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(TCE 701) DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES

LTPC
3 1 0 4
OBJECTIVES: To introduce the students about the Limit State Design method of steel
structural members subjected to different loads, such as compressive, tensile and bending loads
as per the IS code (IS 800 2007). The subject also deals with the design of structural systems,
such as roof trusses and gantry girders.
UNIT I

(16)

INTRODUCTION: Properties of steel Structural steel sections Limit State Design Concepts
Loads on Structures Metal joining methods using rivets, welding, bolting Design of bolted,
riveted and welded joints Eccentric connections - Efficiency of joints High Tension bolts

UNIT II

(8)

TENSION MEMBERS: Types of sections Net area Net effective sections for angles and
Tee in tension Design of connections in tension members Use of lug angles Design of
tension splice Concept of shear lag

UNIT III

(12)

COMPRESSION MEMBERS: Types of compression members Theory of columns Basis


of current codal provision for compression member design Slenderness ratio Design of single
section and compound section compression members Design of lacing and battening type
columns Design of column bases Gusseted base, Slab base.

UNIT IV

(16)

BEAMS: Design of laterally supported and unsupported beams Built up beams Beams
subjected to biaxial bending Design of plate girders riveted and welded Intermediate and
bearing stiffeners Web splices.

UNIT V

(12)

ROOF TRUSSES AND INDUSTRIAL STRUCTURES: Elements of Roof trusses Roof and
side coverings Design loads, design of purlin.

OUTCOMES:
To explain the properties of steel structures and modes of failure of tension members and
different types of connections to join steel members.
To understand the concept of tension members and designing them. Like; angles.
To understand the concept of compression members and designing them. Like; column.
To know the concept of supported and unsupported type of steel bridges subjected to bi
axial bending.
Students will be able to develop skills to analyze and design a structure while working in
a team.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Ramachandra, S. and Virendra Gehlot, Design of Steel Structures Vol. I & II, Standard
Publication, New Delhi, 2007.

REFERENCES
1. Teaching Resources for Structural Steel Design Vol. I & II, INSDAG, Kolkatta.
2. Gaylord, E.H., Gaylord, N.C., and Stallmeyer, J.E., Design of Steel Structures, 3rd edition,
McGraw-Hill Publications, 1992
3. Negi L.S.. Design of Steel Structures, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Pvt Ltd, New Delhi,
2007.
4. IS 800-2007 Indian Standard - General Construction in Steel code of practice (3rd
Revision).

(TCE 702) TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING-II (RAILWAY AND TUNNEL)


LTPC
31 0 4
OBJECTIVES: To expose the students to Railway planning, design, construction and
maintenance and planning and design principles of Airports and Harbors.
PART A: RAILWAY ENGINEERING
Unit I

(9)

Principles of transportation, different modes and their importance, Universal Scenario and Indian
Railways, Railway track development, component parts, gauages, wheel and axle arrangement
Resistance to Traction & Stresses in Track various resistances and their evaluation, hauling
capacity, tractive effort, locomotives and their classification, stresses in rail, sleeper, ballast and
formation.
Unit II

(6)

Permanent Component Parts- Coning of wheels, rail requirements, creep wear and joints in rail,
welding of rails, theory of long welded rails, sleeper requirements and their type, ballast
requirements, specifications, design of ballast section, rail to rail fittings and rail to sleeper
fittings, check rails and guard rails.
Unit III

(7)

Geometric Design of Railway track- Alignment, various types of gradient, horizontal curve,
super elevation, equilibrium cant, cant deficiency, transition curves and design of vertical curves.
Unit IV

(8)

Points and crossing- Working and Design of turn out, various types of track junction and their
configuration, design of cross over and diamond crossing.
Signaling and Interlocking- Types of signals in station and yards, upper quadrant and lower
quadrant signals, automatic signaling, multi aspect signaling, principle of interlocking, high
speed tracks, ballast less track, improvement in existing track for high speed.
PART B: TUNNEL ENGINERRING
Unit V

(10)

Introduction, need and importance of tunnel and its uses, considerations in tunneling, shape and
size of tunnels shafts, Pilot tunnels. Tunneling in hard rock, methods of attack, drilling blasting
mucking and tunnel lining.

Tunneling in soft materials: Mining, Timbering mucking forepoling and shield methods, Safety
measures ventilation lighting and drainage of tunnels. Modern tunneling methods. Equipments
used in tunneling, TBM (tunnel boring machine)
OUTCOMES: On completing the course, the students will have the ability to Plan and Design
various civil Engineering aspects of Railways, Airports and Harbor.

TEXT BOOKS:
1.

S. P. Arora & S. C. Saxena, A Text Book of Railway Engineering

2.

M. M. Aggrawal, Railway Engineering

3.

B. L. Gupta, Roads, Railway, Bridge & Tunnel Engineering

REFERENCES:
1.

D. J. Victor, Essentials of Bridge Engineering

2.

S. Arya & J. L. Ajmani, Design of Steel Structures, Nem Chand & Bros., Roorkee.

3.

IS : 800 1984.

ELECTIVE I
(TCE 703) DESIGN OF PRESTRESSED CONCRETE STRUCTURES
LTPC
3 1 0 4
OBJECTIVES:
Be able to perform analysis and design of prestressed concrete members and connections.
Be able to identify and interpret the appropriate relevant industry design codes.
To become familiar with professional and contemporary issues in the design and fabrication of
prestressed concrete members.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION:

(8)

Materials: High strength concrete and steel, Stress- Strain characteristics and properties.
Basic Principles of Prestressing: Fundamentals, Load balancing concept, Stress concept, centre
of Thrust, Pretensioning and post tensioning systems, tensioning methods and end anchorages.
Unit II

(12)

Analysis of Sections for Flexure and Losses of Prestress: Various losses encountered in pretensioning and post tensioning methods. Stresses in concrete due to pre-stress and loads, stresses
in steel due to loads, Cable profiles.
Unit III

(8)

Deflections: Deflection of a pre-stressed member short term and long term deflections.
Unit IV

(9)

Limit State of Collapse: Flexure IS Code recommendations Ultimate flexural Strength of


sections, Shear IS Code recommendations, shear reinforcement. Limit state of serviceability
control of deflections and cracking
Unit V

(8)

Design of Beams: Design of pre tensioned and post tensioned symmetrical and unsymmetrical
sections. Permissible stresses, design of prestressing force and eccentricity, limiting zone of prestressing cable profile.
OUTCOMES:
Students will understand the general mechanical behavior of prestressed concrete.
Students will be able to analyze and design prestressed concrete flexural members.
Students will be able to analyze and design for vertical and horizontal shear in prestressed
concrete.
Students will be able to analyze transfer and development length as well as prestress losses.
Students will be able to analyze and design for deflection and crack control of prestressed

concrete members.
Students will be able to analyze and design simple connections of prestressed concrete members.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Pre-stressed Concrete N. Krishna Raju Tata mc. Graw Publishers.- 2010
2. Pre-stressed Concrete P. Dayarathnam : Oxford and IBH Publishing Co. - 1996
REFERENCES:
1. Design of pre-stressed concrete structures T.Y.Lin and Ned H. Burns John Wiley &
Sons, New York. - 2004
2. Fundamental of pre-stressed concrete- N.C. Sinha & S.K.Roy - 1994
3. IS:1343:1980
4. Pre-stressed Concrete N.Rajgopalan, Narosa Publishing House - 2008

(TCE 704) GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS


LTPC
3104
OBJECTIVES: To explain the concept of the technology of G.I.S. and its component. Equip
the students with the various types of data used in the field of G.I.S. and also with the various
features and applications of the G.I.S.
Unit I

(6)

Introduction: Geographic Information System (GIS) Concepts and Terminology, Utility of GIS,
Essential components of a GIS, Hardware and Software requirements for GIS, Conceptual
models in GIS.
Data Acquisition: Scanners and Digitizers, Method of Digitization, Data Storage, Verification
and Editing, Remote Sensing data as input to GIS.
Unit II

(8)

Data Types: Spatial data and Non-spatial data, Spatial Data Models: Raster data model and
Vector data model, Data Formats, Raster Vector Data Conversion, Data Compression, Run
Length Coding, Quadtree Tessellation, Point Line and Area features, Topology, Data Reduction
and Generalization, Map Projection and transformation, Geo-referencing, Edge Matching,
Rectification and Registration Data quality and sources of errors.
Unit III

(8)

Non Spatial Data, Database Structure: Hierarchical Database Structure, Network Data Structure,
Relational Database Structure, Data storage and retrieval in GIS, Object Oriented Database,
Database Management System.
Unit IV

(8)

Spatial Data Manipulation and Analysis: Reclassification and Aggregation, Geometric and
Spatial Operations on Data, Layers, coverage, Overlays, Buffers, Measurement and Statistical
Modeling, Raster based analysis, Vector based analysis, Network Analysis, Data Output: Types
of Output.
Unit V

(6)

Applications of GIS in Administration, Planning, Management, Monitoring, Engineering, Digital


Elevation Model (DEM) and other areas, Various GIS packages and their salient features,

Modern trends: Web GIS, Open GIS, Data Mining, GIS Customization, Automated
Mapping/Facilities Management(AM/FM).
OUTCOMES:
A brief introduction to the students to the concept of G.I.S. and various terminologies
used.
Types of data and data models
Types of database structures and the database management system.
Application of G.I.S. in various fields and various GIS packages.
Text Books:
1. Burrough, P.A. and McDonnell, R.A., Principles of Geographic Information System,
Oxford University Press.
2. Chandra, A.M. and Ghosh, S.K., Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems,
Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi.
3. Manual of Remote Sensing, Vol.2, American Society of Photogrammetry & Remote
Sensing.
4. Geographic Information Systems: A Management Perspective, Stan Aromoff WDL
Publications.

(TCE 705) COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN OF STRUCTURE


LTPC
3 1 0 4
OBJECTIVES:
The course aims to teach students about the principles of engineering drawings, create typical
drawings using Computer Aided-Design (CAD) tools, read and interpret civil and structural
engineering drawings
To equip students with the knowledge of fundamental of finite element analysis.
The subject provides knowledge of Optimization Techniques.
UNIT I

(9)

INTRODUCTION: Fundamentals of CAD - Hardware and software requirements -Design


process Applications and benefits.
UNIT II

(9)

COMPUTER GRAPHICS: Graphic primitives - Transformations -Wire frame modeling and


solid modeling Graphic standards Drafting packages
UNIT III

(9)

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS: Fundamentals of Finite Element analysis - Principles of


structural analysis -Analysis packages and applications.
UNIT IV

(9)

DESIGN AND OPTIMISATION: Principles of design of steel and RC Structures Applications to simple design problems Optimization techniques - Algorithms - Linear
Programming Simplex method
UNIT V

(9)

EXPERT SYSTEMS: Introduction to artificial intelligence - Knowledge based expert systems Rules and decision tables Inference mechanisms - Simple applications.
OUTCOMES:
Students are able to do modeling of different structure in both steel and RCC.
Students are able to design and optimize the result of structures.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Groover M.P. and Zimmers E.W. Jr., CAD/CAM, Computer Aided Design and
Manufacturing, Prentice Hall of India Ltd, New Delhi, 1993.

2. Krishnamoorthy C.S.Rajeev S., Computer Aided Design, Narosa Publishing House, New
Delhi, 1993

REFERENCES
1. Harrison H.B., Structural Analysis and Design, Part I and II Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1990.
2. Rao S.S., Optimisation Theory and Applications, Wiley Eastern Limited, New Delhi, 1977.
3. Richard Forsyth (Ed), Expert System Principles and Case Studies, Chapman and Hall,
London, 1989.

10

(TCE 706) HYDRAULIC STRUCTURES


LTPC
3 1 0 4
OBJECTIVES:
To provide knowledge of various hydraulic structures such as energy dissipaters, head and cross
regulators, canal falls and structures involved in cross drainage works.
Introduce the student to fundamentals of design of hydraulic structures in civil engineering.
Unit I

(10)

Introduction: Types of hydraulic structures and their functions, Consideration for their selection.
Dams: Design principles of gravity and earth dams
Unit II

(10)

Spillways: Types of spillways, design of Ogee, Chute, Shaft, Side channel and Siphon spillways,
spillway aerators, spillway gates, energy dissipation downstream of spillways
Unit III

(10)

Diversion Headworks: Components of diversion head works and their design


Channel transitions: Design of channel transitions for sub critical and super critical flows
Unit IV

(10)

Canals Falls and Regulators: Types and design of vertical and sloping glacis falls, cross and
distributory head regulators, energy dissipation downstream of falls
Unit V

(10)

Cross Drainage Structures: Necessity and types of cross drainage structures, design of cross
drainage structures
Pre-requisite: Course on Water Resources Engineering
OUTCOMES:
Students learn Usefulness of cross drainage works and its design.
Apply the basic design principles to engineering design practice.
Text Books:
1.

Bharat Singh, Fundamentals of Irrigation Engineering, Nem Chand and Bros. Roorkee.

2.

G.L Asawa, Irrigation Engineering, New Age International Publishers, New Delhi.

11

(TCE 707) ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF


CIVIL ENGINEERING PROJECTS
LTPC
3004
OBJECTIVES:
Raise students awareness of issues related to the preservation of the quality of the Environment.
The nature of environmental and social impacts related to projects of Civil Engineering.
Introduction to the elaboration of EIS, the process of EIA and legal procedure.
Methodologies of prediction and evaluation of environmental and social impacts; mitigation of
impacts
Discussion of the nature of environmental and social conflicts related to specific projects and
presentation of methodologies to identify and solve those conflicts.
UNIT I

(8)

INTRODUCTION: Impact of development projects under Civil Engineering on environment Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) - Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) EIA
capability and limitations Legal provisions on EIA
UNIT II

(9)

METHODOLOGIES: Methods of EIA Check lists Matrices Networks Cost-benefit


analysis Analysis of alternatives
UNIT III

(9)

PREDICTION AND ASSESSMENT


Assessment of Impact on land, water and air, noise, social, cultural flora and fauna;
Mathematical models; public participation Rapid EIA
UNIT IV

(9)

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLANp: Plan for mitigation of adverse impact on


environment options for mitigation of impact on water, air and land, flora and fauna;
Addressing the issues related to the Project Affected People ISO 14000.
UNIT V

(10)

CASE STUDIES: EIA for infrastructure projects Bridges Stadium Highways Dams
Multi-storey Buildings Water Supply and Drainage Projects Waste water treatment plants.
OUTCOMES:
Students will able to describe the main policies regarding Environment and the interaction with
territory management policies.
Students will able to identify the different stages of the process of Environmental Impact
Assessment.
Students will able to apply methodologies for assessing impacts.

12

Students will able to propose criteria and explain the choice of design solutions that minimize
impacts.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Canter, R.L., Environmental Impact Assessment, McGraw-Hill Inc., New Delhi, 1996.
2. Shukla, S.K. and Srivastava, P.R., Concepts in Environmental Impact Analysis, Common
Wealth Publishers, New Delhi, 1992.
REFERENCES
1. John G. Rau and David C Hooten (Ed)., Environmental Impact Analysis Handbook,
McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1990.
2. Environmental Assessment Source book, Vol. I, II & III. The World Bank, Washington,
D.C., 1991.
3. Judith Petts, Handbook of Environmental Impact Assessment Vol. I & II, Blackwell
Science, 1999.

13

(TCE 708) TRAFFIC ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT


LTPC

3104
OBJECTIVES:
To introduce the students about the various terminologies related to traffic engineering,
significance and scope. The subject also deals with the geometric design of intersections, traffic
survey, control and management.
UNIT I

(9)

INTRODUCTION: Significance and scope, Characteristics of Vehicles and Road Users, Skid
Resistance and Braking Efficiency (Problems), Components of Traffic Engineering- Road
Traffic and Land Use Characteristics.
UNIT II

(9)

TRAFFIC SURVEYS AND ANALYSIS: Surveys and Analysis - Volume, Capacity, Speed
and Delays, Origin and Destination, Parking, Pedestrian Studies, Accident Studies and Safety
Level of Services- Basic principles of Traffic Flow.
UNIT III

(9)

TRAFFIC CONTROL: Traffic signs, Road markings, Design of Traffic signals and Signal coordination (Problems), Traffic control aids and Street furniture, Street Lighting, Computer
applications in Signal design
UNIT IV

(9)

GEOMETRIC DESIGN OF INTERSECTIONS: Conflicts at Intersections, Classification of


At Grade Intersections, - Channallised Intersections - Principles of Intersection Design,
Elements of Intersection Design, Rotary design, Grade Separation and interchanges - Design
principles.
UNIT V

(9)

TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT: Traffic Management- Transportation System Management


(TSM) - Travel Demand Management (TDM), Traffic Forecasting techniques, Restrictions on
turning movements, One-way Streets, Traffic Segregation, Traffic Calming, Tidal flow
operations, Exclusive Bus Lanes, Introduction to Intelligent Transportation System (ITS).
OUTCOMES:
To explain the significance and scope of the traffic engineering.
To understand the concept of surveys and analysis conducted for road users.

14

To understand the various traffic signs and signals for controlling the traffic.
To know the concept of geometric design of the road at the intersection of the road.
Students will be able to develop skills to analyze the various systems in traffic management.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Kadiyali L R, Traffic Engineering and Transport Planning, Khanna Technical Publications,
Delhi, 2000.
2. Khanna K and Justo C E G, Highway Engineering, Khanna Publishers, Roorkee, 2001.

REFERENCES
1. Indian Roads Congress (IRC) specifications: Guidelines and special publications on Traffic
Planning and Management
2. Guidelines of Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, Government of India.
3. Subhash C.Saxena, A Course in Traffic Planning and Design, Dhanpat Rai Publications, New
Delhi, 1989.
4. Transportation Engineering An Introduction, C.Jotin Khisty, B.Kent Lall, Prentice Hall of
India Pvt Ltd, 2006.

15

ELECTIVE II
(TCE 709) BRIDGE ENGINEERING
LTPC
3 1 0 4
OBJECTIVES: To explain the concept of the bridge technology and its various components.
Equip the students with the various types of bridges in use and also to design the various types
of bridges and its components.
Unit I
(4)
General Considerations: Types of Bridges, Economic Spans, Aesthetics, Selection of suitable
type of bridge.
Unit II
(10)
Design Loads and their Distribution: Design loads for highway and railway bridges, analysis of
deck slabs, Load distribution in multi-beam bridges.
Unit III

(12)

Design of Superstructure: Design of balanced cantilever concrete bridge, arch bridge, prestressed
concrete bridge, and box grider bridge. Design of lattice grider railway bridges.
Unit IV

(21)

Introduction to cable bridges. Various types of bearings and their design.


Unit V

(7)

Introduction to Design of Substructure. Introduction to Construction/Erection Methods.


OUTCOMES:
The students will be known to various types of bridges in use according to their
purpose.
To understand the concept of various types of loads to which bridge is subjected.
Analysis of the deck slabs using various methods.
To be able to design the superstructure of various types of bridges.
Design of bearing of cable suspension type of bridge.
Students will be able to design the superstructure of the bridge.
Text Books:
1.

Victor, D.J, Essential of Bridges, Oxford and IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd.

2.

Krishna Raju, N., Design of Bridges, Oxford and IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd

3.

Ponnuswamy, S, Bridge Engineering, Tata McGraw Hill Book Co. Ltd., New Delhi

References:
1.

Raina, V.K, Concrete Bridge Practice, Tata McGraw Hill Book Co. Ltd., New Delhi

2.

Pama, R.P and Cusens, A.R, Bridge Deck Analysis, John Wiley & Sons.

16

(TCE 710) SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT


LTPC
3 1 0 4
OBJECTIVES:
To introduce the students to the various terminologies used in ecology and environmental
management. And the subject also make student understand the various issues related to
environment and environment quality. And, Also to make the environmental impact assessment
and risk management with the help of case studies.
Unit I

(8)

Introduction, Ecology and Living Environment. Environmental Issues. Environmental Quality


Indices.
Unit II

(5)

Standard Setting and Criteria. Environmental Monitoring.


Unit III

(12)

Water Quality Modelling and Management. Meteorology, Dispersion and air Quality
Management.
Unit IV

(8)

Noise: Sources, Effects, Measurement and Control, Noise Effective Building Design.
Unit V

(12)

Environmental/Impact assessment Case Studies. Risk Management. Sustainable Development.


OUTCOMES:
To introduce the students to the various issues related to environment and ecology.
To understand the concept of environment monitoring.
To understand the modeling and management of water and air quality.
To know about the effects, measurement and control of noise pollution.
To make an environmental impact assessment with the help of case studies.
Text Books:
1. Bindu N. Lohani and Alastair, Environmental Quality Management, M. North,
South Asian publishers, New Delhi.
2. Wark & Warner, Air Pollution, Its Origin and Control, Cecil F., I.E.P.A. DunDonnelley Publisher NY.
3. Bala G. Liptak, Environmental Engg. Handbook, Chilton Book Company,
Radnor, Pennsylvania.
17

(TCE 711) GROUND IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUES


LTPC
3 1 0 4
OBJECTIVES:
To introduce the students to the logic of techniques used in foundation engineering for ground
improvement namely, compaction and grouting. The subject also gives knowledge to the
students about the expansive soils and reinforced earth.
UNIT I

(10)

GROUND IMPROVEMENT: Role of ground improvement in foundation engineering,


methods of ground improvement, Geotechnical problems in alluvial, laterite and black cotton
soils. Selection of suitable ground improvement techniques based on soil condition.
HYDRAULIC MODIFICATION: Dewatering: methods of de-watering- sumps and interceptor
ditches, single, multi stage well points, vacuum well points, Horizontal wells, foundation drains,
blanket drains, criteria for selection of fill material around drains, Electro-osmosis
UNIT II

(10)

COMPACTION: In situ densification methods in granular Soils Vibration at the ground


surface, Impact at the Ground Surface, Vibration at depth, Impact at depth. Compaction
equipments, specifications and control.
In situ densification methods in Cohesive soils preloading or dewatering, Vertical drains Sand
Drains, Sand wick geo-drains, Stone and lime columns, thermal methods.
UNIT III

(10)

GROUTING: Grouting: Objectives of grouting, grouts and their properties, grouting methodsascending, descending and stage grouting, hydraulic fracturing in soils and rocks- post grout test
Stabilisation: Cement stabilization, bituminous stabilization, Lime stabilization, Chemical
stabilisation with calcium chloride, sodium silicate and gypsum- Methods, Principles,
Applications and Field Control.
UNIT IV

(10)

Expansive soils
Problems of expansive soils , tests for identification , methods of determination of swell
pressure. Improvement of expansive soils, Foundation techniques in expansive soils - under
reamed piles.

18

Geo-synthetics
Geo-textiles- Types, Functions and applications , geo-grids and geo-membranes functions and
applications.
UNIT V

(8)

Reinforced Earth: Principles, Components of reinforced earth, factors governing design of


reinforced earth walls, design principles of reinforced earth walls.
OUTCOMES:
To explain the role of ground improvement in foundation engineering and methods of ground
improvement.
To understand the concept of compaction and processes used in compaction in granular soils.
To impart knowledge about the grouting and terms used in grouting.
To know the concept of expansive soils and various terminologies used in this type of soil.
Students will be given knowledge about the principles and components of reinforced earth.
To give the knowledge of designing of reinforced earth wall and governing factors.

TEXT BOOKS:
1. Ground Improvement Techniques- Purushothama Raj P. (1999) Laxmi Publications,New
Delhi.
2. Construction and Geotechnical Method in Foundation Engineering- Koerner R.M. (1985) Mc Graw Hill Pub. Co., New York.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Engineering principles of ground modification- Manfred Hausmann (1990) - Mc Graw Hill
Pub. Co., New York.
2. Methods of treatment of unstable ground- Bell, F.G. (1975) Butterworths, London.
3. Expansive soils- Nelson J.D. and Miller D.J. (1992) -, John Wiley and Sons.
4. Soil Stabilization; Principles and Practice- Ingles. C.G. and Metcalf J.B. (1972) Butterworths, London.
5. Jones J.E.P., Earth Reinforcement and Soil Structure, Butterworths, 1995.
6. Jewell, R.A., Soil Reinforcement with Geotextiles, CIRIA special publication, London,
1996

19

(TCE 712) ADVANCED HIGHWAY ENGINEERING


LTPC
3 1 0 4
OBJECTIVES:
To impart the knowledge of highway planning and feasibility study for highways to students and
to make them understand the basic modeling concepts used to analyze flexible and rigid
pavements. And, to tell about the techniques for pavement evaluation, maintenance and
rehabilitation.
Unit I

(10)

Highway planning: Preparation of master plans, Saturation system, Critical Study of National
Road Development Plans, Feasibility study for National Highways and Expressways, Highway
Economics and Financing
Highway Materials; Evaluation of subgrade soil and road aggregates, Types of bituminous
binders and their Suitability, Adhesion and Rheology of bituminous binders, New road materials,
additives, Bituminous mix design

Unit II

(10)

Design Considerations: Equivalent single wheel load, Repetition of loads, pavement StructureSoil interaction, Strength of pavement component materials, Design factors
Flexible payment: Empirical, semi-empirical and analytical design methods, IRC Method of
Design
Rigid Pavements: Load and temperature stresses, Requirements of fillers and sealers, Design of
joints and load transfer devices, IRC methods of design, Design of SFRC pavements.

Unit III

(10)

Construction Techniques and Specifications: Quality control tests, Equipment and Specifications
for water bound macadam, Wet mix macadam and bituminous roads construction, bituminous
surface treatment, Penetration macadam, Bituminous bound macadam, Dense bituminous
macadam, Semi-Dense bituminous concrete, Bituminous concrete, Sheet asphalt and Mastic
asphalt.

Equipment and Specifications for cement concrete roads.

Reinforced Concrete

Pavements

20

Unit IV

(8)

Soil Stabilised Road: Aggregate mixtures, proportioning, Soil stabilized mixes


Special problems related to Drainage

Unit V

(8)

Pavement Evaluation, Maintenance and Rehabilitation: Techniques for Functional and Structural
Evaluation, Causes of failures, Routine and periodic maintenance, Special repairs, Types and
design of overlays, Maintenance management system.
OUTCOMES:
To understand the concept of highway planning, highway economics and highway materials.
To explain the concept of flexible and rigid pavements.
To impart the knowledge of construction techniques for water bound macadam, bituminous and
concrete pavement.
To understand the terminologies related to soil stabilized roads.
To know the concept of techniques related to structural and functional evaluation of pavements.
Students will be given knowledge about the evaluation, maintenance and rehabilitation of
pavements.
TEXT BOOKS
1.

Yoder, E.J., and Witzek, M.W., Principles of pavement Design, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.,
New York.

2.

Flaherty CAO, Highway Engg., vol. 2, Edward Arnol, London.

3.

Khanna, S.K. and Justo, C.E.G., Highway Engg., Nem Chand & Bros, Roorkee.

4.

Bituminous Road construction, HMSO, UK.

REFERENCES
1.

Kadiyali, L.R., Principles and Practices of Highway Engg.

2.

Concrete Roads, HMSO, U.K.

21

(TCE 713) GROUND WATER ENGINEERING


LTPC
3104
OBJECTIVES:
This course will give students a quantitative understanding of the hydraulics of subsurface fluid
flow and engineering applications and design. This includes Characteristics of porous media,
hydrologic cycle, Darcy's law of fluid flow in porous media, Continuity principles, Well
hydraulics; aquifer and borehole testing, Engineering applications of groundwater hydraulics,
Characteristics of water in the vadose zone; unsaturated flow, Infiltration, redistribution,
evaporation, and the water balance.
UNIT I

(9)

FUNDAMENTALS OF GROUND WATER: Introduction Characteristic of Ground water


Distribution of water - ground water column Permeability - Darcy's Law - Types of aquifers Hydrogeological Cycle water level fluctuations.
UNIT II

(9)

HYDRAULICS OF FLOW: Storage coefficient - Specific field - Heterogeneity and Anisotropy


-Transmissivity Governing equations of ground water flow - Steady state flow - Dupuit
Forchheimer assumptions Velocity potential - Flow nets.
UNIT III

(9)

ESTIMATION OF PARAMETERS
Transmissivity and Storativity Pumping test - Unsteady state flow - Thiess method Jacob
method - Image well theory Effect of partial penetrations of wells - Collectors wells.
UNIT IV

(9)

GROUND WATER DEVELOPMENT


Infiltration gallery - Conjunctive use - Artificial recharge Rainwater harvesting - Safe yield
Yield test Geophysical methods Selection of pumps.
UNIT V

(9)

WATER QUALITY
Ground water chemistry - Origin, movement and quality - Water quality standards Saltwater
intrusion Environmental concern
OUTCOMES:
Create a conceptual model of an areas hydrogeology that can be used to guide a site
investigation or engineering design project. Compare methods for solving groundwater flow

22

equations under a variety of situations, selecting the most appropriate modeling techniques based
on an engineering projects goals and evaluating how their weaknesses may impact the final
conclusions. Develop a preliminary consulting report for a groundwater development or
remediation project.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Raghunath H.M., Ground Water Hydrology, Wiley Eastern Ltd., 2000.
2. Todd D.K., Ground Water Hydrology, John Wiley and Sons, 2000.

REFERENCE
1. C Walton, Ground Water Resource Evaluation, McGraw-Hill Publications.

23

(TCE 714) TENDER PROCEDURE AND CONTRACT MANAGEMENT


LTPC
3104
OBJECTIVES:
Accountability in the spending of public money and Transparency in the steps of the decisionmaking processes.
UNIT I

(9)

CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS: Indian Contracts Act Elements of Contracts Types of


Contracts Features Suitability Design of Contract Documents International Contract
Document Standard Contract Document Law of Torts
UNIT II

(10)

TENDERS: Prequalification Bidding Accepting Evaluation of Tender from Technical,


Contractual and Commercial Points of View Contract Formation and Interpretation Potential
Contractual Problems World Bank Procedures and Guidelines Transparency in Tenders Act.
UNIT III

(9)

ARBITRATION: Comparison of Actions and Laws Agreements Subject Matter


Violations Appointment of Arbitrators Conditions of Arbitration Powers and Duties of
Arbitrator Rules of Evidence Enforcement of Award Costs
UNIT IV

(9)

LEGAL REQUIREMENTS: Insurance and Bonding Laws Governing Sale, Purchase and
Use of Urban and Rural Land Land Revenue Codes Tax Laws Income Tax, Sales Tax,
Excise and Custom Duties and their Influence on Construction Costs Legal Requirements for
Planning Property Law Agency Law Local Government Laws for Approval Statutory
Regulations
UNIT V

(9)

LABOUR REGULATIONS: Social Security Welfare Legislation Laws relating to Wages,


Bonus and Industrial Disputes, Labour Administration Insurance and Safety Regulations
Workmens Compensation Act Indian Factory Act Tamil Nadu Factory Act Child Labour
Act - Other Labour Laws.

24

OUTCOMES:
Cost of the work been completed within the costs agreed in the contract, quality of the work been
carried out in accordance with what was specified in the guidelines and the work been completed
satisfactorily within the time specified.
REFERENCES
1. Gajaria G.T., Laws Relating to Building and Engineering Contracts in India, M.M.Tripathi
Private Ltd., Bombay, 1982
2. Tamilnadu PWD Code, 1986
3. Jimmie Hinze, Construction Contracts, Second Edition, McGraw Hill, 2001
4. Joseph T. Bockrath, Contracts and the Legal Environment for Engineers and Architects, Sixth
Edition, McGraw Hill, 2000.

25

(TCE 715) BASICS OF DYNAMICS AND SEISMIC DESIGN


LTPC
3 10 4
OBJECTIVES:
The main objective of this course is to introduce to the student the phenomena of earthquakes,
the process, measurements and the factors that affect the design of structures in seismic areas.
This objective is achieved through imparting rudiments of theory of vibrations necessary to
understand and analyze the dynamic forces caused by earthquakes and structures. Further, the
student is also taught the codal provisions as well as the a-seismic design methodology.
UNIT I

(9)

THEORY OF VIBRATIONS: Concept of inertia and damping Types of Damping


Difference between static forces and dynamic excitation Degrees of freedom SDOF
idealisation Equations of motion of SDOF system for mass as well as base excitation Free
vibration of SDOF system Response to harmonic excitation Impulse and response to unit
impulse Duhamel integral
UNIT II

(9)

MULTIPLE DEGREE OF FREEDOM SYSTEM: Two degree of freedom system Normal


modes of vibration Natural frequencies Mode shapes - Introduction to MDOF systems
Decoupling of equations of motion Concept of mode superposition (No derivations).
UNIT III

(9)

ELEMENTS OF SEISMOLOGY: Causes of Earthquake Geological faults Tectonic plate


theory Elastic rebound Epicentre Hypocentre Primary, shear and Raleigh waves
Seismogram Magnitude and intensity of earthquakes Magnitude and Intensity scales
Spectral Acceleration - Information on some disastrous earthquakes
UNIT IV

(9)

RESPONSE OF STRUCTURES TO EARTHQUAKE: Response and design spectra Design


earthquake concept of peak acceleration Site specific response spectrum Effect of soil
properties and damping Liquefaction of soils Importance of ductility Methods of
introducing ductility into RC structures.

26

UNIT V

(9)

DESIGN METHODOLOGY: IS 1893, IS 13920 and IS 4326 Codal provisions Design as


per the codes Base isolation techniques Vibration control measures Important points in
mitigating effects of earthquake on structures.
OUTCOMES:
On successfully completing this course unit, students will be able to design and build
earthquake-resistant structures, in order to minimize the earthquake risk. By reducing losses of
lives and properties, socio-economical sustainability can be achieved.
TEXT BOOK
1. Chopra, A.K., Dynamics of Structures Theory and Applications to Earthquake
Engineering, Second Edition, Pearson Education, 2003.
2. Agarwal Pankaj, Earthquake resistance design, PHI.

REFERENCES
1. Biggs, J.M., Introduction to Structural Dynamics, McGrawHill Book Co., N.Y., 1964
2. Dowrick, D.J., Earthquake Resistant Design, John Wiley & Sons, London, 1977
3. Paz, M., Structural Dynamics Theory & Computation, CSB Publishers & Distributors,
Shahdara, Delhi, 1985

27

(PCE 701) COMPUTER APPLICATION LAB II


LTPC
0 03 1
OBJECTIVES:
To model loads on structures using current codes and standards, Familiarity with structural
analysis software.
1. USE OF STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS SOFTWARE

(30)

Performing analysis of following structures using STAAD.Pro software


i) Determinate beams- Simply supported beams and cantilever beams subjected to different
loadings
ii) Indeterminate beams- Propped cantilever beams, Fixed and continuous beams subjected
to different point and distributed loadings
iii) 2D frames (up to two spans and two storey)
iv) 2D trusses subjected to loadings at joints only
v) 3D frames (up to 4 x 4 grids and 4 storey) subjected to dead load, live load, wind load
and earthquake load

2. APPLICATION OF EXCEL TO CIVIL ENGINEERING PROBLEMS

(12)

OUTCOMES:
After completing the labs students will be able to use modern structural analysis software, and
analyze statically determinate and indeterminate beams, and frames.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. STAAD.Pro Manual- Bentley,
2. Using STAAD.Pro 2006- Munir Hamad, Shroff publishers and Distributors
3. Reference book on Computer Aided Design Laboratory- Dr M.N.Shesha Prakash,
Dr.G.S.Suresh, Lakshmi Publications
4. A referral on CAD Laboratory- M.A.Jayaram, D.S.Rajendra Prasad, Sapna Publications
5. Learning Excel 2002- Ramesh Bangia, Khanna Book Publishing Co (P) Ltd.,
6. Microsoft Excel - Mathieson SA, Starfire publishers

28

PCE 702 STRUCTURAL DETAILING LAB.


LTPC
0 03 1
OBJECTIVES:
The lab is aimed at improving the ability of students to provide proper detailing of reinforcement
in different structural components to allow more efficient use of reinforcement.
Preparation of working drawings for the following:
1. RC Beams- Simply supported, Continuous, Cantilever
2. T beam / L-beam floor
3. Slabs Simply supported, Continuous, One way and two way slabs.
4. Columns Tied Columns and Spirally reinforced columns.
5. Isolated footings for RC Columns.
6. Combined rectangular and trapezoidal footings.
7. Rolled sections and connections (welded and riveted).
8. Built-up columns and beams.
9. Gusset bases
10. Roof trusses

OUTCOMES:
Design of different component of various structures and representation in different drawings for
carrying out construction activity.

29

(CEP 701/801) PROJECT WORK


LTPC
0 0 12 6

The objective of the project work is to enable the students to work in convenient groups of not
more than five/six members in a group on a project involving theoretical and experimental
studies related to Civil Engineering. Every Project Work shall have a Guide who is a member of
the faculty of Civil Engineering of the university where the student is registered. The hours
allotted for this course shall be utilized by the students to receive directions from the Guide, on
library reading, laboratory work, computer analysis or field work and also to present in
periodical seminars the progress made in the project. Each student shall finally produce a
comprehensive report covering background information, literature Survey, problem statement,
Project work details and conclusions. This experience of project work shall help the student in
expanding his / her knowledge base and also provide opportunity to utilize the creative ability
and inference capability.

30