Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 5

Contents

1

Introduction .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mark van Atten
1.1 Subject and Aim .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2 Gödel’s Commitment to Phenomenology .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3 The Religious Component in Phenomenology... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.4 The Pragmatic Value of Husserl’s and Gödel’s Historical Turn.. . .
1.5 Overview of the Essays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
References .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Part I
2

3

1
2
5
9
14
15
18

Gödel and Leibniz

A Note on Leibniz’s Argument Against Infinite Wholes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mark van Atten
2.1 Introduction .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2 Leibniz’s Argument and Its Refutation .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3 The Consistency of Cantorian Set Theory . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4 The Part-Whole Axiom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5 Concluding Remark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
References .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

23

Monads and Sets: On Gödel, Leibniz, and the Reflection Principle . .
Mark van Atten
3.1 Introduction .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Fitting Cantor’s Sets into Leibniz’ Metaphysics .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 The Reflection Principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4 Gödel’s Analogy Argument for the Reflection Principle .. . . . . . . . . .
3.4.1 Presentation of the Argument . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2 The Analogy Is Ineffective .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.3 ‘Medieval Ideas’ .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33

23
24
28
29
30
31

33
34
39
43
43
47
58
xi

. . . . . .. .. .2 Choice Sequences . . . . .3.1. .. . .2 Mathematics and Phenomenology can be Described as Two (Different) Types of Science. . . .3. .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Epistemological Parity . . 60 61 Gödel’s Dialectica Interpretation and Leibniz .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . 5.. . . . . . . . . .. . . . ... . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . .6 The Dialectica Interpretation . . . . . . 6.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . Mark van Atten References . . References . . . .5 Incompleteness and Intuition. . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . 6. . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Concluding Remark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Inconclusive Arguments . . . 77 77 77 79 79 80 85 86 87 88 89 90 90 92 95 95 98 98 99 103 106 107 107 108 112 122 124 124 127 . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 6. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . On the Philosophical Development of Kurt Gödel . . .. . 6.. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ... . . . . .2 Realism and Rationalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Searching for the Primitive Terms . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Varieties of Idealism . . . . . . . . . . .4 Gödel’s Criticisms of Husserl’s Idealism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . Mark van Atten and Juliette Kennedy 6. . . . . 6. Mark van Atten 5. 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 The Bar Theorem . .2 Transcendental Phenomenology as a Foundation of Mathematics . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. ..3 The Turn to Husserl’s Transcendental Idealism . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. 5. . . . . . . . .3. . .2 Gödel’s Position in the 1950s: A Stalemate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Phenomenology of Mathematics .4 Hilbert’s Program .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . .2. .. . . . . . . . . .4. . .4 A Way Out? . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . .1 Mathematics as Part of Husserl’s Motivation to Develop Phenomenology . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Phenomenology as a Methodical Monadology. . . . . . . .. . . . . .3. . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Examples . .. . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Part II 5 6 73 Gödel and Husserl Phenomenology of Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ... . . . . .1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .2 Gödel and German Idealism . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .4 How Is the Turn Related to Leibniz? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . .4. . . . .3. . . . . . . . .1 Connecting Phenomenology and Mathematics . . . . . . .. . .1 Intuitionistic Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . .xii 4 Contents 3. . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . with Correspondingly Different Types of Knowledge and of Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . .3.3. . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . .3 Gödel’s Turn to Husserl’s Transcendental Idealism . . . . . . .. . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .3 Philosophical Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . .2 Gödel and Heyting . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Continuity Arguments in Set Theory . . . . . . 11. . .2 Personal Contacts . . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Brouwer’s Mysticism . . . . . . . . . 6. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . 11.5 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .2 Weak Counterexamples . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark van Atten 11. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents xiii 6.3 Revisions in the Main Text of the Cantor Paper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Around the Dialectica Interpretation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 11 Gödel and Intuitionism . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . 11. . . . References . . . . . . . . ..7 Gödel’s Assessment of His Philosophical Project . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Gödel’s Mysticism . . . . .1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . 11. . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .1 Gödel and Brouwer . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..3. . . . .5 A Partial Argument Against CCT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .2. . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . 154 8 Two Draft Letters from Gödel on Self-Knowledge of Reason . . . . .. . . . . . . 165 Mark van Atten Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Part III 9 Gödel and Brouwer Gödel and Brouwer: Two Rivalling Brothers. . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and Possible Worlds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . 10. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 The Incompleteness Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . and the Common Core Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Gödel. . Mark van Atten and Robert Tragesser 10. . . .. . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Mark van Atten References . . . 6. .1 Introduction . . . . . . .3 Intuitionistic Logic as a Modal Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 The Given .6 Closing Remarks . . . . . . . .6 130 133 133 134 136 138 140 Comparison with Earlier Interpretations . .. . . . .. . . . 11. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Influence from Husserl on Gödel’s Writings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 10 Mysticism and Mathematics: Brouwer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gödel. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . Mathematics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 173 176 179 181 185 185 186 189 189 190 190 191 194 194 195 195 196 196 . . . . . . . . . 147 Mark van Atten References . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .4 Comparison of Brouwer and Gödel: Mathematics and the Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 On the Schools in the Foundations of Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . .

. . 12.4 A Historical Note . . 311 Name and Subject Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .1 Husserl: Pure Mathematics as Formal Ontology .. . . . . . . . . . 229 Part IV A Partial Assessment 12 Construction and Constitution in Mathematics . . . . . . . . .xiv Contents Appendix: Finitary Mathematics and Autonomous Transfinite Progressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 239 239 244 246 263 268 278 278 279 282 Erratum . . . . . 12. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Brouwer: Mathematics as Mental Constructions. 227 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Intuitionistic Mathematics Is Part of Transcendental Phenomenology . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Introduction . . . 12. . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . 12. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark van Atten 12. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .3 A Systematic Comparison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Discussion of Some Remaining Objections . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Concluding Remark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E1 237 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix: Null on Choice Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Author and Citation Index . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . .3 Beyond Intuitionistic Mathematics? . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . 289 Original Publications . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

http://www.com/978-3-319-10030-2 .springer.