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NEWS

Gov. Brownback
proposes first state
dental school

page 2

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN


MONDAY, JAN. 30, 2017 | VOLUME 133 ISSUE 05

THE STUDENT VOICE SINCE 1904

DISRUPPTED

No. 2 Kansas escapes


Rupp Arena with win
over No. 4 Kentucky

Missy Minear/KANSAN
Senior center Landen Lucas dunks the ball in the second half against Kentucky on Jan. 28. Lucas had 13 points and five rebounds in Kansas 79-73 victory in Rupp Arena.

SKYLAR ROLSTAD
@SkyRolSports

LEXINGTON, Ky.
Earlier this season, the
Kansas Jayhawks defied
the odds with a win over
No. 1 Duke at Madison
Square Garden.
Saturday
night,

hampered by depth issues


and against a fellow topfive team in the nation,
the Jayhawks did the
same thing. No. 2 Kansas
triumphed at Rupp Arena,
defeating No. 4 Kentucky
79-73.
Senior guard Frank
Mason III finished with

21 points in the statement


win. Kentucky also had a
difficult time containing
freshman
guard
Josh
Jackson, who impressed
on a national stage with 20
points.
Of course I know it
means a lot to the fans of
both schools and certainly

theres a lot of tradition on


the line, Kansas coach Bill
Self said. But I thought
our experience ... Frank
and Devonte and Josh
plays much older than his
years, and Svi and Landen
[Lucas] I thought those
guys played with pretty
good poise down the

stretch.
Kansas shot into a
10-point lead in the final
five minutes. The team
defended that lead, which
stood anywhere from 10 to
four points, until the end of
the game.
The team erased any
worry of foul trouble, but

senior center Landen Lucas


took to the bench with 2:24
remaining. For almost
all game, and especially
during the second half,
Kansas remained smart
and careful on defense.
Standout
Kentucky
SEE KENTUCKY
PAGE 11

Anti-campus carry bill gains support


CHANDLER BOESE
@Chandler_Boese

TOPEKA A bill that


would stop concealed carry
of weapons on state college
campuses saw large support
during a hearing in the Kansas Senate on Thursday.
A state Senate committee had a hearing Thursday
on a bill that would give
universities, colleges and
public hospitals and clinics a permanent exemption
from a 2013 law that allowed gun owners to carry
concealed weapons into
more public buildings. The
law granted the universities, colleges and hospitals a
four-year exemption, which
will expire this July 1.
The Federal and State
Affairs Committees hearing
comes only four days after a 19-yearold Kansas State University student
was transported to a hospital with a
self-inflicted gunshot wound from a
weapon kept in a dorm room, against
university rules.
While supporters of the rollback
bill are leaning heavily on this recent
incident, their push to keep concealed weapons off campus has been
building for months.
There are a lot of concerns about
safety, said Andrew Bennett, a Kan-

Sarah Wright/KANSAN
Protestors at Kansas City International Airport aim to spread messages
of acceptance and love in response to President Donald Trumps new
executive order on immigration.

Students at MCI
protest travel ban
DARBY VANHOUTAN
MONA AHMED
@KansanNews
File photo illustration

sas State math professor and its


Faculty Senate president. I think
the fact that we had the accident on
campus brings home, when you have
guns, accidents tend to follow.
Several people from the University of Kansas, including professor
Ron Barrett-Gonzalez, graduate student Megan Jones and Student Body
President Stephonn Alcorn, testified
during the hearing in defense of the
bill.
The Kansas law requires universities, colleges and hospitals to allow

INDEX
NEWS............................................2
OPINION........................................4
ARTS & CULTURE..........................................9
SPORTS.........................................12

adults 21 or older to carry concealed


weapons into their buildings if they
dont have adequate security measures, such as metal detectors or
guards. Those measures could be expensive for university to install.
The University has not yet finalized which, if any, of its buildings
will receive adequate security measures. The schools new weapons
policy, approved by the Board of ReSEE CAMPUS CARRY
PAGE2

KANSAN.COM
GALLERY:
Take a frame-by-frame
look at Kansas victory over
Kentucky at Kansan.com

KANSAS CITY, Mo.


Many students were among
the hundreds of voices
chanting No hate; no fear;
refugees are welcome here
on Sunday at the Kansas City
International (MCI) airport
in Kansas City, Missouri
protesting President Donald
Trumps immigration ban.
You shouldnt be banning people when everyone
is welcome here. Its a nation of immigrants, Cierra
TwoBulls, a graduate student

from Pine Ridge, South Dakota, said.


Individuals gathered outside of Terminal C, which
is the entrance for international arrivals at the airport.
They were protesting against
the executive order signed on
Friday afternoon by Trump
banning travel from seven
Muslim-majority countries
for 90 days and the suspension of all refugee admission for 120 days. The Muslim-majority countries are
Iran, Iraq, Syria, Somalia,
SEE PROTEST
PAGE 2

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KANSAN.COM/NEWS | MONDAY, JAN. 30, 2017

KUMC may gain new dental school


NOLAN BREY
@NolanBrey

Gov. Sam Brownback


announced a plan to begin
developing a school of dentistry in his State of the State
address earlier this month, a
move that higher education
professionals say is sorely
needed.
Kansas, one of 14 states
without a dental school, remains reliant on neighboring states for dental education.
Since 1964, Kansas has
been able to send at least
21 students a year to dental
school at the University of
Missouri-Kansas City with
in-state tuition. In exchange,
Missouri architecture students receive in-state tuition
when studying at the University of Kansas and Kansas State University.
However, while Kansas
sends 21 students to UMKC,
nearly 500 architecture students from Missouri study
in Kansas, according to Dr.
Daniel Thomas, a periodontist and a Regent on the
Board of Regents.
The addition of a dental school at the University
would mark a great change
for the University and for
Kansas.
There is a significant
dental shortage in Kansas,
especially in the rural and
other underserved parts of

FROM CAMPUS CARRY


PAGE 1
gents in December, gives no
details beyond restating the
laws provisions that weapons may be allowed in any
building without adequate
security measures.
The law, with the fouryear exemption for universities and hospitals, passed
with large, bipartisan majorities in 2013, and some of
the legislators who backed
it see no reason to modify
or repeal it.
Sen.
Ty
Masterson
(R-Andover), who sup-

the state, said Natalie Lutz,


communications
director
for the University Medical
Center. A new dental school
dedicated to the needs of the
State of Kansas would help
meet these needs.
Today, of Kansas 105
counties, 95 are dentally underserved, Thomas said.

There is a
significant
dental shortage
in Kansas,
especially in the
rural and other
underserved parts
of the state.

Tanner Hassell/KANSAN
While discussions of a dental school at KU Medical Center have been ongoing since 2011, the idea has gained
traction this year. Members of the Kansas Board of Regents are scheduled to discuss the idea at their monthly
meeting in September.

Thomas said that if the


legislature were to authorize the creation of a dental
school at the University, it
would not be this year because architectural drawings and other preparations
are needed first.
However, talks of new
dental programs have been
going on since 2004. Because of the lack of dental
students practicing in Kansas, a taskforce was formed
to increase the number of
dentists practicing in Kansas and an Advanced Education in General Dentistry program was formed at

Wichita State University,


Thomas said.
Yet, the program has
only 30 total graduates, and
only six stayed in Kansas.
As a result, in 2011, the
Board of Regents established an 11-member task
force, chaired by Thomas,
which sought to increase the
number of students sent to
dental schools and to establish a dental school in Kansas.
Originally, the school
was to be added to Wichita State University, but it
was later changed to the
University of Kansas Medical Center to save cost and
utilize the medicine-related
curriculum already in place,
Thomas said.
Additionally, the task
force looked into buying

seats for students at other


universities in addition to
UMKC, but no such action
ever took place.
A possible location for
the dental school at the
Medical Center is the Dykes
Library, which could be connected to the new Health
Education Building that is
set to be completed in June.
A dental school would
help to alleviate many of the
healthcare problems that
currently plague the state.
For example, Thomas
said that in 2011, it was reported that 57,000 Kansans live in dental deserts,
which are areas over 30
miles away from the nearest
dentist. In that same year,
over 17,000 dental-related
emergency room visits were
recorded, Thomas said.

ported the 2013 law, said


the Kansas State accident
shows that a universitys
ban on concealed guns
does not stop weapons
from being on campus.
Other supporters of the
bill said students, faculty
and staff should have the
option of defending themselves with guns while
on campus. They have a
powerful ally in Gov. Sam
Brownback, who signed the
2013 measure and other
gun-rights bills and said he
remains a strong supporter of gun ownership rights
protected by the Second

Amendment to the U.S.


Constitution.
In a brief interview
Wednesday,
Brownback
acknowledged the concerns
on campuses but added,
Its a constitutional right.
Voters last year ousted
two dozen of Brownbacks
conservative GOP allies
from the Legislature, giving
Democrats and moderate
Republicans more power.
Some rural legislators
whove backed gun-rights
measures in the past have
even started to backpedal
because university faculty and students have been

so vocal. House Majority Leader Don Hineman


(R-Dighton) voted for the
2013 law and isnt yet saying whether hed support a
rollback.
There are two sides to
the debate, absolutely, and
Im sympathetic to both
points of view, Hineman
said.

Natalie Lutz
University Medical Center
communications director

Edited by Omar
Sanchez
The Associated Press
contributed to this report.

FROM PROTEST
PAGE 1
Libya, Yemen and Sudan.
The order also indefinitely bars any person fleeing
from war-torn Syria to the
United States. Ninety-two
students from the seven affected countries attend the
University, according to data
from International Student
Services.
The
countries
that
Trump banned in his order
show no evidence of terrorist
action in the United States.
It seems backwards and the
argument feels invalid, said
Stanci Soderstrom from Lee
Summit, Missouri, who attended the protest with her
14-year-old daughter Keely
Soderstrom.
Although there are no
individuals detained at MCI,
protesters still found the airport backdrop to be a beneficial place to use their voices.
Uniting here like this is a
really good way to feel better
individually and to show others, especially immigrants
and refugees, that Kansas
City is safe, Madeline Elliott,
from St Louis, Missouri, said.
Ayla Yousef, a student
from Overland Park, attended the protest as an opportu-

Sarah Wright/KANSAN
Protesters begin a march around the Terminal C to draw attention to their message of frustration.

nity to be involved in history.


We dont want this to be
the next chapter in our history books and we look back
and regret everything weve
done as a nation, Yousef
said.
Trumps executive order included a preference of
re-admission to the United
States for immigrants who
practice the Christian faith.
Emily Taylor, a protester
from Overland Park, believes
this is contradicting.
I want to take a Christian
stance on this. To show that

even as a Christian, I recognize that this is something


thats wrong. People being
banned from a country goes
against human principle and
kindness, Taylor said.
The MCI protest is similar to those held across the
country, including at JFK
Airport in New York City and
DFW Airport in Dallas.
The Facebook group
where the protest plans originated showed a total of 881
individuals attended the
event, though about several
hundred people were at MCI

at the height of the protest.


Also in attendance was
Kansas City Mayor Sly James
who spoke to protesters using a megaphone toward the
end of the protest.
Were not afraid of people coming in. Were not
afraid of immigrants. Were
not afraid of the poor. Were
not afraid of Muslims. Were
not afraid of women. Were
not afraid of anybody because Kansas City is where
its at and the people here
are the best in the country,
James said.

Additionally, while there


are over 1,400 licensed dentists in the state, Thomas
said this number is deceptive.
According to Thomas,
over half of Kansas dentists are over 50 and many
license holders are retired,
work part-time or practice
across state lines. Furthermore, nationally, 46 percent
of current dental students
are females, who will, on average, spend less time practicing than their male counterparts throughout their
lives, Thomas said.

Edited by Ashley
Hocking

NEWS

KANSAN.COM

Faculty fears for research funding under Trump

Donald Trumps campaign


ran against sustainable
energy, climate change and
the environment, which are
major areas of research for
the University.

EMILY WELLBORN
@Em_wellborn

s the country ushers


in a new presidential administration,
some of the Universitys
faculty and administrators
are worried that research
funding already trending
down will continue to be
cut.
Jim
Tracy,
vice
chancellor
of
research
at the University, said
research funding was down
by 2 percent in the last
fiscal year. The University
receives its funding from
state and federal sources.
A continued decrease in
funding could lead to less
advanced equipment in the
classroom, less experienced
professors
and
could
hurt the marketability of
degrees.
Tracy said that in the last
fiscal year, a total of about
$198 million was generated
for research and about 75
percent of total research
funding came from the state
and federal governments. If
state funding for research
decreases, the University
will have less funding
to provide cutting-edge
equipment for faculty to
compete for federal grants
and funding, affecting the
total amount of funding for
the future.
I believe that students
get a better education
at research universities
because
faculty
are
bringing in the newest
information and the newest
ways of thinking into the
classroom, Tracy said.
In my experience, the

If our scholarly
programs slip
in international
ranking, we may
fall off that
list. That does not
bode well for the
marketability for
the degrees of our
students.
Ron Barrett-Gonzalez
President, Kansas
Conference of the AAU
Professors

Associated Press
Education Secretary nominee Betsy DeVos testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, at her confirmation hearing before the
Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee.

best researchers are often


the best teachers that you
have.
Ron Barrett-Gonzalez,
president of the Kansas
Conference of the American
Association of University
Professors, said cuts could
also impact the Universitys
ability
to
have
over
6,000 graduate research
assistant positions. That,
he said, would lead to less
experienced
professors
in the classroom and less

information from new


research. Barrett-Gonzalez
also said it would toll on the
international reputation of
the University.
As
research
funds
continue to deplete, faculty
will not be able to publish
their best work through
scholarly programs. If that
were to continue, BarrettGonzalez speculates that
the University could lose
its membership within the
Association of American

Universities,
of
which
the University is the only
member in the state of
Kansas.
If
our
scholarly
programs
slip
in
international ranking, we
may fall off that list, he
said. That does not bode
well for the marketability
for the degrees of our
students.
Barrett-Gonzalez
said
he is worried that research
funding is already at

risk because the state is


borrowing funds from the
Kansas Department of
Transportation fund.
If we, as the state, are
having to borrow just to pay
our bills, it does not bode
well for research dollars,
Barrett-Gonzalez said.
Barrett-Gonzalez
and Tracy said they are
worried about how the new
presidential administration
will
handle
higher
education.
President

We dont know what


the new administration in
Washington has planned
for
higher
education,
Tracy said.
The appointment of
Betsy Devos as Secretary
of Education is highly
controversial
amongst
administrators, Tracy said.
Some dont believe that she
has enough experience in
higher education to hold
the office.
Some areas are less likely
to be affected than others.
The National Institute of
Healths funding, which
contributes to a large part
of funding for medical
research, is not expected to
decrease.

Edited by Omar
Sanchez

opinion
FREE-FOR-ALL
WE HEAR
FROM YOU

KANSAN.COM | MONDAY JAN. 30, 2017

Are you trying to talk


to me?
Ive heard that Angry
Birds is run by our
government to keep
track of us.
What will happen if
we lose guac because
of the 20% tax? I will
riot!
This year may be off
to a bumpy start, but
at least it isnt the early
2000s when BumpIts
were a trend.
4 words 12 letters say
it and youre mine,
you want a ride?
Guac saved my life
today
Perks of today: I did
not get a parking
ticket.
Humans are the
worst fucking people.
I swear it on every
testament.
I loathe my parents
for not making do
dance classes as a
kid. I could be in the
School of Dance, but
unfortunately I am
uncoordinated and
talentless lmao

Illustration by Erica Gonzales

Liston: Trumps travel ban threatens


freedom of religion, must be opposed

Most of my days
include 4 cups of
coffee, 1 meal and 5
hours of sleep. Its fine.
Just got a you up?
text at 1:30 pm...
F*** boys are truly
relentless.
I sent a Snapchat to
myself. HOW DID I
DO THAT?
Overheard at the bar:
Omg theres tequila
in my hair
This Instagram dog
has been on more
vacations than I
have
He drank every
time they said blue
bloods on espn. He
was dead before the
game started.

RYAN LISTON
@rliston235

any
people
standing outside
of airports this
weekend were not awaiting
the arrival of family and
friends, but were protesting
President Donald Trumps
travel ban on seven Muslimmajority countries. They
brought signs instead of
luggage and voiced their

Drinking to forget the


pain of the heels Im
wearing

If youre ever unsure


of someone just ask:
how many puppies
are too many? If they
give you a number,
stop talking to them.
To send in an FFA,
text 785-289-8351

READ MORE AT
KANSAN.COM
@KANSANNEWS
/THEKANSAN
KANSAN.NEWS
@UNIVERSITY
DAILYKANSAN

Yet the vast majority of Muslims are not terrorists. Their


faith does not lead them to
violence. Those traveling to
the U.S do so for a number of
reasons, including to escape
violence and acts of terror in
their home countries.
Furthermore,
Trumps
travel ban threatens freedom of religion throughout
the country. Discrimination
and persecution of people for
their religious beliefs have
been opposed in this country
since its founding. Banning
people from Muslim-majority nations exemplifies such
discrimination.
Defending freedom of religion in this country should
not be a partisan issue. Even
some Republicans are criticizing Trumps travel ban,
including Sen. John McCain
(R-Arizona), who believes

this travel ban could help


ISIS recruit and push anti-American views. Everyone
in the U.S. has a right to practice their faith and the U.S.
must not exclude those who
hold ideals that deviate from

Everyone in the
U.S. has a right
to practice their
faith, and the
U.S. must not
exclude those
who hold ideals
that deviate.

the Christian majority from


entering the country.
The aforementioned ruling is a small victory toward
eliminating the executive
order altogether. However,

many people remain unable


to travel into the U.S. Trump
and his administration almost certainly will not back
off of the ban until a permanent ruling is reached on its
constitutionality.
Protesting Trump can
help raise awareness to his
actions that have dangerous
implications, as the Womens Marches and the airport
protests have now shown.
We need to continue to stand
up in opposition to the travel ban if we hope to protect
people from all over the
world and allow them into
our diverse nation, as well as
to ensure our own freedom of
religion.
Ryan Liston is a Sophomore from Lawrence studying Journalism and Political
Science.

Kassebaum: Todays GOP needs moderation

Three redheads walk


into a bar. Theres not
a soul in sight.

Your claim to fame is


that you know all the
words to Ice Ice Baby.

outrage.
Trumps travel ban pertains to anyone who is a citizen of, or was born in, Iraq,
Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia,
Sudan and Yemen. Some of
the people traveling to the
United States were detained
at airports across the country
on Saturday before a federal
judge ruled to allow them
into the country. The ruling,
however, pertains only to individuals who had landed or
were in transit when Trump
signed the executive order
for the travel ban. The travel
ban is still in effect.
Trump rationalizes the
ban under the guise of national security. He stated
on the campaign trail that
the ban on Muslim-majority
countries is intended to protect the U.S. from terrorists
trying to enter the country.

NELLIE KASSEBAUM
@nelliekudk

Ill be honest 2017 Republicans make me upset.


Im not talking about Kansas
RINOs (Republicans in name
only): I mean the Republicans who won in November.
After major Republican
victories were seen in the
House, Senate and the presidency, these wins were widely broadcast as a huge revival
for Republicans.
I disagree.
With the eventual disappearance of the moderate

Republican, who generally


identify as a Democrat on
social issues and Republican
on fiscal and governmental
issues, these recent Republican victories were far-andwide for right-wing Republicans, who in no way promote
the values of the Republican
party my family was or is a
part of.
The Republican cornerstone ideal of limited government was admittedly nice
until the onset of globalization and concerns about our
environment became obvious. The concept of reduced
government spending was
also laudable until military
spending completely dominated government spending.
This idea of civil republicanism is beyond endangered. It certainly cant be
found on todays Republican
agenda. The Republican party of today has started to cling
to and promote the weakest,

most disturbing part of its


platform: social issues.
As passionately as a Republican voter will tell you
they voted straight ticket for
those cornerstone reasons,
they are simultaneously
supporting social issues that
have become not only intolerant, but dangerous.

They are ...


supporting social
issues that have
become not only
intolerant, but
dangerous.

The social platform of


the right-wing Republican
Party victors has long promoted its fervent belief in the
Second Amendment, opposition of gay marriage, and
anti-immigration policies.
The power that resulted from

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LETTER GUIDELINES: Send
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kansan.com/letters.

these recent victories was not


granted to moderate Republicans, but rather their rebranded party that seems to
violate the very foundations
of the Republican Party.
Even Ronald Reagan,
commonly thought of as a
Republican hero, sought to
provide amnesty to three
million illegal immigrants
and imagined an America
with open borders of Mexico
and Canada.
Trump and other newly
elected Republicans are taking power, and those who
voted a straight-Republican
ticket are still searching for
their representatives to take
a stand for fiscal conservation and limited government,
none of which Trump ran on,
nor do other Republican victors seem to support.
Not only were Republican
voters misled by thinking
their party representatives
would uphold the ideals of

CONTACT US
Lara Korte
Editor-in-chief
lkorte@kansan.com

Tucker Paine
Business Manager
tpaine@kansan.com

the Republican party, they


also supported these dangerous social policies simply
because an R was placed by
a candidates name. The apparent lack of research done
by todays Republican voters
is not only disturbing but an
honest insult to our voting
system.
This Republican party is
far from what it once was,
and the danger of its new social platform cannot be overstated. Political parties aside,
we must remain vigilant in
attempt to block this dangerous social agenda, from defunding Planned Parenthood
to striking down President
Trumps travel ban.

Nellie Kassebaum is a
sophomore from Burdick
studying English and public
policy.
Edited by Omar
Sanchez

THE KANSAN
EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan
Editorial Board are Lara
Korte,
Christian
Hardy,
Tucker Paine and Vince
Munoz.

@Kansan.News

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arts & culture


HOROSCOPES
WHATS YOUR
SIGN?

KANSAN.COM | MONDAY, JAN. 30, 2017

Why KU is the most Instagrammed spot in KS

Aries
(March 21-April 19)
Peace and quiet soothe
your spirit. Productivity behind closed doors satisfies.
An idealist needs to be
held to the facts... no excuses. Romance blossoms
through communication.
Taurus
(April 20-May 20)
Friends are especially
helpful. Set goals high,
and ask for support. More
is possible now. Dont be
intimidated. Invest in your
own dreams. Practice
makes perfect.
Gemini
(May 21-June 20)
A work challenge takes
focus. Take charge to grab
an opportunity. Team up
with a genius for a creative
partnership. Discuss future
options.
Cancer
(June 21-July 22)
Travel to discover a locale
youve been studying.
Choose your path carefully.
Be careful and thorough
to advance. Upgrade a
communications device to
increase security.
Leo
(July 23-Aug. 22)
Discuss numbers with your
partner. Keep accounts
and books current. Share
your concerns and support
each other to reach goals.
Someones saying nice
things about you.
Virgo
(Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You dont have to do
everything by yourself...
delegate! Find tasks that
you can give away. Make
and receive promises.
Schedule team actions and
strengthen infrastructure.
Libra
(Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
You can accomplish great
things. The previously impossible looks easy. Fulfill
promises youve made,
with attention to detail. Discuss dreams. Nurture your
health and happiness.
Scorpio
(Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You have a secret source
of power. Draw upon
hidden resources. Invest in
your business, and aim for
excellence. Its a good time
to sell.
Sagittarius
(Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Domestic comforts entice.
Putter in the garden. Cook
up something scrumptious.
Inspiration hits when you
least expect. Follow a
hunch. You can realize a
dream.
Capricorn
(Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Write and refine your thesis. You dont have to start
from scratch. Look at things
from a different angle.
Share your new view of an
old story.
Aquarius
(Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Write down your dreams,
stick to the budget and believe in your team. Provide
a spiritual component. This
idea could really grow into
a profitable venture.
Pisces
(Feb. 19-March 20)
Explore options, and
choose. Go for what you
want. Consider the consequences before acting...
all is not in view. Adapt
as you go. Accept divine
inspiration.

Photo contributed by Kirsten Lanpher


Picture of Anschutz Library by Kirsten Lanpher, an
administrativeassistant in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences,
that has been featured by on University social media.

COURTNEY BIERMAN
@courtbierman

he University is the
most frequently Instagrammed place in the
state of Kansas, according
to a USA Today article published last month. The University ranks above Kansas
State University, Childrens
Mercy Park and the Kansas Speedway as the states
most geotagged location.
The best photos of
campus can gain traction
through the use of #exploreKU on Instagram or
Twitter. Users can use the
hashtag with photos related
to being a Jayhawk. Photos of students forays into
Downtown Lawrence or
their study abroad experiences are included.
The Office of Public Affairs has been tracking #exploreKU since 2013. The
Universitys social media

Photo contributed by Dhanushka Weerasekara


This picture, taken near Anschutz Library by graduate
student Dhanushka Weerasekara, has been featured on

University social media.

team selects three standout photos every week and


reaches out to the photographers to ask for an interview and permission to use
their work. Its official social
media accounts then repost the photos with quotes
from the photographer, including an explanation of
where they were when they
snapped it.
Weve had posts that
do us great favor that do
the University great favor
but we also have people talk
about things that theyre really passionate about, Katie McCurry, senior digital
strategist for the Office of
Public Affairs, said.
McCurry said that #exploreKU is her favorite
University social media
campaign because it relies
solely on the perspective
of students, staff or anyone
else who sees something
unique in the University.

Because the content is user-generated, the photos


capture the authentic "Jayhawk experience," she said.
McCurry said she also
likes that amateur photographers produce most of
the content using their cell
phones.
Senior Brook Nasseri,
who has been featured using #exploreKU, regularly updates her Instagram
profile with pictures taken
on her iPhone, including
those of the University.
Landscapes are her favorite
thing to photograph, and
she said the beauty of campus provides her with plenty of opportunities even
if she's not using a fancy
camera.
"I also just kind of like
the challenge of using the
thing I have in my pocket to
try to capture something in
an interesting way," Nasseri
said.

Photo contributed by Coulton Thomas


Aerial photo of campus by junior Coulton Thomas that has been
featured on University social media.

Other
photographers
who use the hashtag take
a more professional approach.

I also just kind of


like the challenge of
using the thing I have
in my pocket to try to
capture something in
an interesting way
Brook Nasseri
senior

Graduate student and


avid photographer Dhanushka Weerasekara uses
a digital camera to take pictures of tiny details on campus that catch his eye, like
his picture from last month
of a stalk of wheat, illuminated by a sunbeam, which
was featured with #exploreKU. He said its small
things that make campus
beautiful to him.
A photo taken with an

iPhone of a Lawrence sunset, taken by junior Erin


Woods, was also featured
on #exloreKU last November.
Woods, who joined Instagram her sophomore year
of high school, said she likes
taking photos of campus
because the way she sees
her surroundings is always
changing.
Even looking at it every single day, its going
to change, Woods said.
Coming up the hill every
day, its never going to look
the same way twice.
106 users responded to a
Kansan Twitter poll asking
them to choose their favorite location for taking an Instagram photo of campus.
58 percent selected Allen
Fieldhouse, the Campanile and Potter Lake each
received 18 percent of the
vote, and six percent selected Fraser Hall.

In lecture, professor examines how the


Army ushers in social change in America
HANNAH COLEMAN
@hecoleman33

On Wednesday night,
history professor Beth Bailey gave a lecture at the
Kansas Union arguing that
the history and culture of
institutions in this case,
the U.S. Army can restrict or create opportunities for social change. The
lecture was titled The U.S.
Army and The Problem of
Race.
Bailey presented an
overview of what shes researching in her current
project. The yet-to-benamed book will discuss
how the U.S. Army, as an
institution, brought about
social change, especially
during the Vietnam War
and the years following,
when racial conflict was
prominent.
Chancellor Bernadette
Gray-Little was in attendance for the lecture.
Bailey is a scholar of
current U.S. history, specifically the history of the U.S.
military as well as gender
and sexuality.
Even before her interest in military history was
piqued, Bailey initially
worked on studying the history of gender and sexuality, which was the basis for
her book, Sex in the Heartland, a history of what she
refers to as the sexual revolution in Lawrence.
Without any family serving in the armed forces or
having any military train-

ing, Bailey had to start from


scratch when she switched
to studying military history.
What particularly interested Bailey about the
U.S. Army was its ability to
bring about social change,
especially during the 1960s,
a time where society struggled with major racial crises. In her book, she argues
that, in order to understand
changes that include race,
gender and sexuality, the
U.S. military has to be factored in.
The story that we generally get and the critically important piece of it is
that people fight for social
change, Bailey said. Social change then has to be
put into law, or it has to be
written into curriculum, or
it has to be implemented
through institutions ... it
has to be concrete.
Concerning the U.S.
Army, Bailey said that such
a large institution that
touched many young mens
lives was hit with a conflict
of racial tension.
[The U.S. Army] thinks
[the racial conflict] is important because its going
to disrupt combat readiness, so how did they try to
deal with it?, Bailey asked.
And what difference does
it make?"
She spoke on the hair
policy in the U.S. Army, and
how they tried to control
the hairstyles men were allowed to have, an important
factor in the 60s for black
men who were promoting

Caitlynn Salazar/KANSAN
University history professor Beth Bailey speaks to a member of the auidence after her lecture.

black pride, she said.


Bailey said she believes
that looking at these concepts is valuable when looking in a modern sense as
well.

The United States


military has a
lot to offer as an
object of historical
analysis, which
can lead to a better
understanding
of the American
society at large.
Marjorie Galelli
graduate student

I think whats important about looking at this is,


say, when we try to understand social change, when

we try to look at something


that is critically important
to American society, we
need to think about how institutions function, Bailey
said.
Graduate student Marjorie Galelli, in attendance for
the event, came to Kansas
specifically for Baileys expertise on the U.S. Military.
Galelli said she also
shares the same belief: that
the military is a large factor
in understanding the shaping of social change. For
Galelli, Bailey was a crucial
part of her understanding
the concepts of the U.S.
Military and the historiography comes with it.
The United States Military has a lot to offer as an
object of historical analysis,
which can lead to a better
understanding of the Amer-

ican society at large, Galelli said.


Wednesday night was
also Bailey's first inaugural
distinguished professor lecture. Bailey is one of 12 professors in the Foundation
Distinguished Professors, a
group put together by the
University to ensure that it
continues to make significant discoveries.
Moving forward, Bailey
will continue to work on
her book project, sifting
through pages of research,
and teaching, which she
said she believes is as good
a job as anyone can imagine.
Edited by Casey
Brown

ARTS & CULTURE

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SPORTS

KANSAN.COM

11

Kansas ends losing streak with win over Texas Tech


JARED ANDERSON
@JAnderson_383

an. 28, 2017 is a day


that Kansas coach
Brandon
Schneider
will remember forever.
After losing 27-straight
regular season conference
games, Kansas accomplished a feat it hadnt done
since March 2, 2015: they
won.
Fueled by a collective
team effort, Kansas defeated Texas Tech 66-60, ending its lengthy conference
win drought.
Everything seemed to go
right for Kansas, as the Jayhawks scored on their first
two possessions and didnt
look back.
The Jayhawks marched
onto the hardwood sporting their all-red jerseys in
support of Go Red For
Women, a day that strives
to raise awareness of heart
disease in women.
Kansas new look and
strides toward improvement were on full display.
Redshirt-junior guard
Jessica Washington led the
way for Kansas behind her
24-point, four-rebound and
two-assist showing. Sophomore guard Kylee Kopa-

tich a key piece whose


shooting has struggled this
season also stepped up in
a time of deep importance,
posting 14 points and four
rebounds.
While Washington and
Kopatich propelled the
team to triumph, creating
more scoring opportunities
was a sizable contributor
to the win as well, just as
Schneider predicted after
the loss to Oklahoma State.

I thought our
execution, in
terms of our
defensive plan,
was really good.
Brandon Schneider
Kansas Coach

I thought our execution, in terms of our defensive plan, was really good,
for the most part, all night,
Schneider said.
The Jayhawks valued
their possessions on the afternoon, giving up the ball
just seven times, while scoring eight points off of the
Red Raiders 14 turnovers.
Senior forward Caelynn
Manning-Allen played a
noteworthy role in manu-

Missy Minear/KANSAN
Kansas coach Brandon Schneider calls a play against Texas on Jan. 4. On Jan. 28, Kansas beat Texas Tech 66-60.

facturing some of Kansas


offensive possessions, as
she notched 10 points and
eight rebounds.
I thought [Manning-Allen] played really well,
Schneider said. She got six
offensive rebounds and I
remember not too long ago
at TCU, she didnt get any,

and I let her know that. Its


nice to see her activity level
and watch her keep some
balls alive too.
Texas Tech, a team that
has led the Big 12 in threepoint field goal percentage
and defending the three this
season, found itself struggling at the perimeter. The

FROM KENTUCKY
PAGE 11
guards
DeAaron
Fox
and Malik Monk could
be contained, but it was
a number of threes from
Kentucky forward Derek
Willis that kept Kentucky
within striking distance.
Willis finished with 18
points and 5-of-6 from
three-point range.
Fox and Monk finished
with 10 and 18 points,
respectively. At ESPNs
College
GameDays
showing in Rupp Arena
the morning of the game,
pundits debated whether
Monk could score over 25.
Kansas
confidence
seemed to wax and wane
with every possession of
the second half. At one
point, Jackson threw up
a hesitant three-point
attempt
that
missed.
Kansas renewed its lease
on the win on another,
when Mason caught an
alert pass from junior
guard Svi Mykhailiuk and

Red Raiders shot 3-of-17


from beyond the arc, generating an 18 percent threepoint field goal percentage,
compared to the Jayhawks
28 percent.
I thought we really
moved the ball well against
the zone, Schneider said.
We played through the

zone, instead of just around


it, and created some good
looks.
Kansas will look to build
off its momentum this
Wednesday at Oklahoma.
Tip-off is at 10:30 a.m.

reverted to a zone defense


and limited the damage.
Kansas fired back to within
five by halftime.

by the suspension of
sophomore
forward
Carlton Bragg Jr., in the
first half by throwing
freshman forward Mitch
Lightfoot
and
junior
forward Dwight Coleby
into the game for early
minutes. Coleby stayed in
the game to relieve Lucas
for a total of 10 minutes.
I think our guys are
really excitednot that
we played really great,
Self said. I think we were
really excited because
we didnt play great and
fought through and ended
up winning the game.
Due to a loss earlier in
the week to No. 18 West
Virginia, Kansas is likely
to fall in the rankings.
However, the win over
Kentucky will be a boost.
Things wont get any
easier for the Jayhawks as
they move forward into a
difficult home tilt against
No. 5 Baylor at Allen
Fieldhouse on Wednesday,
Feb. 1.

I thought this
could get ugly
really fast, I
thought it was
already ugly. I
dont think they
shot the ball
unbelievably well
by any stretch
early.

Bill Self
Kansas coach

Missy Minear/KANSAN
Junior guard Devonte Graham smiles in the final seconds of Kansas 79-73 victory over Kentucky in Rupp Arena
on Jan. 28.

hit a wide open three.


The Jayhawks threepoint shooting came alive
in the second half. The
Kansas backcourt found a
way to move the ball freely
and it paid off with a 58.8
percent shooting mark in
the second half.
Kansas only shot 26

percent from three on


the night, but its overall
mark was hampered by
poor shooting in the first
half. Kansas didnt make a
single three in the first half
before catching fire in the
second.
I find that, at time,
when
Im
practicing

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shooting with the guys


and theyre all making
threes that it gets kind of
contagious, Jackson said.
So I feel like that opened
it up for us a little bit it
was contagious.
Kentucky led by as
many as 12 points midway
through the first half. Self

housing

Oh, I thought this


could get ugly really fast,
Self said. I thought it
was already ugly. I dont
think they shot the ball
unbelievably well by any
stretch early, but we didnt
shoot it at all and we played
tight and they had all the
momentum.
Self managed his teams
lack of depth, exacerbated

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Kansas guards outshine Kentuckys at Rupp Arena


BRIAN MINI

@brianminimum

EXINGTON, Ky.
Usually when two unheralded recruits go up
against the best point guard
and second-best shooting
guard in their recruiting
class, the latter comes out
on top.
That is, unless you count
No. 2 Kansas win over No. 4
Kentucky.
Backcourt comparisons
dominated discussion surrounding Saturday nights
Kansas game against Kentucky when Jayhawk guards
senior Frank Mason III and
junior Devonte Graham
were slated to go up against
Kentuckys star freshmen
guards Malik Monk and
DeAaron Fox.
Prior
to
Saturdays
matchup, ESPN College
GameDay flashed a comparison of the two backcourts. The Kentucky crowd
went wild when the screen
showed Fox and Monks
point per game average,
38.1, almost five points
higher than the duo of Mason and Graham.
ESPN analyst Jay Bilas
even commented that Kentuckys Fox and Monk might
just be the greatest Kentucky backcourt of all time.
By the end of the game,
the narrative had flipped
and Kentuckys stars found
themselves on the losing
end of a scoring battle with
Kansas backcourt leaders.
When coach Bill Self
was asked about the experience of his guards, he said,
Frank and Devontethose
guys played with pretty good
poise down the stretch. Really good.

Missy Minear/KANSAN
Guards Frank Mason III and Devonte Graham stand together during a dead ball late in the second half against Kentucky. The Jayhawks defeated the Wildcats 79-73 in Rupp Arena.

The twosomes scoring


reflected that. 10 of Grahams 12 points and 13 of
Masons 21 came during
the second half after Kansas
found itself down five going
into halftime.
Masons rise from Towson-commit-turned-Jayhawk climbed even higher
on Saturday night against
two future NBA lottery
picks. After every marquee
game, Masons chances of
having his jersey hanging in
the Allen Fieldhouse rafters
seem to increase.
Graham struggled in
the first half, but Kentucky

guard Dominique Hawkins


said that Graham was able
to get to the basket and hit
second chance points as
well.
During the second half
with Kansas up by just two,
Graham ran up to freshman
guard Josh Jackson in the
corner, took the ball out of
his hands and proceeded to
hit a three-pointer at the top
of the key seconds later.
With 8:30 gone in the
second half, Graham had already outscored both Monk
and Fox, after the two had
scored 18 of Kentuckys 32
points in the first half.

Grahams display showed


two things: he wants to take
big shots with the game
close, and hes capable of
hitting them. After going
0-of-3 from deep in the first
half, Graham hit two of his
four three-point attempts in
a close second half.
I think we just believed
in each other, Mason said
about how the team overcame the poor three-point
shooting in the first half.
[We] started to drive the
ball down hill and stay in attack mode.
Kansas defensive game
plan involved switching to

and from zone, which helped


force five turnovers from
Monk, two from Fox and another three from sophomore
guard Isaiah Briscoe. Thats
just one more impressive accomplishment on the growing resumes of Mason and
Graham.
As for Kentuckys defensive against Kansas guards,
Mason and Graham were
able to capitalize by not forcing anything.
Coach tells us all the
time dont play to the mismatch or just move the ball
and it will naturally come.
So thats what we tried to

do, Jackson said.


Kansas backcourt wasnt
perfect themselves, the two
upperclassmen
finished
with a combined nine turnovers, but the high turnover
rate was a small price to pay
for a key win in Rupp Arena.
Theres still the heart of
conference play, the conference tournament, March
Madness and of course the
NBA Draft, but for a cold
Saturday in January, there
was no better duo than
Frank Mason and Devonte
Graham.

Similar origins, separate paths define KU and Kentucky


SKYLAR ROLSTAD
@SkyRolSports

LEXINGTON, Ky.
Kentucky basketball coach
John Calipari took a long
pause before answering the
last question in a news conference.
The conference was held
with a large group of reporters the day before his Kentucky Wildcats faced the Kansas Jayhawks in an annual
SEC-Big 12 matchup of the
top college basketball powers.
A reporter asked Calipari
a question that forced him to
take a side.
Which basketball tradition is richer: Kansas or Kentucky?
He went back in time to
illustrate the history Kansas
carries with it into games
like these. Calipari was an
assistant for Kansas under
coaches Ted Owens and Larry Brown from 1982 to 1985.
We were in Allen Fieldhouse in the old locker room
and they had, literally, a
shower that was 50 years old,
and Im thinking Phog Allen
showered in this shower,
Calipari said.
So they had a good shower and then they had that old
one. I always went in the old
one. And, you know, from
Wilt Chamberlain to you
think of JoJo [White], all the
guys that played there Im
hoping [former Kentucky
coach Joe B. Hall] was here
today, I know I was trying
to get those guys to come in
too.

File photo/KANSAN
Bill Self, Larry Brown, Ted Owens and Roy Williams come together to honor Allen Fieldhouses 60th anniversary.

Owens, Caliparis mentor,


would join the team at practice after the news conference.
Since Owens cultivated
a coaching mind that went
on to accomplish everything,
Calipari has operated a basketball mammoth in Lexington that didnt begin with
him and certainly wont end
either.
In Lexington, there is decidedly a more basketball
royalty feel to the program.
An image of former Wildcats Anthony Davis and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist smiling
on draft day springs off the
wall behind Calipari outside
Kentuckys practice gym.
At Kansas, images of
everyone from former Jayhawks Wilt Chamberlain to

Andrew Wiggins cover the


gallery near the Kansas locker room, with one common
theme: every player is pictured in a Kansas jersey.
Kansas subtly stratifies its
program from the rest of the
country.
The DeBruce Center
makes the arena look more
sleek, and perhaps Kansas
is stepping it up, but Allen
Fieldhouse is modest. The
knowledge that Chamberlain,
JoJo White or Paul Pierce
once occupied that rectangle
on the floor even if it wasnt
that specific hardwood is
enough to count it among the
venerated college basketball
arenas.
Rupp Arena isnt a cathedral. Its a factory.
Davis, Julius Randle and

John Wall played there. Rick


Pitino and Tubby Smith
coached there. The arena is
attached to a mall. A college
basketball museum is attached, and this one doesnt
hold anything written by Dr.
James Naismith.

A college
basketball
museum is
attached, and this
one doesnt hold
anything written
by Dr. James
Naismith.

Kansas and Kentuckys


basketball traditions stem
from a similar, coinciding
history. When Adolph Rupp

took to Kentucky, it was after


being a pupil of Kansas Phog
Allen, who revolutionized
basketball coaching.
Its only fitting that the
men who stand at the helm
of these two programs now
began at the same place: cutting their teeth as assistants at
Kansas. Calipari coached under both Owens and Brown.
Bill Self came to Kansas
shortly after Calipari left.
Self and Caliparis origins
may have been similar, but
their paths to success were
vastly different.
While Caliparis fledgling
head coaching career found
him coaching in an Elite Eight
and Final Four with UMass,
Selfs career had him recording the first winning season in
his three years as Oral Roberts coach. Self left Oral Roberts with an NIT Tournament
first-round appearance as his
biggest accomplishment.
Caliparis Kentucky machine is unabashed and its
also wildly successful.
After Caliparis Memphis
team fell to Kansas in the
2008 National Championship, Calipari hit back with
a win over Kansas with Kentucky in the 2012 national
title game. Selfs consistent
success over 14 years with
Kansas contrasts with Caliparis explosive success: three
Final Fours, an NCAA championship and an Elite Eight all
in eight years with Kentucky.
Much like Self or any
other successful college basketball coach, Calipari is a
respected celebrity in Lexing-

ton. But thats different, too.


Calipari hosts his own radio
show called Cal Cast, where
he most recently interviewed
Drake. He doesnt tweet at
halftime like Nebraska coach
Tim Miles, but whod be surprised if he did?
The Kentucky basketball
program wouldnt mean this
much without physical proof
of it either.
The team built a $7 million dorm for basketball
players in 2012 called the
Wildcat Coal Lodge. Kansas residence hall, McCarthy
Hall, cost more at $12 million, but it was built three
years later. The Jayhawks
last upgrade in the recruiting
arms race likely won them
Josh Jackson, who averages
15.5 points in an outstanding
freshman season.
A lot has changed since
these two programs were
born.
More than 4,000 games
have been won by Kansas
and Kentucky combined. The
internet wasnt invented, let
alone social media. And there
sure werent lavish residences
for basketball players when
Phog Allen and Adolph Rupp
were coaching.
But even as the modern
college basketball landscape
has grown into what it is today, the Kentucky and Kansas brands of basketball set
themselves apart.