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GET A

OCTOBER 2016 Issue 135

TART ON TH
E
DS
EA

AM

EN

MAK

HI

&

MAKE FLIRTY TASSEL EARRINGS IN UNDER AN HOUR! p.44


AYS
LID
HO

BB

A DIGITAL SUPPLEMENT TO BEAD&BUTTON MAGAZINE

SS
PA R

KLING

OR

15 Autumn
Inspirations
Projects that will ignite
your creativity

WORK THAT
BEAD STASH!
Pretty peyote
leaf set p.30

RIBER
SUBSCUSIVE
EXCtoLber 2016

Learn chenille
stitch p.24
Stitch a classic bracelet
with enticing texture p. 72

BeadDreams 2016:
31 award-winning
designs! p.16

PLUS

$5.99

Cats and beads: The inexplicable


attraction p.90
10 stones you didnt know were quartz p.38

Oc

Your complete beading resource

Fall for
DiamonDuos
with this
pretty bracelet
p. 3

CELEBRATE AUTUMN!
Peyote scarf
ring p. 6

Mighty acorn earrings

Phoenix pendant

p. 8

10

YOUR GUIDE to designing with art beads p.14

p. 14

25274 01125

www.BeadAndButton.com

WELCOME!

B&B Extra October 2016

Autumnal rhythms

hile there is no unified concensus on what season people prefer, fall is

www.FacetJewelry.com

often cited as the favored time for many. Well, just consider things like
acorns, warm fires, pretty scarves, and an earthy seasonal palette and

youll start to get the idea. If these things appeal to you, youll love this issue of
B&B Extra. Nature lovers will embrace Lane Landrys adorable acorn earrings
(p. 14), which would also make a great pendant. Cindy Clarks phoenix (p. 8) may

METAL & WIRE

not warm you up physically, but the blazing colors and fun shaping will give you
a surge of excitement as you progress through the pattern. If you find yourself torn
between wearing a pretty scarf and showing off your newest beaded necklace, try
Svetlana Dubinskys scarf ring (p. 6). With one simple piece, you can show off your
beading skills, don a fashionable scarf, and say no to bulky knots. If scarves arent
your thing, indulge in the colors of the season with Dana Merediths gorgeous fallhued necklace (p. 11). Just dont wear a scarf over it youll really want to show
it off. Bracelet lovers will want to make Marcia Balonis bracelet (p. 3), which
features one of the new beads on the block, the DiamonDuo.
Pick your favorite fall colorway, and go to town!

CLAYS & RESINS

Editor, Bead&Button
editor@beadandbutton.com

STITCHING

Contents
DiamonDuo bracelet ............................................3
Peyote stitch scarf ring..........................................6
Rise of the phoenix pendant............................... 8
Global elements neklace.................................... 11
Mighty little acorns..............................................14
2016 Kalmbach Publishing Co. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced in part
or in whole without written permission from the publisher. The designs in B&B Extra are for your personal
enjoyment. They may not be taught or sold without permission.

Editor Julia Gerlach

ADVERTISING

Senior Art Director Lisa A. Bergman

Corporate Advertising Director Ann E. Smith

Associate Editors
Cassie Donlen, Connie Whittaker
Contributing Editor
Anna Elizabeth Draeger
Editorial Assistant Lora Groszkiewicz
Graphic Designer Lisa M. Schroeder

Advertising Sales Lori Schneider

FIBER & CORD

Ad Services Representatives Melissa Valuch,

This logo
is for
use on masthead only.
Nanette
Hackbarth
Do not use less than 100% of full size.

B&B Extra is published bimonthly by Kalmbach


Publishing Co., 21027 Crossroads Circle,
P.O. Box 1612, Waukesha, WI 53187-1612

Photographer Bill Zuback


Illustrator Kellie Jaeger
Editorial Director Diane M. Bacha

STRINGING

BEAD WEAVING

DiamonDuo

FLOWER
bouquet

Create a bountiful bouquet of flowers to dance around


your wrist using DiamonDuos, pearls, seed beads and
sparkling crystal connections.
designed by Marcia Balonis

2016 Kalmbach Publishing Co. This material may not be reproduced in



October 2016
3
any form without permission from the publisher.

Difficulty rating

Materials

110 seed bead

white/bronze bracelet 7 in. (18 cm)


42 5 x 8 mm DiamonDuo beads (alabaster)

7 4 mm round pearls (Czech, matte copper)


54 3 mm bicone crystals (Preciosa,
topaz AB)
3 g 110 seed beads (Miyuki, black matted
sunset; www.potomacbeads.com)
5 g 150 seed beads (Toho 222, dark copper)
1 2-strand clasp
2 6 mm jump rings
Fireline, 6 lb. test
beading needles, #11
2 pairs of chainnose bentnose, and/or
flatnose pliers

5 x 8 mm
DiamonDuo bead

150 seed bead


4 mm pearl

3 mm bicone crystal

FIGURE 1

green/pink bracelet colors


DiamonDuo beads (jet AB)

d
a

c
a

4 mm pearl beads (Swarovski, lapis)


3 mm bicone crystals (Swarovski,
light rose AB)
110 seed beads (Miyuki 416, lime green)
150 seed beads (Miyuki 146FR, matte
transparent green AB)

Online beading basics

d
b

FIGURE 2

Flower components

1 On 1 yd. (.9 m) of thread, pick up an


alternating pattern of an 110 seed bead
and a DiamonDuo six times, leaving a
6-in. (15 cm) tail and making sure the
top of the DiamonDuos are facing up.
Sew through all the beads again to
form a ring, and sew through the first
110 picked up (figure 1).
2 Pick up five 150 seed beads, and
sew through the open hole of the next
DiamonDuo (figure 2, ab). Pick up five
150s, sew through the following 110 in
the ring, and back through the last two
150s added (bc). Pick up three 150s,
and sew through the open hole of

FIGURE 3

the next DiamonDuo in the ring (cd).


Repeat the last two stitches four times
(de). To complete the round, pick up
three 150s, and sew down through the
first two 150s added at the start of this
step and the next 110 in the ring (ef).
3 Pick up a 150, a 4 mm pearl, and a 150,
and sew through the 110 on the opposite side of the inner ring (figure 3, ab).
Pick up a 150, sew back through the
4 mm, pick up a 150, and sew through
the 110 your thread exited at the start
of this step, going in the same direction
(bc). Sew through the next five 150s,
the outer hole of the next DiamonDuo,
and the following 150 (cd).

www.BeadAndButton.com/basics
ending and adding thread
opening and closing jump rings

Marcia Balonis has had a lifelong passion for jewelry even


during her 35-year financial
career. She found teaching
beading to be a great way to
share her passion. Marcia lives in Florida
and enjoys teaching locally and nationally.
Contact her at marcia@baublesbybalonis.net
or visit www.baublesbybalonis.net or
www.baublesbybalonis.etsy.com.


October 2016
4

FIGURE 4

b
a
c

f
e
d

FIGURE 5

4 Pick up a 150, an 110, a 3 mm bicone


crystal, an 110, and a 150, skip the next
four 150s, and sew through the following
150, DiamonDuo, and 150 (figure 4,
ab). Repeat this stitch five times to
complete the round, and continue
through the first 150, 110, and 3 mm
added in this step (bc). End the tail,
but not the working thread. Set this
flower component aside.
5 Repeat steps 14 to make a total
of seven flowers for a 712-in. (19.1 cm)
bracelet. Each additional component
will add about 1 in. (2.5 cm) to the
final length.

Connections

1 Lay two flower components on


your work surface, with two 3 mms
as the connecting points and the
working thread exiting the crystal
at figure 5, point a.
2 Using the thread from the left
component, pick up a 150, and
sew up through the corresponding
3 mm on the other component
(figure 5, ab). Pick up a 150, an 110,
a 3 mm, an 110, and a 150, and sew
down through the 3 mm your thread
exited at the start of this step (bc).
3 Sew through the adjacent 150 in the
connection, and continue through the
next 110, two 150s, DiamonDuo, two 150s,

110, and 3 mm on the other component


as shown (cd).
4 Pick up a 150, an 110, a 3 mm, an
110, and a 150, and sew up through
the corresponding 3 mm on the first
component. Pick up a 150, and sew
down through the 3 mm your thread
exited at the start of this step (de).
Continue through the next five beads
in the connection, and the 3 mm on
the first component (ef). Sew through
the beadwork to reinforce both connection points, and end the thread.
5 Work as in steps 24 to connect
the remaining components, and end
the thread.
6 Attach a clasp to the end loops
with 6 mm jump rings. w

2016 Kalmbach Publishing Co. This material may not be reproduced in



October 2016
5
any form without permission from the publisher.

PEYOTE STITCH

Scarf ring
I was inspired to make these scarf rings by the
beautiful batik silk scarves made by a friend of
mine. The ring is supported by a leather cord,
creating a sturdy accessory for your favorite scarf.
Difficulty rating

designed by Svetlana Dubinsky

Ring

1 Thread a needle on each end of


3 yd. (2.7 m) of thread, pick up 96
150 seed beads, and center them on
the thread. Sew through the first bead
again to form a ring. These beads will
shift to form the first two rounds as the
next round is added (figure 1, ab).
2 Alternating between the threads,
work in tubular peyote (48 stitches per
round) as follows, working identical

rounds on one side and then the


other and stepping up at the end
of each round. Stitch using even,
medium tension.
Rounds 35: Using 150s, work three
rounds for a total of five rounds (bc).
Rounds 67: With the other needle,
work two rounds of 150s along the
other edge for a total of seven rounds.
Round 8: With one needle, work a
round using 110 cylinder beads (cd).

Materials
scarf ring 2 in. (5 cm) outerdiameter

26 3 mm fire-polished beads (jet


California)
2 g 110 seed beads (Toho 222, dark
bronze)
3 g 110 cylinder beads (Miyuki DB0040,
copper plated)
3 g 150 seed beads (Toho 557, permanent
finish galvanized starlight)
512 in. (14 cm) 2 mm round leather cord
Fireline, 6 lb. test
beading needles, #12

Online beading basics

www.BeadAndButton.com/basics
peyote stitch: tubular, flat even count,
zipping up
ending thread

Svetlana Dubinsky is an
award-winning designer whos
work has won several awards,
including Black Ice, which was
a finalist in BeadDreams 2012.
Contact Svetlana at svetadu@gmail.com.

2016 Kalmbach Publishing Co. This material may not be reproduced in



October 2016
6
any form without permission from the publisher.

Round 9: With the other needle,


work a round using cylinders along
the other edge.
Round 10: With one needle, work
a round using 150s (de).
Round 11: With the other needle, work a
round using 150s along the other edge.
Round 1213: With one needle, work
two rounds using cylinder beads (ef).
Round 14: With the other needle, work
one round using cylinder beads.
3 Cut a piece of 2 mm leather cord
to fit around the circumference when
nestled into the beaded ring, and hold
it in place as you zip up the first and
last rounds of peyote (photo).
4 Sew through a cylinder in the center
outer round. Pick up an 110 seed bead,
a 3 mm fire-polished bead, and an 110
seed bead. Skip three cylinder beads,
and sew through the next cylinder in
the same outer round (fg). Repeat
this stitch to complete the outer edge
embellishment, and end the threads.

150 seed bead


110 cylinder bead
110 seed bead
3 mm fire-polished bead

f
g

FIGURE 1

Bar

1 On 1 yd. (.9 m) of thread, pick up two


110 seed beads, 14 cylinders, and two
110 seed beads, leaving a 6-in. (15 cm)
tail. These beads will shift to form the
first two rows as the third row is added.
2 Work 10 rows in flat, even count
peyote, picking up one bead per stitch:
an 110 seed bead, seven cylinders,
and an 110 seed bead, for a total of
12 rows (figure 2).
3 Zip up the two end rows to form a bar.
4 Sew through the hollow center of the
bar to exit one end. Pick up a 3 mm firepolished bead, and sew through a 150
along the inner round of the ring. Sew
back through the 3 mm and bar, and
pick up a 3 mm. Sew through a 150 on
the opposite side of the same inner
round of the ring. Retrace the thread
path, and end the threads. w

FIGURE 2

October 2016
7

i
x
n
pen
e
o
h
da
p
e
n
h
t

Rise
of

BRICK STITCH

Work in increasing and decreasing brick stitch to make a dramatic pendant.


designed by Cindy Clark
Phoenix body

1 Thread a needle on each end of 2 yd.


(1.8 m) of thread. Pick up a color A and
a color B 110 cylinder bead, and center
them on the thread. Sew through the
beads again, and position them so the
holes are parallel. Work the rest of the
row in ladder stitch as follows, picking
up one cylinder per stitch: 6B, C, 4D, 6E,
2D, C, B, A.
2 Work row 2 in increasing and decreasing brick stitch, following the pattern
and noting the different terms for each
kind of stitch:

Decrease start stitch: Picking up an A


and a B, sew under the second-to-last
thread bridge in the previous row, and
sew back up through the last B just
added. Sew through both beads to
align them, and exit the last B.
Regular stitch: Pick up a C, sew under
the next thread bridge in the previous
row, and sew back up through the C
just added. Work two regular stitches
with Ds, four using Es, two using Ds, four
using Cs, six using Bs, one with a C,
and one with a B.

Increase end stitch: Pick up an A,


sew under the same thread bridge
as in the previous stitch, and sew back
up through the A just added.
3 Continue to work in rows as follows:
Row 3: Increase (A, B), C, D, 2A, 7B, 2C,
5D, C, 2B, A.
Row 4: Decrease (2A), 2B, 5C, 2B, 7A.
Skip two stitches by sewing through
the beadwork, exiting the next D in the
previous row (figure 1, ab). Decrease
(D, C), B, increase A.
4 Work the crest before completing
the body:

2016 Kalmbach Publishing Co. This material may not be reproduced in



October 2016
8
any form without permission from the publisher.

Row 1
Row 7

Row 3

Difficulty rating

Materials
pendant 23 8 x 23 4 in. (6 x 7 cm)

i
Row 5

110 cylinder beads


color A
color B

color C
color D
color E
color F

k
e
d Row 6

g
Row 10

Online beading basics


Row 8

Row 4
Row 2
FIGURE 1

Work a decrease row with a B, a C,


and a D.
Work a decrease row with a D and
a C.
5 Continue in rows as follows:
Row 5: Sew through the beadwork to
exit the bottom A in the set of seven As
in row 4 (point c). Decrease (2A), 6B, 2A.
Row 6: Sew through the beadwork to
decrease a stitch (de). Decrease (2A),
5A. Set aside this thread.
6 Using the tail, work the other half of
the body:
Row 7: Decrease (A, B), 6B, 4C, 2D, 3E,
2D, 2C, B, A.
Row 8: Decrease (A, B), B, 2C, 4D, 2C, 7B,
2C, B, A.
Row 9: Decrease (A, B), F, C, 2B, 4A, 2B,
5C, 2B, 2A.
Row 10: Sew through the beadwork to
decrease by one stitch (fg). Decrease
(2A), 6B, 2A. Skip three stitches, exiting
the top A in the set of four As in the

2 g 110 Miyuki Delica cylinder beads in


each of 5 colors
- color A (DB0426, opaque red luster)
- color B (DB0254, transparent red AB)
- color C (DB2460, transparent orange AB)
- color D (DB1702, copper pearl-lined
marigold)
- color E (DB0623, dyed jonquil silver-lined
alabaster)
1 color F Miyuki Delica cylinder bead
(DB0611, dyed silver-lined wine; for the eye)
12 80 seed beads (opaque red)
4 34 mm drop beads (topaz)
24 in. (61 cm) 3 mm link chain
1 clasp
2 6 mm jump rings
Fireline, 6 lb. test
beading needles, #12
wire cutters strong enough to cut the chain

www.BeadAndButton.com/basics
ladder stitch
brick stitch: increase, decrease
ending and adding thread

previous row (hi). Decrease (A, B), 3B, A.

7 Work the beak before completing


the body:
Work a row with an A, three Bs, and
an A.
Work a row with an A, two Bs, and
an A.
Work a row with an A, an E, and an A.
Work a row with two Es.
Pick up an E, and sew through the
other E in the previous row.
8 Sew through the beadwork to exit at
point j. Work the final row of the body
with seven As. End this thread.

Cindy Clark learned about


beading from her mother and
has been working with beads
for half her life. Contact her
at cindy_c@gmx.com.

Crest fringe

1 Using the remaining thread, sew


through the beadwork to exit the end D
at the top of the head. Pick up 11 Ds.
Skip the last D, and sew back through
the next 10 Ds and the D your thread
exited at the start of this step. Sew
through the C in the same row.


October 2016
9

Row 10
k

Row 4
d

Row 12
l

j
Row 8

Row 14

Row 16
n

a
m

Row 1
Row 3

g
Row 9
h
Row 7
Row 5

Row 11

p
Row 13

FIGURE 2

2 Pick up eight Cs. Skip the last C, and


sew back through the next seven Cs
and the last two Cs in the crest. Sew up
through the adjacent B.
3 Work as in step 2 to add a fringe of six
Bs, and then add a fringe of five As off
of the adjacent end A. End this thread.

Tail fringe

1 Thread a needle on each end of


3 yd. (2.7 m) of thread, and center it
in the bottom A in the center row of
the body. With one needle, sew through
the beadwork to exit the second A from
the bottom on one side of the body. Set
this thread aside.
2 With the other needle, work the tail
embellishment: Pick up an A, a B, and
a drop bead. Skip the drop bead, and
sew back through the B, A, and center A
on the body going in the same direction. Sew through the next A along the
bottom edge.
3 Pick up four Bs, an 80 seed bead,
four Cs, a drop bead, four Cs, an 80,
and four Bs. Sew back through the
corresponding bead on the other side
of the center A. Sew back through the
loop, the A your thread exited at the
start of this step, and the next A along
the bottom edge.
4 Pick up five As, an 80, four Bs, an 80,
four Cs, two Ds, a drop bead, two Ds,
four Cs, an 80, four Bs, an 80, and five As.
Sew through the corresponding bead
on the other side of the center A. Sew

back through the loop, the A your


thread exited at the start of this step,
and the next A along the bottom edge.
5 Pick up 10 As, an 80, five Bs, an 80, five
Cs, an 80, three Ds, a drop bead, three
Ds, an 80, five Cs, an 80, five Bs, an 80,
and 10 As. Sew through the corresponding bead on the other side of the center A. Sew back through the loop and
the A your thread exited at the start of
this step, and sew through the beadwork to the second A from the bottom
on the this side of the body (figure 1,
point k).

Wings

1 Work in increase and decrease brick


stitch, following the pattern in figure 2:
Row 1: Decrease (A, B), D, B, A.
Row 2: Increase (A, B), C, D, B, A.
Row 3: Increase (A, B), C, D, C, B, A.
Using ladder stitch, increase this row
with an A, a B, and an A (ab).
2 Finish this wing tip by working a
decrease start stitch with two As (bc),
and then add a single A at the tip,
and continue through the end A in
row 3 (cd).
3 Continue in rows:
Row 4: Decrease (A, B), C, B, C, 2D, 2B, A.
Using ladder stitch, increase this row
with two As (fg). Pick up an A, and sew
through the last A added in row 4 (gh).
Row 5: Increase (A, B), 2B, A, B, D, B, A,
2B, A.

Row 6: Decrease (2A), A, B, 2D, B, A,


2B, A.
Row 7: Decrease (2A), A, B, C, D, C, B, A.
Row 8: Increase (A, B), 3C, B, A.
Row 9: Pick up two As, sew through the
first A again in the same direction to
increase an extra stitch, and then work
the rest of the row: B, 2C, B, C, B, A.
Row 10: Increase (A, B), B, A, B, 3C, B, A.
Row 11: Increase (A, B), B, 2C, B, 2A, 2B,
A. Using ladder stitch, increase this row
with two As (ij). Complete this wing
tip by picking up three As and sewing
through the end A (jk).
Row 12: Decrease (A, B), 2B, A. Skip a
stitch, sewing through to exit the next A
in the previous row. Decrease (A, B), B,
2A, B, A.
Row 13: Decrease (2A). Skip a stitch,
sewing through the beadwork to exit
the next A in the previous row. Decrease
(A, B), B, A. Skip a stitch, and sew through
the beadwork to exit the next A in the
previous row. Decrease (2A), 2A. Sew
through the beadwork to exit the sixth
bead added in this row (lm).
Row 14: Increase (A, B), B, A. To complete this wing tip, work as follows:
a row with an A, two Bs, and three As
(adding two As in ladder stitch)
a row with an A, three Bs, and an A
a row with four As
4 Sew through the beadwork to exit the
second bead from the bottom of row 13
(no). To complete this wing tip, pick up
three As, and sew through the adjacent
A (op).
5 Sew though the beadwork to exit
the top A in row 10 of this wing. Set
the thread aside.
6 Using the other needle, work the second wing on the other side of the body.

Chain

1 Using either needle, sew through the


end link of a chain. Sew back through
the A on the wing. Retrace the thread
path several times, and end the thread.
Repeat with the other needle.
2 Cut the chain in half, and attach the
clasp to one end with a jump ring.
3 Attach a jump ring to the end link of
the other chain. w

2016 Kalmbach Publishing Co. This material may not be reproduced in



October 2016
10
any form without permission from the publisher.

STRINGING / WIREWORK

Global elements
necklace

Elevate simple stringing with a wire-wrapped glass tube


designed by Dana Meredith

2016 Kalmbach Publishing Co. This material may not be reproduced in


October 2016
any form without permission from the publisher.

11

This necklace is a celebration of disparate elements:


an organic horn-like tube, a colorful center bead, and
the contrast between a translucent rondelle and opaque
amethyst rounds. To pull it all together, several beads
of a similar diameter on the opposite side of the glass
tube provide visual (and literal!) balance.

Materials
necklace 18 in. (46 cm)

1 6-in. (15 cm) glass tube bead


(www.claspon-claspoff.com)
1 2-in. (5 cm) glass U Tube bead
(www.sonoranbeads.com)
1 23 mm glass rondelle
(www.juliemillerglass.com)
3 19 mm round jasper beads
5 15 mm round amethyst beads
48 10 mm faceted blue fluorite nuggets
(www.beadsdirectonline.com)
8 10 mm wavy spacers
12 8 mm disk spacers
(www.silverinstyleusa.etsy.com)
4 3 mm round spacers
flexible beading wire, .018 or .019
45 in. (1.2 m) 20-gauge wire
24 in. (61 cm) 26-gauge wire
2 crimp beads
1 in. (2.5 cm) French (bullion) wire
1 toggle clasp
chainnose pliers
roundnose pliers
diagonal wire cutters
earrings 11 4 in. (3.2 cm)

Wired tube bead

1 Cut a 45-in. (1.2 cm) piece of


20-gauge wire. On one end, use roundnose pliers to make a small loop, and
position it about 1 in. (2.5 cm) from the
large end of the 6-in. (15 cm) glass tube
on the inside curve (photo a).
2 Wrap the wire around the tube six
times, covering the loop (photo b).
Snug the wraps together with chainnose pliers.
3 Using your fingers, shape the wire
down the length of the tube, forming
curves on both the inside and outside
curves. Make sure to wrap around
the tube at least once and leave a
1012-in. (2530 cm) tail for finishing
(photo c).
4 To finish, make six wraps around the
small end of the tube, snugging them
together with chainnose pliers. Leaving
a 12-in. (1.3 cm) tail, trim the excess wire.
Using roundnose pliers, form a small
loop on the end of the wire, rolling the
wire toward the wraps.

Difficulty rating

wiggle room

If you have trouble sliding the


binding wire under the wraps,
be persistent. Move the wraps
up or down on the tube,
manipulate the wraps with
your fingers, and use chainnose pliers to pull it through.
When wrapping the inside
curve, wrap above the loop
on the large end, and catch
the loop in several wraps on
the small end.

2 10 mm faceted nuggets
2 8 mm disk spacers
2 112-in. (3.8 cm) eye pins
2 68 mm jump rings
1 pair of hammered earring posts and
ear nuts (www.fusionbeads.com)
2 pairs of chainnose pliers
roundnose pliers
diagonal wire cutters

Online beading basics


www.BeadAndButton.com/basics

crimping
plain loops
opening and closing jump rings

Dana Meredith is a jewelry


designer and associate editor
for Taste of Home magazine.
See more of her work at
www.dsmoriginals.etsy.com.


October 2016 12

e
5 Cut a 6-in. (15 cm) piece of 26-gauge
wire. Slide it under the first set of wraps
on the outside curve (see Wiggle
room, p. 12), and wrap tightly around
the bundle five to seven times (photo d).
Trim the excess wire. Repeat on the
opposite side of the wraps and on the
wraps at the small end of the tube.
6 Using the tip of your chainnose pliers,
make several small twists to tighten the
wire to the tube in the curves (photo e).
Do not overtighten.

Necklace

1 Cut a 2426-in. (6166 cm) piece of


beading wire. String a 2-in. (5 cm) tube
bead, centering it on the wire. On each
end, string two wavy spacers, a 15 mm
round bead, and two wavy spacers
(photo f).
2 On one end, string the wired tube,
large end first, making sure the top of
the wire design is face up. String two
disk spacers and a nugget (photo g).
3 On the other end, string a glass rondelle. String four pairs of disk spacers
alternating with three 19 mm round
beads (photo h).
4 String three 15 mm rounds, two disk
spacers, and three nuggets (photo i).

5 Cut two 12-in. (1.3 cm) pieces of


French (bullion) wire. On each end of
the beading wire, string: 3 mm spacer,
crimp bead, 3 mm spacer, French wire,
half of a toggle clasp. Check the fit
and add or remove nuggets if necessary. Go back through the beads just
strung (photo j), and tighten the wire.
Crimp the crimp beads, and trim the
excess wire.

Earrings

1 For each earring: On an eye pin,


string a nugget. Make a plain loop
(photo k).
2 Open a 68 mm jump ring. Attach a
disk spacer and a loop of the nugget
unit. Close the jump ring (photo l).
3 Open the loop of the dangle and
attach the earring post (photo m). w

practice makes perfect

Use inexpensive craft wire to practice


wrapping and shaping the wire on the
glass tube bead until you find a design
you like. Slide the wire off the tube and
use it as a reference when wrapping
with the final wire.


October 2016 13

TUBULAR HERRINGBONE STITCH

MIGHTY

little acorns
Acorns are revered in many cultures as a symbol of
potential, luck, and strength (from the tiny acorn grows
the mighty oak). I love acorns and am thrilled to have
figured out how to make them so I can wear and enjoy
them all year long.

150 seed bead


110 seed bead

designed by Lane Landry


b

Earrings
Acorn base

1 On 1 yd. (1.4 m) of thread, pick


up six 150 seed beads, leaving a 6-in.
(15 cm) tail. Sew through all the beads
and the first 150 again to form a ring.
The working thread and tail will exit
opposite sides of the same 150.
2 Work in rounds of tubular herringbone stitch as follows, stepping up
through the first bead added at the
end of each round:
Round 1: Pick up two 150s, and sew
through the next two 150s in the ring
(figure 1, ab). Repeat this stitch twice,
and step up through the first 150 added
in this round (bc). This base contains
the three primary stacks.
Round 2: Begin increasing to six stacks
by picking up two 150s, and sewing

down through the next 150 in the


previous round. Position the new beads
to sit with the holes parallel to the
beads in the previous round (figure 2,
ab). Pick up a 150, and sew up through
the top 150 in the next stack (bc).
Position the new 150 in the gap
between the stacks in the previous
round. Repeat these two stitches
twice to complete the round (cd).
Round 3: Finish increasing to six stacks
by picking up two 150s, and sewing
through the next 150 in the previous
round (figure 3, ab) and the 150
picked up in the adjacent gap (bc).
Pick up two 150s, and sew through the
same 150 your thread is exiting (cd).
Sew through the top 150 in the next
stack (de). Repeat these stitches twice
to complete the round (ef).

FIGURE 1

b
a

FIGURE 2

FIGURE 3

October 2016
14
any form without permission from the publisher.
2016 Kalmbach Publishing Co. This material may not be reproduced in

FIGURE 4

FIGURE 5

Round 4: Work six stitches with two


150s per stitch (figure 4). There are
now six stacks.
Round 5: Begin increasing to 12 stacks
by working six stitches and adding a
150 between each pair of stitches
(figure 5).
Round 6: Finish increasing to 12 stacks
as in round 3 (figure 6).
Rounds 713: Work seven rounds of
tubular herringbone stitch using 150s,
stepping up after each round. Insert the
12 mm bead after completing the first
three rounds. This will help maintain the
tension in the subsequent rounds.
Round 14: Begin decreasing to six
stacks: Work a stitch with two 150s. Pick
up one 150, and sew through the next
150 in the stack the following 150 in the
next stack. Repeat these two stitches
five times to complete the round.
Round 15: Using tight tension, finish
decreasing to six stacks: Work a stitch
with two 150s, and then sew through
the decrease 150 in the previous round
and the first 150 in the following stack.
Repeat these two stitches five times to
complete the round.
Round 16: Using tight tension, pick up a
150, and sew down through the next 150
in the previous round. Sew through the
decrease 150 in the next stack. Sew up
through the top 150 in the next stack.
Repeat this step five times to complete
the round.
3 Sew through the six single 150s in
the last round to snug up the beads
around the 12 mm bead. End the
working thread and tail.

Acorn top

1 On 1 yd. (.9 m) of thread, repeat

FIGURE 6

Difficulty rating

Materials
earrings 11 8 x 3 4 in. (2.9 x 1.9 cm)

2 g 110 seed beads (Toho 1707, gilded


marble orange)
2 g 150 seed beads (Miyuki 1053,
galvanized yellow gold)
2 12 mm plastic round beads
1 pair of earring findings
2 4 mm soldered jump rings
Fireline, 6 lb. test
beading needles, #12
2 pairs of chainnose, bentnose, and/or
flatnose pliers

Online beading basics

www.BeadAndButton.com/basics
herringbone stitch, tubular
ending and adding thread
opening and closing loops and jump rings

matching pendant

This acorn would also make a


great little pendant. Follow all the
steps as for the earring, but attach
a 6 mm jump ring instead of a
4 mm jump ring, and string it on
a strand of 150 seed beads.

Lane Landry lives in beautiful


Gig Harbor, Washington. She
and her daughter Cara operate
an online bead pattern store,
www.simplebeadpatterns.com. Contact Lane
at lane@simplebeadpatterns.com.

step 1 and rounds 16 of Acorn base,


using 110 seed beads instead of 150s.
2 Continue in rounds of tubular herringbone stitch as follows:
Round 7: Without picking up any beads,
sew down through the next 110 in the
previous round, and up through the top
110 in the following stack (figure 7, ab).
Pick up one 110, and sew down through
the next 110 in the previous round and
up through the top 110 in the following
stack (bc). Pick up two 110s, and sew
down through the next 110 in the previous round and up through the top 110
in the following stack (cd). Pick up an


October 2016 15

b
e

f
a

c
b

FIGURE 7

110, and sew down through the next 110


in the previous round, and up through
the top 110 in the following stack (de).
Repeat these stitches twice to complete
the round (ef).
Round 8: Sew down through the next
110, pick up an 110, and sew through
the single 110 at the top of the next
stack (figure 8, ab). Pick up an 110,
and sew through the top 110 in the
next stack (bc). Repeat these two
stitches five times to complete the
round (cd), retrace the thread path
using tight tension to create a curve
along the edge round.

d
a

Assembly

1 Align the six main stacks of the


acorn top to sit evenly on the six main
stacks of the acorn base (photo a).
Using the working thread from the
acorn top, sew through a corresponding bead in the acorn base (photo b),
the next bead in the base, and the
following 110 along the edge of the
acorn top (photo c). Sew through
the next four 110s along the edge of
the acorn top. Repeat to attach the
top at the six main stacks of the top
and base, and end the working thread.

FIGURE 8

2 Using the tail, sew through the 4 mm


soldered ring and the 110 opposite the
110 your thread exited in the initial ring
(photo d). Retrace the thread path
several times to secure the ring, and
end the thread.
3 Open an earring finding, and attach
it to the 4 mm ring.
4 Make a second earring. w

2016 Kalmbach Publishing Co. This material may not be reproduced in



October 2016
16
any form without permission from the publisher.