHINA SOCIETY FOR
HYDROPOWER
ENGINEERING

We work
on

water to

better the future

The opening ceremony of the 2015 World Hydropower


Congress will take a special look at China, and why it is
one of the most influential actors in the hydropower
sector today. In this interview, the societys president,
Zhang Jiyao, talks about the status of hydropower in
China and the strategy for future development.

China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research

A-1 Fuxing Road, 100038 Beijing, P. R. China


T.+86-10-6878-1650, F.+86-10-6841-2316, dic@iwhr.com
www.iwhr.com

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

15

IN CONVERSATION WITH ZHANG JIYAO CONT


What is the significance of the World Hydropower Congress
being hosted in China?
Hydropower is an important renewable energy source, and also a
working priority in our plans to substitute fossil fuels. It can help to
address climate change through the reduction of greenhouse gas
emission, and to achieve higher levels of prosperity.
China is the largest developing country in the world, and one of
the worlds fastest growing economies. Developed countries
around the globe share an approximate hydropower
development level of 80 per cent, while in China the level is
comparatively lower.
At the same time, the huge amount of coal consumption also
confronts China with the difficult task of reducing its carbon
emissions. By virtue of the congress, China will be able to learn
from various countries around the world: advanced concepts and
technologies, ripe experience and management, refined systems
and setups.
On the other hand, it will also allow us to share with our
counterparts all over the world our success and experience in
building hydropower constructions.
Since the countrys economic reforms, China has established a set
of practices to take advantage of the market mechanism in order
to resolve hydropower investment problems, to accelerate the
development of resources, and to secure and guard economic
development. Holding the World Hydropower Congress here
enables countries from all over the world to thoroughly
understand the path of Chinas hydropower development from
close quarters.
China is endowed with abundant hydropower resources,
representing approximately one-sixth of the worlds total.
Along with current advancements in technology, Chinas
hydropower constructions display evident advantages of late
development. Most of the current global top ten hydroelectric
power stations in terms of installed capacity are located in China.
A generous quantity of engineering practice has brought China
to the forefront of the worlds hydropower planning, design,
construction, and equipment manufacture.
This event allows participants to visit and to examine some of
Chinas most recognised hydropower projects this can help
to support further advances in worldwide hydropower
technology development.

What is the historical role of hydropower in China?


Hydropower serves an indispensable function in national
and regional development all over the globe; the same applies
in China.
China started to build hydroelectric power stations in the early
20th century, although the construction and development
process has been rather sluggish until recently. During the first
30 years of the establishment of the new China, an array of
critical plants were constructed in order to fulfil the demands
of both flood control and irrigation, to satisfy the basic daily
needs of society.
During this period, small hydro development in rural
Chinese areas happened at a relatively faster pace.
Following the economic reforms, China entered a peak phase
in the development of large-scale hydroelectric power stations,
marked with the construction of the Three Gorges Dam. At the
end of 2014, Chinas installed hydropower capacity reached
beyond 300 GW, constituting approximately 22 per cent of
national power installed capacity.
Hydropower has played an important part in Chinas economic
development and societal advancement, providing necessary
support and security. Not only has it effectively resolved flood
control and water supply problems, at the same time it has made
major contributions to the modernisation of China.
How does hydropower fit into Chinas development
plans for 2020?
On account of its enormous population and economic volume,
China requires an equally large amount of resources. Realistically
speaking, due to the population size, it is not plausible for China to
mirror wholly the resource development pattern of Western
nations. Chinas sustainable development can only be achieved by
gradually decreasing the proportion of fossil fuels within the
energy structure, while increasing the use of sustainable and
renewable energy resources.
From a developmental point of view, it is beyond the bounds of
possibility that nature will be able to provide enough fossil fuel
energy to satisfy the ever-increasing needs of human beings
living in a modern world. Therefore, if China wants to achieve
modernisation and sustainable development, it has to further
increase its utilisation of hydropower and other renewable
energy sources.
In the face of increasingly severe environmental problems, China
has taken active measures to contain global warming together
with the rest of the world, establishing strict energy-saving and
emission-reduction targets: striving to achieve 15 per cent
non-fossil resources in primary energy consumption by 2020,
along with a 4045 per cent reduction in carbon emissions in
comparison with 2005.

For a nation and for a river,


hydropower and water
resources development are
often inseparable.
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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Active encouragement of hydropower development is a


major part of our strategy to meet these energy-saving and
emission-reduction targets, constantly improving our energy
structure, and taking on climate change.

Some predict that world hydropower installed capacity


will reach 2050 GW by the year 2050. Do you think this is an
achievable target?
I think it is possible. Along with the continuous construction of
hydroelectric power stations, the large quantity of wind and
solar constructions entering the power system means that we
will still need to build a huge number of pumped-storage
hydropower stations.
Chinas installed hydropower capacity will undergo a
substantial increase in the future. Simultaneously, under the
general trend of global advancement, developing countries
will accelerate the pace of their own economic development
and hydropower use.
Through the hard work of national governments and hydropower
contractors and builders, in 2050, the target of 2,050 GW of
installed hydropower capacity is absolutely achievable.
In addition to providing electricity, hydropower possesses
many other comprehensive benefits. Do you think that this
is well understood around the world?
Every nation has its own different understanding of, and policies
for, hydropower development. There are quite a few countries
where hydropower development resides under the jurisdiction
of the department of energy, and others where it is under the
department of water resources.
The functional ability of hydropower in terms of water resources
adjustment and control is often not fully appreciated and utilised.
Humanitys use of hydropower has not existed for long, but the
damming of rivers for water conservation purposes has a history
that can be traced back some thousands of years. Human society
has constructed dams to prevent floods, to irrigate, to supply
water, and to make adjustments to the uneven spatial and
temporal distribution of water resources.

What do you hope will be the outcome of the 2015 World


Hydropower Congress?
We are very glad that the 2015 World Hydropower Congress is
being held in China, and to be given the chance to understand
the most recent trends in world hydropower development;
to examine and to explore, together with our hydropower
counterparts from all over the world, the concept of sustainable
hydropower development, and effective ways to protect the
environment and comprehensively develop water resources;
and to learn from the experience of developed countries,
while at the same time displaying the results and experience of
Chinas hydropower constructions to congress participants.
I believe that through communication between industry
leaders, the participants of this congress will not only achieve
general improvement in terms of the design and technology
of hydropower construction plans, equipment manufacturing
and operational management; participants will also gain
rewarding knowledge regarding the protection of the
ecological environment, policy support and social
engagement, facilitation of poverty alleviation and the
promotion of overall economic development.
Concurrently, everyone will also be able to further explore the
policy systems and mechanisms for facilitating hydropower
development; learn from a range of experience regarding
investment and financing models; and finally to strengthen the
collaboration between different nations and regions, together
making their due contributions to the worlds sustainable
hydropower development.

Hence, present hydropower development in nations all over the


globe acts not only to resolve the demands of electricity supply,
but also to resolve the necessity of water resources adjustment
and control.
For a nation and for a river, hydropower and water resources
development are often inseparable. In a sense, the various
additional functions of a reservoir that serve the public interest
during the process of hydropower construction are more
important than the electricity supply itself.
Hydropower is meant to satisfy the development needs of human
society, while water resources development is required to meet
the needs of survival. If the international society can form an
accord in these matters, hydropower will be able to achieve
even further development.

The China Society for Hydropower Engineering is a national,


lawfully registered non-profit academic body established by
hydropower engineering professionals throughout China. It
serves as a bridge of communication between the Chinese
government and the countrys hydropower engineering
professionals, as well as an indispensable societal force with
respect to developing engineering technology in the sector.
You can find out more
at www.hydropower.org.cn.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

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IN CONVERSATION WITH
JIN-YONG CAI
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT
AND CEO, INTERNATIONAL
FINANCE CORPORATION
At the 2015 World Hydropower Congress, IFCs CEO
Jin-Yong Cai will facilitate a discussion between key
players on international cooperation and development.
In this interview, he discusses the influence of the BRICS
countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa)
on hydropower worldwide, and IFCs approach to
sustainable development.

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

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IN CONVERSATION WITH JIN-YONG CAI CONT


Why is developing hydropower a priority for IFC?
One of IFCs main areas of focus is increasing access to
electricity to the more than 1 billion people who currently live
without it. Almost all of these people live in sub-Saharan Africa
and South Asia. We are also working to make reliable power
available to the 2.5 billion people without steady electricity
to their homes, schools, hospitals and businesses. Countries
cannot realise sustainable economic growth without a stable
supply of electricity. Businesses in all sectors suffer without it.

What are the most important considerations for IFC to


support a hydropower project?
IFC helps develop sustainable and commercially viable
hydropower projects through an integrated package of
investment and advisory services, including project financing,
expertise on construction risks, long tenors, equity, insurance
assistance, and environmental and social risk management.

Key considerations in whether to support a given hydropower


project include project and site-specific characteristics
Hydropower accounts for nearly one-fifth of the worlds electricity construction periods, civil works and up-front capital costs.
supply; it has helped power growth in countries including Canada, For projects to be successful and viable, they need to have a
Norway, the United States, China and Brazil. But it remains
credit-worthy off-taker, tariffs that cover costs, and a working
underexploited in many developing countries with strong
wholesale electricity market.
hydropower potential. In sub-Saharan Africa, for instance,
less than 10% of hydropower potential has been tapped.
How can the environmental and social aspects of a
For IFC, hydropower is an essential part of our toolkit as we
hydropower project be managed?
seek ways to turn the lights on and keep them on in more
Each hydropower plant development is unique, and each
places. It is the renewable energy source with the largest
project presents complex environmental and social risks that
potential to transform economies. It also poses complex
challenges for local communities, for the environment, and for must be taken into account and measured transparently
throughout the project cycle.
project sponsors and financiers, and we are working carefully
to address and manage these.
From an environmental and social perspective, one large
dam of 1,500 MW in a remote area on one river basin may
have fewer negative impacts than the combined impacts
What are IFCs plans for supporting the sustainable
of 100 or 200 small-scale projects located on many rivers.
development of hydropower?
The environmental and social impacts of hydropower plant
IFC has played a key role in bringing many hydropower projects to projects vary depending on project size, type, site, and other
fruition. We provide long-tenor financing to match the life of the
local conditions, and these should be evaluated closely.
asset and can take on construction risks that commercial banks
All new hydropower plant investments must be carefully
have been reluctant to contemplate. Our strategy is to continue
selected, sited and managed to maximise overall benefits
this support, while ensuring that best-practice environmental and and mitigate any negative consequences.
social standards are implemented and followed in the sector.
Both IFC and the World Bank support the Hydropower
We are also working with the World Bank in countries such as
Sustainability Assessment Protocol, an enhanced sustainability
Nepal to bolster local government capacity and regulatory
assessment tool used to measure and guide performance in
frameworks that will support private sector development of
the hydropower sector.
hydro projects of various sizes.
IFCs Performance Standards on Environmental and Social
Over the last decade, IFC has invested more than $1.3 billion in
Sustainability, revised most recently in 2012, provide key
42 hydropower projects in countries including Brazil, Panama,
industry-leading references for environmental and social risk
Guatemala, Chile, Peru, Turkey, Uganda, Nepal, Pakistan and
management practices. These underpin all of IFCs investments
India. Along with our partners across the World Bank Group,
in hydropower, as in other sectors. The widespread adoption of
IFC is engaged in responsible, sustainable development of
the Equator Principles, which are based on IFCs Performance
hydropower projects of all sizes and types, including run of
Standards, by commercial banks has had a tremendous impact
the river, pumped storage, and reservoir, plus off-grid projects
on how the financial sector views environmental and social
for rural areas. IFC has invested in close to 5,000 MW of
issues in the financing of hydropower projects.
hydropower plants, with an average size of 100 MW.
The largest was 500 MW and the smallest 9 MW.
Going forward, we will focus on supporting cross-border
hydropower projects, where some of the electricity generated
from hydropower in countries such as Georgia, Nepal, Bhutan and
Laos is sold across borders for both national and regional benefit.

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

How has the finance sector in general changed its view with
regard to the environmental and social risks related to
hydropower projects?

IFC plays a role in supporting development through


regional collaboration. Can you tell us more about it?

For many developing countries, hydropower is a key resource


for national economic development, an important source of
international trade, and a vehicle for assuring year-round
power supply. With many waterways crossing international
Hydropower project developers now recognise they need to
borders some 60% of rivers flow in trans-boundary basins, for
make sure that all environmental and social impacts are taken
instance there are also clearly opportunities for hydropower
into account following best practices, just as they need to meet
to be a regional economic driver.
domestic regulatory requirements and fulfill financing
institution expectations.
One is example is Nepal and its neighbours in the Himalayas.
Nepal has among the worlds richest potential for hydropower,
Also, it is now widely acknowledged that when designed
yet Nepalese citizens endure 12 to 18 hours of power cuts on a
properly, the benefits of multi-purpose hydroelectricity projects
daily basis. Demand for electricity is growing quickly, and there
can extend beyond energy, to water security, investments in
is a severe dependence on diesel generators, which are
roads, social infrastructure, communications and skill-building
polluting and expensive.
to support local or regional economic development.
The World Bank Group is working with the government of
Nepal to develop hydropower as a potential energy source for
How are the BRICS countries influencing the
the country and for the region, with potential cross-border
development of hydropower worldwide?
transmission lines stretching to India, Bangladesh and Bhutan,
including through the Nepal-India Electricity Transmission and
Middle income and large emerging economies are influencing the
Trade Project. IFC is also looking at setting up a hydro-trading
development of hydropower worldwide through demonstration
special purpose vehicle in India with the Electricity Holding
effects by showing how these projects can be managed well to
Company of Bhutan (Druk Holding) to sell some of Bhutans
the benefit of their populations. In Brazil, 85% of power
hydroelectric power in the private Indian Energy Exchange
generation is derived from hydropower.
(IEX) and through a portfolio of short- and long-term contracts
China now has more installed hydropower capacity than the next with industrial groups.
three countries combined (Brazil, the United States and Canada).
With total hydroelectricity generation at 905 TWh, or almost a
quarter of electricity consumption, this is greater than the total
Most of the worlds untapped hydropower potential is
electricity consumption of Germany and Spain combined. One
located in the developing world. What will be the biggest
company alone China Three Gorges Corporation has total
challenges in developing it between now and 2050?
controllable installed capacity of nearly 50,000 MW. And hydro
Hydropower is highly capital intensive with large upfront
continues to grow quickly in China. According to Bloomberg
capital costs, returns spread over long periods, a history of cost
News Energy Finance, hydropower made up 21% of Chinas
over-runs and, as previously discussed, a number of associated
total generation capacity at the end of 2013, and China added
environmental and social risks. Construction risks need to be
4.7 GW of hydropower capacity in 2014 alone.
addressed and transparency in engineering, procurement and
India is endowed with significant hydroelectric potential and
construction (EPC) contracts will be vital.
ranks fifth in the world in terms of usable potential. The total
Public opinion will also be key to the sectors development.
hydro capacity, which is yet to be tapped, is around 67% of the
There needs to be greater understanding that hydropower,
potential. As with many developing countries, India is poised for
when properly managed, is a sustainable and renewable
a significant increase in energy demand in the next few decades.
energy source.
The gap in the electricity demand-supply situation is highlighted
by the fact that the country experienced a peak deficit of 5.2%
and an energy deficit of 4.2% in the financial year 201314.
Hydropower generation in India is a key building block of the
governments energy strategy.
Decades of experience have taught us that there are better and
worse ways of doing hydropower projects, both large and small.

Other developing countries are looking to these countries as


they contemplate how to approach their own vast hydropower
resources. Sub-Saharan Africas 400 GW of undeveloped
hydropower potential is enough to quadruple its existing
installed capacity of 80 GW. Nepal has only developed 600 MW
of its estimated 200,000 MW of hydropower potential.
Myanmars potential for hydropower is the highest in Southeast
Asia, topping 100,000 MW, but at the moment only 29% of the
countrys population has access to electricity. If realised, the
hydropower produced will benefit 6 million people. Laos has
shown the way to develop cross-border hydropower plants like
the 1,000 MW Nam Theun 2 that sells power to Thailand.

Both IFC and the World Bank support


the Hydropower Sustainability
Assessment Protocol, an enhanced
sustainability assessment tool used
to measure and guide performance
in the hydropower sector.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

21

WATER
DOESNT
COME FROM
A TAP

1986 Panda symbol WWF WWF is a WWF Registered Trademark

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IN CONVERSATION WITH
ELHAM IBRAHIM
AFRICAN UNION
COMMISSIONER FOR
ENERGY AND
INFRASTRUCTURE
The African Union is convening the opening plenary
on the future of hydropower in Africa on Wednesday
20 May at the 2015 World Hydropower Congress. In this
interview, Elham Ibrahim, the AUs commissioner for
infrastructure and energy, discusses the progress Africa
has made over five decades, and the challenges
for the future.

Only nature can provide the water all life depends on. WWF works
to ensure that healthy freshwater ecosystems can meet the growing
demands for food, water and energy, while providing vital habitat for
wildlife. But we cant do it alone. Just as we all rely on water, we all
must be part of the solution. WWF works with communities,
business and governments to secure water for people and nature.
panda.org/freshwater

Sunset over East Dongting Lake, Hunan Province, China. Yifei Zhang / WWF

22

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

23

IN CONVERSATION WITH ELHAM IBRAHIM CONT


In 2013, the African Union marked its 50th anniversary.
What have been the organisations most significant
achievements in energy and infrastructure?
If we look at the statistics that have been available since 1973,
there is no doubt that we have made great progress. For example,
electricity generation increased by almost three-fold to 138 GW in
the last 30 years, and energy consumption grew from 110 kWh per
capita in 1973 to 664 kWh per capita in 2010.
More than 30 large energy facilities, including hydropower plants,
were built during this period. Crude oil refining capacity on the
continent increased by almost four times over the last 40 years to
3.2 million barrels per day.
However, there still remain challenges that need to be addressed
in the African energy sector, and infrastructure development in
general. The African Union Commission (AUC) is implementing
initiatives aimed at addressing these challenges.
How would you describe the energy challenges
of Africa today?
Africa still faces enormous challenges in its energy sector that
include low generation capacity and efficiency, high costs,
unstable and unreliable energy supplies, low access to modern
energy, and insufficient energy infrastructure.

How does energy and infrastructure fit into the


Agenda 2063 vision?
Africa Agenda 2063 was launched during the celebration of the
50th Anniversary of the African Union. Most of the first 50 years of
the AU was dedicated towards liberation and independence of
our countries in Africa. Now, Africas vision is to look for strategies
to address its developmental challenges.
Agenda 2063 has been developed as a strategic framework
and work plan to address development issues in Africa for the
next 50 years. It has seven aspirations that include: a
prosperous Africa with inclusive growth and sustainable
development; an integrated and politically united continent
based on the ideals of Africans; a peaceful and secure Africa; an
Africa with good governance, respect for human rights, justice
and the rule of law; an Africa with a strong cultural identity,
values and ethics; an Africa whose development is peopledriven, relying on the potential offered by its youth and
women; and Africa as a strong and global player and partner.
The development of infrastructure is crucial to the
achievement of economic and human development goals in
Africa as stated in Agenda 2063. Through its programme for
infrastructure development (PIDA), the AUC already has plans
for an integrated and connected regional infrastructure in key
areas including energy, transport, ICT, and water, which will
enable regional integration, development of regional markets
as well as ensuring regional stability and cooperation.

Only about 31 per cent of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa


have access to electricity, with about 14 per cent electrification
rates in the rural areas, while about 80 per cent of the Sub-Saharan
African population depends on biomass energy for cooking,
Has PIDA been successful in bridging Africas
mostly using traditional stoves with very low efficiencies leading
infrastructure gap?
to serious impacts on health and life.
With PIDA, for the first time we have had one programme of its
The huge reserves of both renewable and non-renewable energy kind for the whole continent, aiming for an agreement among
resources on the continent provide Africa with great opportunities all stakeholders. This in itself was a success, to align all of our
to improve modern energy access, which will accelerate
efforts in one direction.
industrialisation, reduce poverty and sustain the impressive
PIDA is a regional infrastructure development programme
economic growth experienced in the last decade.
developed by the AUC, the African Development Bank (AfDB)
These resources present Africa with the option of choosing
and the NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency (NPCA)
different combinations of energy systems, including grid and
involving the regional economic communities. The programme
off-grid systems at the local, national and regional levels to meet
aims to facilitate continental integration by improving
the growing energy demand. For example, the electricity demand regional infrastructure.
of Africa is growing at about 6 per cent annually, expected to
For example, the energy sector has 15 energy programmes/
reach 3,100 TWh/year by 2040, compared to the current demand
projects including nine hydropower projects, four regional
of about 600 TWh per year, indicating an over six-fold increase
power transmission lines, one oil pipeline and one gas pipeline.
over this period.

Some experts have predicted that the worlds hydropower


capacity could be doubled to 2,050 GW by 2050.
Is this possible, and what role can Africa play?

The new AfricaEU Energy Partnership (AEEP) has a target


to bring energy access to an additional 100 million
Africans by 2020. Do you think this is a realistic aim?

Definitely yes, hydropower has huge potential in Africa


accounting for about 12 per cent of the worlds technically feasible
potential, which could generate over 1,800 TWh/yr of electricity.

The AfricaEU Energy Partnership is one of eight partnerships of


the EUAfrica joint strategy with focuses on energy access, energy
security, renewable energy and energy efficiency.

Unfortunately, what we are now using in hydropower is very


low compared to the potential. If we consider this potential in
Africa combined with other hydropower potentials in the
world, yes I think this vision and the planned global energy
target can be achieved.

This initiative aims to stimulate the addition of 10,000 MW of new


hydropower plants by 2020, taking into consideration both social
and environmental standards. This means that hydropower will be
central to achieving the targets set out in the programme.

If we look at how much we have now and how much we need


in the period up to the year 2050, we find that it is achievable
even in Africa, where about 92 per cent of the technical
potential is not yet developed. In PIDA, we can see that most
of the energy projects are based on hydropower.
Considering the amount of hydropower not yet developed
despite the high demand, we should analyse the reasons why
it is like that. We need to consider the global challenges that
will affect the achievement of this target.
I think for Africa it is clear that we need to look for other
dimensions and other ways to increase the implementation.
For example, there is a need to improve the access to finance
and mobilise the private sector, and establish effective policies
and regulatory regimes that can stimulate the development
and investment in the energy sector. We also need to address
the social and environmental issues, such as the displacement
of people and the effect on biodiversity.
There is definitely a need for global cooperation of all partners
including the African stakeholders, on all levels, to tackle these
challenges and together find out ways to remove the barriers in
order to maximise the use of hydropower potential.

This forms part of a wider vision for the continent that aims to
bring access to electricity to an additional 250 million Africans. The
initiative brings together political and business leaders from Africa
and Europe together at the highest level, and will be the main
vehicle for driving EU funding into energy development in Africa.
We also have the Hydropower 2020 initiative, which has been
launched by the African Union Commission to design and
implement strategies aimed at stimulating and accelerating the
development of major hydropower projects on the continent.
Under this initiative, the AUC carried out a training workshop
specifically for the Inga 3 project on how to model a public
private partnership for the implementation of the project. Now
the Government of DR Congo is following the publicprivate
partnership model to negotiate with three private sector entities
to develop the project.
These are examples of programmes focused on hydropower,
while complementary programmes are in place to develop
other renewable energy sources such as geothermal, solar,
biomass and wind.

In Africa we have already started working together to mobilise the


private sector. At the national and regional levels we started
working on harmonising policies and regulations. I think we are
progressing well, and we can realise this specific target that we
have set for the exploitation and use of hydropower.

Africas strategic energy vision, as reaffirmed in the Maputo


Declaration on 5 November 2010, is to develop efficient, reliable,
cost-effective, and environmentally compliant infrastructure for
the physical integration of the continent and to enhance access to
modern energy services for the majority of the African population.
The huge hydropower potential in Africa presents opportunities
to use the technology at the regional, national and local levels, in
the form of large, small, micro and mini hydropower systems.
The development of hydropower systems in Africa features
prominently in the infrastructure development plans of the AUC
and the regional economic communities, as well as the regional
power pools.

24

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

The first 50 years of the AU was dedicated towards


liberation and independence of our countries in
Africa. Now, Africas vision is to look for strategies to
address its developmental challenges.
World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

25

What is your background in the energy sector?


I have over 32 years experience within the energy sector, beginning
my career at the National Hydropower Corporation (NHPC), India.
In 1994, I moved to Australia and worked for the Snowy Mountains
Engineering Corporation (SMEC) as a consultant on a number
of international hydropower projects.
I began working at the Asian Development Bank within the
energy sector operation for the Peoples Republic of China (China)
and Central Asia in 2003, before eventually becoming director of
ADBs East Asia energy division in 2010. Now, I am also chair of
ADBs energy committee, overseeing its energy sector operations.
My current role is to oversee the energy sector lending and nonlending projects in China and Mongolia, as well as ensuring ADBs
energy sector projects meet the relevant policies and priorities.

IN CONVERSATION WITH
ASHOK BHARGAVA
CHAIR, ENERGY COMMITTEE,
AND DIRECTOR, EAST ASIA
DIVISION, ASIAN
DEVELOPMENT BANK
The Asian Development Bank (ADB) is convening an
opening plenary session on assessing demand and
opportunities in Asia, the worlds most resource-rich
hydropower region, on Thursday 21 May. In this interview,
Ashok Bhargava, chair of the energy committee
and director of ADBs East Asia Division, discusses
hydropowers role in Asia, and trends in investment.

What do you think is the significance of the World


Hydropower Congress being hosted in China?
China, as in so many things, is a world leader in hydropower
development, and as such can provide significant learning
opportunities for other countries with similar ambitions to exploit
their hydropower resources.
In particular, China provides a good example of how to rapidly
develop new projects, and how to ensure they function as
successful businesses.
I also think the congress provides a good opportunity for China to
learn from other international experiences how they can improve
the sustainability of their hydropower projects.
How has the spectrum of hydropower investors changed
in Asia in recent years?

One thing countries across Asia have in common is


fast-growing economies. How can hydropower help to
meet the growing energy demands?

I think we have seen an increasing amount of private sector


involvement within hydropower projects. Previously, projects
used to be developed through public sector or governmentHydropower is a mature renewable energy and is available at a
backed financing. However, more recently, private sector
reasonable cost across Asia; it has become fairly widespread across investment has become more prevalent.
the region, especially where previously there had been limited
To give you an example, in 20092013 ADB provided about
access to electricity.
USD 2 billion worth of investment within the region for
Hydropower has been an important part of the energy mix in terms hydropower development, and of this about a third was through
of supplying electricity across the region. In China, for example,
private sector operations.
hydropower provides about a fifth of the countrys electricity.
I think what is driving this increase is that investment in the
So hydropower is an important player, and we can see its role
environment-friendly projects are becoming more popular.
increasing in some countries especially those that have ambition Clean energy is definitely the demand of the day, and combined
to provide more solar and wind based electricity but dont have
with technology advancement for hydropower plant construction
sufficient regulating or balancing capacity in the grid. Mongolia,
and remunerative tariffs, it has become an attractive proposition
for example, needs hydropower in order to integrate larger
for investors.
quantities of renewable energy into the system.
What is ADBs approach to the environmental and social
sustainability of hydropower projects? What are the
expectations placed on developers?
Environmental and social challenges go hand in hand with
meeting development needs. In order for projects to develop on
time and sustain operation, there needs to be good buy-in from
local communities.

What do you hope will be the outcome of the discussions


between so many different participants in hydropower
at the 2015 World Hydropower Congress?
I hope we see a good interaction among all the stakeholders.
Hydropower is generally a clean energy, but it still has its issues.
Stakeholders have a responsibility to ensure that it remains a clean
power source.

Hydropower projects, especially the large ones, need to consider


the social dimensions; especially those related to resettlement.
ADBs expectations for developers are clearly detailed in our
policies, and across the region there are many projects that have
successfully adhered to them.
At the basis of our policies is a full public disclosure of
environmental issues, consideration of alternative project designs
etc. Furthermore, we endeavour to give a voice to communities
impacted by projects, not only at the initial stages but throughout
a projects life-cycle. We also strive to ensure that they can be
gainfully employed in the projects operation and maintenance.

Environmental and social challenges go hand in


hand with meeting development needs.
26

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

One of our core approaches is to consider projects not only in


regard to their potential for provision of electricity, but as an
opportunity to spur economic growth within the project area.
World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

27

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28

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

29

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NETWORKING TOUR:
EXPERIENCE THE GREAT WALL
19 May

Itinerary
8.009.00
Depart congress venue for Mutianyu Great Wall
9.0011.00
Explore Mutianyu Great Wall
11.0012.00
Lunch and return to congress venue

Taking place on the opening morning


of the congress, this half-day tour takes
participants to a symbol of Chinese
civilisation, and one of the wonders of
the world the Great Wall of China.
This special networking tour is a unique
opportunity to connect with other congress
delegates while experiencing one of the
worlds greatest landmarks.
The Great Wall around Beijing was built during the Ming
Dynasty, for reasons of fortification. About 70 km north of
Beijing, Mutianyu is a masterpiece of restoration, with 22
original-style watchtowers.
While it is the longest fully-restored Great Wall section open to
tourists, there is also an opportunity for visitors to hike along
unrestored sections.
This section of the wall, built with slabs of granite, is 22 km (14
miles) long, seven or eight meters high and four or five meters
wide, crenellated on both sides.
Construction began on this section of the Great Wall in the
Northern Qi Dynasty (550577). During the reign of Emperor
Hongwu (13681398), General Xu Da rebuilt the Great Wall on
its original foundation.
The Mutianyu Pass was fortified in 1404 (the second year of
Emperor Yongles reign), with a rare triangular formation of
three interlinked watchtowers.
Construction was finished on the wall at Mutianyu, as it now
stands, when General Qi Jiguang was transferred to the area to
command the garrison in 1568 (the second year of Emperor
Longqings reign).
While the majority of Great Wall visitors see the Badaling
section, Mutianyu (meaning Admire Fields Valley) is less
crowded and offers the chance to enjoy serene views of the
mountains and the rolling foothills through which the wall
meanders. With the greens of pines and cypresses covering
90 per cent of the surrounding area, the scenery here is
beautiful all the year round.
For last-minute bookings, speak to us at the
registration desk.

30

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

31

CONGRESS
PROGRAMME

general meeting
and opening banquet

International Convention & Exhibition Center

Tuesday 19 May
19.00 22.00

The International Hydropower Associations General Meeting is an


opportunity for members to learn more about the associations work over the
last two years, and its plans for the future. Non-members are also welcome to
attend and find more about IHAs activities, and to meet the community.
The meeting will be followed by the official welcome dinner.

Discover IHAs work


The meeting will feature presentations from the associations
president and Board members on a number of key work areas,
including how IHA delivers value to members, and a range of
topics on which it aims to build and share knowledge.

Mosonyi Award for Excellence in Hydropower


The Mosonyi Award for Excellence in Hydropower, named after Emil Mosonyi, the
founding president of IHA, recognises outstanding individual contributions to the
sector. The 2015 award will be presented to three recipients at the meeting.

Also on the agenda





32

IHA honorary memberships: recognising outstanding contribution to the associations work


IHA Young Researcher Award: rewarding emerging talent in the hydropower sector
Board elections: presenting the candidates to shape and oversee IHAs 201517 work programme17
work programme

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

general-meeting-page-white.indd 1

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015


08/05/2015 00:57

33

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

OPENING CEREMONY PART ONE:


WELCOME AND FOCUS
ON CHINA
Overview

Chinas extraordinary developments


have made the country one of the most
influential actors in the sector today.
What is the countrys strategy for
sustainable hydropower development
over the period 201550?
This session and the following one will set the scene for the
congress, by exploring the state of hydropower, as well as
challenges over the next decades.
The session will begin with a welcome from the hosts,
organisers and partners.

ADVERTISEMENT
Convenor
International Hydropower
Association
When
Tues 19 May 14.3016.00
Location
Grand Ballroom

THE SESSION PANELLISTS

YAN Zhiyong
Chairman of the Board of Directors
and President of the Power
Construction Corporation of China
Mr Yan is a professor level senior
engineer; he is currently serving as
the chairman of Board of Directors
and President of Power Construction
Corporation of China.

XIE Changjun
Executive Vice President, China
Guodian Corporation
Xie Changjun, executive vice president
of China Guodian Corporation, has been
engaged in research and development,
and management of thermal power
engineering and renewable energy
throughout his career.

THE SESSION SPEAKERS


LIN Chuxue
Executive Vice President, China
Three Gorges Corporation

Ken ADAMS
President, International
Hydropower Association

WANG Lin
President, China Three Gorges
Corporation

Ken graduated as a civil engineer


from the University of London, UK;
he is president of IHA and is principal
of Ken Adams and Associates.

Wang Lin, president of China Three


Gorges Corporation, plays an active
and leading role in the management
research of cascade dispatching and
operation of the Three Gorges project.

Lin Chuxue is responsible for


international business, IT
development and application,
scientific study and technical
innovation, environmental protection,
coordination and communication with
hydro and environment-related
international NGOs.

34

ZHANG Jiyao
President, China Society for
Hydropower Engineering

Wang Shucheng, president of


Chinese National Committee on
Large Dams, was vice president of the
former State Power Corporation and
the minister of Water Resources.

Zhang Jiyao, president of China


Society for Hydropower Engineering,
is a member of the Standing
Committee of the National
Committee of the Chinese Peoples
Political Consultative Conference.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Ding Yanzhang has had long-term


involvement in the construction and
management of hydropower projects.
He is a vice president of the China
Society of Hydropower Engineering.

2002

2000
500 368

YANG Qingting
Assistant General Manager, China
Huadian Corporation
WANG Shucheng
President, Chinese National
Committee on Large Dams

DING Yanzhang
President and Director of the Board,
China Energy Engineering Group
Co., Ltd.

Yang Qingting is a senior engineer.


He is currently assisting the president
of China Huadian Corporation in his
capacity as assistant general manager
of the corporation.

JIA Jinsheng
Vice President, IWHR
Jia Jinsheng, vice president of IWHR,
is also the vice president and
secretary General of Chinese National
Committee on Large Dams, and is
honorary president of ICOLD.

China Huadian Corporation is one of five state-owned sole proprietorship power generation.
i t s m a j o r b u s i n e s s i n c l u d e : p o w e r g e n e r a t i o n , h e a t p ro d u c t i o n a n d s u p p l y ;
development of primary energy related with electricity such as coal, and
relevant professional and technical service.The corporation owns Yunnan
Jinsha River Hydropower Co., Ltd. with planned installed capacity
exceeding 20000MW and Guizhou Wujiang Hydropower
Development Co., Ltd. with installed capacity about
10000MW.In 2014, the company moved up by 21
places to No. 368 on the Global 500 list.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

35

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

OPENING CEREMONY PART TWO:


INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
AND HYDRO DEVELOPMENT
Overview

New dynamics are driving the


development agenda. Strong leadership
and demonstrable progress has been
achieved by the BRICS nations. The
economies of Brazil, Russia, India, China
and South Africa have become driving
forces in their respective regions, and there
is vast hydropower potential in each.
The comparison with some of their neighbouring countries
is striking. The case of Nepal is an important example.
Beyond the dramatic loss of lives, the recent disaster in Nepal
has highlighted the need for robust, modern infrastructure.
The need for the country to have access to reliable water
and energy services has never been greater.
How can international collaboration lift countries out of
poverty, and help achieve the new United Nations sustainable
development goals? How can the capacity of the BRICS nations
be further channelled into strategic, regional development,
and what is the role of the international financial institutions,
corporations and network organisations like IHA?

Session objectives
Bringing together representatives from government,
businesses and financial institutions, this session will look at
the new opportunities for international collaboration around
sustainable hydropower development. Issues of development
models and finance in some of the least developed countries
will be discussed by the participants setting the scene for the
following sessions of the Congress.

ADVERTISEMENT
Convenor
International Hydropower
Association
When
Tues 19 May 16.30-18.00
Location
Grand Ballroom

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Jin-Yong CAI
Executive Vice President
and CEO, IFC
Jin-Yong Cai is executive vice
president and CEO of IFC, a member
of the World Bank Group and the
largest global development
institution focused on private
sector development.

Vyacheslav KRAVCHENKO
Deputy Minister of Energy, Russia
Vyacheslav Kravchenko was
appointed deputy minister of energy,
Russia, in September 2013. He is also
deputy chairman of the Board of
Directors of the Federal Grid
Company of Unified Energy System.

Gil MARANHO Neto


Vice President, International
Hydropower Association

Mike MULLER
Commissioner, National Planning
Commission, South Africa

Gil Maranho Neto has been working


in the Brazilian electricity sector since
1994, and for GDF Suez since 1996,
where he is responsible for business
development and sustainable
development in Brazil.

A registered professional engineer


in South Africa and the United
Kingdom, Mike Muller has extensive
public policy and management
experience at national, regional
and international level.

Radhesh PANT
CEO, Investment Board of the
Government of Nepal

Arun Kumar VERMA


Joint Secretary (Hydro), Ministry of
Power, India

Mr Pant has extensive experience in


the banking sector in Nepal. He was
previously the CEO of two major
commercial Nepali banks, and also
served as the president of the Nepal
Bankers Association.

Mr Verma has a vast experience of over


28 years. His areas of distinguished
works and specialisation include power
sector, tribal development, and
environment and forests.

Wencai ZHANG
Vice-President, Asian
Development Bank
Mr Zhang, vice president of ADB,
was previously director general
of the Department of External
Economic Cooperation at the
Ministry of Finance of the
Peoples Republic of China.

36

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

37

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

OPENING PLENARY
THE FUTURE OF HYDROPOWER:
AFRICA
Overview

Of the 915 million people in Africa,


only 290 million currently have access to
electricity. Despite incredible richness
in energy resources, and significant
advances in rolling out electricity supply
to its population, by 2040 530 million
people are projected to still be without
access to electricity.
At the same time, while Africa as a whole contributes less than
2 per cent of global emissions, climate change is poised to
significantly affect the continent.
From a hydropower perspective, less than 10 per cent of the
estimated 283 GW of technically feasible potential has been
installed. Another 25 GW is under construction, and by 2040,
hydro is expected to account for more than a quarter of growth
in capacity. This potential is not evenly spread throughout the
continent, and key large projects can have a material impact on
Africas ability to meet development targets.
This session will be moderated by Cameron Ironside, sustainability
director at the International Hydropower Association.

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Co-convenor
African Union Commission
When
Wed 20 May 9.00-10.30
Location
Grand Ballroom

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

maintenance in power and infrastructure sectors.


Teferra BEYENE
Advisor to the Minister of Water
and Energy, Ethiopia
In addition to his government role,
Teferra Beyene is the executive
director of the Nile Basin Initiative,
a regional intergovernmental
partnership that brings together
the basins riparian countries.

Simon DUJANGA
State Minister for Energy, Uganda
H.E. DUjanga, minister for energy,
Uganda, has a background in
electrical engineering and served as
the deputy managing director and
later managing director of the
Ugandan Electricity Board.

38

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

performed 1517 overseas contracts in the fields of hydropower, thermal power, new
energy, transmission and distribution, infrastructure and equipment manufacturing in
108 countries around the world. POWERCHINA was ranked 313th among Fortune Global
500 in 2014.

others 4.3%

hydropower 23.0%
Gatien HORACE
Minister of Energy and
Hydrocarbons, Madagascar

Elham IBRAHIM
African Union Commissioner for
Energy and Infrastructure

Gatien Horace was appointed to his


current role as minister of energy and
hydrocarbon in January 2015. He was
previously minister of employment,
technical and professional education.

Dr Ibrahim holds a PhD in electronics


and communications; she was
elected commissioner of
infrastructure and energy at the
African Union Commission in 2008,
and re-elected in 2012.

Ambitious continental and regional plans and policies are seen


as key drivers to address the gap between Africas wealth of
resource potential, including significant hydropower, and its
daunting current shortfalls. Considerable importance is being
placed on large regional projects to deliver solutions.

This session will explore progress from a hydropower


perspective in developing some of these projects, the benefits
such an approach offers, as well as the significant challenges
facing such high-reaching programmes, such as balancing
regional and national water sovereignty issues and financing
such projects.

By the end of 2014, POWERCHINA had total asset of RMB 416.8 billion (USD 66.6 billion),
annual revenue of RMB 265 billion (USD 42.4 billion). By the end of 2014, POWERCHINA

real estate 8.3%

Session objectives

One of the most promising plans, the Programme for


Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA), offers real
potential to develop large-scale regional projects targeted
at material gains in addressing Africa-wide answers to the
current challenges.

Power Construction Corporation of China (POWERCHINA) is a multinational corporation


group headquartered in Beijing, China, providing one-stop services from planning,
investigation, design, consulting, construction to finance, installation, operation and

thermal power 35.0%

water resources
development 7.0%
new energy 3.9%
urban development 2.2%

transportation 12.8%

power grid 3.5%

International Revenue Structure (2014)

John Abdulai JINAPOR


Deputy Minister of Power, Ghana
John Abdulai Jinapor oversees policy
development in the power and
renewable energy sector in Ghana.
He has held a number of
distinguished positions throughout
his career, including presidential aide
and spokesperson.

Freddy Lafos Yave LAMFEL


Chief of Staff to the Minister of
Hydraulic Resources and Electricity,
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Mr Lamfel has over 30 years
experience as a professional engineer
and senior engineering manager in
different multinational corporations,
including Anglo American and SASOL
Synfuels in South Africa.

THE TOP 250 INTERNATIONAL CONTRACTORS (RANK 2014)


Sinohydro
Corp., Beijing,
China

23

SEPCO Electric
Power Constr. Corp.,
Weifang, Shandong,
China

58

SEPCO Electric
Power Construction
Corp., Jinan,
Shandong, China

102

THE TOP 150 GLOBAL DESIGN FIRMS (RANK 2014)


Hydrochina Corp.,
China

12

Add: No.22 Chegongzhuang West Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100048, P.R.China
Website: http://en.powerchina.cn Email: overseas@powerchina.cn

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

39

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

2050 BY 2050: WHAT ARE


THE SCENARIOS?

ADVERTISEMENT
Co-convenor
The World Energy Council
When
Wed 20 May 11.0012.30
Location
North Hall

Overview

Global energy scenarios present a


range of projections for hydropower
development in the coming decades,
ranging from a 50% increase in installed
hydropower capacity, up to a more
than doubling of capacity to 2,050 GW
by the year 2050.

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Paolo FRANKL
Head of Renewable Energy,
International Energy Agency

Dolf GIELEN
Director of Innovation and
Technology Centre, IRENA

Paolo Frankl, head of the renewable


energy division at the International
Energy Agency, leads their work
on renewable energy, advising
on technology, markets and
system integration.

Dolf Gielen is the director of IRENAs


Innovation and Technology Centre,
which advises countries on
technology status and roadmaps,
energy planning, cost and markets
and innovation policy frameworks.

This session will be moderated by Tracy Lane, hydropower


development director at the International Hydropower Association.

Jacob IRVING
President, Canadian Hydropower
Association (CHA)

Hans-Wilhelm SCHIFFER
Chair of World Energy Resources
Study Group, World Energy Council

Session objectives

Mr Irving has ten years experience


as an association manager and
stakeholder relations specialist.
He currently leads CHA, whose
mission is to promote the
advantages of hydropower.

Dr Schiffer is the executive chair of the


World Energy Resource Programme at
the World Energy Council; He consults
for the RWE group.

But how realistic are these scenarios? Will this include a score
of new projects, or will this development include a mix of new
builds, upgrades and powering of existing dams?
In order for scenarios to be realised, certain conditions
would be necessary to facilitate such rapid growth;
care must also be taken to ensure the projects are designed
and developed sustainably, balancing environmental, social
and economic considerations.

This session will explore the range of published energy


scenarios, and what they predict for the future of hydropower.
Energy scenario experts will present their work, followed by a
discussion of how and why hydropower might develop along
certain pathways.
Speakers will share insights into what is currently driving
hydropower development, and what the sector and its
stakeholders need to consider as part of hydropowers
growth trajectory.
This session will be moderated by Tracy Lane,
hydropower development director at the International
Hydropower Association.

40

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

ZHANG Boting
Vice Secretary General, China
Society for Hydropower Engineering
Before his role at CSHE, Zhang Boting
was engaged in hydropower station
design research and engineering
structure reliability analysis for the
China Institute of Water Resources
and Hydropower Research.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

41

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

WATERENERGY NEXUS:
HOW DO WE OPTIMISE WATER
AND ENERGY SERVICES?
Overview

Water and energy are inextricably linked.


The waterenergy nexus refers to the
relationship between the impact on water
in the supply of energy, and the amount
of energy needed to collect, clean, move,
store and dispose of water.
Hydropower sits at the heart of this nexus, using water as its
fuel to generate electricity while, in many cases, making water
available for other needs such as irrigation, navigation,
recreation and drinking.
As awareness for the waterenergy nexus grows, the
hydropower sector has an imperative to build understanding
internally, as well as with external stakeholders, on how
hydropower uses water, and the contributions hydropower
makes to managing water scarcity and other water
management services.

Session objectives
This session aims to identify hydropowers central role within
the waterenergy nexus. Representatives of the World Energy
Council and World Water Council will share their definitions
and perspectives on the waterenergy nexus within the
context of global industry.

Co-convenor(s)
World Water Council
When
Wed 20 May 11.0012.30
Location
Middle Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Reza ARDAKANIAN
Director, UNU-FLORES
Reza Ardakanian of Iran was appointed
as the founding director of the United
Nations University Institute for
Integrated Management of Material
Fluxes and of Resources in 2012.

Antoine BADINIER
Deputy Vice-President, EDF
Hydropower Generation and
Engineering Division
Antoine has been vice-president
of EDF Hydropower Generation and
Engineering Division, since June 2014;
he has 33 years experience in the
energy sector.

Overview

Everyone agrees that making


development sustainable is what
matters. The UN will adopt a series
of sustainable development goals
on the back of its post-2015 agenda.
Hydropower is relevant to several of these goals, not least goal 7
(ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern
energy for all); goal 13 (take urgent action to combat climate
change and its impacts); and goal 6 (ensure availability and
sustainable management of water and sanitation for all).
But is sustainable development feasible when development
needs for energy and water are urgent? What does it take to
make it a reality?

Co-convenor(s)
IUCN
When
Wed 20 May 11.0012.30
Location
South Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Bernard BARANDEREKA
Energy Expert, African Union
Commission

Giulio BOCCALETTI
Global Managing Director for Water,
The Nature Conservancy

Bernard Barandereka is energy expert


for the department of infrastructure
and energy of the African Union,
and former minister of mines and
energy of Burundi.

Giulio is an expert on environmental


and economic sustainability.
He leads the worlds largest team of
freshwater scientists, policy experts,
economists and on-the-ground
conservation practitioners.

James DALTON
Coordinator of Global Initiatives,
IUCN Water Programme

Torstein SJTVEIT
Chief Executive Officer,
Sarawak Energy

James, coordinator of global


initiatives, IUCN Water Programme,
has worked for 20 years in water
resource management, in areas
including technology, governance
and business planning.

Torstein was appointed as the chief


executive officer of Sarawak Energy
in 2009. Prior to this he was president
and CEO of STX Europe ASA.

Session objectives
Benedito BRAGA
President, World Water Council
Benedito Braga is secretary for
sanitation and water resources for the
state of Sao Paulo, and professor of civil
and environmental engineering at
Escola Politecnica of University of Sao
Paulo, Brazil.

Charles FEINSTEIN
Director for the Energy Global
Practice
Charles Feinstein is responsible for the
operations and day-to-day management
of the Worlds Bank combined energy,
mining and oil and gas investment,
analytical and advisory portfolio.

This will be followed by a panel discussion involving the main


actors in current research initiatives, aimed at applying current
knowledge of the nexus in real-world assessments.
This session will be moderated by Jakob Granit, director of the
Stockholm Environment Institute.

DEVELOPMENT VS SUSTAINABILITY:
HOW CAN WE FIND THE
RIGHT BALANCE?

Jakob GRANIT
Director, Stockholm
Environment Institute
Dr Granit, centre director at SEI and
panel member on the Scientific and
Technical Advisory Panel, GEF, has 20
years experience in transboundary
freshwater resource management
and development.

Marie-Jos NADEAU
Chair, World Energy Council
Marie-Jos Nadeau was elected chair
of the World Energy Council (WEC) for
2013 to 2016. She is the first woman to
hold this position. She is also the
former executive vice president of
Hydro-Qubec.

This session is intended to elicit a range of opinions on


the need for sustainability when development priorities are
highly pressing in some regions. The aim is not to highlight
the intractability of opposing opinions, nor is it to agree
repetitively on the importance of both sustainability and
development. Instead it is intended to isolate the issues
and contexts that enable or hinder the achievement of
sustainable development.
The session will contemplate whether consideration of
relatively minor sustainability issues hinders broader
sustainable development. Furthermore, it will attempt to
identify the factors that enable development to proceed
rapidly yet sustainably, or that enable investment in
sustainability to deliver developmental benefits.
This session will be moderated by James Dalton, co-ordinator
of global initiatives for the IUCN Water Programme.

ZHOU Jianping
Chief Engineer, Power China
Zhou Jianping, chief engineer of
Power Construction Corporation,
China, is also civil engineer,
investment advisor, and director for
the research and development centre
of National Energy Hydropower.

WANG Hao
Academician, Chinese Academy
of Engineering
Prof Wang is the honorary director of
the department of water resources,
IWHR, and director of the State Key
Laboratory of Simulation and
Regulation of Water Cycle in River Basin.

42

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

43

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS


AND WATER QUALITY:
EXPERT DISCUSSION
Overview

Mitigating climate change is one of the


most important goals for sustainable
development. There is a clear and
pressing need to quantify the greenhouse
gas (GHG) footprint of all human activities
so that efforts to reduce or mitigate those
impacts can be effectively targeted.
The issue of GHG emissions attracts increasing focus from
governments, lenders and other stakeholders. Reliable,
consistent approaches are required to evaluate GHG emissions
for all types of assets at different stages of development.
The GHG status of freshwater reservoirs that is, any change
in GHG emissions in a river basin resulting from the creation of
a reservoir has been discussed in both scientific and policy
forums. There are concerns around the uncertainty in estimates
of GHG emissions from reservoir systems, and that these
impacts are often attributed to hydropower projects,
while reservoirs serve multiple purposes.

Session objectives
A panel of international experts involved in the UNESCO/IHA
GHG Research Project will present the state of knowledge in
the field, including the development of a screening tool for
predicting GHG fluxes from freshwater reservoirs.
The exchange will focus on recent progress with the
development of the tool and the challenge ahead for the
scientific and decision-making communities.
This session will be moderated by Vanessa Warnock,
principal environmental consultant at Mott MacDonald.

ADVERTISEMENT
Co-convenor(s)
UNESCO-IHP
When
Wed 20 May 13.0014.10
Location
North Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Jukka ALM
Senior Scientist, Natural Resources
Institute Finland

Miguel DORIA
Assistant Programme Specialist,
UNESCO Division of Water Sciences

Dr Alm has 20 years research


experience, focused on wetland
biogeochemistry and GHG fluxes
in pristine organic soils and those
drained for forestry or agriculture.

Dr Miguel de Frana Doria joined the


UNESCO Secretariat in 2006, where,
among other projects, he is working
with IHA on guidelines for
greenhouse gas measurements.

Atle HARBY
Director, Centre for Environmental
Design of Renewable Energy (CEDREN)

Rikard LIDEN
Senior Hydropower Specialist,
Water Practice, World Bank Group

Dr Harby is the director of CEDREN,


an interdisciplinary research centre
for the development of hydropower,
wind power, transmission lines and
the implementation of policy.

Rikard Liden has been assigned as


senior hydropower specialist to the
World Banks Global Water Practice
since 2010, leading the banks
Hydropower Community of Practice.

Yves PRAIRIE
Chair, Global Environmental
Changes, UNESCO

TAN Debao
Head of the Spatial Information
Application Department, Changjiang
River Scientific Research Institute

Yves Prairie is a full professor of


biology at the University of Quebec
at Montreal. His main research focus
is on all aspects of carbon cycling.

Prof. Tan Debao, director of the spatial


information application department
for the Changjiang River Scientific
Research Institute, has 25 years
experience in dynamic monitoring and
evaluation of basin eco-environment.

Vanessa WARNOCK
Principal Environmental Consultant,
Mott MacDonald
Vanessa Warnock provides
environmental specialist support
on a wide range of energy projects,
including environmental and
social impact assessments, and
environmental due diligence reviews.

44

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

45

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

CONNECTIVITY FOR AQUATIC


SPECIES: EXPERT DISCUSSION

Co-convenor
WWF
When
Wed 20 May 13.00-14.10
Location
Middle Hall

Overview

The need to secure and restore ecological


connectivity in rivers for aquatic species is
well recognised, but how it is achieved in
practice varies significantly, and debate
continues as to what success looks like.
Achieving ecological connectivity requires more consideration
than simply installing a fish pass. Choosing dam location is a
crucial part of river basin design required to minimise the
extent and impacts of fragmentation. Solutions to connectivity
barriers need to be based on good understanding of the river
basin ecosystem and an assessment of the connectivity needs
of different species. In addition, it is important for solutions to
address up and downstream ecological health to ensure that
migration is successful.
When river basin ecology and connectivity requirements are
fully understood, and fragmentation has been avoided and
minimised, problematic barriers to connectivity can be
mitigated by targeted measures such as fish passes and
fish-friendly turbine.

Session objectives
The discussion will focus on how to avoid and minimise the
impact on vital parts of river basins, before going on to
examine mitigation strategies through project design,
operation, and fish passages. Specific objectives are to:

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

CHEN Daqing
Head, Yangtze River Fisheries
Research Institute, China Three
Gorges Corporation
Professor Chen Daqing has 26 years
experience in freshwater ecology, fish
biology and river basin management.
He has coordinated more than 60
projects at national and Sino-US level.

Domingo FERNANDEZ
Senior Veterinarian and Manager
of Fishery Actions, Itaipu Binacional
Domingo, senior veterinarian and
manager of fishery actions, Itaipu
Binacional, has also acted as
hydropower consultant for fish
migration systems in dams in the
Amazon regions.

GAO Yong
Deputy Director, Chinese Sturgeon
Research Institute, China Three
Gorges Corporation
Gao Yong, senior engineer at China
Three Gorges Corporation, and
deputy director of the Chinese
Sturgeon Research Institute, has ten
years experience running aquatic
ecology and sturgeon conservation.

LI Lifeng
Freshwater Director, WWF
Since 2002, Dr Li has worked on water
and river basin management at WWF.
Furthermore, he coordinated the task
force on integrated river basin
management, China Council for
International Cooperation on
Environment and Development.

46

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Electric power systems are in a state of


change. In response to climate concerns,
many policymakers are re-evaluating
their countries use of fossil fuels, while
promoting a more renewable energy mix.
As wind and solar penetration increases in response to new
incentive programmes and falling prices, the role of
hydropower is also evolving.
From its traditional role of providing base load power or
twice-daily peaking, in many markets hydropower is
increasingly called on to provide balancing services multiple
times a day to help smooth the impacts of variable output of
wind and solar. This could have a profound impact on where
and how hydropower is developed in the future.

When
Wed 20 May 14.30-16.00
Location
North Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Irene GINER-REICHL
Executive Director, Global Forum for
Sustainable Energy (GFSE)

Yoshiaki MINO
General Manager, Kansai Electric

Dr Giner-Reichl is president of the


GFSE, which she founded in 1999.
Since 2012 she has been Austrian
ambassador to the Peoples Republic
of China and Mongolia.

Yoshiaki Mino is general manager of


Kansai Electrics international business
and co-operation department,
focusing mainly on the development,
design, construction and maintenance
of hydropower projects.

Jian-hua MENG
Water Security Specialist, WWF
Jian-hua is senior sustainable
hydropower specialist, leading WWFs
International Water Security Initiative on
hydropower. He is a member of the
Governance Committee of the
Hydropower Sustainability
Assessment Protocol.

Following an overview of the global status of renewable


energy, representatives from renewable energy technologies
and pumped storage providers will give an update on sector
progress and anticipated future development. This will then be
followed by a panel and audience discussion of how the
evolution of energy mixes worldwide will influence
hydropower development.

PEI Zheyi
Head of the Hydropower Division,
State Grid Corporation of China

Peter RAE
Honorary Chair, International
Renewable Energy Alliance

Pei Zheyi, senior engineer at the State


Grid Corporation of China, is a council
member of the China Society for
Hydropower Engineering, and deputy
director of the Wind Power
Grid-Connected Technical Committee.

Peter Rae is honorary chair of the


International Renewable Energy
Alliance (REN Alliance) and an honorary
life member of the International
Hydropower Association.

Laura WILLIAMSON
Communications and Outreach
Manager, REN21

ZHANG Jun
Deputy General Manager, Huanghe
Hydropower Development Co., Ltd.

Laura was appointed communications


and outreach manager at REN21 in
April 2013. Previously, she worked for
the United Nations Environment
Programme on industry and
sustainability issues.

Zhang Jun has rich experience in


hydropower station mechanical
equipment maintenance and
management. He is also engaged
in hydropower cascade and
watershed management.

This session will be chaired by Irene Giner-Reichl, executive


director of the Global Forum for Sustainable Energy, and
moderated by Laura Williamson, communications and
outreach manager at REN21.

Give an overview of state of the art of technical


mitigation strategies.

This session will be moderated by Jian-hua Meng,


water security specialist at WWF.

Overview

Co-convenor
REN21

Session objectives

Provide participants with an understanding of the need for


ecological connectivity at the broad ecosystem scale.

Discuss ongoing connectivity challenges from theoretical


and practical perspective with input from leading
hydropower companies.

FUTURE ENERGY MIX:


HOW WILL IT INFLUENCE
HYDRO DEVELOPMENT?

Stefan SCHMUTZ
Professor, University of Natural
Resources and Life Sciences In
Vienna, Austria
Stefan is a professor at the University
of Natural Resources and Life
Sciences in Vienna, Austria, and heads
the Institute of Hydrobiology and
Aquatic Ecosystems.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

47

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

MODERNISATION:
HOW CAN EXISTING
ASSETS BE OPTIMISED?
Overview

According to IHAs database of


hydropower statistics, over half of the
worlds current 1,050 GW of installed
capacity will undergo renovations for the
purpose of upgrading and modernisation
in the next 35 years.
By 2050, the entire 1,000 GW of current capacity will have
required modernisation. Modernisation of hydropower
infrastructure can include: plant life extension; automation;
re-purposing; operating mode optimization (i.e., transitioning
from baseload supply to peak-only and vice-versa); and
installing different types of equipment (i.e., higher capacity
turbines, quicker temporal variation etc.).
The need to modernise raises a number of challenges and
opportunities, especially when coupling the long lifetimes
of civil infrastructure with an uncertain future of changing
climates, variable energy mixes and volatile markets.

Session objectives
This session will explore the challenges and opportunities
facing the hydropower sector with respect to the
modernisation of todays existing infrastructure.
The session aims to assess how we can build resilient
infrastructure today for a volatile and uncertain future.
Session panellists will discuss how to ensure future flexibility
during modernisation, addressing questions such as when we
need to modernise, at what scope, and under what conditions
will the largest benefits be realised.
This session will be moderated by Gil Maranho Neto, director
of business development at GDF Suez Energy Brasil, and IHA
vice president.

48

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Co-convenor
China Institute of Water Resources
and Hydropower Research
When
Wed 20 May 14.30-16.00
Location
Middle Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Bo HU
Vice Manager of Engineering
Monitoring Technology Division,
NARI Group Corporation
Dr Bo Hu has been a senior engineer
at Nari Group Corporation since 2013.
His research interests cover dam
safety monitoring, stability analysis of
hydraulic structures, rock mechanics
and geo-engineering.

Sami KHAN
IHA Young Researcher of the Year
2015
Sami Khan, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, USA, is the 2015 winner
of the IHA Young Researcher Award
for his work on and characterising
rare-earth based hydrophobic
surfaces and coatings.

Jos Carlos MINUZZO


Operations Director,
Tractebel Energia

QIU Xiliang
President and General Manager,
Harbin Electric Machinery

Since 1999, Jos has been energy


production director at Tractebel
Energia. Before this, he was
maintenance and thermal generation
manager at Eletrosul Company of
Transmission and Generation.

Qiu Xiliang has 25 years experience


in hydropower development. He has
successfully delivered the manufacture
of large-scale hydrogenerators for key
projects including China Three Gorges,
Xiluodu and Xiangjiaba.

RESETTLEMENT:
WHAT ARE THE BOUNDARIES
AND RESPONSIBILITIES?
Overview

Resettlement processes are challenging


in the best of circumstances, and present
real risks to project implementation.
Hard lessons have been learned in
situations where responsibility for aspects
of resettlement is left to third parties.
In other cases, prescriptive legislative requirements, such as
cash compensation measures required in certain countries,
can lead to a deterioration of livelihoods.
This puts pressure on developers, who are often required to
act as vehicles for local development, taking on responsibilities
that would normally fall on other stakeholders.
Clear resettlement strategies that enable stakeholders to
implement project-tailored resettlement programmes that
not only compensate for the impacts of resettlement, but also
improve affected livelihoods, go some way to ameliorating
the risks in such situations.

Session objectives
The keynote will capture the challenges and outline a possible
framework. Case studies of resettlement programmes in
different regulatory contexts will be presented, capturing
both challenges and successful measure for overcoming these
challenges when implementing a successful resettlement plan
in diverse contexts.

Co-convenor
Hohai University
When
Wed 20 May 14.30-16.00
Location
South Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Thais FERRAZ SOARES


Socio-Environmental Consultant,
ESBR

Olivier SALIGNAT
Project Manager, Division of
International Development, EDF

Thais has worked on sustainability


issues associated with the Jirau
hydropower plant; she holds a
postgraduate degree in economy
and energy management, Federal
University of Rio de Janeiro.

Since 2012, Olivier Salignat has been


a project manager at EDFs division
of international development, in
charge of new hydropower projects
in Latin America.

SHI Guoqing
Professor, National Research Centre
for Resettlement, Hohai University

Richard TWUM
Executive Secretary, Ghana
Dams Dialogue

Guoqing, professor and director of


the National Research Centre for
Resettlement, Hohai University, was
a leading creator of the International
Displacement and Resettlement
Network in 2000.

Richard, a social scientist with over


twelve years experience in
resettlement issues, has helped to
develop recommendations on large
water infrastructure in West Africa.

Edward WOJCZYNSKI
Portfolio Project Management,
Manitoba Hydro

ZHANG Xiaoling
Director, China Land Investment
and Planning Institute

Ed is responsible for the pre


construction phase of projects for
Manitoba Hydro, including
management, planning,
environmental studies, community
consultation and regulatory approval.

Professor Zhang, president of the China


Land Surveying and Planning Institute,
has 22 years experience in land
management policies, land use planning
and land use-related standards.

The presentations will be followed by a panel discussion that


will bring to the table views from social experts, project
developers and governments.
Kamau B.A. SADIKI
National Hydropower Business Line
Manager, US Army Corps of Engineers

WANG Dekuan
Chair, Beijing IWHR Technology
Co,. Ltd

Mr Sadikis primary responsibilities


are developing and sustaining the
Corps hydropower programme
strategic direction, annual budget
development, policy development,
hydropower asset management and
infrastructure performance.

Dr Wang, a professor and chairman of


Beijing IWHR Technology Co., Ltd, has
28 years experience in developing and
implementing automation systems for
about 300 hydropower stations.

The discussion will focus on the scope and responsibilities


when implementing a successful resettlement plan in
diverse contexts.
This session will be moderated by Ed Wojczynski,
portfolio project manager at Manitoba Hydro.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

49

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

HYDROPOWER SAFETY:
WHAT IS GOOD PRACTICE?

ADVERTISEMENT
Co-convenor
IHA Safety Working Group
When
Wed 20 May 16.30-18.00
Location
North Hall

Overview

Safe operation of hydropower facilities


is one of the highest priorities for any
hydropower project. The chief objective
of any hydropower safety programme is
to protect the public, the environment
and site assets from damages resulting
from the construction and operation of
a hydropower project.
Hydropower, particularly in OECD countries, is largely
regarded as a very safe technology with a good performance
record; however, recent accidents have highlighted the issue of
hydropower safety around the world. Incidents internal to the
hydropower plant, as well as those related to water releases,
can damage not only the facility and local environment in
question, but will impact the sector as a whole. Instilling a
culture of safety, backed up by a strong risk management
approach across the full lifecycle of all hydropower projects, is
necessary to ensure an acceptable safety record for the industry.

Session objectives
This session will bring together hydropower operators,
dam safety experts, and regulators to share lessons learned
and discuss good practice in hydropower safety. The group will
explore how to define and report on hydropower safety, and
how to communicate lessons learned and promote
good practice.
The audience is encouraged to participate in the discussion
which will specifically highlight the knowledge and tools which
may be needed to improve the sectors safety performance.
This session will be moderated by Dominik Godde,
IHA Board member.

50

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Jean-Franois ASTOLFI
Executive Vice President,
lectricit de France (EDF)

CHEN Houqun
Executive Member of the Council,
CHINCOLD

Jean-Franois, senior executive


vice president of the Hydropower
Generation and Engineering Division
(DPIH) of EDF, is also chair of the
science and policy committee of IHA.

Chen Houqun is academician of the


Chinese Academy of Engineering
and research professor of the China
Institute of Water Resources and
Hydropower Research.

Mario FINIS
Senior Vice President, MWH Global

Rasim KHAZIAHMETOV
Director of Technology Policy,
JSC RusHydro

Mario, senior vice president with MWH


Global and a US Government approved
independent dam safety consultant,
has 30 years experience in global
energy and water resources.

Rasim graduated from the Moscow


Energy Institute, majoring in thermal
power plant engineering. He joined
RusHydro in 2005 and is currently
director of technology policy.

David WRIGHT
Senior Advisor, Norwegian
Water Resources and Energy
Directorate (NVE)

WU Shiyong
Deputy General Manager,
Yalong River Hydropower
Development Company

David Wright is program director in the


international section of the Norwegian
Water Resources and Energy
Directorate, currently responsible for its
institutional cooperation programs in
Myanmar, Bhutan and Tanzania.

Professor Wu Shiyong is the deputy


general manager at Yalong River
Hydropower Development
Company, in charge of hydropower
planning, designing and scientific
research management.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

51

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

CLIMATE RESILIENCE:
HOW CAN IT BE
DEMONSTRATED?
Overview

We have entered an era where climate


risk is real. Financial institutions seek to
address this risk by encouraging projects
to be resilient to climate change, while
businesses must consider how to
incorporate climate-related risks into
project design and operations.
The World Bank defines climate resilience as the ability to
withstand, recover from, and reorganise in response to climate
change so that all members of society may develop or maintain
the ability to thrive.

Co-convenor
The World Bank
When
Wed 20 May 16.30-18.00
Location
Middle Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Pierre BIEDERMANN
Principal Environment Advisor,
European Bank for Reconstruction
and Development (EBRD)
Pierre Biedermann is principal
environmental advisor at EBRD,
he leads the appraisal of the
environmental and social performance
of hydropower projects.

Marco BRAUN
Hydroclimatology Specialist,
OURANOS Consortium
As a member of the Climate Scenarios
and Services Group, Marco Braun is
responsible for climate scenarios
related to the water and energy
resources programmes at the
Ouranos Consortium.

Actions for climate resilience are those that seek to reduce


sensitivity, or increase adaptive capacity, to climate change.
Planning hydropower systems from a long-term, climateresilient perspective should include the aim to ensure that
future generations inherit institutions and infrastructure that
will not be compromised by climate change. There is no doubt
that this sustainability principle is valid; but how can it be
implemented in practice?

Session objectives

Tammy CHU
Managing Director, Entura
Tammy is the managing director of
Entura, one of the worlds most
experienced specialist power and
water consulting firms, part of the
Hydro Tasmania group.

This session will discuss climate change resilience with respect


to hydropower, and will focus particularly on business decisionmaking and hydropower financing. Our panellists will discuss
the underlying principles of resilience, and how to manage the
uncertainties and business risks associated with it.
The session will focus on how new approaches to climate
resilience will affect business decision-making and project
financing, particularly exploring the expectations for and
examples of a sustainable, climate-resilient investment.
In addition, developers and owners will address resilience in
terms of their associated risks.
This session will be moderated by Andrew Scanlon,
principal consultant at Andrew Scanlon and Associates,
and IHA Board member.

52

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Tron ENGEBRETHSEN
Senior Vice President,
International Hydro, Statkraft
Tron Engebrethsen has over 17 years
experience leading power generation
at Statkraft. His portfolio includes
over 160 power plants, with a
combined capacity of more than
16,000 MW, mainly hydropower.

DOWNSTREAM FLOWS:
WHAT IS A SUSTAINABLE
COMPROMISE?
Overview

The management of downstream flows


from hydropower projects is an essential
element of sustainable hydropower
development, but there is often
disagreement over the magnitude and
timing of flows required.
Hydropower projects can significantly alter downstream river
flows by changing flow dynamics to follow energy demand or
by reducing flow to a bypassed stretch.
These alterations can lead advocates to call for increased flows
or dynamic flow regimes to maintain and support a rivers
ecological and morphological processes and its ability to
deliver ecosystem services to people.
However, increased and dynamic downstream flows have
financial and service implications for hydropower generation,
which can lead companies to resist significant changes to their
operating regime.

Session objectives
This session will consider the compromises required to satisfy
downstream social and ecological objectives in partnership
with a profitable and reliable hydropower project.
The session will introduce the current state of thinking for
downstream flows before presenting innovations which have
helped to achieve sustainable compromises around the world.

Diego RODRIGUEZ
Senior Economist, World Bank
Diego Rodriguez is the task
team leader of Thirsty Energy,
the World Bank initiative on the
quantification of the tradeoffs of
the energywater nexus.

WANG Guoqing
Professor, Nanjing Hydraulic
Research Institute

Co-convenor
UNESCO-IHE
When
Wed 20 May 16.30-18.00
Location
South Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

LI Yuanyuan
Vice President, General Institute of
Water Resources and Hydropower
Planning and Design, Ministry of
Water Resources, China
Prof. Li Yuanyuan has 30 years
experience in water resources and
water ecology research, national
water resources planning and
policy formulation, as well as river
basin management.

Helen LOCHER
Principal Consultant for
Sustainability, Hydro Tasmania
Helen has 25 years experience
working on environmental, social
and sustainability issues. She worked
for the Tasmanian state government
in environmental assessments and
industry licensing.

Michael McCLAIN
Chair Professor of Ecohydrology and
Head of the Hydrology and Water
Resources Chair Group, UNESCO-IHE

Rebecca THARME
Director of Partnerships, Great
Rivers Partnership, The Nature
Conservancy

Prof. McClain, chair professor of


ecohydrology and head of the
hydrology and water resources group
at UNESCO-IHE, leads environmental
flow assessments for river systems in
Kenya and Tanzania.

Dr Tharme, director of partnerships


for great rivers at the Conservancy,
guides science-based strategies to
sustainably tackle development
challenges across eight of the worlds
large river basins.

This session will be moderated by Michael McClain, chair


professor of ecohydrology and head of the hydrology and
water resources chair group at UNESCO-IHE.

Dr Wang, professor of NHRI and chief


engineer of the Research Center for
Climate Change, has 20 years
experience researching climate change,
hydrology and water resources.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

53

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

OPENING PLENARY
ASSESSING DEMAND AND
OPPORTUNITIES: ASIA
Overview

Asia is the richest hydropower region


in the world; however, there are quite
different rates of utilisation.
The one thing all countries in the region have in common is
growing GDPs. With rates of growth between 4 and 8 per cent,
huge demands are being placed on countries to rapidly
expand their energy sectors.
This is causing a change in how countries view this sector,
moving away from the publicly owned utilities to a mix of
public and private players.
While a substantial portion of development aims to satisfy
domestic demand, resources are not equally distributed
through the region.

ADVERTISEMENT
Co-convenor
Asian Development Bank
When
Thurs 21 May 9.00-10.30
Location
Grand Ballroom

Murum Hydro Electric Project

Powering

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Building on a proud history of more than 70 years as an


Abid Sher ALI
State Minister for Water and
Power, Pakistan

Ashok BHARGAVA
Director, East Asia Division, Asian
Development Bank

Abid Sher Ali has served in various


political fields and has held positions in
the standing committees on education
(as chairman), on privatisation and
investment, on water and power and
on youth affairs.

Ashok, director of ADB, oversees


energy sector operations in China
and Mongolia; he is an electrical
engineer with 33 years of energy
sector experience.

Mukah Coal Plant

Session objectives
This session brings together a range of high-level, countryspecific perspectives to give a diverse overview of the
development and investment picture across the region.
In particular, guest speakers will provide insights on
interconnections in Central Asia, attracting investment in
Malaysia, new development in Myanmar, the new domestic
market in Laos, and bilateral development between India
and Nepal.
This session will be moderated by Ashok Bhargava, director of
the Asian Development Banks East Asia Division.

clean power for new industries at competitive prices to


build a secure, sustainable and aordable energy
future, we are creating new opportunities in Sarawak
for generations to come.
The Sarawak State Governments vision of the Sarawak
Corridor of Renewable Energy (SCORE) is now a reality.

Keshab DHOJ ADHIKARI


Joint Secretary, Ministry of Energy,
Nepal
Keshab Dhoj Adhikaris responsibilities
include promoting hydropower
development both under private
and public sector investments,
and coordinating power-related
government agencies and donors.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Sarawak Energy is the catalyst in driving the success of

Maw Thar HTWE


Deputy Minister for Ministry of
Electric Power, the Republic of
the Union of Myanmar
H.E. Maw Thar Htwe has more
than 33 years of rich experience in
Myanmars electric power sector,
from an apprentice engineer through
to his current role as deputy minister.

Rustam RAHMATZODA
Chairman, Barki Tojik

Tan Sri Adenan SATEM


Chief Minister of Sarawak

Rustam Rahmatzoda has been


chairman of the open stock holding
company Barki Tojik since July 2014.
He has 30 years experience in a
variety of senior government and
engineering roles.

Tan Sri Adenan Satem, chief minister


of Sarawak, is president of Parti
Pesaka Bumiputera Bersatu Sarawak,
chairman of Barisan Nasional Sarawak
and chairman of Majlis Mesyuarat
Kerajaan Negeri.

Raghuveer SHARMA
Chief Investment Officer, IFC

Viraphonh VIRAVONG
Vice Minister, Ministry of Energy
of Mines, Laos

Raghuveer Sharma is Chief Investment


Officer, Infrastructure and Natural
Resources, Asia at IFC, where he has
worked since 1983 in the electricity,
petroleum, telecommunications,
transport and environmental sectors.

54

bold steps to support the transformation of Sarawak


into a modern high income economy. By developing

This imbalance provides a significant opportunity for those


resource-rich countries to utilise export revenues to generate
income, and finance other aspects of their development.
This driver, along with readily available finance and investment,
is leading to rapid improvement and integration of grids across
the region.

eective local utility company, Sarawak Energy is taking

SCORE providing the Power to Grow to create a


stronger economy for Sarawak in Malaysia.

Bintulu Combined-Cycle Power Plant

Power to Grow

Samalaju Industrial Park, Bintulu

Mr Viravong, an engineer with a degree


in mechanical engineering, is vice
minister, Ministry of Energy of Mines,
Laos, and on the Board of Directors for
Theun Hinboun Power.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

55

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

PROJECT AND FINANCIAL


STRUCTURING: WHAT ARE
THE NEW OPTIONS?
Overview

An increasing number of models for project


financing have been developed and tested.
What has been the experience and how
can good outcomes be replicated?
Session objectives
The session is intended to outline the various models for
financing hydropower projects and to consider when each
option is most appropriate under various circumstances.
It will open with a keynote address from the International
Finance Corporation (IFC) on the current models and the
associated challenges.
There will then be presentations from the different
perspectives of various bodies in the financial sector and
the commercial development sector. It will conclude with
a round-table panel discussion followed by opportunities
for a Q&A session.
This session will be moderated by Roy Adair, chairman and
managing director of Sustainable Energy Services PTY Ltd,
and IHA Board member.

ADVERTISEMENT
Co-convenor
International Finance Corporation
When
Thurs 21 May 11.0012.30
Location
North Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

CHAI Jun
Division Chief, Loan and Credit
Department, China Exim bank

DU Chunguo
Vice President, Overseas Business,
Power China

Chai Jun has 15 years of banking


experience, with a portfolio of
projects covering infrastructure,
energy, telecommunication and
trade finance.

Mr Du, vice president of the Overseas


Business Unit of Power China, is
responsible for overseas marketing,
and investment and acquisitions in
Europe, America and Oceania.

A.B. GIRI
CEO, Hindustan Electric
Power Limited

Morgan LANDY
Director of Transaction
Bank Solutions, IFC

Mr Giri is qualified in mechanical


engineering and business
management; he has 45 years of
experience in technical, general
management and business
leadership positions.

Mr Landy, co-director of IFCs


Transactional Risk Solutions
Department, leads the corporation in
fulfilling its commitments to sustainable
development, ensuring that IFC grows
through ESG risk management.

Kelly MALONE
Partner, King & Spalding

Radhesh PANT
CEO, Investment Board of the
Government of Nepal

Mr Malone serves as partner and


head of the Global Power Team
of King & Spalding, specialising
in the development, financing
and construction of major
hydropower projects.

Mr Pant has extensive experience in


the banking sector in Nepal. He was
previously the CEO of two major
commercial Nepali banks, and also
served as the president of the Nepal
Bankers Association.

Hansong ZHU
President of China Investment
Banking, Goldman Sachs
Hansong Zhu joined Goldman Sachs
in 2000 as a senior associate, and
became an executive director in 2001.
He was named managing director in
2005 and partner in 2008.

56

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

57

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

SEDIMENT MANAGEMENT:
WHAT ARE THE
MITIGATION OPTIONS?
Overview

Sedimentation in river systems is caused by


both natural erosion and human activities,
such as deforestation, mining, agriculture
and infrastructure development.
The sediment yield varies considerably from one basin to
another. Reservoirs can cause changes to sediment transport
in river systems, creating an accumulation of sediment in the
reservoir and reducing the sediment discharge downstream.
Effects include increased erosion downstream and a reduction
in deposition both inland and in coastal deltas.

Co-convenor
Tsinghua University
When
Thurs 21 May 11.0012.30
Location
Middle Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

George ANNANDALE
Principal, Golder Associates

Marc GOICHOT
Programme Advisor, WWF

Dr Annandale, identified by
International Water Power & Dam
Construction as one of 20 engineers that
made a significant contribution to dam
engineering, consults internationally on
hydropower projects.

Marc, worked in Vietnam, Cambodia,


Thailand and Laos as a technical and
policy adviser. He is a member of the
WWF Global Reference Group on
Water Security.

Finding solutions to the accumulation of sediment and


nutrient caused by reservoirs is important for the health
of the ecosystems that the river supports.

Session objectives

Pravin KARKI
Senior Hydropower Specialist,
World Bank Group

LIANG Quanwei
Chief Designer, Dongfang
Electric Machinery

Pravin has 20 years experience in


hydropower and water resources, he is
currently leading the World Banks work
on the international technical guidance
note on sediment management.

Liang Quanwei is experienced in


developing numerical simulation
methods and engineering models
to analyse and predict the
hydro-abrasive erosion problems
in hydraulic machines.

The sediment management session will include an overview


of sediment hotspots around the world, and will explore the
challenges that sediment transport presents at the river-basin
and project levels.
Through the examples presented by case study, a panel of
experts will discuss the approaches to sediment management
and the mitigating techniques that can be employed, including
civil systems and materials for hydro-mechanical equipment.
This session will be moderated by Pravin Karki, senior
hydropower specialist at the World Bank Group.

58

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Overview

The increased emphasis on hydropower


sustainability has led diverse voices from
within the hydropower sector and from
various stakeholders to hypothesise that
integrating conservation throughout the
development process can not only improve
environmental and social outcomes, but
also contribute to better business outcomes,
for example by lowering risk.

Co-convenor
The Nature Conservancy
When
Thurs 21 May 11.0012.30
Location
South Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Luiz Gabriel AZEVEDO


Sustainability Director, Odebrecht
Engineering and Construction

Garo BATMANIAN
Lead Environmental Specialist,
World Bank

Mr Azevedo has been involved with


infrastructure and environmental
management in some 30 countries.
He has worked at the World Bank as a
lead water resources engineer and a
sustainability sector leader.

Garo Batmanian is the World Banks


lead environment specialist and
agriculture, environment and forestry
sector coordinator for China and
Mongolia, based in the Beijing office.

Jean Michel DEVERNAY


Honorary IHA Member

LI Wenwei
Executive Director, Yangtze Three
Gorges Technology and Economy
Development Co., Ltd

The hydropower sector, river-dependent communities and


ecosystems all stand to benefit from a better understanding
of the business case for integrating conservation into
hydropower development.

In addition, sediment management is also needed to reduce the


loss of reservoir storage capacity and therefore available water
resources for multiple services, including power generation.
Further issues needing management include the impact of
sediment abrasion on gate-works, turbine equipment and
other components.

CONSERVATION: WHEN IS IT
COMPATIBLE WITH HYDROPOWER
DEVELOPMENT?

In addition to benefiting ecosystems and communities, can


comprehensive integration of conservation throughout the
development process offer financial and economic benefits
to project developers, funders and energy agencies?

Session objectives
This session will explore the business case and its
applicability, including how applicable it is in the context
of a developing economy.

Mr Devernay, former chief technical


specialist for hydropower at the
World Bank, served for 14 years as
the vice-president of IHA; he is now
an honorary member.

Li Wenwei has years of experience in


scientific researching, technology
consulting, and environmental
protection management.

A keynote presentation will propose that integrating


conservation into hydropower development can offer
significant benefits to project developers.
Gregory MORRIS
Owner, GLM Engineering

WANG Zhao-Yin
Professor, Tsinghua University

Dr Morris, lead author of Reservoir


Sedimentation Handbook, has 40
years experience consulting and
lecturing on water resource and
sediment issues, including sediment
management in reservoirs and
hydropower projects.

Dr Wang is professor of hydraulic


engineering, Tsinghua University,
and chairman of the Advisory Council
of the International Research and
Training Center on Erosion and
Sedimentation (UNESCO).

The proposition will be debated by a panel and the argument


put to the audience for debate.
This session will be moderated by Jean-Michel Devernay,
IHA honorary member.

Jeff OPPERMAN
Lead Scientist, The Nature
Conservancys (TNC) Great Rivers
Partnership
Jeff, lead scientist for TNCs Great
Rivers Partnership and director of
the Conservancys sustainable
hydropower global strategy, has
been working to protect rivers
and lakes for 15 years.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

59

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

GOOD CORPORATE
GOVERNANCE:
CEO ROUNDTABLE
Overview

Leadership in corporate governance is


considered one of the keys to the
successful and sustainable development
of hydroelectric projects. More widely,
the diffusion of good practices in this
field is essential for creating an
environment conducive to investment.
While good governance covers a wide spectrum of activities,
there is currently an increasing emphasis on promoting
transparency, integrity, accountability and stakeholder
engagement for good governance.

FHYP15-014 HYDRO-QUBEC ANNONCE CLEAN ENERGY INFO: KA / NATH DUPONT


VERSION: ANGLAIS PUBLICATION: 2015 HYDROPOWER WORLD CONGRESS PROGRAM FORMAT: 210 MM X 297 MM COULEUR: CMYK LIVRAISON:
A D17VAVRIL
E R TPARUTION:
I S E MNDE

NT

Co-convenor
Transparency International
When
Thurs 21 May 13.00-14.10
Location
Middle Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Susan CT-FREEMAN
Head of Business Integrity
Programme, Transparency
International
Susan manages projects aimed
at raising standards of corporate
anti-corruption practice. She represents
Transparency International on the
World Economic Forums partnering
against corruption initiative.

Steve DAVY
CEO, Hydro Tasmania
Steve has been chief executive
officer at Hydro Tasmania since 2005
and is currently chairman of Hydro
Tasmanias mainland retail business,
Momentum Energy.

For hydropower, this is particularly relevant, due to the number


and size of contracts that projects can involve. Furthermore,
the construction sector has been identified as one of the
priority sectors for improved governance by the G20.

Session objectives
A brief presentation by Transparency International will
introduce some of the key elements of good corporate
governance, with a particular focus on the roles of: the
CEO, the board and corporate compliance (in-country
and overseas), as well as management of third-party risks
and communications.

Waqar Ahmad KHAN


CEO, Star Hydro Power Limited
Waqar Khan has worked in the power
sector for 22 years. He has
engineering experience on large
projects, and has been a part of the
executive management of thermal
and hydropower IPPs.

Jean-Christophe PHILB
Chairman, Nam Theun 2
Power Company
Jean-Christophe Philb is chairman of
the Board of Directors of Nam Theun
2 Power Company Limited, the owner
of the Nam Theun 2 project in Laos.

CEOs and senior business representatives will be ready to


share the experience of their organisation with regard to
corporate governance.
This session will be moderated by Donal OLeary,
senior adviser at Transparency International.

Segomoco SCHEPPERS
Senior general manager,
Eskom Uganda
Segomoco Scheppers portfolio is
focused on Eskoms business interests
outside South Africa, including
engagement with the regional
power pools and developers.

CLEAN ENERGY TO REDUCE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS


By generating clean, renewable energy, Hydro-Qubec acts as a key player in the fight against
climate change. Our hydroelectric facilities emit negligible amounts of greenhouse gas: 40 times
less CO2 than natural-gas power stations and 100 times less than coal-fired generating stations.
As North Americas largest producer of clean, renewable energy,
Hydro-Qubec places sustainable development at the heart of every project.

FHYP15-014 Ann_CleanEnergy_HWC.indd 1

60

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

2015-04-17 14:59

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

61

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

EARLY STAGE SUSTAINABILITY:


HOW CAN IT BE ASSESSED?

Co-convenor
State Secretariat for Economic
Affairs of Switzerland
When
Thurs 21 May 13.00-14.10
Location
South Hall

Overview

The most important environmental and


social mitigation measure is good site
selection. Pre-feasibility studies often miss
the opportunity to explore the full range of
sustainability elements during site selection.
The application of the early stage tool of the Hydropower
Sustainability Assessment Protocol can highlight key
environmental and social risks and opportunities early enough
in project selection to avoid or address risks that would
otherwise be built into projects.

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Andrew T. BARFOUR
Director/Project Coordinator,
Ghana Energy Development
and Access Project (GEDAP)

Mattia CELIO
Programme Manager, State
Secretariat for Economic Affairs
of Switzerland (SECO)

Ing. Barfour is team leader for the early


stage sustainability assessments and
capacity building for six hydropower
sites by IHA, funded by SECO.

Mattia, programme manager at SECO,


is responsible for infrastructure
financing projects in Ghana, Tanzania,
and Bosnia and Herzegovina,
addressing the energy and urban
water supply sectors.

This provides the opportunity for these risks to not only be


mitigated, but potentially avoided or minimised.

Session objectives
This session will also explore the considerable benefits of
assessing potential projects against a strategic framework that
identifies environmental, social, technical and economic risks
and opportunities.
The session will explore the value of applying a full range of
risk mitigation strategies in project decision-making, such as
using the early stage tool, and its relevance in different
regulatory regimes.
As an example, this session will present the experiences of the
initial application of the tool in the Republic of Ghana.
This session will be moderated by Mattia Celio,
programme manager at the State Secretariat for Economic
Affairs of Switzerland.

MACROECONOMIC BENEFITS
OF HYDROPOWER: CAN
WE QUANTIFY THEM?
Overview

Current climate and energy policy seeks


to build affordable, secure and sustainable
energy systems. Hydropower is not only a
cost-efficient supply of low-carbon
electricity; its use also encompasses
considerable economic benefits.
Hydropower, both directly and indirectly, contributes to the
economy in several ways.
Direct benefits include: electricity generation; substantial
contributions to local, regional and national GDPs; and highvalue employment. Indirect contributions can be generated by
the multi-purpose benefits of hydropower, including flood
mitigation; water supply; recreation and tourism.

Co-convenor
IEA Hydro
When
Thurs 21 May 13.00-14.10
Location
North Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Anne BOLLE
Senior Climate Advisor, Statkraft

Emmanuel BRANCHE
Senior Economist Engineer, EDF

Anne Bolle has expertise in the nexus


of energy and climate policies, with
focus on regulatory frameworks,
incentives and risks. She is a co-lead
of the project group Strengthening
the voice of hydropower.

Emmanuel Branche is an expert on


sustainable development assessment
for renewables, and their role in
mitigation of, and adaptation to,
climate change. He is also engaged
in waterenergy nexus works.

Colin CLARK
Chief Technical Officer, Brookfield
Renewable Energy Group

LEI Xiaomeng
Vice Chief Engineer, China Yangtze
Power Co. LTD (CYPC)

Colin, Chief Technical Officer of


Brookfield Renewable Energy, provides
global oversight for engineering and
technical affairs. Colin is a licensed
professional engineer in Ontario and
British Columbia.

Xiaomeng, vice chief engineer for


CYPC, has been working for the
company since 2003; his work involves
power system integration, PPA
negotiation, operational coordination,
and electricity market analysis.

Session objectives
Roger GILL
Principal Consultant, Hydro
Focus PTY

Fekahmed NEGASH
Executive Director, ENTRO,
Nile River Basin

Roger, managing director and


principal consultant of Hydro Focus
Pty Ltd, an international consulting
business, has over 30 years
experience within the renewable
energy sector.

Fekahmed Negash is executive


director of the Eastern Nile Technical
Regional Office (ENTRO), covering
Egypt, Ethiopia, South Sudan and
Sudan, within the Nile Basin Initiative.

This session aims to present a comprehensive overview of the


macroeconomic benefits created by hydropower, especially its
contribution to local and regional social and economic welfare.
The session convenes experts from several research initiatives
that are looking to address the multi-purpose benefits of
hydropower and their direct or indirect macroeconomic
effects beyond just electricity generation.
The session will touch on hydropowers effect on todays
economy, and the role of hydropower in future economies.
This session will be moderated by Tracy Lane,
hydropower development director at the International
Hydropower Association.

Niels NIELSEN
Secretary, IEA Hydro
Niels, a highly experienced
hydropower manager with a
strong background in hydropower
development, dam engineering,
dam safety and hydroplant
modernisation, co-ordinates the
research program for IEA Hydro.

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

63

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

HYDROPOWER INVESTMENT:
HOW CAN RISK AND REWARD
BE BALANCED?
Overview

Hydroelectric plants are long-lived assets


that attract an increasingly diverse
spectrum of investors. At the same time,
new ownership models are developing.
What will the investment landscape look
like in the coming decades?
There is an increasing expectation of international and
private sector investors involvement in hydropower
development. To attract such investment, certain key
conditions need to be in place.

ADVERTISEMENT
Co-convenor
International Hydropower
Association
When
Thurs 21 May 14.30-16.00
Location
North Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Edson Luiz DA SILVA


Director of Planning and Control,
Tractebel Energia

Jessica FARMER
Principal Investment Officer,
InfraVentures

Edson is the director of planning


and control at Tractebel Energia.
He has a PhD in electrical engineering,
and 30 years experience in the
electricity industry.

Jessica joined IFC as principal investment


officer for infraventures, where she
heads the Asia portfolio. Before IFC,
she worked at the Export-Import
Bank of the United States.

LI Guanghua,
CPI Yunnan International Power
Investment Co., Ltd

Sean KIDNEY
CEO, Climate Bonds Initiative

Session objectives
A multilateral development bank will present its experiences
on creating the environment for foreign direct investment
including the establishment of appropriate market
arrangements and legal frameworks.
The position of potential investors will be described through
a corporate lens. The motivation for investing in emerging
markets will be presented by a key investor.
Following this, a panel will respond to the presentations,
based on investment experience throughout the world.

Mr Li joined CPI in 2003. After


working in the department of
planning and development for six
years, he moved into his current role
as general manager in 2009.

Sean Kidney is the CEO and


co-founder of the Climate Bonds
Initiative, an international nongovernmental organisation working
to mobilise debt capital markets for
climate solutions.

M.M MADAN
President and CEO, Jindal
Power Limited

Deepak RAUNIAR
CEO, Hydroelectricity Investment
and Development Company Ltd

Mr Madan, president of Jindal Power,


has 40 years experience in hydropower.
He was awarded the prestigious I.N.
Sinha Award, recognising his
contribution to water resources.

Deepak Rauniar has a wealth of


experience at senior management
and executive level, and has spent
more than 20 years working within
Nepals financial sector.

This session will be moderated by Torstein Sjtveit, CEO of


Sarawak Energy, and IHA Board member.

Lei ZHANG
Energy Specialist, South Asia Division,
Asia Development Bank (ADB)
Mr Zhang joined ADB in 2010.
He is responsible for processing
and administering energy projects
in Bangladesh and Nepal, and is
also involved in projects within
India and Bhutan.

64

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

65

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT:
HOW CAN BENEFITS AND
COSTS BE SHARED?
Overview

Hydropower is often a major factor in


economic and social development at
local, national and regional levels.
With the increasing number of interconnectors between
electricity systems and 260 of the worlds rivers crossing at
least one national boundary, the future development of
hydropower often involves cooperation not just among
domestic stakeholders, but also with stakeholders from
neighbouring countries as well.
The opportunities and benefits associated with regional
hydropower development can increase in tandem with the
number of countries concerned, as can the complexities and
potential risks.

ADVERTISEMENT
Co-convenors
ASEAN Centre for Energy;
International Water
Management Institute
When
Thurs 21 May 14.3016.00
Location Middle Hall

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Min KHAING
Director, Department of Hydropower
Implementation, Myanmar
As a director of the design branch
of the department, Min Khaing is
responsible for the planning, design,
quality control, feasibility evaluation
and design of hydropower projects.

Kate LAZARUS
Senior Operations Officer, IFC
Kate Lazarus is team leader of a program
to improve environmental and social
standards in hydropower, with 13
years experience in governance
issues in the Mekong region.

Session objectives
The session will provide an overview of regional cooperation
in hydropower through expert presentations on energy and
water aspects, followed by case studies related to
international rivers and transmission projects.
It will finish with a discussion of benefits and costs of regional
hyrdropower development.
This session will be moderated by Kate Lazarus, senior
operations officer at the International Finance Corporation.

LI Shufei
Department Chief, Changjiang
Institute of Survey, Planning,
Design and Research
Li Shufeis work is mainly focused
on water resources planning and
utilisation research, especially in river
basin planning and reservoir operation.

Munyaradzi C. MUNODAWAFA
Chief Executive, Zambezi
River Authority
Munyaradzi Munodawafa is a
Fellow of the Zimbabwe Institute
of Engineers, and a contributor to
the Engineers Without Borders
programmes jointly organised with
the Zambia Engineering Institute.

Matthew MCCARTNEY
Theme Leader for Ecosystems
Services, IWMI
Matthew McCartney is a principal
researcher specialising in water
resources, and wetland and
hydro-ecological studies. He is
currently theme leader of the IWMIs
theme on Ecosystem Services.

Jos Mara SNCHEZ TILLERA


Technical Director, Itaipu Binacional
Mr Snchez has 30 years experience
working at Itaipu Binacional. He served
as head of the system operation
division and operation superintendent,
before commencing his current role as
technical director in 2008.

CREEI, is a consultancy company providing high-end services with regard to industry policy, planning,
technology research, engineering and project review; the industrial technology regulator in charge of
hydropower and new energy; a national hydropower engineering technology R&D center; the administrative institute responsible for running national renewable energy information management
Sanjayan VELAUTHAM
Director General, ASEAN Centre
for Energy
Sanjayan Velautham has more than
25 years experience in the industry,
academia and research institutes.
Prior to ASEAN, he has held senior roles
at A*STAR, General Electric and UNDP
Malaysia, among others.

66

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

centre as well as national renewable energy project quality supervision centre, etc. CREEI is one of
IRENA Global Atlas partners.

http://www.creei.com

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

67

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE:
HOW DOES IT INFLUENCE
DECISIONS?
Overview

The Hydropower Sustainability


Assessment Protocol provides for the
first time a common language to assess
hydroelectric projects around the world,
and has now been applied in over 15
countries on over 25 projects. How has
this initiative helped decision-makers?
Session objectives
This session is intended to showcase the potential of
the protocol in assessing sustainability performance,
and providing a platform for dialogue.

Co-convenor
International Institute for
Environment and Development
When
Thurs 21 May 14.30-16.00

THE SESSION SPEAKERS AND PANELLISTS

Mohamad Irwan AMAN


Sustainability Manager,
Sarawak Energy

Pablo CARDINALE
Principal Specialist, Environmental,
Social and Governance, IFC

Irwan joined Sarawak Energy as


sustainability manager in 2011.
He is responsible for developing
and implementing sustainability
strategies that reflect Sarawak
values and support business plans.

Pablo, a marine biologist and


zoologist with a PhD in
environmental engineering, has
worked as an environmental and
social specialist for multilateral
development banks for 15 years.

LE Thi Ngoc Quynh


Deputy Director, EVN
Le Thi Ngoc Quynh is the deputy
director of the science, technology
and environment department of EVN,
Vietnams state-owned corporation
responsible for power generation,
transmission and distribution.

Wang Xianguang has been chief


representative and project engineer
for CWE in Pakistan, Nepal, Cambodia
and Mauritius. He is currently
engaged in health, safety and
environmental protection.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Location
Yanqi Island Conference Centre

Part 1: High level perspectives and priorities


for the hydro sector

For three days, the World Hydropower


Congress has brought together many
of the sectors leaders to dissect the
biggest challenges facing it; this session
is an opportunity to move the
conversation forward.
Indeed: to increase its contribution to development, hydropower
must be developed sustainably, and with consideration to good
practices. What are the actions and initiatives required to share
knowledge more widely within the sector?

SPEAKER HIGHLIGHTS
Participants will hear from a range of perspectives, including:

Ken ADAMS
President, International
Hydropower Association
Ken graduated as a civil engineer
from the University of London, UK;
he is president of IHA and is principal
of Ken Adams and Associates.

Speakers from a range of backgrounds, representing different


regions of hydropower activity, will discuss the key takeaways
of the congress, and the steps needed to strengthen the
sectors performance worldwide.

WANG Xianguang
General Manager, Quality and HSE
Department, China International
Water & Electric Corp (CWE)

68

When
Thurs 21 May from 17.00

Location
South Hall

It will seek to pinpoint the added value that protocol


assessments have provided, as seen by the project
developers or operators, especially in developing countries.
This session will be moderated by Jamie Skinner, water
team leader at the International Institute for Environment
and Development.

CLOSING SESSION
AND DINNER

Convenor
International Hydropower
Association

Jamie SKINNER
Water Team Leader, International
Institute for Environment and
Development
Jamie leads the water team at
the International Institute for
Environment and Development.
He is a member of the social chamber
of the Hydropower Sustainability
Assessment Protocol.

LI Jugen
Vice Standing President and Acting
General Secretary, China Society for
Hydropower Engineering (CSHE)
Li Jugen is vice standing president
and acting secretary-general of CHSE.
He is also the secretary-general of the
Pan Jiazheng Hydropower Science
and Technology Fund.

Part 2: Closing dinner


A dinner will immediately follow the final remarks, and give
participants a last opportunity to enjoy the quiet sunset over
Yanqi Island and reflect on the congress proceedings.

Richard TAYLOR
CEO, International Hydropower
Association (IHA)
Richard, a Fellow of the Energy
Institute (UK), became a founding
Board member of IHA in 1995, and
has served as the associations
executive director since 2001.

Elisa XIAO
Principal Consultant, ERM Impact
Assessment and Planning Team
Elisa Xiao specialises in environmental
social and health impact assessments,
resettlement planning, and
environmental and social due
diligence review and assessment.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

69

SPEAKER
DIRECTORY
Name

Organisation

Session

Page

Name

Organisation

Session

Page

Ken Adams

President, International Hydropower Association

Opening ceremony; closing session

34, 69

Miguel De Franca Doria

Assistant Programme Specialist, UNESCO-IHP

Greenhouse gas emissions and water quality

44

Abid Sher Ali

State Minister for Water and Power, Pakistan

Asia

54

Du Chunguo

Vice President, Overseas Business, Power China

Project and financial structuring

56

Jukka Alm

Senior Scientist, Natural Resources Institute Finland

Greenhouse gas emissions and water quality

44

Simon DUjanga

State Minister for Energy, Uganda

Africa

38

Mohamad Irwan Aman

Sustainability Manager, Sarawak Energy

Sustainability performance

68

Tron Engebrethsen

Senior Vice President, International Hydro, Statkraft

Climate resilience

52

George Annandale

Principal, Golder Associates

Sediment management

58

Jessica Farmer

Principal Investment Officer, Infraventures

Hydropower investment

64

Reza Ardakanian

Director, UNU-FLORES

Waterenergy nexus

42

Charles Feinstein

Director, Energy and Extractives, World Bank Group

Water-energy nexus

42

Jean-Franois Astolfi

Executive Vice President, lectricit de France

Hydropower safety

50

Domingo Fernandez

Connectivity for aquatic species

46

Luiz Gabriel Azevedo

Sustainability Director, Odebrecht

Conservation

59

Resettlement

49

Antoine Badinier

Deputy Vice-President, Electricite de France

Waterenergy nexus

42

Bernard Barandereka

Energy Expert, African Union Commission

Development vs sustainability

43

Mario Finis

Senior Veterinarian and Manager of Fishery Actions, Itaipu


Binacional
Socio-Environmental Consultant,
Energia Sustentvel do Brasil
Senior Vice President, MWH Global

Hydropower safety

50

Andrew T. Barfour

Early stage sustainability

62

Paolo Frankl

Head of Renewable Energy, International Energy Agency

2050 by 2050

40

Gao Yong

46

Conservation

59

Teferra Beyene

Advisor to the Minister of Water and Energy, Ethiopia

Africa

38

2050 by 2050

40

Ashok Bhargava

Director, East Asia Division, Asian Development Bank

Asia

54

Roger Gill

Deputy Director, Chinese Sturgeon Research Institute,


China Three Gorges Corporation
Director of Innovation and Technology Centre,
International Renewable Energy Agency
Principal Consultant, Hydro Focus Pty

Connectivity for aquatic species

Garo Batmanian

Director/Project Coordinator, Ghana Energy Development


and Access Project (GEDAP)
Lead Environmental Specialist, World Bank

Early stage sustainability

62

Pierre Biedermann

Principal Environment Advisor, EBRD

Climate resilience

52

Irene Giner-Reichl

Executive Director, Global Forum for Sustainable Energy

Future energy mix

47

Giulio Boccaletti

Development vs sustainability

43

A.B.Giri

CEO, HindustanElectricPowerLimited

Project and financial structuring

56

Anne Bolle

Global Managing Director for Water,


The Nature Conservancy
Senior Climate Advisor, Statkraft

Macroeconomics

63

Marc Goichot

Programme Advisor, WWF

Sediment management

58

Emmanuel Branche

Senior Economist Engineer, EDF

Macroeconomics

63

Jakob Granit

Director, Stockholm Environment Institute

Water-energy nexus

42

Benedito Braga

President, World Water Council

Waterenergy nexus

42

Radha Gyawali

Minister of Energy, Nepal

Asia

54

Marco Braun

Hydroclimatology Specialist, OURANOS Consortium

Climate resilience

52

Atle Harby

Greenhouse gas emissions and water quality

44

Jin-Yong Cai

Executive Vice President and CEO, IFC

Opening ceremony: international cooperation

36

Director, Centre for Environmental Design of Renewable


Energy (CEDREN)
Minister of Energy and Hydrocarbons, Madagascar

Africa

38

Pablo Cardinale

Sustainability performance

68

Asia

54

Early stage sustainability

62

Project and financial structuring

56

Connectivity for aquatic species

46

Chen Houqun

Principal Specialist, Environmental, Social & Governance,


International Finance Corporation
Programme Manager, State Secretariat for Economic
Affairs of Switzerland
Manager, Representative Office for Southern and Eastern
Africa, China Exim Bank
Head, Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, China
Three Gorges Corporation
Executive Member of the Council, CHINCOLD

Hydropower safety

50

Tammy Chu

Managing Director, Entura

Climate resilience

52

Colin Clark

Chief Technical Officer, Brookfield Renewable Energy

Macroeconomics

63

Susan Ct-Freeman

Head, Business Integrity Programme, Transparency


International
Director of Planning and Control, Tractebel Energia

Good corporate governance

60

Hydropower investment

64

Mattia Celio
Chai Jun
Chen Daqing

Edson Luiz Da Silva


James Dalton

Development vs sustainability

43

Stephen Davy

Coordinator of Global Initiatives, International Union for


the Conservation of Nature Water Project
CEO, Hydro Tasmania

Good corporate governance

60

Jean-Michel Devernay

Honorary Member, International Hydropower Association

Conservation

59

Keshab Dhoj Adhikari

Joint Secretary, Ministry of Energy, Nepal

Asia

54

Ding Yanzhang

General Manager, China Energy and Electricity


Construction Group (CEEC)

Opening ceremony: focus on China

34

70

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Thais Ferraz Soares

Dolf Gielen

Gatien Horace
Maw Thar Htwe

Modernisation

48

Elham Ibrahim

Deputy Minister for Ministry of Electric Power,


the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Vice Manager of Engineering Monitoring Technology
Division, NARI Group Corporation
African Union Commissioner for Energy and Infrastructure

Africa

38

Jacob Irving

President, Canadian Hydropower Association

2050 by 2050

40

Jia Jinsheng

Opening ceremony: focus on China

34

John Abdulai Jinapor

Vice President, China Institute of Water Resources and


Hydropower Research
Deputy Minister of Power, Ghana

Africa

38

Pravin Karki

Senior Hydropower Specialist, World Bank

Sediment management

58

Min Khaing

Regional development

66

Sami Khan

Director, Department of Hydropower Implementation,


Myanmar
IHA Young Researcher of the Year 2015

Modernisation

48

Waqar Ahmad Khan

CEO, Star Hydro Power Limited

Good corporate governance

60

Rasim Khaziahmetov

Director of Technology Policy, JSC RusHydro

Hydropower safety

50

Vyacheslav Kravchenko

Deputy Minister of Energy, Russia

Opening ceremony: international cooperation

36

Freddy Lafos Yave Lamfel

Chief of Staff to the Minister of Hydraulic Resources and


Electricity, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Director of Transaction Risk Solutions, International
Finance Corporation
Senior Operations Officer, International Finance
Corporation

Africa

38

Project and financial structuring

56

Regional development

66

Bo Hu

Morgan Landy
Kate Lazarus

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

71

Name

Organisation

Session

Page

Name

Organisation

Session

Page

Le Thi Ngoc Quynh

Deputy Director, VietNam Electricity (EVN)

Sustainability performance

68

Segomoco Scheppers

Senior General Manager, Eskom Uganda

Good corporate governance

60

Lei Xiaomeng

Vice Chief Engineer, China Yangtze Power Co. LTD

Macroeconomics

63

Hans-Wilhelm Schiffer

2050 by 2050

40

Li Guanghua

Hydropower investment

64

Stefan Schmutz

Connectivity for aquatic species

46

Li Jugen

General Manager, China Power Investment Corporation


(CPI)
Vice-President, China Society Hydropower Engineering

Closing session

69

Raghuveer Sharma

Asia

54

Li Lifeng

Freshwater Director, WWF International

Connectivity for aquatic species

46

Chair of World Energy Resources Study Group,World


Energy Council
University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in
Vienna, Austria
Investment Officer, Infrastructure and Natural Resources,
Asia, International Finance Corporation
CEO, Sarawak Energy

Development vs sustainability

43

Li Shufei

Regional development

66

Resettlement

49

Conservation

59

Sustainability performance

68

Downstream flows

53

Greenhouse gas emissions and water quality

44

Liang Quanwei

Department Chief, Changjiang Institute of Survey,


Planning, Design and Research
Executive Director, Yangtze Three Gorges Technology and
Economy Development Co., Ltd.
Vice-President, General Institute of Water Resources and
Hydropower Planning and Design
Chief Designer, Dongfang Electric Machinery

Sediment management

58

Closing session

69

Rikard Liden

Senior Hydropower Specialist, World Bank

Greenhouse gas emissions and water quality

44

53

Opening ceremony: focus on China

34

Resettlement

49

Helen Locher

Vice President, International Hydropower Association;


Executive Vice President, China Three Gorges Corporation
Principal Consultant for Sustainability, Hydro Tasmania

Director of Partnership, Great Rivers Partnership, The


Nature Conservancy
Executive Secretary, Ghana Dams Dialogue

Downstream flows

Lin Chuxue

Downstream flows

53

54

President and CEO, Jindal Power Limited

Hydropower investment

64

Kelly Malone

Partner, King & Spalding LLP

Project and financial structuring

56

Minister of Energy and Water Resources, Republic of


Tajikistan
Director General, ASEAN Centre for Energy

Asia

M. M. Madan

Regional development

66

Gil Maranho Neto

Vice President, International Hydropower Association

Opening ceremony: international cooperation

36

Matthew McCartney

Regional development

66

Downstream flows

53

Jian-hua Meng

Theme Leader for Ecosystems Services, International


Water Management Institute
Chair Professor of Ecohydrology and Head of the
Hydrology and Water Resources Chair Group, UNESCO-IHE
Water Security Specialist, WWF International

Connectivity for aquatic species

46

Yoshiaki Mino

General Manager, Kansai Electric

Future energy mix

47

Jos Carlos Minuzzo

Operations Director, Tractebel Energia

Modernisation

48

Gregory Morris

Owner, GLM Engineering

Sediment management

58

Mike Muller

Opening ceremony: international cooperation

36

Munyaradzi Crispen Munodawafa

Commissioner, National Planning Commission,


South Africa
Zambezi River Authority

Regional development

66

Marie-Jos Nadeau

Chair, World Energy Council

Water-energy nexus

42

Fekahmed Negash

Executive Director, ENTRO, Nile Basin Initiative

Early stage sustainability

62

Niels Nielsen

Joint, Secretary, IEA Hydro

Macroeconomics

63

Jeff Opperman

Lead Scientist, Great Rivers Partnership, The Nature


Conservancy
CEO, Investment Board of the Government of Nepal

Conservation

59

Opening ceremony; project and financial structuring

36, 56

Li Wenwei
Li Yuanyuan

Michael McClain

Radhesh Pant
Pei Zheyi

Future energy mix

47

Jean-Christophe Philb

Good corporate governance

60

Yves Prairie

Chair, Global Environmental Changes, UNESCO

Greenhouse gas emissions and water quality

44

Qiu Xiliang

President and General Manager, Harbin Electric Machinery

Modernisation

48

Peter Rae

Honorary Chair, International Renewable Energy Alliance

Future energy mix

47

Deepak Rauniar

CEO, Hydroelectricity Investment and Development


Company Ltd
Senior Economist, World Bank

Hydropower investment

64

Climate resilience

52

Resettlement

49

Olivier Salignat

Shi Guoqing
Jamie Skinner
Tan Debao
Richard Taylor
Rebecca Tharme
RichardTwum

Head of the Division of Hydropower, State Grid


Corporation of China
Chairman, Nam Theun 2 Power Company

Diego Rodriguez

Torstein Sjtveit

Usmonali Usmonzoda
Sanjayan Velautham
Arun Kumar Verma

Professor, National Centre for Resettlement, Hohai


University
Water Team Leader, International Institute for Environment
and Development
Head of the Spatial Information Application Department,
Changjang River Scientific Research Institute
CEO, International Hydropower Association

Opening ceremony: international cooperation

36

Viraphonh Viravong

Joint Secretary (Hydro) in the Ministry of Power,


Government of India
Vice Minister, Ministry of Energy and Mines, Laos

Asia

54

Wang Dekuan

Chair, Beijing IWHR Technology Co,.Ltd

Modernisation

48

Wang Guoqing

Professor, Nanjing Hydraulic Research Institute

Climate resilience

52

Wang Hao

Waterenergy nexus

42

Wang Lin

Academician, Chinese Academy of Science; Honorary


Director, Department of Water Resources, IWHR
President, China Three Gorges Corporation

Opening ceremony: focus on China

34

Wang Shucheng

President, Chinese National Committee on Large Dams

Opening ceremony: focus on China

34

Wang Xianguang

Sustainability Performance

68

Wang Zhao-Yin

General Manager of Quality & HSE Department, China


International Water & Electric Corp.
Professor, Tsinghua University

Sediment management

58

Vanessa Warnock

Principal Environmental Consultant, Mott MacDonald

Greenhouse gas emissions and water quality

44

Laura Williamson

Communication and Outreach Manager, REN21

Future energy mix

47

Edward Wojczynski

Portfolio Project Management, Manitoba Hydro

Resettlement

49

David Wright

Senior Advisor, NVE

Hydropower safety

50

Wu Shiyong

Deputy General Manager, Yalong River Corporation

Hydropower safety

50

Elisa Xiao

Principal Consultant, ERM

Sustainability performance

68

Xie Changjun

Executive Vice President, China Guodian Corporation

Opening ceremony: focus on China

34

Yan Zhiyong

Opening ceremony: focus on China

34

Yang Qingting

Chairman of the Board of Directors and President of the


Power Construction Corporation of China
Assistant General Manager, China Huadian Corporation

Opening ceremony: focus on China

34

Zhang Jiyao

President, China Society for Hydropower Engineering

Opening ceremony: focus on China

34

Zhang Jun

China Power Investment Corporation Yellow River

Future energy mix

47

Zhang Boting

2050 by 2050

40

Hydropower investment

64

Wencai Zhang

Vice Secretary General, China Society for


Hydropower Engineering
Energy Specialist, South Asia Division,
Asia Development Bank
Vice-President, Asian Development Bank

Opening ceremony: international cooperation

36

Zhang Xiaoling

Director, China Land Investigation and Planning Institute

Resettlement

49

Lei Zhang

Modernisation

48

Jos Mara Snchez Tillera

Project Manager, Division of International


Development, EDF
National Hydropower Business Line Manager, US
Army Corps of Engineers
Technical Director, Itaipu Binacional

Regional development

66

Zhou Jianping

Chief Engineer, Power China

Development vs sustainability

43

Tan Sri Adenan Satem

Chief Minister of Sarawak

Asia

54

Hansong Zhu

President of China Investment Banking, Goldman Sachs

Project and financial structuring

56

Kamau B.A. Sadiki

72

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

73

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The International Hydropower Association works with with leading
international organisations in the fields of energy and water to
improve policy environments for sustainable development.
Our partnerships help ensure that hydropower will benefit
development around the world

Join today and shape the future:

www.hydropower.org/join
policies-and-strategies-A5-english.indd 1

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- .pdf 1 15-4-14 11:17

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Join our vibrant


community
C

CM

MY

Hanergy

CY

Holding
Group Ltd. is a multinational
clean energy company, committed to changing the world by
clean energy, with core businesses covering three major areas as
hydropower, wind power and
thin-film solar power. Hanergys
total installed capacity of hydropower projects exceeds 6GW.

CMY

Hydropower

www.hanergy.com

Wind power

Solar power

Sustainable

The International Hydropower Association works with a network of


members and partners active in over 100 countries worldwide.
Our mission is to advance sustainable hydropower by building and sharing
knowledge on its role in renewable energy systems, responsible freshwater
management and climate change solutions.

www.hydropower.org/join
community-poster-A5.indd 1

Gongboxia
Hydropower Station
150

Total installed capacity


of 1.5GW

51

annual generating
capacity of 5.1 billion kwh

132

maximum dam height of


132m

Huanghe Hydropower Development


Co.,Ltd.has always adhered to the
development of clean energy, it has
Banduo, Longyangxia, Laxiwa, Lijiaxia,
Gongboxia, Suzhi, Jishixia, Yanguoxia,
Bapanxia, Qingtongxia and Datong River
Basin Hydropower Stations with a total
installed capacity of 10,77GW. It has
created a large hydropower base in the
upper reaches of the Yellow River.

Longyangxia Hydropower Station


Laxiwa Hydropower
Station
420

Total installed capacity


of 4.2GW

102

annual generating capacity


of 10.2 billion kwh

250
maximum dam height
of 250m

30/04/2015 14:21

We are specialized in development


and operation ofhydro,
coal-firing, wind power and other
clean energy sourses. By the end
of 2014, we own total assets of
RMB 56.3 billion, 4282 crew
members, and total installed
capacity of 11539.5 MW including
38 hydro power plants such as
Longtan, 1 coal-firing power
plant and 6 wind farms, in which
88.47% are clean energy sourses.

2014
5634282

128
Total installed capacity
of 1.28GW

76

60
annual generating
capacity of 6 billion kwh

247
reservoir capacity of
24.7 billion m3

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

3816
1153.95
88.47%

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

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Nanjing Hydraulic Research Institute (NHRI), set up in 1935, originally called Central Hydraulic Re
search Institute, is the oldest of its kind in China. The Institute was designated by the Chinese Government
as one of the national non-profit research institutions for public service in 2001. NHRI is a multipurpose na
tional hydraulic research complex, mainly dedicated to basic research, applied research and technological
development, and undertaking directional, principal and comprehensive researches for water conservancy,
hydroelectric power and waterway transportation projects. At the same time, the Institute acts as the Dam
Safety Management Center, the Research Center for Climate Change, the Engineering Quality Inspection
Center and the Nanjing Engineering Measurement Examination Center of the Ministry of Water Resources.
ADD: 223 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029, P.R. China
FAX: 86-25-85828888

78

Tel: 86-25-85828121/85828808

HTTP://www.nhri.cn

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POWERCHINA KUNMING has been devoting itself to harmonious development between human
and the nature since 1957. It is one of the leading engineering companies in the world for
development of hydropower resources, renewable energy and infrastructure.
In the process of developing renewable energy, POWERCHINA KUNMING is always your reliable
partner and honest friend.

ADD:115 East Renmin Road, Kunming,


Yunnan, P. R. China
TEL: (0086 -871) 63062606, 63062043
FAX: (0086 -871) 63191380
Website: http://www.khidi.com

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Undertaking planning,reconnaissance, engineering,


EPC, consultation, supervision and investment for
projects including hydro power station, pumped storage
power station, water conservancy, waterway
transportation, wind ,solar and etc

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DISCOVER CHINA:
STUDY TOURS
The World Hydropower Congress offers
participants the opportunity to visit and
study some of Chinas greatest cultural
features and technical achievements.
These pages take a look at the various
study tours available.

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P R E - CO N G R E S S

P R E - CO N G R E S S

STUDY TOURS:
CHINA THREE GORGES PROJECT

STUDY TOURS:
SHISANLING (MING TOMBS) PUMPED STORAGE

16-17 May

18 May

Itinerary
Day 1:
05.00: Travel to Beijing International Airport
09.55: Arrive at the Three Gorges Airport
12.10: Lunch at the Three Gorges Project Hotel
13.30: Cruise touring the Xiling Gorge, passing through
the Gezhouba shiplock
17.30: Return to hotel
18.00: Dinner at hotel
Day 2:
07.00: Breakfast at hotel
08.00: Visit China Three Gorges Dam
10.10: Travel to Three Gorges Airport
11.50: Flight back to Beijing

The China Three Gorges Dam is one of


the worlds greatest engineering feats.
At 22,500 MW, the project is the worlds
largest power station in terms of installed
capacity, and in 2014 it broke the world record
for annual generation, producing 98.8 TWh.
Although the project is recognised for its power generating
capacity, the primary purpose of the dam and its reservoir is
flood control. Before its completion in 2009, a major flood in
1998 passed through the Three Gorges site. The flood caused
economic losses to the region of RMB 166 billion in a single
high-flow event, a cost equivalent to the total investment
cost of the Three Gorges project.

The Shisanling pumped-storage


hydropower station, set close to Chinas
iconic Ming tombs, combines history with
modern technological achievement.
To tackle the mismatch between electricity supply and
demand in the Beijing area, the government provided the
funds for the development of the project. Planning started in
1990, and in 1992 the foundation stone of the project was laid.
The first pump-turbine unit was commissioned in 1995, and by
1997 all four units were in operation, with a combined installed
capacity of 800 MW.

In 2009, the Three Gorges project was commissioned, one year


ahead of schedule and RMB 30 billion under budget. When
another flood occurred in 2010, the project was in operation and
managed to attenuate the peak flow, averting an estimated
economic impact of a further RMB 26.6 billion.

The total installed capacity of the Shisanling station is 800 MW,


and the annual electricity production is 1.2 billion kWh. Its main
mission is to provide a source of backup power for regulating
power load peaks and for contingencies, improving the
electricity supply quality for Beijing, reducing frequent output
and opening, improving operation conditions and lowering coal
consumption. At the same time, the project provides peak load
shifting, frequency modulation and phase modulation.

With a departure from Beijing, the tour will take participants on


a guided visit to the Xiling Gorge and the Gezhouba Shiplock.
On day two, participants will travel to Yichang (Hubei Province)
to visit the dam site at the Three Gorges project.

The site selected for the project is near the world-renowned


Ming tombs in the Changping district of Beijing. Participants
on this tour will have the chance to visit the tombs, which were
included in the 2003 World Cultural Heritage list by UNESCO.

Take this opportunity to enjoy the spectacular scenery along the


Xiling Gorge on the Yangtze River, set in the mountainous region
of Zigui County, featuring many beautiful lakes and waterways.

Ming Tombs is the name given to 13 mausoleums belonging


to emperors from the Ming Dynasty. Of these, the Dingling
Underground Palace, unveiled in 1956, was the first and only
one of the imperial tombs opened to the public.
The Dingling Tomb is the mausoleum of Emperor Zhu Yijun
(1563-1620) and his two empresses. Zhu Yijun was the longest
reigning Emperor of the Ming Dynasty, occupying the throne
for 48 years.
Built over six years, the tomb covers 180,000 square meters and
is of great historical significance. It attracts millions of visitors
every year from all over the world.

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P O S T - CO N G R E S S

STUDY TOURS:
YELLOW RIVER TOUR
22-24 May

Itinerary
Day 1:
10.00: Travel to Beijing Airport
13.00: Flight leaves from Beijing
14.45: Flight arrives at Luoyang
15.40: Visit the White Temple
17.10: Travel to the hotel
18.00: Dinner
Day 2:
08.30: Travel to the Xiaolangdi Project
10.00: Visit the Xiaolangdi Project and scenic region
12.30: Lunch
14.00: Travel to the Longmen Grottoes
15.30: Visit the Longmen Grottoes
18.00: Return to the hotel for dinner
Day 3:
08.30: Travel from the hotel to the Shaolin Temple
10.15: Visit the Shaolin Temple
12.30: Lunch
14:00: Travel to Zhengzhou airport or Luoyang Longmen Station

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

This three-day tour will take participants to


some of the most breathtaking features and
significant technical sites of the sprawling
Yellow River, including the Shaolin Temple,
the Longmen Grottoes and the Xiaolangdi
Water Conservancy Project.
The Xiaolangdi Water Conservancy Project is the key project for
harnessing the potential of the Yellow River. Its construction
began in 1994 and was completed by the end of 2001. The main
function of the project is sediment management and flood
control, while it also provides power generation and irrigation.
The Shaolin Temple is the most famous temple in China because
of its significance in martial arts, or Wushu Chang, as well as its
historical importance and its role in Chinese Buddhism.
The Longmen Grottoes, located near Luoyang, Henan Province,
are a treasure house of ancient Buddhist cave art. The grottoes
were hewed and carved during the Northern Wei Dynasty
(386534), when the rulers relocated their capital to Luoyang near
the end of the 5th century. At that time, Buddhism was spreading
east into China and was venerated by the imperial court.

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P O S T - CO N G R E S S

P O S T - CO N G R E S S

STUDY TOURS:
JINSHA RIVER TOUR

STUDY TOURS:
YANGTZE TOUR

22-24 May

22-24 May

Itinerary
Day 1:
05.00: Travel to Beijing International Airport
07.45: Flight leaves from Beijing International Airport
11.00: Arrive at Yibin
11.30: Lunch at Xiangjiaba dam site
13.00: Visit Xiangjiaba project

Jinsha River, on the upper reach of the


Yangtze River, is one of Chinas abundant
hydropower areas, with a feasible
hydropower potential of 75,000 MW
on the main stream.

15.30: Travel to the Xiluodu project


18.30: Check in at Xiluodu Dam Site Hotel and dinner
Day 2:
08.00: Breakfast at Xiluodu Dam Site Hotel
08.30: Visit the Xiluodu project
10.00: Travel back to Yibin
12.30: Lunch at Yibin
13.30: Travel to Chengdu
18.00: Check in at Howard Johnson Hotel and dinner
Day 3:
07.30: Breakfast at the Howard Johnson Hotel
08.30: Cultural tour of Chengdu Panda Base
12.00: Lunch
13.00: Cultural tour of the ancient Dujiangyan irrigation project
16.00: Dinner and checkout of Howard Johnson Hotel
18.00: Travel back to the airport
20.10: Flight to Beijing leaves
22.50: Arrive back in Beijing

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Itinerary
Day 1:
05.10: Travel to Beijing International Airport
07.15: Depart from Beijing International Airport
10.30: Arrive at Three Gorges Airport (Yichang)
12.30: Lunch at Three Gorges Project Hotel
14.00: Visit Zigui County and tour of Qu Yuan Memorial Temple
17.30: Return to hotel

On this tour participants will be able to see some of the most


impressive achievements on the river, in particular the newly
completed 13,860 MW Xiluodu project. They will also have a
chance to come face to face with giant pandas.

18.30: Dinner at hotel

On the first day of this tour, participants will visit the Xiangjiaba
hydropower project, completed in 2015. The project has a total
installed capacity of 6,400 MW.

12.00: Lunch at hotel

On day two, the tour visits the Xiluodu hydropower station


the worlds third largest power station, behind the Three
Gorges project and Itaipu.
On the last day of the tour, participants will visit Chengdu
Panda Base: a non-profit research and breeding facility for
giant pandas. The base was established in March 1987 with the
mission to further the research and conservation carried out by
the Chengdu Zoo.
Finally, the tour moves on to the Dujiangyan Irrigation System,
a world cultural heritage. Constructed in the 3rd century BC,
the system still controls the waters of the Minjiang River and
distributes it to the fertile farmland of the Chengdu plains.

Day 2:
07.30: Breakfast at hotel
08.30: Visit the Three Gorges Project
13.30: Cruise touring the Xiling Gorge, passing through
the Gezhouba shiplock
17.30: Return to hotel
18.30: Dinner at hotel
Day 3:
07.30: Breakfast at hotel
08.30: Check out of hotel
09.10: Visit Chinese Sturgeon Institute
10.10: Travel to Three Gorges Airport
11.50: Flight back to Beijing
13.55: Arrive in Beijing

The Yangtze River is home to the China


Three Gorges project the worlds largest
hydropower station and many of Chinas
most celebrated cultural sites. This tour
captures the most memorable highlights
along the river.
On the first day, participants will visit Zigui County, one of
the new residences for Three Gorges project migrants.
From here, they will proceed to visit the Qu Yuan Memorial
Temple. Qu Yuan was a patriotic poet who lived in ancient
China, around 340278 BC. The traditional Chinese Dragon
Boat Festival is celebrated to commemorate him.
On day two, participants will visit the Three Gorges project,
Xiling Gorge and the Gezhouba shiplock. The Three Gorges
Dam is a multi-objective development project with major
benefits in flood control, power generation, navigation and
more. At 22,500 MW, the project is the worlds largest power
station in terms of installed capacity, and in 2014 it broke the
world record for annual generation, producing 98.9 TWh.
On day three, tour participants will visit the Research Institute
of Chinese Sturgeon. The institute is devoted to the research
and protection of Chinese sturgeon and other rare and
endemic aquatic wildlife in the Yangtze River.

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THE INTERNATIONAL
HYDROPOWER ASSOCIATION:
20 YEARS OF ADVANCING
SUSTAINABLE HYDROPOWER

The International Hydropower Association


(IHA) is the main organiser of the World
Hydropower Congress. Working with a vibrant
community of members and partners active in
over 100 countries, IHAs mission is to advance
sustainable hydropower by building and
sharing knowledge on its role in renewable
energy systems, responsible freshwater
management and climate change solutions.

This years event in China marks the


associations 20th anniversary. Founded in
1995 under the auspices of UNESCO, IHA has
been part of a remarkable journey for
the sector in its two decades as the voice of
sustainable hydropower. During this time, the
worlds installed hydropower capacity has
grown from 625 GW to over 1,000 GW,
catalysing growth and development, and
improving peoples lives around the world.
The publication of the World Commission on
Dams final report in 2000 marked the need for
a new approach to hydropower, with an
increasing focus on sustainability and the
participation of affected communities in
project planning.
In the years that followed the report, IHA
participated in initiatives of various UN
programmes, governments and the financial
community to better understand the costs
and benefits of hydropower.
In the wake of growing activities, the
association has continued to expand since
employing its first professional director in
2001. In 2010 IHA regional offices were opened
in China and Brazil, and additional offices are
now under consideration.

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20 YEARS OF ADVANCING SUSTAINABLE HYDROPOWER CONT

Driving sustainability performance


The association has played a leadership role in driving the
sector towards sustainable practices. IHAs first sustainability
guidelines for hydropower projects in 2004, followed by
the first version of the Sustainability Protocol in 2006,
were important steps in providing tools for developers to
guide performance.
This work provided the basis for the creation of the Hydropower
Sustainability Assessment Forum; a multi-stakeholder body
consisting of representatives of governments, commercial and
development banks, social and environmental NGOs, and the
hydropower sector. The forum collaborated over three years
to refine a new tool to measure and guide performance in
the hydropower sector: the Hydropower Sustainability
Assessment Protocol.
IHA has managed the implementation of the protocol
since its launch in 2011, with the strong support of
the organisations that were represented on the forum.
The association now works in partnerships around the world
to promote a better understanding of how it can be used in
different local and regional contexts. The protocol has now
been utilised in 27 countries, covering all of the worlds regions.

Collaborating to advance policies and


strategies for the sector
IHA works with leading international organisations in the
fields of water, energy and climate to build a better
understanding of policy environments for sustainable
development. Partnerships have proved to be a constructive
way to explore the role of hydropower in a world that is
increasingly turning to renewable energy options.
In addition to working with industry (IHAs membership
includes over 100 of the worlds hydropower corporations),
the association collaborates with an extensive global network
of organisations such as the World Bank, United Nations,
the International Renewable Energy Agency, the World Water
Council, WWF, and many others.
An example of this collaborative approach has been the
associations work to develop a better understanding of
hydropower and climate change. Since 2006, an aspect of this
has been IHAs work with UNESCO and a wide scientific reference
group to improve knowledge on hydropowers greenhouse gas
footprint. The launch of a prototype tool at the World
Hydropower Congress to assess emissions from reservoirs is the
latest step in this ongoing project that is providing real value to
the water, energy and climate community.

Today, the world is facing major challenges concerning water,


energy and climate. Around the globe, 1.1 billion people do not
have access to clean water, while 1.2 billion live without access
to electricity.

1995

The dominance of fossil fuels in the global energy supply drives


climate change, exacerbating these problems. With the global
demand for energy expected to increase by some 60 per cent
by 2050, the world must look towards a reliable and sustainable
mix of energy sources.

1997 IHA participates in first international


dialogue on hydropower and dams

Hydropower, the worlds largest source of renewable electricity, has


an increasingly important role to play as part of a mixed energy
portfolio in adapting to climate change. It can make a major
contribution towards achieving the United Nations sustainable
development goals, and IHA is committed to supporting this.
Development is challenging on many fronts. While the way
forward for hydropower must be economically and technically
robust, its footprint must be one that respects the environment
and truly improves peoples lives.
IHAs vision is a world where water and energy services are
delivered to all in a sustainable way.

Creating a platform for knowledge: data


IHA works to continually advance knowledge through its
database of the worlds hydropower companies and stations,
built in collaboration with regulators, ministries and electricity
associations, as well as the worlds station owners and
operators to serve as a resource for the industry.

Developers and operators, governments and banks, academia


and NGOs, national and international organisations all of
these groups have unique expertise and perspectives to
contribute. IHA aims to bring all of these voices together,
and find common understanding on the ways forward.

This invaluable source of knowledge is used to keep our


members informed, and also to ensure that hydropower data
is accurately represented in international publications and
reporting mechanisms.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Timeline

With over 260 of the worlds river basins shared by two or more
countries, the environments in which hydropower is developed
are often transboundary, while the rise of instant communications
has deepened our ability to connect both regionally and globally.

The database holds over 10,000 records on hydropower


stations worldwide. Through this work, the association seeks
to build and share knowledge about the hydropower sector for
industry, the general public, NGOs, international organisations
and research institutes.

94

A vision for the future

Join the community


By joining IHA you can become part of an extensive
international hydropower network. As a member, you enjoy
better access to information, new connections and strong
representation on issues affecting you.
Membership is open to all organisations and individuals with an
interest in sustainable hydropower. The associations membership
community includes hydropower owners, developers, consultants,
contractors, equipment manufacturers, government agencies,
regulators, financial institutions, research establishments, universities,
non-government organisations and industry associations.
To find out more, or to sign up online,
visit www.hydropower.org/join.

IHA Constitution signed in Paris under


the auspices of UNESCO

1995 625 MW installed hydropower


capacity worldwide

2000 World Commission on Dams


report is published
2001

IHA employs first professional director

2002 IHA participates in the World Summit


on Sustainable Development
2004 IHA is a founding member of the
International Renewable Energy Alliance
(REN Alliance)
2005 770 MW installed hydropower
capacity worldwide
2006 The first IHA Sustainability Protocol
is published
2007 First IHA World Congress is held
in Antalya, Turkey
2008 The Hydropower Sustainability
Assessment Forum is created
2010 IHA regional offices are opened in
China and Brazil
2011 The Hydropower Sustainability
Assessment Protocol is launched at the
IHA World Congress in Iguazu, Brazil
2013 1,000 GW installed hydropower
capacity worldwide
2013 The World Bank publishes its new
energy strategy
2014 IHA launches a new website and
visual identity
2015 The Hydropower Sustainability
Assessment Protocol is applied for the
first time in Africa, now having covered
all continents
2015 IHA celebrates its 20th anniversary at the
World Hydropower Congress in Beijing

95

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EIGHT WAYS TO MAKE THE


MOST OF YOUR CONGRESS
With a thousand delegates, over a hundred speakers and some 25 sessions packed into
three days of congress in Beijing, its difficult to prioritise your time. These simple tips
can help you to maximise the benefits of attending.

Use the congress app

Proactively seek out new ideas

In addition to this handbook, weve put together a


special app for congress that guides you through the
programme with live updates, and enables you to
connect with other participants in real time. To download
it to your phone, simply search for WHC2015 in your
phones app store and follow the instructions.

With many sessions taking place simultaneously, the


most appealing track may be to cover the topics most
familiar to you. Keep in mind that the congress is a
unique opportunity to build knowledge in new areas
as well as developing your existing expertise; to find
new opportunities, try to attend at least one session
on a topic you are not so comfortable with.

Make use of the facilities for private meetings


Are you employed by a company that is a main
sponsor of the congress? If so, you have access to the
excellent meeting room facilities in the Kempinski
Sunrise Hotel. If not, then you can still arrange
meetings in the range of restaurants on site.
See the venue maps on page 95 for more details.

Record actions clearly in your notes

Make a stop at the congress interview booth

Share with your networks

Keep your handbook

Process business cards in real time


Its likely you will meet a lot of people at congress,
and acquire a sizeable collection of business cards.
Sifting through them all when you get back to the
office can be time-consuming. Try separating the
business cards you collect into two groups one for
those that you want to follow up on immediately, and
another for those that will be filed away into your
contact list. To be even more organised, write actions
on the cards in the follow-up group.

With so many presentations happening at the


congress, it is tempting to note down every idea and
soundbite to take away. Try including specific actions
for follow-up separate them from other notes,
perhaps by using stars or colour-coding. As a
challenge, can you record one key takeaway from
each session you attend?

The IHA communications team will be on-site at


the venue recording the views and reactions of
participants. Would you like to give your insight on a
topic? Take five minutes to pop over to the booth and
take part in a filmed interview. The team will be happy
to share the footage with you afterwards, for you to
use for your own communications channels.

You may be the only person in your team, department


or even your entire organisation attending the congress.
Make sure you share the most important takeaways
with your colleagues when you return, whether its
an informal debriefing over lunch, or a detailed
presentation in the office. Also, share your experience
with a wider audience by posting key points and
pictures from the congress on social media networks.

Conference programmes frequently end up in the bin


when the event is over, but they can actually become
an invaluable professional resource. With details of
well over 100 speakers on a range of topics featured
in this publication, think twice before discarding it
it may very well prove handy in the future as a
directory of expertise.

Did you know?


Eight is considered a lucky number in
China. The word for eight, pronounced
ba, sounds similar to the word that
means to make a fortune.

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97

DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA:


AN ETIQUETTE AND
LANGUAGE GUIDE
First time in China, or one of many? Cultural sensitivity can make a world of difference
in building relationships with business partners. As the world of hydropower is getting
smaller, here are some tips that will be useful in communicating with your partners in China.
The language

Meetings and negotiations

Mandarin is the official language of China, although Cantonese


is widely used in the southern part. Apart from these two
languages, China has approximately 15 different dialects,
spoken in the various regions and among minority groups.

It is important to be well prepared for meetings, as your host


will most probably know you and your business well. Having a
detailed proposition of the value of your company and product
may prove useful. In addition, you may want to consider
translating your materials into Chinese and making arrangements
to have an interpreter present in a business meeting.

It is a tonal language, meaning that the same word pronounced


with a different tone will convey a different meaning. Pinyin is
the Romanisation form of Chinese characters used in China.
It allows for the writing of Chinese using the Latin alphabet,
with tones indicated on top of each syllable.

Business etiquette and communication

Face is an important concept in Chinese culture that can


be compared to the Western idea of honour or prestige.
It is useful to understand how this concept applies when it
comes to conducting business.

Chinese non-verbal communication speaks volumes pay


close attention and amend your behaviour accordingly.

In addition, saying no to a request from someone more


senior may be interpreted as not giving face and disrespecting
someones position. Showing face towards business partners
is a key component of acceptable business behaviour.

Building relationships (guanxi - network)


Personal relationships are at the centre of business in China.
Make sure you put in the effort to build positive relationships
and trust between you and your partners. Patience and politeness
are prized characteristics enabling relationship building.
Dining together with your business partners is a good way
to build up trust and develop good relations, which is the
foundation of any successful cooperation with the Chinese.
Friendship, combined with a degree of trust and the mutual
obligations (guanxi) might be the best recipe for a successful
business in China. Therefore, it is highly important to establish
and nurture relationships on both a personal and business level.

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Your Chinese counterparts may


appreciate an invitation to the
companys headquarters
If using an interpreter, address
the client rather than the
interpreter. It is also suggested
to bring your own interpreter
and not necessarily rely on one
provided by your counterpart
You are always well advised to
dress formally, as this is a sign
of respect towards your
Chinese counterparts.

Negotiations might happen at a slower pace. Be patient and focus


on developing long-lasting business relationships. Business
partners tend to be quite reserved and formal at initial meetings.

Negotiating and doing business

During business meetings, be careful to preserve face.


One way of doing this is to avoid open criticism or conflict,
which can be perceived as unacceptable behaviour.

Quick tips

Even if you are listening intently, avoid frowning while someone


is speaking, as it may be interpreted as a sign of disagreement.
Therefore, Chinese people will often maintain an unemotional
expression while speaking in business meetings.

English

Chinese pronunciation
(phonetic)

Written Chinese

Hello

Nee-hao

Good morning/evening

Zaoshanghao / Wanshanghao

Business cards

Good bye (lit. See you again)

Dsai-jian

The exchange of business cards is considered important to


establish business relationships. Always offer and accept
business cards with two hands. You are well advised to have
one side of your business card translated into Chinese.

How are you?

Nee-hao-ma

Im good, thank you

Wo hen-hao, shie-shie

Nice to meet you

Hengaoshingrenshinin

My name is X

Woojiao...

Thank you!

Shie-shie

I am sorry

Boo-haoyeesu

Excuse me

Dwee-boochee

Please wait a moment

Chingdengyee-shea

Do you speak English?

Nee huwayshuoyingwoun-ma

Im sorry, I dont understand

Boo-haoyeesu. Woo tingboo-dong

Looking forward to our collaboration

Cheedaeyunin hertsuo

Do you have a business card?

Neen-yomingpeean-ma

Enjoy your meal

Yongtsuanyuukwai

Advancing sustainable hydropower

Tree-gyen ke chee-shuu shui-dean

It may be considered disrespectful to stare into another


persons eyes. In crowded places one might want to avoid eye
contact to give your Chinese business partners privacy.

Once you have received a business card, it is a good idea to


take a moment to look at the card and pay a compliment, as
this is seen as a sign of respect. It may be considered rude not
to look at the business card of your counterpart.
As China is very respectful of hierarchy, it is crucial to state
your title/position on your business card. This might
influence how one is perceived during negotiations and
the decision-making process.

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

99

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100 World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

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World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

101

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Media Room

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102 World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

103

CONGRESS PLANNER
Tuesday 19 May
Time

Session

14.30 16.00

16.30 18.00

19.00 21.00

Wednesday 20 May
Time

Session

Thursday 21 May
Time

Breakfast

Breakfast

9.00 10.30

9.00 10.30

11.00 12.30

11.00 12.30

13.00 14.10

13.00 14.10

14.30 16.00

14.30 16.00

16.30 18.00

17.00 18.30

Dinner

Dinner

104 World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

Session

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

105

PROGRAMME AT A GLANCE
Tuesday 19 May
Time

Session

14.30 16.00

Opening ceremony part one:


welcome and focus on China

16.30 18.00

Opening ceremony part two:


international cooperation and hydropower development

19.00 21.00

IHA General Meeting and opening banquet

Wednesday 20 May
Time

Thursday 21 May
Time

Session

Breakfast

Breakfast

9.00 10.30

The future of hydropower: Africa

9.00 10.30

13.00 14.10

14.30 16.00

16.30 18.00

Assessing demand and opportunities: Asia


Co-convenor:
Asian Development Bank

Co-convenor:
African Union Commission

11.00 12.30

Session

2050 GW by 2050:
what are the scenarios?

Waterenergy nexus: how do we


optimise water and energy services?

Development vs sustainability:
how can we find the right balance?

Co-convenor:
World Energy Council

Co-convenor:
World Water Council

Co-convenor: International Union


for the Conservation of Nature

Greenhouse gas emissions and


water quality: expert discussion

Connectivity for aquatic species:


expert discussion

Corporate leaders lunch

Co-convenor:
UNESCO-IHP

Co-convenor:
WWF

Convenor:
IHA

Future energy mix: how will it


influence hydro development?

Modernisation: how can existing


assets be optimised?

Resettlement: what are the boundaries


and responsibilities?

Co-convenor:
REN21

Co-convenor: China Institute of Water


Resources and Hydropower Research

Co-convenor:
Hohai University

Hydropower safety:
CEO roundtable

Climate resilience:
how can it be demonstrated?

Downstream flows: what is a


sustainable compromise?

Co-convenor:
IHA safety working group

Co-convenor:
The World Bank

Co-convenor:
UNESCO-IHE

Dinner

106 World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

11.00 12.30

13.00 14.10

14.30 16.00

17.00 18.30

Project and financial structuring:


what are the new options?

Sediment management: what are the


mitigation options?

Conservation: when is it compatible


with hydropower development?

Co-convenor:
IFC

Co-convenor:
Tsinghua University

Co-convenor:
The Nature Conservancy

Macroeconomic benefits of
hydropower: can we quantify them?

Good corporate governance: what is


good practice?

Early stage sustainability:


how can it be assessed?

Co-convenor:
IEA Hydro

Co-convenor:
Transparency International

Co-convenor: State
Secretariat for Economic
Affairs of Switzerland

Hydropower investment:
how can risk and reward be balanced?

Regional development: how can


benefits and costs be shared?

Sustainability performance:
how does it influence decisions?

Convenor:
IHA

Co-convenors: ASEAN Centre


for Energy / International
Water Management Institute

Co-convenor: International Institute


for Environment and Development

Closing session and dinner


Convenor:
IHA

Dinner

World Hydropower Congress Programme | Beijing, 19-21 May 2015

107

chaosdesign.com

Under the auspices of:

Chinas National Energy Administration

Organised by:

China Association for Science and Technology

Organising partners:

Main sponsors:

Partners:

Media Partners:

World Hydropower Congress


Secretariat
International
Hydropower Association
Nine Sutton Court Road
London SM1 4SZ
United Kingdom
congress@hydropower.org