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BC Forest Safety Council Qualified Trainer

Preparation Program Review


Certification Services August 2013
The BC Forest Safety Councils (BCFSC) Qualified Training Preparation
Program, submitted and received July 09 2013, cannot be approved as
submitted.
The following report, comprising feedback from technical as well as
curriculum development perspectives, outlines the barriers to acceptance for
the program. Many of the issues highlighted in this report were included in
the May 2013 review of the BC Forest Safety Councils Qualified
Supervisor/Trainer (QS/T) Preparation Program.
Production falling is a dangerous occupation, as illustrated by high injury and
fatality rates within the industry. Certified and experienced fallers possess a
wide array of skills and competencies, similar to many trades workers. The
ability to transfer those skills and competencies from one generation of
fallers to the next is critical to the safety of fallers as well as the ability to
maintain production.
The BC Forest Safety Council is encouraged to adopt training methodologies
that have been successfully implemented in other high-risk industries. Other
industries have adopted an apprenticeship model (referred to as Industry
Training), similar to the model that has been proposed by the BC Forest
Safety Council.
Despite advocating for an Industry Training model, the BC Forest Safety
Council has not addressed 3 core elements of this model:
1. needs analysis
2. instructional (trainer) competencies
3. ongoing quality assurance for the program
The report contains details around these three, and other, issues.

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Report Outline
1. Defined Objectives and Assessment
Training ......................................................Page 3
DACUM charts
2. BC Faller Training
Standard.................................................................................
.Page 5
3. Practicum...............................................................................
.............................Page 6
8 days
Certified Falling Supervisors
Selection of lessons
Core competencies
Lesson plan
4. Train-theTrainer....................................................................................
...........Page 8
Adult education modelling
Theory exam
5. Instructor
Manual...................................................................................
...........Page 10
Reference information
PowerPoint lecture
Duplication
6. Candidate
Manual...................................................................................
...........Page 11
Reference materials
Lecture materials
Sample documents
7. Review
Notes......................................................................................
...............Page 12
Duplication
BC Faller Training Standard (BCFTS)
Certified Faller Supervisor (CFS)
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Instructors
BC Faller Training Standard and other materials
Purpose
Train-the-Trainer
Quiz
Competencies
Other

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1. Defined Objectives and Assessment Training


DACUM charts
The first step in developing any training program is to identify what the
desired result is. This gap analysis examines the candidates current state of
knowledge, skills, and abilities; and compares it to a desired level of
knowledge, skills and abilities.
The obligation to conduct this analysis lies with the program, or course,
developer.
The following is an excerpt from the Institute for Credentialing Excellence ICE
1100:2010(E) Standard for Assessment Based Certificate Programs:
7.5The intended learning outcomes, content and design of the
education/training, delivery method, and assessment(s) shall be in alignment
[i.e., the content, design and delivery of the education/training shall be
appropriate for accomplishing the intended learning outcomes, and the
assessment(s) shall be appropriate for assessing participants
accomplishments of the intended learning outcomes].
7.6The intended learning outcomes and the knowledge, skills, and competencies
to be addressed in the education/training shall be determined systematically
based on an analysis of the need of the :
a. Participants;
b. Industry (as appropriate);
c. Consumers (as appropriate);
d. Other identified stakeholders
The procedure used to conduct this analysis shall be consistent with the
published purpose of the program. The procedure for selecting content for
the education/training shall include an analysis of participant and stakeholder
needs appropriate to the purpose, scope, and stakes of the certificate
program.

This analysis to determine required competencies can be achieved in a


variety of ways, including:
1. DACUM (an acronym for the process known as Developing a
Curriculum)
2. outcomes mapping
3. job analysis
Without an analysis of the required competencies, the training program will
not have appropriate learning activities or assessment(s). Additionally,
without defined objectives, the program will lack validity and reliability. In
other words, the results will not be consistently duplicated from one training
session to the next.
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This ability to replicate, or duplicate, is essential in any training program, but


particularly in a high risk occupation.
DACUM Charts:
Although Appendix A of the QT Preparation Program includes 2 charts titled
DACUM, neither one of these charts is a DACUM.
Page 119 is actually a program overview. Pages 122-123 is formatted as a
traditional DACUM chart but in application is an outline of the faller activities
located within the BC Faller Training Standard.
The Goals outlined in the left column are the modules/topics listed in order
from the BCFTC Standard (BCFTS). The Objectives outlined in the right rows
are not measurable competencies (per Blooms taxonomy). The most
significant gap in the DACUM charts submitted by the BC Forest Safety
Council is that none of the Goals or Objectives includes trainer
competencies.
Training of new fallers is the primary purpose of the Industry Trainer
program, so identified competencies must include instructional/trainer
competencies.
The foundation of any training program contains defined outcomes.
The QT Preparation Program has not identified the required
competencies of a Qualified Trainer, nor has it clearly identified the
learning outcomes.
Without this proper foundation, the Qualified Trainer Preparation
Program will not provide adequate training to, or assessment of, the
candidates within the program.

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2. BC Faller Training Standard


The BC Faller Training Standard is a faller training program developed in
2003 by WorkSafeBC in consultation with industry. The training program
includes an instructor manual (100+ pages and 90+ topics), a student
manual, and additional resources (videos, InfoFlip, log book, quizzes, and
exams). At the completion of the program, trainee fallers are eligible for
examination. The examination is known as the BC Faller Field Examination.
The QT Preparation Program states that the Faller Trainee, QT and QS/T will
fall in accordance with the BC Faller Training Standard; this is a misnomer as
the BC Faller Training Standard is a training program that includes
standardized processes (and is the standard for training Fallers in the
province of British Columbia) but it is not a Standard [something developed
and established by an authority as a rule for the measure of quantity, weight,
extent, value, or quality].
The Qualified Trainer (QT) Preparation Program states that an experienced
and certified faller is intimately familiar with the BC Faller Training Standard.
This is an assumption that Certification Services cannot accept. The
BC Forest Safety Council has not provided evidence to substantiate the claim
that experienced fallers are intimately familiar with the BC Faller Training
Standard.
Many of the experienced fallers who would qualify to become QTs or QS/Ts
would have been grandfathered into the program and would have only taken
the BC Faller Field Examination. This is likely the case for any faller with
more than 10 years experience.
Furthermore, if the experienced and certified faller was trained after 2003,
their experience with the BC Faller Training Standard would be from the
perspective of a student, not an instructor.
The time, learning activities, and assessment(s) dedicated to the BC
Faller Training Standard within the QT Preparation Program are
insufficient to ensure that the BC Faller Training Standard is
delivered properly.
The design of the practicum puts both the QT and Trainee faller at
risk, as the QT will be distracted by their lack of familiarity with the
training program.
In such a high hazard environment, it is not appropriate for the QT
candidate to deliver training, assessments, and provide
coaching/feedback for the first time in a field setting.
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3. Practicum
8 days
Certified Falling Supervisor
Selection of lessons
Core competencies
Lesson plan
The definition of a practicum is a course of study designed especially for the
preparation of teachers (instructors) and clinicians that involve supervised
practical application of previously studied theory. The BC Forest Safety
Council has elected to embed the train-the-trainer/adult education
components within the practicum component of the QT preparation program.
In principle this is an acceptable proposition, but in application the Train-theTrainer practicum submitted does not adequately address the required
competencies, or competency assessments, of a Qualified Trainer.
8 days:
Practicums are conducted under the direct supervision of a qualified person
for the entire period, however in the QT Preparation program; the QT
candidate is only under direct supervision for 8 days out of 30. The QT
Preparation Program states that during days 6-14 and 16-29 the QT
candidate will be under the supervision of the Certified Falling Supervisor
(CFS).
Certified Falling Supervisor:
This use of the CFS noted above raises questions and concerns, including:
how is the CFS trained to provide feedback to the QT candidate, & when and
how is the placement of a QT candidate coordinated with the CFS? The use of
the CFS within the practicum adds significant responsibilities to the CFS who
will require additional training to act as a preceptor [an expert who gives
practical experience and training to a student]. CFSs are already responsible
for developing the Block Falling Plan & Emergency Response plan,
coordinating and controlling falling activities in the block, conducting
inspections, coordinating other phases and general management.
Selection of lessons:
Practicums and other hands-on modes of instruction are accepted practices
in any psychomotor/kinesthetic based skill and task acquisition. However,
the principle of Progressive Skills Development [constructivist method or skill
acquisition from simple to complex] is still a requirement. In the context of
the QT Preparation Program, modules/topics/activities must be carefully
selected for the QT candidate to meet predetermined objectives before
moving to the next stage of the practicum.
Core Competencies:
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The QT Preparation Program does not appear to have applied methodology in


selecting which competencies must be achieved before moving to the next
stage.
Lesson plan:
1.1.3 Training Practicum section, states:
Agree who will deliver each topic over the five days in Segment 1. The QT
Candidate should take the lead and deliver the majority of topics. The QS/T may
deliver some topics to give the QT candidate a break and mix-up the delivery
from the Trainee Fallers perspective.
Discuss how the demonstration will work between the QS/T and the QT
candidate. Agree who will take the lead demonstrating and who will support with
questions and reinforcement of key messages.

Lesson plans utilized by the QS/T should explicitly state which core
competencies are to be demonstrated and assessed for every module of the
BC Faller Training Standard. Although 5 days of co-teaching (as submitted by
the BC Forest Safety Council) is not sufficient time for the QT candidate to
demonstrate enough skill to be left unsupervised; a more rigorous lesson
plan may enable the QS/T and QT to maximize the time allotted. Each
module of the BC Faller Training Standard requires the QT to utilize different
core instructional competencies to deliver the material.
Examples:
A1 Perform Faller Training Course Orientation requires lecture and
overhead questioning skills.
B3.2 Physical Well-Being and Musculoskeletal Injuries requires
demonstration and constructive feedback skills.
C4.3 Cutting Requires media technique, questioning, and
competency assessment skills.

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4. Train-the-Trainer
Adult education modelling
Theory exam
Adult education modelling:
When providing instruction in any discipline, it is critical to model best
practices of that discipline. While the Train-the-Trainer workshop submitted
by BC Forest Safety Council mentions certain principles of adult education, it
does not emulate them.
Examples include, but are not limited to:
The majority of the workshop is lecture based; research indicates that
the retention from passive learning of this kind is less than 30%.
Lectures are the most efficient way to deliver information, but they are
not the most efficient way to learn that information. Lectures are
instructor-centred, not learner-centred.
Page 24 Verbal instruction will be forgotten in a short period of time
Although acknowledged in the materials that verbal instruction is
easily forgotten, this is in the fact the primary mode of instruction in
the Train-the-Trainer workshop.
Page 30 Provide bite size pieces of information that can easily be
absorbed without information overload, confusion Although
acknowledged in the materials, the Train-the-Trainer theory is
delivered using lecture with 70 PowerPoint slides, over a period of 7.5
hours. This could be considered information overload.
Page 60 Provide Demonstrations. Allow hands-on practice time.
Conduct Assessment and provide feedback Although this is
acknowledged in the materials, the Train-the-trainer workshop does
not include this.

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Theory exam:
At the completion of the Train-the-Trainer workshop, there is Final Activity
(quiz) that includes a mix of matching and multiple choice items, or
questions. Since there are only 12 items in the quiz, the items should
correlate to the 12 most important key concepts from the workshop. Without
a test blueprint [defined cognitive objectives and assessment tools] it is
difficult to rationalize the items that were included in the exam.
Based on the items in the quiz, the following concepts are assessed
(feedback regarding the assessed concept is in bold font):
1. Characteristics of adult learners
2. Learning modes (based on Flemings VARK model)
a. This is a very abstract concept for this type of training.
3. Learning stages
a. It is unclear what the source material is as these stages
are different from the generally accepted 4 stages of
learning (to acquire competence).
4. Comparing Teaching, Presenting, and Coaching
a. It is unclear what the purpose of this question is or how it
relates to training fallers.
5. Some elements of starting a training session
6. Some elements of delivering a topic
7. Some elements of wrapping up a training session
a. The item and answers to this are incorrect, as wrapping
up a training session is not a defined step in a lesson
plan.
8. Effective ways of handling questions
a. This question is unclear.
9. Considerations for handling difficult situations
10.
11.

12.

Where do you find information to deliver a training session


Appropriate assessment tools
a. It is unclear what the source material for this question is.
Assessment tools should tie to Blooms Taxonomy.
Sequence for progressive skill development
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5. Instructor Manual
Reference information
PowerPoint lecture
Duplication
Reference information:
As identified in the May 2013 review of the QS/T program, the Instructor
Manual must include reference information, including page numbers and
sections, for the QS/T delivering the training. Since there are multiple
documents referenced throughout the course materials, it would be
extremely beneficial to the instructor to have a copy of the referenced
material embedded in the instructional materials. This would minimize the
amount of time spent moving between source materials in training sessions.
PowerPoint lecture:
When developing a lecture using PowerPoint, the key points should be listed
on slides, while the lecture in its entirety is listed in the Instructor Manual.
Within the QT Preparation Program, there is no consistency in the format of
the lecture. Some points are on the slide only; other sections are in the
manual only. Additionally, in some sections of the lecture, it is unclear if the
intention is for the text within the manual is to be read, or if the text is
simply notes to the instructor.
Duplication:
As identified in the May 2013 review of the QS/T materials, the overview of
the program is duplicated many times throughout the Instructor manual. It is
important for instructors and students to have a clear understanding of the
process; however this level of duplication is a distraction for an instructor
attempting to use the manual. The instructor manual is an important tool,
and should be designed with clarity in mind.

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6. Candidate Manual QT Candidate Reference Kit


Reference materials
Lecture materials
Sample documents
Reference materials:
The QT candidate requires a well laid-out lesson plan for the practicum. On
pages 52-57 of the Reference kit there is a condensed Agenda for the 30
days of delivery. If the QT candidate and the QS/T are coordinating delivering
of the BC Faller Training Standard, that must be documented.
The Reference kit should include lesson plans and the ability to document
which instructor (QT or QS/T) is delivering that particular lesson. Like the
instructor manual, the materials referenced within the manual should be
embedded into the manual.
Lecture materials:
The Train-The-Trainer workshop contains 70 PowerPoint slides. The slides are
the only reference material provided to the QT candidate for this theory
component. Many of the slides lack detailed information, so additional
resources should be provided to give context and background for each of the
slides. As classroom materials, the presentation materials should include
lined blank spaces for the candidate to take notes as required.
Sample documents:
Sample documents (such as the log book, and documentation for the Trainee
Faller) should be included within the Reference kit. It would be beneficial for
the QT candidate to have sample documentation that illustrated best
practices. Completed sample forms would make it clear the QT candidate
what the expectation is from the BC Forest Safety Council for the
documentation of Trainee Fallers.
A QT candidate could complete the QT Preparation Program without
utilizing the Reference kit. This illustrates the lack of utility of the
manual.

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7. Review Notes
The following pages include the original notes drafted by the writer while
reviewing the QT program. Some of the items are captured in sections 1-6
of the report, other items simply provide further examples of issues
identified in this report.

Duplication
BCFSC
CFS
Instructors
BC Faller Training Standard and other materials
Purpose
Train-the-Trainer
Quiz
Competencies
Other

Duplication:
Page 3 & Page 4 - graphic for describing the process for becoming a QT
is on both pages
Page 9 - Candidate handbook. This is identified previously on pages 5 &
8
Page 15 Overview and Confirm Qualifications Met section previously
outlined on pages 5-10
Page 15 Enroll Selected Candidates section previously outlined on
page 8
Page 20- Train the Trainer identified previously on page 6
Page 62 Train the Trainer as identified on page 20
Page 64 Overview of the Train-the-Trainer Practicum
Page 65 Train the Trainer Practicum Objectives
BCFSC:
Page 13 A BCFSC policy is referenced for the ongoing auditing of QTs.
Where is this policy located and what does it entail?
Certified Falling Supervisor (CFS):
Page 4 - The Certified Falling Supervisor is identified as being responsible to
oversee the site and falling activities during the training practicum. There is
no training and/or materials available to the CFS or any indication that they
will receive training to conduct this level of supervision. The level and quality
of supervision required of two workers in training will be significantly higher
than the supervision of two fully trained and certified workers.
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Pages 65-70 Where is the reference material for the CFS?


Instructors:
Page 65 Instructor requirements and responsibilities These responsibilities
should be made clear and/or the contract should be included with the course
submission.
Program and Defining Objectives:
Page 5 During the Screen and Enroll stage, conducted by administrators at
BCFSC, references are checked to confirm the candidates aptitude for
training. What questions will be asked of the candidates references to
confirm an aptitude for training? Prior training experience has not been
identified as a prerequisite, so how would the referee be able to speak to the
candidates aptitude?
BC Faller Training Standard & other materials:
Page 5 & Page 16 Within the program overview, it states that the purpose
of Step 2 is to prepare the candidate to deliver the BC Faller Training
Standard Course... including course learning objectives, delivery model,
assessment tool and support material. However, in reviewing the Instructor
Manual for the QT program, the only learning activity is an unguided review
within a 90 minute lecture. It is important to note that the BC Faller training
standard is 100+ pages with 98+ topics. Most of the topics have learning
objectives and learner activities. It is impossible to review and discuss this
amount of material in a constructive way in the time allotted or methods
used.
Page 19 The learning objectives states QT Candidate will...have a plan to
assist them prepare and deliver the BC Faller Training Standard. It is
unclear if this is a written plan created by the candidate or the QS/T.
Additionally it is unclear when this plan would be created, discussed and
reviewed.
Page 5 Within the program overview, it states that Candidates will be
provided an information package... What does this package look like?
Page 8 under the Program Materials section, the student and instructor
guides for the BC Faller Training and Certification course are not listed as
required materials.
Page 26 Relevancy - In this lecture the QS/T directs the QT candidate to
stress the reason for each activity. This program does not include a lesson
that covers the rationale or purpose of each learning activity with the BC
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Faller Training Standard, subsequently how would the QT candidate be


prepared to stress the rationale?
Page 27 Explain Leaning Modes The lecture states that it is important to
incorporate as many learning modes as possible into the lessons. Based on
Slide 16, how will the QT have the knowledge, skill or ability to assess when
and how changes should be made to the BC Faller Training Standard?
What is the source material for the following statement Trying differing ways
to explain concepts will increase the Candidates effectiveness for
transferring knowledge/skill? In a psychomotor/kinesthetic skill, (like falling
a tree) skill acquisition should be through repeated application of the skill,
not by having the instructor explain something multiple ways.
Page 29 Discuss tips for Teaching Keep the Trainee Faller engaged and
focused. Have a steady amount of work assignments to keep active and pose
questions to keep them thinking and analyzing Within the 98+ plus topics
there should be more examples provided as it relates to faller training. This
highlights the need for inclusion of an extended review of the BC Faller
Training Standard section. Additionally, there may be certain sections of the
training in which it is not appropriate to add additional work load to the
trainee.
Page 30 Tips for teaching Avoid overwhelming the Trainee Faller with
alternatives or extra information that detracts from the core, critical
elements How will the QT candidate know which elements are core & critical
without additional education on the format of the BC Faller Training
Standard?
Page 33- Challenge to expand skills while reinforcing the foundation skills
How will the QT candidate know which elements are core skills in accordance
with the BCFTS? A concern would be that the instructors bias would guide
them in determining (correctly or incorrectly) to what the core skills are. The
risk of this would be mitigated if additional education and training were
included the training program.
Page 41 44 Overview of the BCFTS It should be noted that the BCFTS is
not simply a standard (like an ANSI/CSA standard) but an entire program of
instruction. The materials submitted repeatedly imply that an experienced
faller will know the BCFTS materials. While an experienced faller may be
falling to a standard that would be successfully evaluated using the Field
Examination form; that fact alone does not equate to familiarity with the
BCFTS course materials. In the same that an experienced driver may be
driving to a standard that would result in success in a driving road test, that
fact alone would not equate to familiarity with a drivers training course.
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Assuming the candidate only takes 30 minutes for lunch, there is less than 2
hours allotted to review 98+ plus topics and 100+ pages of materials
contained in the BCFTS. The identified assessment of learning for the
candidate is that they will: identify learning objectives, length, instructional
materials, summarize how they will use the manual, and summarize how
they will deliver the topic during the Train-the-Trainer practicum. It would be
impossible in complete both the lecture and learning assessment in a
meaningful way within 2 hours.
For ease of use, the pages and sections of the BCFTS that are pertinent to
this review should be listed. Reference materials should also have specific
pages and sections referenced.
Page 54-55 - Page references should be included. Also the Preparation for
Training would be a worthwhile learning activity.
Page 63 Additional materials If there are additional resource materials
they should be clearly listed, and this should be reviewed within the
workshop, not at as part of the summary. It is not appropriate to introduce
new materials in a summary.
Purpose:
Page 3 This manual is intended to be an instructor guide, not an overview
of the QT program. The manuals purpose is not made clear in the
introduction.
Page 4 The goal identified is unclear. A clear goal statement would be:
Instruct New Faller Trainees in accordance with the BC Faller Training
Standard.
Page 4 The manual states the following The QT Preparation Program
offered by the BC Forest Safety Council (BCFSC) prepares QT candidates to
be designated a QT. The intention of this program is to train, assess, and
certify experienced fallers as Qualified Trainers. The lack of clearly defined
goals and objectives is a theme throughout the materials.
Page 5 Within the program overview, it states The purpose of Step 3 (Train
the Trainer practicum) is to build skill in preparing and delivering the BC
Faller Course... as per the BC Faller Standard...This includes applying the
principles of adult education. The intention of this program is it to train,
assess, and certify experienced fallers as Qualified Trainers.
Page 64 - Within the program overview, it states The purpose of Step 3
(Train the Trainer practicum) is to build skill in preparing and delivering the
BC Faller Course... as per the BC Faller Standard...This includes applying the
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principles of adult education. The intention of this program is it to train,


assess, and certify experienced fallers as Qualified Trainers.
Train-the-Trainer:
Page 6 Day 5 checkpoint How can the QT be signed off after 5 days of co
teaching? There are no set competencies identified (for example conducting
a lecture, demonstrations etc?). Additionally no test blue print has been
provided to explain why Days 5, 15, and 30 are appropriate assessment
days.
Page 14 The instructor/Evaluator section states A QS/T will be assigned by
the BCFSC...The QS/T will remain with the QT Candidate throughout the QT
Preparation Program. This is contrary what is explained on Page 6 (and
other sections). The QT candidate will be working with the CFS for 23 of 32
days of the QT Preparation Program.
Page 25 Motivation for Learning Within the 98+ plus topics there should
be more than 3 examples of how to motivate learners as it relates to Faller
training. This highlights the need for an extended Train-the-Trainer section.
Page 26 Explain the Characteristics of Adult Learners - Guide the Trainee
Faller to acquiring knowledge and skill what does this look like? Within the
98+ plus topics there should be more examples provided as it relates to
Faller training. This highlights the need for an extended review of the BC
Faller Training Standard section.
Page 39 Human Factors Within a very short time frame, QT candidates are
expected to have absorbed significant information regarding adult education
principles. In addition, 30 minutes has been allotted to review human factors
(HF). Provided that HFs are covered in the Falling Supervisor course, why has
this topic been deemed critical enough to add to an already condensed
workshop?
Page 49 Progressive Skills Development The lecture states each skill is
explained, demonstrated, performed and coached before moving to the next
skill. This method of developing skills and abilities is a cornerstone of adult
education; however Progressive Skills Development is not utilized when
training the QT candidates.
Quiz:
Page 59 Debrief It is contradictory to utilize a written theory exam as
evidence of competency, and then state Discuss any answers that were
different from the suggested solution. Avoid discussing right and wrong
answers and focus on ensuring the Candidates understanding...
Competencies:
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Page 10 The evaluation standards only identify one competency: delivery of


the BC Faller Training Standard. A test blueprint needs assessment and/or a
DACUM would identify that this 31 day program has more than one
competency.
Page 11 - The assessment of learning identified for the Train-the-Trainer
workshop is a quiz. This is an insufficient assessment of learning.
Furthermore, the measure states Candidate must demonstrate an
understanding of the subject matter.... Understanding is not a measurable
level of competency.
Page 13 - The Evaluation Section of the Instructor guide identifies a
Candidate Evaluation which is located in the Skills Assessment document. It
is unclear which document that is, or what the purpose is of identifying a
summative practical examination.
Page 14 What is the criteria that the Falling Manager will utilize to deem a
person competent?
Page 15 The-Train the-Trainer section states that the purpose of the
Workshop is to prepare...QT Candidate...to deliver...including understanding.
Understanding is not a measurable level of competency.
Page 30 The ability to provide clear and concise demonstrations is critical
when teaching psychomotor/kinesthetic skills. 3 lines within the entire
lecture are dedicated to this skill. Furthermore, the demonstration process is
typically referred to as the 3Ds, (or 4Ds) Demonstrate, Describe, Do. The
lack of explanation and practice of a key instructional competency again
highlights why additional training and education in the principles of adult
education is required for the QTs to become competent trainers.
Page 32 The tips outlined on pages 31/32 are key instructional
competencies that should be evaluated individually and feedback given. This
illustrates why additional training and education in the principles of adult
education is required for the QTs to become competent instructors.
Page 35 Handling Challenging Situations This is a key instructional
competency that should be evaluated. It is not sufficient to cover this skill in
2-3 slides, without a learning activity.
Page 49 Skills booklet Documentation and feedback to the Faller Trainee
is a core competency of QTs. It is not sufficient to cover this skill in 30
minutes through a passive lecture. A learning activity and assessment of
competency would be more appropriate. Additionally this section is briefly
dealing with two instructional competencies; documentation and feedback
which should be dealt with separately.
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Page 51 Critical Observation and Intervention Given the high risk nature
of production falling, the QTs must have significant judgement skills when
determining when and how to intervene. This is a competency that should be
practiced and evaluated previous to field practice (and exposure to multiple
hazards). It is not sufficient to simply review this competency in a single
PowerPoint, with the statement ensure safety.
Page 51 Constructive Feedback This is a skill that could easily be
practiced in a classroom setting. Again this is a core competency for
instructors, and highlights the need for additional education and training in
the principles of adult education for the QTs to become competent
instructors.
Page 57 Documentation of Training - Documentation and feedback to the
Faller Trainee is a core competency of QTs. It is not sufficient to cover this
skill in 60 minutes through a passive lecture. A learning activity and
assessment of competency would be more appropriate.
Pages 21, 46, 55, 58 (list is not inclusive) Assess/Evaluate the Candidate To
ensure that the candidate has adequately demonstrated competency by
naming, identifying, explaining etcetera, the suggested answers should be
clearly listed for the QS/T as a reference.
Other:
Page 14 Introductory paragraph for the Qualifications of a QS/T. The
wording is unclear and requires editing.
Page 14 Introductory paragraph for the QS/T Guide. The wording and
purpose is unclear and requires editing.
Page 24 Review Training Basics Verbal instruction will be forgotten in a
short period of time. Despite acknowledging this fact in the lecture, the
majority of the Train-the-Trainer workshop is verbal instruction.
Page 27 Respect The lecture states the Trainee Faller is your peer, an
equal. This is not reflective of the relationship, particularly when the QT is
supervising and evaluating the work of the Trainee Faller.
Page 30 - Delivering a Topic Provide bite size pieces of information that
can be easily absorbed without information overload, confusion or boredom
Despite acknowledging this fact in the lecture, the Train-the-Trainer workshop
is 7.5 hours of primarily lecture using 70 PowerPoint slides with virtually no
learning activities.

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Page 60 Slide 68 All points identified on this slide are technically correct
(organize and prepare, follow lesson plans, provide demonstrations, allow
hands on practice time, conduct assessment and provide feedback).
However, despite acknowledging these principles of adult education in the
lecture, the Train-the-Train workshop does not model them.

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