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Peroxide Based Oxygen Production

Running Head: PEROXIDE BASED OXYGEN PRODUCTION

Oxygen Production Affected by the Concentration of the Substrate Peroxide when Catalyzed by
the Enzyme Catalase
Maya Givens, Carly Kirk, Emma Lamb, and Elaina Porter
Life Science Academy

Abstract
This experiment was conducted to resemble everyday reactions within the human body. It
was done using varying amounts of Hydrogen Peroxide, water, and the enzyme catalase; these

Peroxide Based Oxygen Production

ingredients were mixed using a magnetic stirring plate, and the buildup of pressure was recorded
and graphed on a computer. It was found that at higher Hydrogen Peroxide concentrations, the
rate of Oxygen production increased. So, more Oxygen is produced over any amount of time
when a greater concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide is present.
Background
It is known in the scientific community that the body has the ability to rid itself of toxic
substances through the use of enzymes. This experiment was designed in attempt to recreate this
action within the body in the case of Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) and the enzyme catalase. It is
understood that that peroxide is destructive to human body systems, but it is also commonly
exposed to them through the air, skin, and digestion of food and drink. From this basic
understanding, an experiment was developed to record how the concentration of Hydrogen
Peroxide, the substrate, affects catalase enzyme action as it would within the body.
Hypothesis
When starting this experiment, a question was posed: Of the substrate Hydrogen Peroxide
(H2O2), how does the concentration of water (H2O) within Hydrogen Peroxide affect the speed of
Oxygen (O2) production in 125 seconds? After observing this question and sorting through
possible results, a hypothesis was drawn: If the concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) in an
enzyme reaction with catalase affects the rate of product (Oxygen; O2) production, then a higher
concentration will elicit a higher production rate. The production of the Oxygen (O2) will
decrease as the concentration of the water (H2O) in Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2 ) rises, and the
Oxygen (O2 ) production will increase as the water (H2O) concentration in Hydrogen Peroxide
(H2O2) decreases. The dependent variable being the amount of Oxygen (O2 ) produced, and the
independent variable being the concentrated amount of Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2).

Peroxide Based Oxygen Production

After other research done on similar topics was reviewed, their results coincide with the
posed hypothesis of a positive correlation between enzyme reaction and product production
(Reviewmylife.co.uk)
Materials and Methods
Materials used in this experiment include a computer with Logger Pro, LabQuest Mini,
Vernier Gas Pressure Sensor, a laboratory journal, an experimental design handout, catalase
solution, distilled water, a magnetic stir, a magnetic stirring plate, 50 mL Erlenmeyer flask, 3%
Hydrogen Peroxide solution, a ring stand, a utility clamp, a rubber stopper, tubing with Luer-lock
connector, 50 mL graduated cylinder, and a pipette.
First, all listed materials were gathered. Then, the ring stand was assembled and the
magnetic stirring plate was placed on top of it. The 50 mL Erlenmeyer flask was then tightened
in the clamp of the ring stand so that the bottom of flask was resting on the plate. The magnetic
stirrer was then placed in the flask along with 5 mL of 3% Hydrogen Peroxide and 5 mL of
distilled water that were measured using the 50 mL graduated cylinder. At the same time, the
computer with Logger Pro was set up and the LabQuest Mini was plugged into the computer.
Then, the Vernier Gas Pressure Sensor, that includes the rubber stopper and tube that the pressure
goes through for the sensor to read, was plugged into the LabQuest Mini. After the computer was
ready to graph the results, 1 mL of catalase was then added to the flask using a pipette. Directly
after the catalase was added, the rubber stopper was placed into the flask and the dial on the
magnetic stirring plate was turned to level 6. Then, Logger Pro graphed the results (Graph 1, 2,
3) and it ran for 125 seconds. The magnetic stirring plate was also turned off, and the flask was
unclamped.

Peroxide Based Oxygen Production

Results were then recorded (Table 1). After the data was recorded, the graph was cleared
and the flask was cleaned out. Then, all steps were repeated but with 10 mL of 3% Hydrogen
Peroxide and no distilled water. Then, all steps were repeated once again but with 15 mL of 3%
Hydrogen Peroxide and 5 mL of distilled water. In all trials, 1 mL of catalase was used.
After all necessary data was collected, the slopes of the graphs were used to find the rate
of Oxygen produced at the varying concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide and water, along with 1
mL of catalase (Table 1).
Results
Once each experiment was complete, the specific measurements of Oxygen (O2)
production were recorded. The solution of Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) with a 1.5% concentration
had a rate of Oxygen (O2) production of 0.1167 kPa/s. The second experiment, consisting of a
concentration of 2.25%, produced an Oxygen rate of 0.3512 kPa/s. The peroxide concentration of
3% resulted in an Oxygen (O2) production of 0.4743 kPa/s (Table 1). Each experiment showed a
positive correlation over a time of 125 seconds (Graphs 1, 2, 3).
Discussion
The experiment yielded clear results showing that the higher the concentration of
Hydrogen Peroxide, the greater the production of Oxygen. Similar to what was hypothesized, the
3.0% Hydrogen Peroxide had a positive effect on the production of Oxygen as a product of the
enzyme action (Graph 3). Each increased concentration increment produced a greater amount of
Oxygen (i.e. 1.0% to 2.25%). The results of this experiment demonstrate that the more
concentrated a substrate is, the more products its reaction will yield over a short period of time
(Table 1). This means that in the human body, a similar function will occur.

Peroxide Based Oxygen Production

In the experiment, several aspects of the equipment and nature of the project contributed
to possible human error. One of these human errors could have had an unwanted effect on the
data. Mismeasurement could have come to light while taking up liquid and air into a pipette.
Improvements could be made in the experiment in the way of using varying concentrations of the
peroxide to produce more contrasting results. The small initial concentration of the peroxide
meant that, as the fluid continued to be diluted, the change in slope on the graph seemed to be
smaller, making the results less clear or concise.
Conclusion
The solutions with a higher Hydrogen Peroxide concentration yielded more Oxygen production
over a time period of 125 seconds than the solutions with a lower concentration.

Tables and Graphs

Peroxide Based Oxygen Production

Table 1. Data collected and recorded from the experiment.

Graph 1. Oxygen (O2) production with a concentration of 1.5%.

Graph 2. Oxygen (O2) production with a concentration of 2.25%.

Peroxide Based Oxygen Production

Graph 3. Oxygen (O2) production with a concentration of 3.0%.


Work Citation
Reviewmylife.co.uk. (5 June 2008). The Effect Of Substrate Concentration On The Activity Of
The Enzyme Catalase. Reviewmylife.co.uk. [accessed 12 January 2017]. Retrieved from
http://www.reviewmylife.co.uk/blog/2008/06/05/the-effect-of-substrate-concentration-on-theactivity-of-the-enzyme-catalase/.