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December 20, 2016 Tuesday

7:00 – 10:00 a.m. – Morning Class Christmas Party 10:00 -12:00 p.m. - Afternoon Class Christmas Party

2:00 – 7:00 p.m. – Faculty Christmas Party

December 21, 2016 Wednesday

 

EDUCATIONAL FIELD TRIP

December 22 , 2016 To January 2, 2017

 

PART OF CHRISTMAS VACATION

January 3, 2017 Tuesday

 

LP# _____

Grade 7 – E. Delos Santos (10), G. Del Pilar (9), G. De Jesus (8), F. Dagohoy (7), J. Calaguas (6)

I.Objectives

After doing this activity, learners will be able to;

differentiate transverse from longitudinal waves, and mechanical from

electromagnetic waves; explain how waves carry energy from one place to another

Distinguish between transverse waves, longitudinal waves and surface waves

II. Lesson

Quarter III – FORCE, MOTION ANND ENERGY Topic: Module 2 – Waves Around You Subtopic: Waves and Waves Properties

III. References

Teachers Guide pp. 6-8

 

Learner’s Guide pp. 14 – 17 Curriculum Guide p.46

Tom Henderson, The Physics Classroom

IV. Materials

Module, ISN, Pen and Paper For ppt. presentation: LCD Projector, Laptop,

V. Lesson Proper:

  • A. Routine

Checking of the physical condition of the room

Greetings

Checking of attendance by group

  • B. Engage

Encountering Idea ( Recall ):

 

The Basics of a Wave

  • C. Explore

Discussion of the objectives of the lesson.

Learners will be asked to form into groups.

Time allotment for preparation : 10 minutes

Time allotment given for group presentation: 5 minutes

Activity The Wave Exercise

This activity is designed to create a physical, kinesthetic lesson for wave theory. In it, the students themselves model the wave.

  • D. Explain

Key Concepts

A wave is a disturbance that carries energy from place to place.

Electromagnetic waves (or EM waves). Some waves do not need

matter (called a “medium”) to be able to move (for example, through space). Mechanical waves Some waves MUST have a medium in order to

o

o

Compression: where the particles are close together

move Parts of longitudinal waves:

Rarefaction: where the particles are spread apart

Parts of the Transverse Wave

o

o

Crest: the highest point of the wave

Trough: the lowest point of the wave

Waves can be typified according to the direction of motion of the vibrating particles with respect to the direction in which the waves travel

  • a. Waves in rope are called transverse waves because the individual segments vibrate perpendicular to the direction in which the

waves travels.

  • b. Longitudinal waves are produced when each portion of a coil

spring is alternatively compressed and extended.

  • c. Waves on the surface of a body of water are a combination of

transverse and longitudinal waves. Each moves in a circular pattern as the waves pass by. Wave Properties

o

Wavelength: The distance between one point on a wave and the exact same place on the next wave.

   
o Frequency: How many waves go past a point in one second; unit of measurement is

o

Frequency: How many waves go past a point in one second; unit of measurement is hertz (Hz). The higher the frequency, the more energy in the wave. 10 waves going past in 1 second = 10 Hz 1,000 waves go past in 1 second = 1,000 Hz 1 million waves going past = 1 million Hz

o

Amplitude: How far the medium moves from rest position

(where it is when not moving). Remember that for transverse waves, the highest point is the

crest, and the lowest point is the trough.

 
o Frequency: How many waves go past a point in one second; unit of measurement is
o Frequency: How many waves go past a point in one second; unit of measurement is

o

Wave speed: Depends on the medium in which the wave is traveling. It varies in solids, liquids and gases. A mathematical way to calculate speed:

wave speed = wavelength x frequency

 
 

(m)

(Hz)

 

OR

 

v = f

x

ג

 

Problem: If a wave has a wavelength of 2 m and a frequency

 

of 500 Hz, what is its speed? Answer: speed = 2 m x 500 Hz = 1000 m/s

 
  • E. Elaborat

 

e

Ask;

 

What happens when waves pass by?

 
  • F. Evaluate

Scores will be based on the result of the activity.

Success Indicator

 

VI.

Assignm

 

ent/

Answer the sample worksheet entitled, “Anatomy of a Wave Worksheet”

Follow-

See the attached copy

up

Activity

 

Note:

December 20, 2016 Tuesday

7:00 – 10:00 a.m. – Morning Class Christmas Party 10:00 -12:00 p.m. - Afternoon Class Christmas Party

2:00 – 7:00 p.m. – Faculty Christmas Party

December 21, 2016 Wednesday

 

EDUCATIONAL FIELD TRIP

December 22 , 2016 To January 2, 2017

 

PART OF CHRISTMAS VACATION

January 3, 2017 Tuesday

 

LP# _____

Grade 7 – E. Delos Santos (10), G. Del Pilar (9), G. De Jesus (8), F. Dagohoy (7), J. Calaguas (6)

I.Objectives

After doing this activity, learners will be able to;

differentiate transverse from longitudinal waves, and mechanical from electromagnetic waves;

 

show various types of electromagnetic waves

examine the electromagnetic wave through diagram

II. Lesson

Quarter III – FORCE, MOTION ANND ENERGY Topic: Module 2 – Waves Around You Subtopic: Electromagnetic Spectrum

III. References

Teachers Guide pp. 25 – 26 Learner’s Guide pp. 24 – 26 Curriculum Guide p.46

   

IV. Materials

Module, ISN, Pen and Paper Activity Worksheet (Wavestown Diagram) Reading Material (Introduction to the Electromagnetic Spectrum)

V. Lesson Proper:

  • A. Routine

Checking of the physical condition of the room

Greetings

Checking of attendance by group

  • B. Engage

Introduction:

 

Energy from the sun reaches the earth through electromagnetic waves. As opposed to mechanical waves, the electromagnetic waves require no material/medium for their passage. Thus, they can pass thru empty space. Locate the electromagnetic spectrum chart in your classroom. A

smaller image of the chart is shown below. Identify the common name of each wave shown in the chart.

1.

 

__________________

__________________________

 

2.

 

__________________

__________________________

 

3.

 

__________________

__________________________

 

4.

 

__________________

  • C. Explore

Discussion of the objectives of the lesson.

Learners will work individually.

Overview of the first activity.

This activity will introduce you to different types of electromagnetic waves, Teacher supervision. Do the activity

 

Activity

Wavestown

 

Procedure:

1.

Color and label the chart below, then match the items in the picture to

 

the Electromagnetic Spectrum.

 

2.

Use the descriptions below to help locate examples of electromagnetic

 

waves in the Wavestown picture.

  • D. Explain

By looking at the diagram, the following questions will help guide the discussion;

1.

Identify the common of each wave shown in the chart.

2.

Examine the electromagnetic spectrum

Key Concepts The electromagnetic spectrum shows the various types of electromagnetic waves, the range of their frequencies and wavelength. The wave speed of all electromagnetic waves is the same and equal to the speed of light which is approximately equal to 300,000,000 m/s.

 

o

Radio waves have the longest wavelength in the electromagnetic spectrum. These waves carry the news, ball games, and music you

listen to on the radio. They also carry signals to television sets and

   

o

cellular phones. Microwaves have shorter wavelengths than radio waves, which heat

o

o

o

o

o

the food we eat. They are also used for radar images, like the Doppler radar used in weather forecasts. There are infrared waves with long wavelengths and short

wavelengths. Infrared waves with long wavelengths are different from infrared waves with short wavelengths. Infrared waves with long wavelengths can be detected as heat. Your radiator or heater gives off these long infrared waves. We call these thermal infrared or far infrared waves. The sun gives off infrared waves with shorter wavelengths. Plants reflect these waves, also known as near infrared waves. Visible light waves are the only only electromagnetic waves we can

see. We see these waves as the colors of the rainbow. Each color has a different wavelength. Red has the longest wavelength and violet has the shortest wavelength. These waves combine to make white light. Ultraviolet waves have wavelengths shorter than visible light waves.

These waves are invisible to the human eye, but some insects can see them. Of the sun's light, the ultraviolet waves are responsible for causing our sunburns. X-Rays: As wavelengths get smaller, the waves have more energy. X-

Rays have smaller wavelengths and therefore more energy than the ultraviolet waves. X-Rays are so powerful that they pass easily through the skin allowing doctors to look at our bones. Gamma Rays have the smallest wavelength and the most energy of the waves in the electromagnetic spectrum. These waves are generated by radioactive atoms and in nuclear explosions. Gamma rays can kill living cells, but doctors can use gamma rays to kill deceased cells.

  • E. Elaborate

The sun is an important source of ultraviolet waves, which is the main cause of sunburn. Sunscreen lotions are transparent to visible light but absorb most UV light. The higher a sunscreen’s protection factor (SPF) the greater the percentage of UV light absorbed. Why are UV rays harmful to the skin compared to visible light?

  • F. Evaluate

Scores will be based on the result of the activity.

 
   

Success Indicator

   

7-6

7-7

7-8

7-9

7- 10

 

Grade/Section

J.

Dagohoy

G.De Jesus

G.Del Pilar

E. Delos Santos

Calaguas

No. of learners with Mastery Level

No. of learners needing Reinforcement

Total

VI. Assignment/ Follow-up Activity

Have an advanced reading on the different properties of the following

 
 
  • 1. Sound

  • 2. Light

Reference:

Learner’s Module pp. 30 - 40 Any integrated Science Book/ Physical Science

 

VI.

Note:

 

NAME : ___________________________________________

GR./SEC. : _______________

SCORE: _____

WAVESTOWN