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Program and Course Catalog

CDU
CDU at a Glance
CDU serves Catholics and non-Catholics who
wish to learn more about the Catholic Church,
deepen their Faith, or pursue professional
­development in religious studies and
theology. For 25 years, CDU has
educated adults, including lay people, religious 25 Years of Leadership in Distance Education
sisters and brothers, priests, deacons, and
missionaries in 57 countries. Our unique
approach to learning provides adults an
accredited, high-quality academic experience
without the commute to a university campus.

CDU courses and programs include:


• M.A. in Theology with concentrations
in ­Ecclesial Service, Sacred Scripture,
­Philosophy/Theology, and Catholic Culture
• B.A. Completion Degree in Theology
• Catechetical Diploma
• Advanced Catechist Certificate
• Professional development in religious studies
• Catechist formation
• Adult faith enrichment

120 East Colonial Highway


Hamilton, Virginia 20158-9012
Toll Free: 1-888-254-4238 ext. 700 n Fax: 540-338-4788 n E-mail: admissions@cdu.edu n www.cdu.edu
Board of Trustees Trustees
Chairman of the Board Monsignor William J. Awalt
The Most Reverend Paul S. Loverde, D.D., S.T.L., J.C.L. Archdiocese of Washington
Bishop of Arlington Retired

Vice-Chairman for External Affairs The Most Reverend Michael J. Bransfield, D.D.

Joy
Russell B. Shaw Bishop of Wheeling-Charleston
Washington, DC
The Most Reverend John M. Dougherty, D.D., V.G.
Vice-Chairman for Mission Auxiliary Bishop of Scranton

from the
The Reverend. Paul F. deLadurantaye, S.T.D.
Secretary for Religious Education and Sacred Liturgy Jude P. Dougherty, Ph.D.
Diocese of Arlington Dean Emeritus,

Truth
Department of Philosophy
Secretary and Treasurer The Catholic University of America
Marianne Evans Mount, Ph.D.
President James P. Downey, Esquire
The Catholic Distance University Downey and Mayhugh
Warrenton, VA
The motto of CDU is Joy from the Truth, gaudium de veritate. In his
The Most Reverend Joseph W. Estabrook, D.D.
Apostolic Constitution Ex corde ecclesiae, John Paul II described ­Catholic Auxiliary Bishop
Archdiocese for Military Services, USA
­universities as coming from the heart of the Church. He stated that
Patricia F. B. Guntle
“[a Catholic university] shares that gaudium de veritate, so ­precious to
Great Falls, VA
St. Augustine, which is that joy of searching for, discovering and
Clarence Eugene Martin, III, K.M., Esquire
­communicating truth in every field of knowledge.” (Ex corde ecclesiae, art. 1) Martin and Seibert
Martinsburg, W VA

Judith Poppalardo, Esquire


Arlington, VA

Monsignor Peter J. Vaghi


Archdiocese of Washington
Pastor, Church of the Little Flower
Bethesda, MD
Contents
Introduction to CDU ......................................................................2
Accreditations & Memberships...................................7

General Information........................................................................8
Financial Aid...............................................................13
Military Assistance Programs......................................14
Tuition & Fees.............................................................15

Graduate Programs ........................................................................17


M.A. in Theology........................................................17

Undergraduate Programs ..............................................................26


B.A. Completion ........................................................26
Catechetical Diploma..................................................31

Continuing Education ..................................................................35


Advanced Catechist Certificate.................................36
Parish Plan ............................................................39
Noncredit Courses and Seminars...............................41

Course Descriptions........................................................................42
Graduate .....................................................................43
Undergraduate ............................................................51
Continuing Education ...............................................57
2009 Online Seminars................................................60

Faculty ............................................................................................62

Administration and Departments ................................................64

© 2009 The Catholic Distance University

CDU does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability or age in its programs and
services. Questions regarding the implementation of this policy may be addressed to the president. Tuition and
fees presented in this catalog are current from July 1, 2009 - June 31, 2010. The information in this catalog is
subject to change. Please visit cdu.edu for current information about policies, programs and courses.
2 Introduction to CDU

Introduction
We are living at a unique and exciting moment in the history of the Church.
Since the close of the Second Vatican Council, the Church has proclaimed Christ’s
invitation to share actively in His mission and respond to the universal call to holiness.

We need lifelong formation in the Word of God through an authentic, systematic


exploration of the mystery of Christ’s love. We are called to deepen our faith and, as we
embark upon the Third Millennium, to be familiar with the documents of the Second
Vatican Council, called by Pope Paul VI the Catechism of Modern Times.

CDU was established in 1983 to meet the needs of adults who recognize that religious
literacy is a lifelong process of growing in the knowledge and love of God. Responding to
the needs of modern people, CDU uses an increasingly popular educational format called
distance education. This provides adults with the opportunity to adapt the method, time,
and place of learning to their own situation and schedule.

Our curriculum includes Vatican II documents and abundant readings from Sacred
Scripture. The Catechism of the Catholic Church brings the Word of God to us in a
language and style rich in meaning for our day. It also is an integral component of the
entire curriculum and serves, along with the Bible, as a required text. In the words of
Christ himself, “The truth will make you free.” CDU’s singular mission is to bring the
truth of Christ and his Church to the world through various innovative methods of
distance education. We believe that CDU will assist you in your journey to live out the
fullness of God’s call to bring the Good News of Jesus Christ to a hungry world.
Introduction to CDU 3

Mission Statement For over twenty-five


years, CDU has educated
The Catholic Distance University (CDU) responds to the need for lifelong spiritual
adults worldwide
formation and a deeper knowledge of Church teaching. CDU’s mission calls for trans-
mitting faithfully and systematically the teachings of Sacred Scripture, the living including lay people,
Tradition of the Church, and the authentic Magisterium, as well as the spiritual heritage religious sisters and
of the Fathers, Doctors, and Saints.
brothers, priests, deacons,
CDU serves, in particular, Catholics who wish to deepen their faith and individuals who and missionaries.
want to pursue professional development: the laity, among them parents and catechists;
priests, permanent deacons, and religious. It also welcomes non-Catholics who wish to
CDU offers adults a
learn more about the Catholic Church. CDU offers degree and non-degree programs
using a variety of distance education technologies, including online courses and carefully designed
programs. curriculum of doctrinal,
moral, and spiritual
formation that combines
the convenience of
learning at home or at
work with the academic
benefits of a highly
qualified faculty.
4 Introduction to CDU

CDU History and Governance


The Catholic Distance University began May 13, 1983 as the first
catechetical institute in the United States to award the catechet-
ical diploma and teach the Faith to adults using modern distance
learning techniques. The late Bishop Thomas J. Welsh, then,
Bishop of Arlington, served as president and chairman of the
board of CDU from its founding in 1983 until June 2003. CDU is
now under the leadership of Bishop Paul S. Loverde, of Arlington,
Virginia.

In January 1986, CDU (formerly The Catholic Home Study


Institute) became accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the
Distance Education and Training Council in Washington, D.C., a
national accrediting agency for distance learning recognized by the
U.S. Department of Education. In 1984, CDU began offering
undergraduate credit for courses taken at CDU. Initially credit was
awarded through an affiliation with Gannon University.

CDU is certified by the State Council of Higher Education of


Virginia. In 2004, a new undergraduate BA in Theology Degree
Completion Program was accredited. CDU continues to attract
outstanding faculty from Catholic universities and seminaries. Its
international student body is comprised of laity (75%), and reli-
gious and clergy (25%) who represent all U.S. dioceses and 57
countries worldwide.

CDU is a nonprofit corporation in the Commonwealth of Virginia governed by a Board


of Trustees made up of Catholic clergy and laity under the leadership of the Bishop of
Arlington, in whose diocese CDU is based. As a catechetical institute, the bishop has the
authority to overrule board decisions in the areas of faith and morals.
Introduction to CDU 5

Distance Learning for Adults The Church has deep

Distance learning is a method of education in which instructors and students do not roots in distance learning.
meet in traditional classrooms. Instead, classrooms are recreated in a virtual course room The first distance
where lectures are presented, students ask questions, and course materials are discussed. educator in the Church

When choosing distance learning, adult learners can: was St. Paul who, in the
• Access coursework from anywhere first century A.D., wrote
When taking a course online, students can fully participate in group discussions epistles, or letters of
from home, on vacation, at a business destination, or anywhere that life may go.
• Relocate without changing colleges instruction, to the early
There is no need to withdraw and transfer to another university (risking the loss of Christian communities.
earned credits) if there is a move across the country or around the world. His epistles catechized the
• Schedule study time to meet needs
Online classes allow students to fit studies into the daily rhythms of a work week early Christians and
and natural preferences for day or night work. continue to catechize
• Eliminate the need for drive time, parking hassles and classroom dashes
today as part of divine
Distance learning allows students to concentrate on studies and not on complicated
arrangements for transportation and family care. Revelation.
• Learn at a pace that best fits learning styles and personalities
• Achieve educational goals when a job or family schedule doesn't allow for on-
campus classes and programs

Here are a few things to think about when considering distance education:
• Do you need a higher level degree for your job but don’t have the flexibility
to drive to a college campus several nights a week?
• Would you like the opportunity to continue your education at a time and
place that is convenient for your schedule?
• Does your current schedule simply not allow you to attend on-campus classes
every week?
• Are you comfortable using email and accessing the Internet?
• Is being part of a learning community something you value?
• Are you self-motivated?
• Do you feel comfortable trying new ways to learn?
• Does the opportunity to interact with adults from all over the world excite you?

If you answered "yes" to these questions, then distance education could be for you.
6 Introduction to CDU

“CDU is fulfilling an CDU Distance Learning Formats


important mission to
Online Group Courses
prepare adults to live out
CDU offers three-credit university courses on a semester basis, with classes beginning in
their Faith and to partici- September, January, and May. Classes meet asynchronously, which means ‘not at the
pate in the Church’s same time’, so students choose the time of day that is most convenient for them to log
into their course rooms. Each course is divided into 12 weekly lessons and requires a
mission of evangelization
proctored final exam. Most three-credit courses also require a term paper.
and to build up a culture
of life” Research shows that interactive group classes offer an optimal learning environment.
Melissa Gobs Our unique course room design encourages interaction with the professor and other
DRE Arlington Diocese students. Each course room is like a classroom: each week a lecture is presented for
students to read and there is an area for discussing the lecture by posting questions and
responses. The course room is available 24-hours a day which means students can study
at a time that best fits their schedule.

Online Seminars
These seminars are designed in three-weekly lessons where students read the lecture,
post discussion and questions, and complete a one-page paper at the end of the seminar..
When taking for academic credit, a term paper is required. These seminars are open to
degree-earning, university level students as well as other adults who are interested in
learning more about the Catholic Faith.

Online Individual Courses


CDU’s Catechism series is offered in the online individual format. These courses allow
students to work at their own pace under the direction of a course instructor. Within 48
hours after enrolling, students taking online individual courses can access all course
materials and assignments online, have direct access to the course instructor, but do not
have the opportunity to interact with other students.

Paper Individual Courses


CDU also offers courses in a paper format with printed course material mailed to
students. Assignments are completed and sent to the course instructor for grading. Upon
completion of the course, students take a proctored exam and receive a grade.

Personal Help
No matter which course format you choose, personal help is always available, In fact,
many students have informed us that they received more personal attention from their
CDU courses through distance learning than they did for courses taught in a traditional
classroom.

Whether you are a teacher, parent, priest, religious sister, brother, permanent deacon,
college student, convert, or simply someone hungry to learn more about the Faith,
CDU makes distance learning easy, convenient, and inspiring.
Introduction to CDU 7

Accreditation and Membership


DETC
CDU is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education and
Training Council (DETC). The Accrediting Commission of DETC is recognized by the
U.S. Department of Education as a national accrediting agency. DETC is a recognized
member of the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). CDU is an insti-
tutional member of CHEA.

Military Tuition Programs


For military personnel and their spouses and dependents, CDU participates in tuition
reimbursement through the U.S. Department of Defense.

SCHEV
The State Council of Higher Education of Virginia (SCHEV) has certified CDU as a
private degree-granting institution in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Title IV School
The Secretary of Education has determined that The Catholic Distance University is an
eligible institution under The Higher Education Act of 1965. This recognition allows
students to consider deferment of certain federal student loans and possible tax credits
for tuition payments.

Veterans Adminstration Programs


For U.S. Military veterans, their spouses and dependents, CDU is a Yellow Ribbon
School and fully participates in tuition assistance program of the U.S. Veterans
Adminstration.

Vatican Congregation for the Clergy


The Vatican Congregation for the Clergy has authorized CDU to award the
Catechetical Diploma — a valuable teaching credential in the Church. CDU was the
first Catechetical Institute in the United States to award the Catechetical Diploma and
teach the Faith to adults using distance education.

NCCL and NCEA


The Catholic Distance University maintains an active membership in the National
Conference for Catechetical Leadership (NCCL) and The National Catholic
Educational Association (NCEA).

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB)


In the Lay Survey conducted by the USCCB, many respondents asked for information
on resources that would enable them to learn more about the Catholic faith, especially
for those who did not live near a Catholic academic institution. In response to this, the
Committee on the Laity surveyed all accredited Catholic colleges, universities, semi-
naries and schools of theology which offer classes to lay people through distance
learning. CDU is on the USCCB list of approved Catholic colleges and universities
offering distance education.
8 General Information

How to Apply to a CDU Program


CDU offers a flexible, year around application process for all programs. Admission
requirements vary depending on the program. Please see the program area for more
information: graduate programs begin on page 17; undergraduate programs on page 26;
continuing education on page 35.

How to Enroll In A Course/Seminar


CDU offers both a flexible year around, open enrollment system as well as trimester
based online courses. The most current information about course offerings is found at
cdu.edu.

Simply enroll online at cdu.edu, mail an enrollment form, or fax a completed enrollment
form to CDU along with the appropriate tuition payment. (Enrollment forms can be
downloaded from the CDU web site). Tuition may be paid by check, money order, or
credit card (Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express).

An email address is required to enroll in programs and courses at CDU. If you do not have
an email address, please contact our Admissions Department at admissions@cdu.edu or
1.888.254.4238 ext. 700 for assistance.

Course Schedules and Extensions


Online Courses
All courses taken in the online trimester-based format are designed to be completed in
fourteen weeks. Students enrolling in these courses should expect to spend 5-10 hours a
week completing lessons, participating in online discussions, and posting assignments.
Twelve weeks are allowed for coursework, one week is provided to study for the final
exam, and students take the proctored final exam in the fourteenth week. Students who
take courses online and would like to have printed course materials can print them
directly from their computers or have a commercial business provide this service. CDU
does not supply printed materials to students taking online courses.

Paper Courses
Six months is allowed for the completion of each graduate and undergraduate paper course.
More than twenty-five years-of experience in distance education has shown that CDU’s most
successful students typically complete their courses within four months.

If a student fails to complete a course in the time allowed, then the course is expired and
the student is required to enroll again in the same course at the later date. Full tuition is
charged and the student needs to submit all remaining course work. There will be a
charge for any course materials that need to be replaced. Please contact the program
registrar for more information.
General Information 9

Grading Scale Textbooks and Church


documents may be
CDU uses a numerical system of grading, without pluses or minuses. Course grades are
purchased from CDU’s
determined as follows:
online bookstore. For the
Numerical Grade Letter Grade Quality Point
most current information
90 - 100 A 4.0
80 - 89 B 3.0
about required textbooks,
70-79 C 2.0 prices and ordering
65-69 D 1.0 information, visit cdu.edu.
Below 65 F 0

Required Grade Averages


Undergraduate Level
To receive college credit at the undergraduate level, a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0
or higher must be achieved for each course. Similarly, to earn the BA in theology
completion degree or the catechetical diploma, an overall cumulative GPA of 2.0 or
higher is required. Undergraduate degree students who have a GPA of 1.0 or lower will
be on academic probation. Students on academic probation will be referred to the dean.

Graduate Level
Graduate students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to continue in the graduate
program and to be awarded the master’s degree. Students who have a GPA
lower than 3.0 will be on academic probation. Students on academic proba-
tion will be referred to the graduate dean.

Textbooks
The Catechism of the Catholic Church (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, Second
Edition) is a required text for all CDU courses.

A Catholic Bible is also a required text for all CDU courses. Certain translations are
more faithful to the meaning of the original, inspired texts than others, and some
versions may be designed to serve specific purposes (e.g. bible study). A good English
Bible for use in theological study is the Revised Standard Version-Catholic Edition
published by Ignatius Press.

Church documents are also available online at web sites including the Vatican’s web site
(vatican.va) and EWTN’s web site (ewtn.com).

Please note: a number of courses use the same textbooks, which results in a cost savings for students. CDU’s online bookstore is
serviced by a third party book provider, which sets its own shipping and handling policies. Visit cdu.edu to learn more.
10 General Information

Shipping and Handling from CDU


If you are enrolled in a paper course, CDU provides free postage and handling for course
materials shipped from CDU to addresses in the United States. Course materials sent
within the United States are shipped priority mail. For an extra charge, students can
receive them via Federal Express. Students outside the United States are required to pay
additional postage at the time of enrollment. Students are responsible for postage on
materials mailed to CDU. Non-course related items purchased from CDU are subject to
shipping and handling fees. The online bookstore charges shipping and handling at the
time of purchase.

Transcripts
An official transcript of courses completed for college credit will be issued by CDU to a
receiving institution at the request of the student. Official transcripts will be issued to
students in a sealed envelope or sent directly to a receiving institution. The fee for
sending a transcript is $10 per address and must be paid in advance. It is the student’s
responsibility to seek credit transfers for courses completed at CDU. Please contact the
registrar for more information.

Learning Differences
CDU recognizes that learning styles vary, and learning differences exist among students
capable of doing college work. CDU will attempt to accommodate differences on a case-
by-case basis and encourages students with special needs to alert Admissions in their
application. For example, extra time may be allotted for examinations for students with
diagnosed learning disabilities.

Students’ Rights and Responsibilities


CDU follows the letter and spirit of pertinent federal and state laws. CDU adheres to guide-
lines published by the Accrediting Commission of the DETC and takes seriously the
responsibility to provide high-quality education. In turn, students are expected to demon-
strate personal and intellectual honesty and to conform to all university rules and regulations.

CDU complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. No one
outside the university shall have access to, nor will the university disclose any information
from student records without the written consent of the student except to appropriate
personnel within the university, to officials of other institutions at the student’s request, to
accrediting agencies carrying out accrediting functions, or to persons in an emergency in
order to protect the health or safety of students or others. Only members of the university
staff acting in the student’s educational interest are allowed access to student records.
General Information 11

At its discretion, the university may provide directory information in accordance with
the provisions of the Act, including student name, address, telephone, date and place of
birth, major field of study, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, the most
recent educational institutions attended by the student, and participation in officially
recognized activities. Students may withhold directory information by notifying the
university in writing.

Academic Conduct Policy


The Catholic Distance University expects all students to conduct themselves in accord
with the Christian principles of justice and charity. Likewise, CDU will strive to treat
students with the same principles of justice and charity based on the Gospel of Jesus
Christ, from which it derives its mission and to which it bears witness. CDU will provide
due process in the investigation of any alleged infraction.

CDU defines academic misconduct to include the following actions:


• Any violation of the academic regulations.
• Cheating: the use of books, notes, or assistance from other students or the giving of such assistance
to fulfill requirements — tests, exams, or other course related work—unless specifically authorized
by the professor.
• Plagiarism: according to the MLA Handbook, “Plagiarism is the act of using another person’s ideas
or expressions in your writing without acknowledging the source...In short, to plagiarize is to give the
impression that you have written or thought something that you have in fact borrowed from someone
else...The most blatant form of plagiarism is to repeat as your own someone else’s sentences, more or
less verbatim...Other forms of plagiarism include repeating someone else’s particularly apt phrase
without appropriate acknowledgment, paraphrasing another person’s argument as your own, and
presenting another’s line of thinking in the development of an idea as though it were your own.”
(Joseph Gibaldi and Walter S. Acthlert, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, New York:
Modern Language Association of America, 1984).
• Obstruction: engagement in activities that interfere with the educational mission and programs of CDU.
• Falsification: the modification of academic records, information, or documents without proper
authorization.

Procedures for reporting and processing academic misconduct are as follows:


• The faculty member, administrator, or fellow students identifying the academic misconduct must
report the complaint in writing with appropriate evidence to the undergraduate or graduate dean. If the
dean decides that a hearing is warranted, the student will appear before the Academic Committee, the
dean, and a member of the student body appointed by the Academic Committee.
• If the Academic Committee finds that the student did indeed commit an act of academic misconduct,
it may impose one of the following penalties:
-Dismissal, whereby the student’s enrollment is immediately and permanently terminated.
-Suspension, whereby the student is asked to leave the university for a specified period of time,
ordinarily not less than six months. After this period of suspension, the student may reapply for
admission to the university.
12 General Information

-Disciplinary Probation, whereby a severe warning is issued to the student indicating that any
further instances of academic misconduct will warrant suspension or dismissal. Normally, this
penalty is rendered for a student’s first major violation of the academic misconduct policy. These
penalties are noted upon the student’s permanent record.
• The dean will inform the student in writing of the decision and clearly explain any penalty imposed.
• The student will have one week to appeal the decision to the president, who in turn will have one
week to render a final decision.

Academic Complaints
The occasion may arise where a student has a complaint against a faculty member or
administrator. In christian charity, the student should attempt to resolve the problem
privately and in an informal manner as follows:
• The student ought to confer first with the faculty member or administrator and discuss the issue of
concern.
• If the student still does not think his concern has been rectified, he may next confer with the appro-
priate superior of the faculty member or administrator in question, e.g. conferring with the
undergraduate dean over the conduct of a faculty member.
• If these initiatives are not successful, then the student ought to approach the president who will
investigate the student’s complaint and render a final course of action.

Faculty and Course Evaluations


When a course is completed, each student is strongly encouraged to complete a course
evaluation with a candid and honest evaluation of the course and the instructor. This
information is a vital part of the formal assessment process carried out by the university and
helps to improve course materials and instructor teaching skills, and to reward excellence.

Disciplinary Conduct Policy


Any member of the student body or the faculty and staff may bring an allegation of
serious or continued abusive behavior to the attention of the disciplinary committee.
Such allegations must be made in writing.

The disciplinary committee will determine whether the alleged conduct is appropriate
for investigation. If the committee members consider it to be serious enough to warrant
examination, they will gather evidence and take testimony from both the person
reporting the misconduct and the student accused of misconduct.

Both sides will have two weeks in which to present evidence about the case. The disci-
plinary committee will render a decision within one week of having received all
evidence, and will send written notification of its decision to all concerned parties. It
will also determine appropriate penalties, which may range from a period of probation to
expulsion from the university.

A final appeal may be made to the university president within one week of the discipli-
nary committee's decision. The determination of the president will be final and binding.
Student Complaint Against a Faculty Member
Financial Aid 13

The occasion may arise where a student has a complaint against an instructor or staff
member. In Christian charity, the student should attempt to resolve the problem
privately and in an informal manner. The student should confer first with the instructor
or staff member to discuss the issue of concern. If the student still does not think his
concern has been resolved, the student should contact the program registrar for assis-
tance in contacting the appropriate administrator: graduate registrar at cwolfe@cdu.edu or
undergraduate registrar at kwooddell@cdu.edu.If these initiatives are not successful, then
the student should contact in writing the president who will investigate the student’s
complaint and render a final course of action.

Financial Aid Options at CDU


The Catholic Distance University is committed to assisting students as they pursue a
CDU education. The university’s financial assistance programs are designed to help
students best match financial resources with the many options available. After a student
has made the best use of salary and savings, there are three options to help bridge any
financial gap that may exist between resources and tuition expenses.

Scholarships, Grants, and Other Sources


CDU encourages students to search for funding from scholarships, grants, military and
veterans tuition assistance, company tuition reimbursement, and parish/diocese tuition
assistance.

Payment Plans
CDU payment plan allows students to manage tuition payments with three or four
month payment plans for undergraduate and graduate single course enrollments. At the
time of enrollment, students select the option that best meets their budget needs. On or
about the 15th day of each month, installments will be charged to a designated credit
card/debit card (MasterCard, Visa, American Express or Discover) or students may send
checks or money orders for monthly payments. There is a $30 fee to cover processing a
payment plan and a down payment of $250 is required at the time of enrollment for both
graduate and undergraduate courses.

Sallie Mae Private Loans


If more funding is still needed, CDU encourages students to fill in the remaining need
with private loans. SallieMae partners with CDU to help students receive tuition loans
at favorable rates. Students work with Sallie Mae to structure length, terms, and pay-
back schedules to fit their needs. Log on to www.SallieMaeEdTrust.com/signature to learn
more about the Signature Student Loan to start the application process.
14 Military Assistance

Possible Tax Advantages


As a Title IV school, students can consider deferment of certain federal student loans
and possible tax credits for tuition payments, These tax credits can provide dollar-to-
dollar reductions in your final tax liability.
• The Lifetime Learning Tax Credit is a tax benefit equal to 20% of a family’s tuition
expenses, up to $10,000 for post secondary education and training.
• The Hope Tax Credit, worth up to $1,650, is available for first and second year
students enrolled at least half-time in a college program.
Students are encouraged to visit the IRS web site at www.irs.gov and talk to their
accountants to learn more about possible tax credits.

Military Assistance Programs


CDU works closely with
For over 25 years, CDU has provided educational opportunities to service members,
the Archdiocese for the
veterans, and members of military families. While many universities offer degree
Military Services, USA, programs for the military, CDU is one of the few that addresses the intellectual and spiri-
and other supporting tual hunger of our students as they come together to form a virtual community united in
a pursuit of knowledge, truth, and the love of God.
organizations to provide
the type of educational Active participation in government programs
opportunities most needed As a DETC accredited university, CDU is approved by the Department of Defense for
all branches of active duty military to receive tuition assistance (TA) and is approved for
by Catholic military and
the payment of VA educational benefits. To learn more about these programs, visit the
their families. U. S. Department of Defense web site.

Yellow Ribbon School


The Catholic Distance University (CDU) has entered into an agreement with the US
Department of Veterans Affairs making CDU students eligible for Yellow Ribbon program
benefits. The Yellow Ribbon GI Education Enhancement program is a provision of the
Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008. As a Yellow Ribbon school,
veterans and their dependents can take graduate level courses at CDU with tuition
expenses fully covered. As a Yellow Ribbon program school, undergraduate and graduate
tuition is fully covered for reimbursement. A special feature of this program allows
veterans to transfer the Yellow Ribbon Benefits to his/her dependents (spouse and child).

Knowledgeable military support office


Our staff has years of training and experience in meeting the unique financial and
academic needs of military members, veterans, and their families. They are fully trained
in government programs including tuition assistance and VA benefits and work closely
with service members and their families to maximize benefits available to them. To learn
more, call Carol Ciullo, Director of Admissions at 1.888.254.4238 ext. 700.
Tuition & Fees 15

Tuition & Fees CDU is not financially


supported by the Church.
Tuition is set by the Board of Trustees and is subject to change without notice. Tuition
Our tuition reflects the
for all courses and programs is accepted in U.S. currency only. Tuition may be paid with
Master Card, Visa, Discover Card, or American Express, a debit card bearing one of the cost of providing high
previous credit card logos, check, or money order. CDU does not bill for tuition, except quality, accredited
for pre-approved third-party payments (contact the finance office for pre-approval).
academic programs.
Tuition CDU’s tuition is still
Continuing Education $143 per course lower than many Catholic
Undergraduate Course (paper and online) $239 per credit hour universities.
Graduate Cours (paper and online) $390 per credit hour

Continuing Education online seminar $143 per seminar

Undergraduate online seminar $239 per seminar

Graduate online seminar $390 per seminar

Parish Plans See page 40 for fees

Program Application Fees (non-refundable)

Undergraduate Catechetical Diploma program $100

Advanced Catechist Certificate program $ 75

Bachelor of Arts degree completion program $100

Master of Arts degree program $150

Other Fees

Annual Technology Fee (all undergraduate and graduate students)* $154

Transfer from online to paper course (includes course materials) $ 95

Transfer from paper to online course $ 50

Three or four month payment plan $ 30

Copy of official transcript $ 10

Replacement of paper based course manual (undergraduate and graduate) $ 95

Replacement of paper based course manual (continuing education) $ 50

Tuition and fee schedule are effective 7.01.09-6.30.10. Students with CDU financial obligations at the completion of a course or a
degree program will not be awarded a degree, transcript, or course completion certificate until all financial obligations are met.

*All students enrolled in a graduate, undergraduate, or Catechetical Diploma course (online or paper) pay an annual fee of $154. The
fee is payable in the month of February for all students enrolled as of January 31 of that year. Students enrolling in a course after
January 31 of each year pay the annual fee in the month following their enrollment. The fee is charged to the student’s credit card
on file.
16 Tuition & Fees

CDU Satisfaction and Refund Policy


Online or Practicum (or any fixed-length academic degree course of 16 weeks or less)
If CDU is notified of cancellation within five calendar days after midnight of the day on which
the enrollment agreement is accepted, an applicant requesting cancellation in whatever manner
within this time will be given a refund of all tuition paid to CDU. Students requesting cancella-
tion during subsequent weeks from a start date are entitled to the following:

Published length of course Refundable tuition due after

1-6 weeks 1st week=70% 2nd week=40% 3rd week=20% 4th week= 0%
1st week=80% 2nd week=60% 3rd week=40% 4th week= 20%
7-10 weeks
5th week=0%
1st week=80% 2nd week=70% 3rd week=60% 4th week=50%
11-16 weeks 5th week=40% 6th week=30% 7th week=20% 8th week=10%
9th week= 0%

*Refundable tuition is the total course tuition minus the registration fee. The registration fee may be either
$75 or 20% of the total course tuition, not to exceed $200

Paper Courses (for graduate and undergraduate)


We believe you will be completely satisfied with your course. However, if for any reason
you discontinue your studies during the period of enrollment (six months), the
University has established this liberal cancellation and refund policy for your protection.
A student may terminate an enrollment at any time by notifying the University (prefer-
ably in writing).

If CDU is notified of cancellation within five (5) calendar days after midnight of the day
on which the enrollment agreement is accepted, an applicant requesting cancellation in
whatever manner within this time will be given a refund of all money paid to CDU.

From five calendar days after midnight on the day on which the enrollment agreement is
accepted and until the time the University receives the first completed lesson assign-
ment from the student, upon cancellation, the University is entitled to a registration fee
of $75 or 20% of tuition, whichever amount is higher, not to exceed $200.

After the University receives the first completed lesson assignment and until the student
completes half of the course, if the student requests cancellation, the school shall be
entitled to the registration fee and charge which shall not exceed the following:
• Up to and including completion of the first 10% of the course, 10% of the tuition
after deducting the registration fee.
• After completing more than 10% of the course and up to and including completion of
25% of the course, 25% of the tuition after deducting the registration fee.
• After completing more than 25% of the course and up to and including completion of
50% of the course, 50% of the tuition after deducting the registration fee.
If the student completes more than half of the course, the University shall be entitled to
retain the total course tuition.
Master of Arts in Theology 17

Graduate Programs

Graduate Programs
Master of Arts in Theology
CDU’s Master of Arts in Theology provides serious study of dogmatic, moral, and sacra-
mental theology, philosophy, spirituality, and Church history. Many students choose the
M.A. solely as a way to increase their knowledge of the Catholic faith, as well as to bring
that knowledge to their families, careers, or individual lives. The M.A. program is also
useful for individuals seeking careers in Church work, or who are already involved in
teaching or religious education, or are preparing for a religious vocation.

Students select from four areas of concentration when earning a M.A. from CDU. These
concentrations enable students to give practical application to their degree. After
completing the core curriculum that provides a solid foundation in Catholic theology, M.A.
students focus in one of the concentration areas: Sacred Scripture, Philosophy/Theology,
Ecclesial Service, or Catholic Culture
18 Master of Arts in Theology

Admission Requirements for M.A. in Theology


• An application form and $150 non-refundable application fee
• Proof of a bachelor’s degree in any academic discipline from an institution accredited by
an agency recognized by the United States Department of Education or equivalent for
non-U. S. schools
• Official transcripts giving proof of the highest degree earned
(Transcripts must be sent directly to CDU from the issuing institution; send to
Director of Admissions, The Catholic Distance University, 120 East Colonial
Highway, Hamilton, VA 20158-9012)
• Completion of the prerequisite course, Introduction to Christianity, unless granted a waiver

General Program Requirements for M.A. in Theology


• Completion of the 19 credits of core curriculum courses (includes Graduate Academic
Skills)
• In consultation with faculty advisor, select a concentration and complete 15 credits in
concentration and 5 credits in electives
• Completion of Graduate Academic Skills (a 1-credit course that extends over three
years and is included in core requirements)
• Pass a written comprehensive exam that includes all core courses
• Pass a written comprehensive exam that includes all concentration courses
• Completion of a research paper of approximately thirty pages on a topic in the
concentration, to be submitted after all course work is completed. Students enroll in
Thesis Direction and consult with their advisor to select a topic and finish within six
months.

CDU is truly a learner-centered institu-


tion that makes lifelong learning in the
faith not only a goal, but a reality for
thousands of Catholic adults worldwide
who are earning accredited degrees,
certificates, and diplomas without
leaving the comfort of home.
Master of Arts in Theology 19

Prerequisite Course for M.A. in Theology

Course No. Course Title Credits

206-0106 Introduction to Christianity 0

This course is online. Occasionally students qualify for a waiver for the prerequisite course. To receive a waiver, a letter must be submitted
to the graduate dean presenting evidence, such as a syllabus or transcript, indicating sufficient background

Core Curriculum for M.A. in Theology

Graduate Programs
Complete all 5 three credit courses, 3 one credit courses, and Graduate Academic Skills; all courses are
online

Course No. Course Title Credits

216-0101G God, Man, and Universe 3

206-2301 Introduction to Christology 3

206-1001 Theology of the Church 3

206-0307 Fundamental Moral Theology 3

206-0204 Theology of the Sacraments 3

206-1203 Philosophy for Theology I: Augustine’s and the Platonic Tradition 1

206-1204 Philosophy for Theology II: Aquinas and the Aristotelian Tradition 1

206-1205 Philosophy for Theology III: Modern Philosophy 1

206-1701 Graduate Academic Skills* 1

*Academic Skills (206-1701) is a 3-year course that all M.A. students enroll in at the beginning of the program. Tuition for this course
is a one-time, one-graduate-credit fee billed at the time of enrollment. All students are strongly encouraged to include a serious study of
scripture in their program, either as part of the concentration or among their electives.

Areas of Concentration for M.A. in Theology


Students will take 15 credits within the area of concentration, 5 credits of electives, plus
enrollment in Thesis Directions. Before selecting an area of concentration, students must get
approval from a faculty adviser. Usually, they should have completed more than half of the
core curriculum before declaring a concentration. Permission to select a concentration
begins with a message to the graduate registrar (gradregister@cdu.edu) who will monitor the
process and make sure all necessary steps occur in the proper order. Towards the end of
their programs, students should also contact the graduate registrar to arrange for approval
of a thesis proposal and supervision of the written thesis by a faculty advisor.
20 Master of Arts in Theology

Concentration: Theology for Ecclesial Service


This concentration is designed for people who currently work for or who intend to work
for the Catholic Church in a professional or volunteer capacity. Deacons, catechetical
leaders, Catholic school principals and teachers, music and liturgy directors, pastoral
associates, and those involved in social outreach programs will find this a rich and
helpful program in both theoretical and practical terms. Students who choose this
concentration will work closely with a faculty adviser to make sure that their studies
correspond to their personal goals.

Ecclesial Service Course List


Complete core curriculum (see page 19), 15 credits within concentration, 5 elective credits, and
enrollment in Thesis Direction; unless noted all courses are online

Course No Course Title Credits

204-1601 Practicum for Church Work Professionals 3

206-0306 Gospel of Life in Health and Medicine 3

206-0501 Church History, Part I 3

206-0502 Church History, Part II 3

206-0541 Catholic Martyrs of the Twentieth Century 3

206-0602 The Role of the Laity in the New Evangelization 3

206-0701 Survey of Catholic Spirituality 3

206-0902 Leadership for Catholic Adult Faith Formation 3

206-1101 Catholic Apologetics 3

206-1401 Introduction to the Church’s Social Teaching 3

206-1501 Introduction to Canon Law 3

206-2102 The Mind of John Paul II: Theology of the Body 3

206-2501 Principles of Ecclesial Service 3

201-0104 paper Madonna: Mary in the Catholic Tradition 3

201-0203 paper The Historical Development of Marriage 3

211-0901 paper General Catechetics: Methods and Materials 3

210-0000 Thesis Direction 0

Related online seminars (for current offerings see page 60 or cdu.edu) 1


Master of Arts in Theology 21

Concentration: Catholic Culture


In music, sculpture and painting, literature, and architecture, the Catholic tradition has
produced some of the world’s greatest works of art. Students in this concentration will
not only become more familiar with that great tradition, they will come to understand

Graduate Programs
how the products of the religious imagination express and are connected with the great
truths of the faith over the various historical periods in which the Church has added to
this proud heritage.

Catholic Culture Course List


Complete core curriculum (see page 19), and 15 credits within concentration, 5 elective credits, and
enrollment in Thesis Direction; all courses are online

Course No. Course Title Credits

206-0501 Church History, Part I 3


206-0502 Church History, Part II 3
206-0602 The Role of the Laity in the New Evangelization 3
206-0701 Survey of Catholic Spirituality 3
206-2202 Catholic Imagination 3
206-2203 Modern Catholic Literature 3
206-2204 Art, Architecture, and Sacred Spaces 3
206-2205 Sacred Music 3
206-2206 Dante 3
210-0000 Thesis Direction 0
Related online seminars (for current offerings see page 60 or cdu.edu) 1

Public witness to the way of Christ, as


found in the Gospel and upheld by the
Church’s Magisterium, shapes all aspects
of an institution’s life, both inside and
outside the classroom.
Pope Benedict XVI
22 Master of Arts in Theology

Concentration: Sacred Scripture


More than a mere book, the Bible is a virtual library of texts dating from the earliest
recorded history to the century following Christ’s death. Students in this concentration
will study the sacred texts and their relationship to other disciplines such as archeology,
history, theology, and hermeneutics. This program emphasizes both an accurate reading
of texts based on the best scholarship and the Bible’s position as a living document in
the Catholic tradition.

Sacred Scripture Course List


Complete core curriculum (see page 19), 15 credits within concentration, 5 elective
credits, and enrollment in Thesis Direction; students should take no more than 6 credits in a Biblical
language; all courses are online

Course No. Course Title Credits

206-0402 Introduction to Sacred Scripture 3

206-0403 Theology of Scripture 3

206-0410 Pentateuch 3

206-0420 History of Israel 3

206-0430 Prophets 3

206- 0440 The Book of Job 3

206-0451 The Gospel of St. John 3

206-0452 Synoptics 3

206-0460 Paul 3

206-0501 Church History, Part I 3

206-0502 Church History, Part II 3

206-0701 Survey of Catholic Spirituality 3

206-1801 Latin I 3

206-1802 Latin II 3

206-1803 Biblical Greek I 3

206-1804 Biblical Greek II 3

210-0000 Thesis Direction 0

Related online seminars (for current offerings see page 60 or cdu.edu) 1

Concentration: Philosophy/Theology
Master of Arts in Theology 23

The Catholic Church possesses a highly sophisticated and elaborate tradition of reflec-
tion on the relations between faith and reason. In this concentration, students will be
able to look deeply into the great figures in that tradition, from St. Paul to modern
philosophers and theologians, with an eye towards both a more profound theoretical
understanding as well as the application of theological and philosophical truths to some
of the urgent ethical and social questions of the modern world.

Philosophy/Theology Course List


Complete of core curriculum (see page 19), 15 credits within concentration, 5 elective credits, and

Graduate Programs
enrollment in Thesis Direction; all courses are online

Course No. Course Title Credits

206-0306 Gospel of Life in Health and Medicine 3

206-0501 Church History, Part I 3

206-0502 Church History, Part II 3

206-0541 Catholic Martyrs of the Twentieth Century 3

206-0602 The Role of the Laity in the New Evangelization 3

206- 0701 Survey of Catholic Spirituality 3

206-1101 Catholic Apologetics 3

206-1401 Introduction to the Church’s Social Teaching 3

206-1501 Introduction to Canon Law 3

206-1201 Truth of the World 3

206-1202 Special Topics in Christian Thought 3

206-2102 The Mind of John Paul II: Theology of the Body 3

210-0000 Thesis Direction 0

Related online seminars (for current offerings see page 60 or cdu.edu) 1


24 Master of Arts Theology

General M.A. Program Information

Transfer Credit and Work Experience


CDU normally accepts a maximum of six graduate credits in transfer, and credits must have
been earned no more than five years prior to transfer. The graduate dean makes the decision
regarding the transfer of credit. An official transcript is required. CDU does not grant grad-
uate credit for work experience. All students who take graduate courses and wish to receive
credit and/or a final grade report must have undergraduate transcripts on file.

Program Time Limits


Students accepted for the M.A. Program will have five years to complete degree
requirements.

Proctored Examinations
Final examinations and comprehensive examinations for graduate study must be proctored.
Each student provides CDU with the name, address, email address, and telephone number of
an appropriate person in his or her community who could serve as a proctor, such as a
teacher, priest, or sister. CDU will make arrangements to send an examination to the proctor.
Students are notified when examinations are sent. Proctors certify that the examination was
administered according to accepted procedures and return the examination to CDU for
grading. The time and place for administering the exam will be arranged between the
proctor and student.

Academic Probation
Students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to continue in the graduate program. Students
who have a GPA lower than 3.0 will be on academic probation. The graduate dean will
review incidents of academic probation on an individual basis. Students will remain on
academic probation until their GPA returns to a 3.0 or better. If students fail a course,
they may not retake the examination. At the discretion of the graduate dean, and in
consultation with the professor, students may rectify deficiencies by completing remedial
assignments and examinations. A course extension of one year will be granted (for a fee)
to complete all remedial work and any additional examinations. Upon failure of a
comprehensive examination, one retake examination will be allowed. Exceptions to
these regulations will be referred to the Academic Committee.

Leave of Absence
For serious reasons, a student may apply for a leave of absence until able to resume study.
During this leave, elapsed time does not accrue toward the maximum completion time
allowed for finishing the degree. A letter requesting leave should be addressed to the
graduate dean.

Graduate Library Resources


Course authors provide bibliographies and supplemental reading lists with course
materials. This information is useful for term papers and course work. Borrowing
privileges to full-time CDU students have been granted to Woodstock Theological
Master of Arts in Theology 25

Library, with 195,000 volumes and 700 periodicals. Local students may visit the
library in person and distant students may use the inter-library loan system. Full-
time program students are welcome to call the librarians for personal assistance. A

Graduate Programs
CDU student ID card is needed for library loans.

Delta Epsilon Tau: International Honor Society for Distance Learning


CDU, the first distance university in the Church to highlight academic achievement, is
Virginia’s Alpha Chapter of Delta Epsilon Tau. To be invited for admission into the
honor society, graduates must have demonstrated academic excellence by attaining an
overall GPA of 3.8 (on a 4.0 scale) during their graduate studies. Each student who
accepts the invitation to join the Delta Epsilon Tau Honor Society will receive an offi-
cial certificate of membership, a Delta Epsilon Tau Gold Key lapel pin, a congratulatory
letter, and a narrative of the Honor Society as well as reference letters (upon request).

Withdrawing From a Course or a Program


A student may terminate enrollment in the M.A. program or an individual course at any
time by notifying the university; however, a student is advised to do so in writing.
Refunds will be granted on request, according to the Program Satisfactory Policy (See
Section I on the Course Enrollment form and page 16 of this catalog.)

Taking Graduate Level Courses Without Applying to the Program


Are you working on a master’s degree at another school and need a theology course?
Or, an adult simply seeking greater knowledge of the Catholic faith? CDU offers the
option of taking graduate courses and seminars without applying to our academic
program. A copy of an undergraduate degree is all that is needed to enroll in a graduate
level courses. Assignments, testing, and tuition are the same for non-program students.
Any CDU graduate level course or seminar successfully completed can be applied toward
a CDU degree program. Beginning on page 43 of this catalog, you will find course
descriptions for graduate level courses offered at CDU.
26 Bachelor of Arts in Theology Completion Program

Undergraduate Programs

B.A. in Theology Degree Completion Program


CDU’s offers a degree completion program for a Bachelor of Arts degree in theology. It is
designed for students who have not yet earned a bachelor’s degree, but who have earned
a minimum of 90 undergraduate credits (including general education requirements.)
Once accepted into CDU’s program, they earn 36 additional credits in theology
enabling them to graduate with an accredited B.A. degree in theology.

This theology degree will help students expand their knowledge of the Catholic faith
and develop the skills needed to demonstrate competency in explaining the essential
teachings of the Catholic Church using sacred Scripture, sacred tradition, and
Magisterial documents, with emphasis on the Catechism of the Catholic Church and the
Documents of Vatican II.
Bachelor of Arts in Theology Completion Program 27

B.A. in Theology Admissions Requirements


• An application form and $100 non-refundable application fee
• Official transcript(s) from all prior accredited postsecondary education (recognized by
the United States Department of Education, or equivalent for non-U.S. schools).
Transcripts must be sent directly to CDU from the issuing institution(s); sent to
Director of Admissions, The Catholic Distance University, 120 East Colonial
Highway, VA 20158-9012.

Undergraduate Programs
• Acceptance into the program is either full or provisional. For full acceptance, the
applicant must have completed 90 general education credits including 46 core credits.
For provisional acceptance, the applicants must be working towards the completion of
the 90 required credits. CDU provides the opportunity to work on both at the same
time. To be accepted as a provisional student, 60 undergraduate credits must be
completed.

General Education Requirements Needed to Enroll in B.A. program


In order to qualify for acceptance into the B.A. degree completion program, students must
have completed 90 college credit hours including the 46 core academic requirements listed
below. Additional courses that complete the required 90 credit hours are electives. To assist
with calculating credits, a student may download the Basic Course Requirement Worksheet
in the B.A. program section of CDU’s web site (cdu.edu/pdfs/Requirements_Worksheet.pdf.)

Oral and Written Communications (English, Literature, Speech) 6

Social Sciences (History, Sociology, Economics, Political Science) 12

Natural Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Geology) 8

Math and Information Technology (Mathematics, Statistics, Computer Usage) 6

Foreign Languages (Modern, Classical) 6

Humanities and Fine Arts (Arts, Music, Philosophy) 6

Physical and Health Education 2

CDU offers the following online courses to meet general education requirements:

Course No. Course Title GE Area Credits

106-1801 Latin I* Foreign Languages 3


106-1802 Latin II* Foreign Languages 3
106-1803 Biblical Greek I* Foreign Languages 3
106-1804 Biblical Greek II* Foreign Languages 3
106-2501 Basic English Grammar and Composition I Oral and Written Comm. 3
106-2701 Western Civilization, Part I Social Sciences 3
106-2702 Western Civilization, Part II Social Sciences 3
*These language classes cannot be used for both foreign language general education requirements and BA program electives.
28 Bachelor of Arts in Theology Completion Program

College of Humanities & Sciences at Harrison Middleton University


CDU and the College of the Humanities and Sciences Harrison Middleton University
(CHUMSCI.edu) have formed a partnership that allows students to take additional or
supplemental courses from the College of the Humanities and Sciences Harrison Middleton
University to complete their general education requirements. Students completes a CDU
application for acceptance into the B.A. completion program. After preliminary acceptance
has been granted, the student will contact CHUMSCI and request a special CDU enroll-
ment form. This form allows the student to take courses at CDU's tuition rate. Upon
successful completion of a course, the credits will automatically transfer to the B.A. in
Theology Degree program at CDU. Students can also take CDU courses at the same time,
therefore working on all of their requirements together. To learn more, visit cdu.edu.

General Program Requirements for B.A. Completion Program


• Completion of 90 general education requirements including 46 core academic
requirements
• Completion of 36 credits at CDU to include 27 core credits and 8 elective credits
• Completion of required Undergraduate Academic Skills

Course Curriculum For B.A. Program

Required Course for B.A. in Theology


Complete all 9 three credit courses and Graduate Academic Skills; all courses are online

Course No.- Course Title Credits

106-0101 God, Man, and the Universe 3

106-0203 Sacraments: Masterworks of God 3

106-0304 Catholic Fundamental Moral Theology, Part A 3

106-0305 Catholic Fundamental Moral Theology, Part B 3

106-0404 Survey of the Old Testament 3

106-0406 Survey of the New Testament 3

106-0603 The Four Constitutions of Vatican II 3

106-1701 Undergraduate Academic Skills* 1

116-0102 Jesus Christ: God, Man, and Savior 3

116-0800 Fundamentals of Catholic Doctrine 3

*Academic Skills (106-1701) is a 3-year course that all B.A. students enroll in at the beginning of the program. Tuition for this course
is a one-time, one-undergraduate-credit fee billed at the time of enrollment. Many of these courses are also offered in paper format. Please
refer to undergraduate course descriptions that begin on page 51 of this catalog.
Bachelor of Arts in Theology Completion Program 29

Elective Courses for B.A. in Theology


Select from the courses below for a total of 8 required credits; unless noted, all courses are online

Course No. Course Title Credits

106-1801 Latin I 3

106-1802 Latin II 3

Undergraduate Programs
106-1803 Biblical Greek I 3

106-1804 Biblical Greek II 3

106-1101 Catholic Apologetics 3

106-0701 Survey of Catholic Spirituality 3

101- 0104 paper Madonna: Mary in the Catholic Tradition 3

101-0203 paper Historical Development of Marriage in the Church 3

101-0502 paper Early and Medieval Church History (paper format 101-0502) 3

101-0601 paper Vocation and Mission of the Laity (paper format 101-0601) 3

101-0901 paper General Catechetics: Methods and Materials 3

Related online seminar courses (for current listing see page 60 or cdu.edu) 1

Credit Transfer and Work Experience


For theology credits, CDU will accept a maximum of six transfer undergraduate credits,
providing they meet the requirements of the program (Catholic theology from a
Catholic institution). Credits must have been earned no more than five years prior to
transfer. If they are accepted, these six credits may apply to the 36 credits required for
the major in theology. An official transcript is required. CDU does not grant undergrad-
uate credit for work experience.

Proctored Examinations
Final examinations must be proctored. Students provide CDU with the name, address, tele-
phone number, and email address of one appropriate person in their community who could
serve as proctor, such as a librarian, teacher, priest, or sister. Students are notified when
examinations are sent to the proctor. Proctors certify that the examination was administered
according to accepted procedures and return the examination to CDU for grading. The time
and place for administering the exam will be arranged between the proctor and student.

Program Time Limits


Students accepted into the B.A. program have six years to complete the degree require-
ments. This applies to both full and provisional acceptance.
30 Bachelor of Arts in Theology Completion Program

Academic Probation
Undergraduate students are required to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher. An
undergraduate student whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 is automatically placed on
academic probation. During probation, a student must attain a semester GPA of at least
2.0; further, the student must raise the cumulative GPA to the 2.0 or higher level in
order to be removed from academic probation.

The undergraduate dean on an individual basis will review incidents of academic proba-
tion. Students will remain on academic probation until their grade point average returns
to 2.0 or better. If a student fails a course, he may not retake the examination. At the
discretion of the undergraduate dean, and in consultation with the professor, a student
may rectify deficiencies by completing remedial assignments and examinations. A course
extension of one year will be granted for a fee to complete all remedial work and any
additional examinations. Exceptions to these regulations will be referred to the
Academic Committee.

Leave of Absence
For serious reasons, a student may apply for a leave of absence until he or she is able to
resume study. During this leave, elapsed time does not accrue toward the maximum
completion time allowed for finishing the degree. A letter requesting leave should be
addressed to the graduate dean.

Undergraduate Library Resources


Course authors provide bibliographies and supplemental reading lists with course mate-
rials. This information is useful for term papers and course work. Borrowing privileges to
full-time CDU students have been granted to Woodstock Theological Library, with
195,000 volumes and 700 periodicals. Local students may visit the library in person and
distant students may use the inter-library loan system. Full-time program students are
welcome to call the librarians for personal assistance. A CDU student ID card is needed
for library loans.

Delta Epsilon Tau: International Honor Society for Distance Learning


CDU, the first distance university in the Church to highlight academic achievement in
distance education, holds Virginia’s Alpha Chapter of Delta Epsilon Tau. To be invited
for admission into the honor society, graduates must have demonstrated academic excel-
lence by attaining an overall GPA of 3.8 (on a 4.0 scale) during their undergraduate
studies.

Each honored graduate who accepts the invitation to join the Delta Epsilon Tau Honor
Society will receive an official certificate of membership, a Delta Epsilon Tau Gold Key
lapel pin, a congratulatory letter, and a narrative of the Honor Society, as well as refer-
ence letters (upon request).
Catechetical Diploma 31

Undergraduate Programs
The Catechetical Diploma

The Catechetical Diploma is for everyone. The final commission Christ gave to his
followers, to make disciples of all nations, is as true today as it was 2000 years ago. Each
person, from consecrated religious to business executive, is called to share the Gospel
message of God’s love.

CDU provides a systematic program of study to help lay volunteers, religious, priests,
parents, teachers and business leaders become true catechists— those trained to teach the
Faith with authority. Students who successfully complete this program of study will be
awarded a special ecclesiastical teaching certificate— the Catechetical Diploma, awarded
by the authority of the Vatican Congregation for the Clergy.
32 Catechetical Diploma

Admissions Requirements for Catechetical Diploma


• Complete an application form and submit with a non-refundable $100 application fee
to CDU
• Submit with the application, proof of a high school diploma and copy of a transcript
for any undergraduate credit work completed (a high school diploma is all that is
required to apply for this program)
• Submit a letter of recommendation from your parish priest with the application form

Program Requirements for Catechetical Diploma


• Completion of 36 credits – 33 core credits and 3 elective credits
• Catechetical project, such as an essay, research paper or lesson plan
• A comprehensive (closed-book) examination when all courses and project are
completed
• Completion of all requirements within 5 years from the date of acceptance into the
program

Course Curriculum for Catechetical Diploma


Required Courses for Catechetical Diploma
Complete all 11-three credit courses; unless noted, all courses are online

Course No. Course Title Credits

106-0101 God, Man, and the Universe 3

116-0102 Jesus Christ: God, Man, and Savior 3

106-0203 Sacraments: Masterworks of God 3

106-0304 Catholic Fundamental Moral Theology, Part A 3

106-0305 Catholic Fundamental Moral Theology, Part B 3

106-0404 Survey of the Old Testament 3

106-0406 Survey of the New Testament 3

106-0603 The Four Constitutions of Vatican II 3

106-0701 Survey of Catholic Spirituality 3

116-0800 Fundamentals of Catholic Doctrine 3

101-0901 paper General Catechetics: Methods and Materials 3


Catechetical Diploma 33

Elective Courses for Catechetical Diploma


Select from any ony of the courses below for a total of 3 elective credits

Course No. Course Title Credits

101-0104 paper Madonna: Mary in the Catholic Tradition 3


101-0203 paper Historical Development of Marriage in the Church 3

Undergraduate Programs
101-0401 paper Introduction to Sacred Scripture 3
101-0502 paper Early and Medieval Church History 3
101-0601 paper Vocation and Mission of the Laity 3
106-1101 online Catholic Apologetics 3
Related online seminars (for current listing see page 60 or cdu.edu) 1

Program Time Limits


Students accepted into the Catechetical Diploma Program have five years from the date
of acceptance to complete the requirements. CDU recommends, however, that students
try to complete the program earlier.

Academic Probation
To earn the Catechetical Diploma, an overall cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher must be
achieved. Students who earn a grade of D or F in one course (GPA of 1.0 or lower) will
be on academic probation. Students on academic probation will be referred to the dean
of catechetical programs. At the discretion of the dean, and in consultation with the
professor, a student may rectify deficiencies by completing remedial assignments and
examinations.

Proctored Examinations
Final examinations must be proctored. Students provides CDU with the name, address,
telephone number, and email address of one appropriate person in their community who
could serve as a proctor, such as a librarian, teacher, priest, or sister. Students are notified
when examinations are sent to the proctor. Proctors certify that the examination was
administered according to accepted procedures and return the examination to CDU for
grading. The time and place for administering the exam will be arranged between the
proctor and student.

Undergraduate Library Resources


Course authors provide bibliographies and supplemental reading lists with course mate-
rials. This information is useful for term papers and course work. Borrowing privileges to
full-time CDU students have been granted to Woodstock Theological Library, with
195,000 volumes and 700 periodicals. Local students may visit the library in person and
distant students may use the inter-library loan system. Full-time program students are
welcome to call the librarians for personal assistance. A CDU student ID card is needed
for library loans.
34 Catechetical Diploma

Taking undergraduate courses and seminars without applying to the program


CDU offers the option of earning undergraduate college credit without apply to a
program. Please refer to page 51 to view a complete list of undergraduate courses offered
by CDU. A copy of a high school diploma is all CDU requires for undergraduate courses.
Assignments, testing and tuition are the same for non-degree seeking students. Any
CDU undergraduate level course successfully completed can be applied toward a CDU
degree program.

CDU’s global
community
includes all 50
states and 57
countries
around the
world
Continuing Education 35

Continuing Education

Continuing Education
Faith formation is a lifelong journey. Just as we are required to stay current in our
professional lives, the Church calls us to continue growing in knowledge of our faith.
CDU’s continuing education programs offer adults carefully designed curriculum of
doctrinal, moral, and spiritual formation that combines high quality, faithful teachings in
a convenient distance learning format.

CDU’s Continuing Education Program includes the Advanced Catechist Certificate


program, online interactive seminars, Parish and Diocesan Plans, and non-degree courses
for adult enrichment and catechist formation in the Faith.
36 Advanced Catechist Certificate

The Advanced Catechist Certificate

Those who teach with authority change lives. Children, young people, and adults eagerly
respond to knowledgeable and trained catechists. This training takes commitment, dedi-
cation, confidence, and zeal. With the Advanced Catechist Certificate (A.C.C.) program,
CDU can help lay volunteers, religion teachers, and parents become true catechists –
those trained to teach the Faith with wisdom and knowledge.

Admissions Requirement for Advanced Catechist Certificate


• Complete an application and send with a non-refundable application fee of $75
to CDU. Application forms for the A.C.C. program are available at cdu.edu.
• Submit a letter of recommendation from your parish priest with the application form

Program Requirements for Advanced Catechist Certificate


• Completion of all 5 theology courses
• Completion of 2 catechetical methods courses, or the equivalent* in online seminars
• Completion of 2 scriptures courses, or the equivalent* in online seminars
• Completion of 2 elective courses, or the equivalent* in online seminars
*Two seminars are equivalent to 1 course

Course Curriculum for Advanced Catechist Certificate

Required Theology Courses


All 5 Catechism courses are required; these courses are offered in the online individual format

Course No. Course Title CEUs

306-0800 Introduction to the Catechism 2.0

306-0801 The Profession of Faith 2.0

306-0802 The Celebration of the Christian Mystery 3.0

306-0803 Life in Christ 3.0

306-0804 Christian Prayer 2.0


Advanced Catechist Certificate 37

Required Catechetical Methods Courses


Choose 2 courses or 4 related online seminars; these courses are offered in paper format

Course No. Course Title CEUs

301-0901 Catechetical Foundations: Part I 3.5

301-0902 Catechetical Foundations: Part II 3.5

301-0903 Catechetical Foundations: Part III 3.5

301-0904 Catechetical Foundations: Part IV 3.5

Continuing Education
Related online seminars (see page 60 or cdu.edu for current offerings) 1.0

Required Scripture Courses


Choose 2 courses or 4 related online seminars; these courses are offered in paper format

Course No. Course Title CEUs

301-0401 Introduction to the Bible: Part I 2.5

301-0402 Introduction to the Bible: Part II 3.0

301-0403 Wisdom: A Journey with God to God 3.5

Related online seminars (see page 60 or cdu.edu for current offerings) 1.0

Elective Courses
Choose 2 courses or 4 related online seminars; courses are offered in paper format only

Course No. Course Title CEUs

301-0601 Mary: Mother of the Redeemer, Mother of the Church 2.0

303-0501 Great Moments in Church History (EWTN) 5.0

303-0805 The Catholic Moral Challenge: For the New Millenium Part I(EWTN) 1.5

303-0806 The Catholic Moral Challenge:The Ten Commandments Part II(EWTN) 2.0

Related online seminars (see page 60 or cdu.edu for current offerings) 1.0

Program Time Limits


Students accepted into the Advanced Catechist Certificate program have four years from
the date of acceptance to complete the requirements.

Leave of Absence
For serious reasons, a student may apply for a leave of absence until he or she is able to
resume study. During this leave, elapsed time does not accrue toward the maximum
completion time allowed for finishing the degree. A letter requesting leave should be
addressed to the dean of catechetical programs.
38 Advanced Catechist Certificate

Withdrawing From a Course or a Program


A student may terminate enrollment in a course or program at any time by notifying the
university; however, a student is advised to do so in writing for his or her own protection.
Refunds will be granted on request, according to the program satisfactory policy. Written
withdrawal request should be sent to: Continuing Education Registrar, The Catholic
Distance University, 120 East Colonial Highway, Hamilton, VA 20158.

Diocesan Catechetical Certification


CDU partners with many dioceses to provide certification training for catechist. Our
program provides a faithful and systematic approach to Catholic doctrine, Sacred
Scripture, Catholic morality, and appropriate catechetical principles and methods.
Courses are offered using a distance learning format, so catechists have the flexibility to
work on certification from home eliminating the need to attend meetings and classes.
CDU’s Advanced Catechists Certificate is designed to exceed the clock hours of most
diocesan certification programs. Contact CDU’s Dean of Catechetical programs at
888.254.2542 ext. 709.
Parish Plan 39

Parish Plan Program

The Parish Plan is one of the many ways CDU has responded to the U.S. Bishops
concern that parishes create ways to encourage and help adult Catholics nourish and
grow in their faith - a faith that is "living, explicit, and fruitful." While it is called a
parish plan, it is designed to be effective within any group including religious communi-
ties and non-parish based apostolates such as Legion of Mary, Regnum Christi, and
home schoolers.

Continuing Education
The format of this program can be customized to meet the needs and personality of the
group. Some parish plans are formal with scheduled weekly sessions and assignments.
Other groups take a more informal approach meeting with no scheduled meeting times.
Depending on the personality and resources of each parish, CDU's parish plan program
is designed to provide educational structure with administrative flexibility to meet the
needs of each parish and group.

Parish Plan Options


CDU's parish plans offer four ways to study using CDU's continuing education courses
and seminars. These options offer online, online individual, and paper-based learning
formats. Key to the success of any parish plan program is the parish plan coordinator
who will oversea the program within the parish or group. A minimum of three partici-
pants is required to start a parish plan.

Online Option I: Online Individual Courses


This option offers a series of five online courses that study the Catechism of the Catholic
Church. Program participants work with the parish coordinator to enroll in these online
individual courses offered at a group rate. The parish coordinator is responsible for adver-
tising, distributing and collectiong enrollment forms, completing the coordinator’s form
and sending this with enrollment forms and a single payment to CDU, as well as submit-
ting the program evaluation after the seminar has been completed.

Online Option II: Online Seminars


This option allows participants to experience 3-week online noncredit seminars at a
discounted rate. The parish coordinator is responsible for advertising, distributing and
collectiong enrollment forms, completing the coordinator’s form and sending this with
enrollment forms and a single payment to CDU, as well as submitting the program
evaluation after the seminar has been completed.
40 Parish Plan

Paper Option I: Group Study with a Parish Plan Coordinator


This option enables parishioners to study independently and/or with a group under the
direction of a competent local coordinator, at a significantly reduced cost. It allows the
participants the freedom to combine systematic independent study with convenient peri-
odic group discussions or supportive presentations. The parish coordinator plays an
active and central role in facilitating the group course including submitting enrollments
and fees to CDU, receivings and distributing course materials as well as directing group
meetings and submitting grade report.

Paper Option II: Group Study with CDU


Under this option, a group of 3 or more parishioners study independently and/or with a
group, submitting assignments directly to CDU, at a reduced cost. The role of the parish
plan coordinator is minimal with this format, since all of the scoring and grading is done
through CDU. However, this option allows parishioners to have the advantage of a
group support system as they pursue their studies.

Parish Plan Fee Schedule


Fees are based on the level of involvement required by the parish coordinator and the
number of participants enrolled in the parish plan.

Online Options I and II


The Parish Plan Coordinator will send to CDU one mailing that includes a single check covering all
tuition, along with the enrollment forms for all participants. With this option, CDU provides efficient
online format and interactive online instructional support.

No. of
Cost per person/per course or seminar Discount from standard tuition
participants
3 -10 $110 $33
11+ $95 $48

Paper Option I
The Parish Plan Coordinator will send one mailing that includes a single check covering all tuition,
along with the enrollment forms for all participants. With this option, the parish plan coordinator
corrects and records

No. of
Cost per person/per course Discount from standard tuition
participants
3 -5 $90 $53
6-11 $85 $58
12 or more $70 $70

Paper Option II
The Parish Plan Coordinator will send one mailing that includes a single check covering all tuition,
along with the enrollment forms for all participants. With this optiont, CDU corrects and records all
mailed assignments.

No. of
Cost per person/per course Discount from standard tuition
participants
3+ $110 $33
Noncredit Adult Faith Formation 41

Noncredit Adult Faith Formation


CDU offers something for all Catholics. Our continuing education for non-credit courses
and seminars are enriching and rewarding opportunities to transform your knowledge
and love of God while allowing you to become a lifelong learner equipped and inspired
to change the world. Continuing Education Units (CEUs) and clock hours are awarded
for all non-credit courses and seminars. There are no previous educational requirements

Continuing Education
to experience a continuing education course or seminar at CDU - just a genuine interest
to grow in your knowledge of the Faith.

Noncredit Online Seminars


CDUs online seminars offer faithfully Catholic
teachings on contemporary topics in a flexible three-
week format. Classes meet asynchronously, which
means 'not at the same time', so students choose the
day and time that is most convenient for them to log
into their course rooms. Students can access reading
assignments, weekly questions, group discussion, and
chapel mediations with a user-friendly format that is
supported with a help desk for questions. See page 60
of this catalog for a list of seminars or visit cdu.edu.

Catechism of the Catholic Church


Grasp the beauty and depth of the Catholic Faith as it unfolds in the Catechism of the
Catholic Church. CDU offers five online individual courses - an introductory course and
four courses each based on one of the pillars of the Catechism.. Adults who complete
one or all of these courses will be able to present Catholic teaching using accurate
language and appropriate documentation. Each course includes a study of the Catechism
content, its catechetical significance, and spiritual insights. This series provides a system-
atic program of study to help lay volunteers, religious; priests, parents, and catechists as
they teach, evangelize, and defend the Faith.

Noncredit Paper-Based Courses


CDU offers several paper-based courses designed for adult faith formation and enrich-
ment. Topics include Sacred Scripture, catechetical methods, and EWTN courses. See a
complete non-credit course list on page 57 of this catalog or visit cdu.edu for the most
up-to-date listing.
42 Course Descriptions

Course Numbering System


CDU courses are identified by a seven-digit numbering system. The first
three digits refer to general categories and the last four refer to a specific
course. The first number identifies the level (1 for undergraduate, 2 for grad-
uate). The second number refers to the edition (original or revision). The third
number indicates the format (print, audiotape, online, video). The fourth and
fifth numbers refer to the department or discipline. The last two digits refer to
the specific course.

Note
The Catechism of the Catholic Church, (Libreria Editrice Vaticana), Second
Edition (electronic text with biblical hyper links available online at:
www.vatican.va) is a required text for all CDU courses as is the Bible. We
recommend the Revised Standard Version-Catholic Edition. Ignatius Press
publishes this version, commonly referred to as the “Ignatius Bible”. Electronic
text available online: http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/rsv.browse.html

Other required textbooks are listed with each course and can be purchased
through our online bookstore.
Graduate Courses Descriptions 43

Graduate Courses 201-0401 Paper


Sacred Scripture
201-0104 Paper 3 graduate credits
Madonna: Mary in the Catholic Tradition This course offers a comprehensive summary of essential
3 graduate credits concepts for biblical study and their use in catechesis: inspira-
A Survey of teachings on the Blessed Mother beginning with tion, inerrancy, and canonicity. Lessons trace the origin of the
Biblical portraits of Mary, and continuing through the Madonnas Bible and the transmission of the text, explain the different
of the Fathers of the Church, the great medieval theologians, and versions of the biblical texts, explore the major Church docu-
the mariologists of the modern and contemporary periods. On ments on Scripture, introduce the science of hermeneutics and
the Master's level, further examination and reflections upon the its various disciplines, describe scientific contributions, and
Biblical Madonnas, the development of the Marian dogmas in analyze the effect of one’s presuppositions on interpretation.
Sacred Tradition and their special significance today. The special Readings from Scripture are used as illustrations. The
relationship between Mary and the Holy Spirit, the place of Anthology contains a commentary on the Church documents,
Marian doctrine and devotion in the ecumenical and interfaith readings from Introduction to the New Testament, and material

Graduate Course
dialogues and in the Catechism of the Catholic Church will be on the geography of Israel.
examined. Required Text:
Required Texts: God's Word to Israel, Joseph Jensen, O.S.B.
Madonna: Mary in the Catholic Tradition, Fr. Frederick M. The Interpretation of the Bible in The Church, Pontifical
Jelly, O.P. Biblical Commission
Mary in the New Testament, Brown, Donfried, On the Study of the Sacred Scripture (Providentissimus Deus),
Fitzmyer,Reumann, Editors Leo XIII
Mary, Mirror of the Church, R. Cantalamessa Promotion of Biblical Studies (Divino Afflante Spiritu), Pius XII
Theotokos, Michael O’Carroll Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation (Dei Verbum),
The Thousand Faces of the Virgin Mary, George H. Tavard Vatican II
Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, (Lumen Gentium), Biblical Exegesis and Church Doctrine, Fr. Raymond E. Brown
Vatican II Recent Discoveries of the Biblical World, Fr. Raymond E. Brown
Devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, (Marialis Cultus), Paul VI The Critical Meaning of the Bible, Fr. Raymond E. Brown
Mother of the Redeemer (Redemptoris Mater), John Paul II The New Jerome Biblical Commentary , Fr. Raymond E.
Guardian of the Redeemer (Redemptoris Custos), John Paul II Brown, S.S., Joseph A. Fitzmyer, S.J., Roland E. Murphy,
Behold Your Mother, Woman of Faith, N.C.C.B. O.Carm.
Mary in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Fr. Frederick M. Anthology of Readings
Jelly, O.P.
204-1601 Paper -
Norms for Judging Apparitions & Private Revelations, Fr.
Frederick M. Jelly, O.P. Practicum for Church Work Professionals
Anthology of Readings 3 graduate credits
This program is open to students actively employed in church-
201-0203 Paper related work or in Catholic schools who can verify that they
will work a minimum of 150 job hours within one 12-week
The Historical Development of Marriage
period. The field study project is intended to enhance the
3 graduate credits
quality of work done by Church professionals, and is designed to
This course presents a comprehensive presentation of marriage:
help good Church workers become even greater assets to their
the history and development of marriage theology through the
documents of Vatican II and Pope John Paul II. Includes parishes and schools by helping them to benefit from exercises in
lessons focusing on marriage in Canon Law, wedding liturgies, planning, action, and reflection.To enroll in this course, student
and marriage and family as the "way" of evangelization. must have prior approval from either the graduate academic
Required Text: dean or the dean of students.
Theology of the Body, John Paul II
What God Has Joined, Fr. Peter J. Elliott 206-0106 Online
On Christian Marriage (Casti Connubi), Pius XI Introduction to Christianity
The Role of Christian Family in Modern World (Familiaris Prerequisite course
Consortio), John Paul II Introduction to Christianity is a course that covers the basic themes
Anthology of Readings of the Catholic faith. The course is laid out in terms of the articles
of the Apostle’s Creed and will follow the text written by Joseph
44 Graduate Course Descriptions

Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) that is entitled Introduction to The Role of the Christian Family in the Modern World,
Christianity. It is designed to help the modern Catholic understand Familiaris Consortio, John Paul II
the faith more deeply within the modern context. When The Gospel of Life, Evangelium Vitae, John Paul II
students finish this course they will be able to explain the Faith Anthology of Readings
in some detail and, more importantly, they will be able to grasp Also available in paper format as 201-0306
the fundamental themes in Catholicism, such as the notion of
faith itself, the understanding of the divine Trinity, the nature 206-0307 Online
and role of Jesus Christ as Savior, the nature of the Church,
Fundamental Moral Theology
and the operation of the Church in the world.
3 graduate credits
.
Please note: Because this course uses audio and flash technology, it is highly recom-
Moral theology comes alive and grows in the hearts and minds
mended that students have a high-speed internet connection and a flash player such as of people and transforms the way in which they make sense of
Adobe Flash or the Safari flash plug-in (MAC). Most will find that they already have life into the way in which Jesus, crucified and risen, makes
flash. Otherwise, it is freely available on the web at http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/.
Download assistance is available. A written transcription of each lesson is provided in
sense of life (the Beatitudes). With the help of readings by
Graduate Courses

the course room. moral theologian Fr. Servais Pinckaers and others, students
Required Text: should be able to discover and understand that the foundations
Introduction to Christianity 2nd edition, Joseph Cardinal (the Triune God's creating, redeeming, and sanctifying activi-
Ratzinger ties) and components (conscience, character, and prudence) of
moral theology come together in a person's repentance and
206-0204 Online continuing conversion.
Required Text:
Theology of the Sacraments
The Holy Bible (Revised Standard Edition)
3 graduate credits
The Sources of Christian Ethics, Servais Pinckaers, O.P.
Future course under development
Halfwits, Gerard Goggins
Mere Christianity, C.S.Lewis
206-0306 Online
Catechism of the Catholic Church (Revised Vatican
Gospel of Life in Health and Medicine Edition), Libreria Editrice Vaticana
3 graduate credits Values in a Time of Upheaval, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger
This is an overview of the various ethical and religious issues that On the Christian Meaning of Human Suffering, John Paul II
confront us all in modern societies. It is divided into three parts. The Pursuit of Happiness, Servais Pinckaers, O.P.
The first examines the relationship between ethics and health Splendor of Truth (Veritatis Splendor), John Paul II
care, paying special attention to “listening” to nature’s design and
The Holy Spirit in Life of Church & World (Dominum et
its implications for health, the art of healing, and health care Vivificantem), John Paul II
institutions. The second part presents the theology of the body,
Online Anthology Readings
NaPro (Natural Reproductive) Technology, contraception and
Recommended Text:
sterilization, cloning, abortion, and other elements of the “New
Euthyphro, Plato
Manichaeanism.” Part Three covers the end of life, the tech-
nology of the body, euthanasia, medical procedures, medical
experimentation, organ donation, the dehumanization of the 206-0402 Online
embryo, the culture of death, and many other topics. Introduction to Sacred Scripture
Required Text: 3 graduate credits
Ethical Principle in Catholic Health Care, Edward James Future course under development
Furton, Boston: The National Catholic Bioethics Center, 1999.
Catechism of the Catholic Church (Revised Vatican 206-0403 Online
Edition), Libreria Editrice Vaticana
Theology of Scripture
Declaration on Euthanasia, Vatican
3 graduate credits
Charter for Health Care Workers, Vatican, Pontifical
Council for Pastoral Assistance to Health Care Workers, Future course under development
June 2001
Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care 206-0410 Online
Facilities, U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops Pentateuch
Nutrition and Hydration: Moral and Pastoral Reflections, 3 graduate credits
April 1992, U.S. Bishops' Committee for Pro-Life Activities Future course under development
Of Human Life, Humanae Vitae, Paul VI
On the Christian Meaning of Human Suffering, Salvifici Doloris,
John Paul II
Graduate Course Descriptions 45

206-0420 Online 206-0460 Online


History of Israel Paul
3 graduate credits 3 graduate credits
Future course under development. Future course under development.

206-0430 Online 206-0501 Online


Prophets Church History, Part I
3 graduate credits 3 graduate credits
Future course under development This course offers an overview of the rise and spread of the
Church from the time of its founder, Jesus Christ, through
persecution and acceptance in the Roman empire to the fall of
206-0440 Online
the Empire and the beginnings of Christian states. The course
The Book of Job

Graduate Courses
continues through the Carolingian period, considering the
3 graduate credits confrontation with Islam and ends around the year 1200.
Future course under development Various facets of early Christian life are considered both in
original and secondary sources. These include art, liturgy,
theology, political life and ethics. This course includes audio
206-0451 Online
lectures with written transcripts.
The Gospel of St. John Required Text:
3 graduate credits Spirit of Early Christian Thought: Seeking the Face of
This course on the Gospel of St. John is designed to help God, Robert L. Wilken
students gain a familiarity with the biblical text of the Fourth
Gospel (in English). Students read and study the Gospel of St. 206-0502 Online
John closely, examining its primary theological and literary
characteristics. Important secondary materials will guide our
Church History, Part II
study. In addition to employing the best of modern critical 3 graduate credits
interpretation, the Gospel of St. John is to be read here within The second half of the Church History track will take the
the framework of the Church’s living Tradition. Students who student through the height of the Christian Middle Ages,
complete this course should be able to demonstrate a good through the Renaissance, and into the Reformation. It will
understanding of the Fourth Gospel’s major theological then deal in depth with the Counter Reformation and the
themes, symbols, and literary techniques. explosion of Catholic missions. The problem posed by the
Required Text: Enlightenment and modern history to the Church will also be
The Holy Bible (Revised Standard Edition) examined. Finally, a picture of the Church in the twentieth
century will be drawn. This course will include audio lectures.
The Gospel According to John: A Literary and Theological
Commentary, T. Brodie, 1997 edition Required Text:
The Hour of Jesus, I. De la Potterie, 1990 edition Owen Chadwick, A History of Christianity, St. Martin's
Gospel of St. John, Navarre Bible, 2005 edition. Griffin, 1995
Jesus of Nazareth, Benedict XVI (Doubleday, 2007)
The Jerome Biblical Commentary, or The New Jerome Biblical 206-0541 Online
Commentary Catholic Martyrs of the Twentieth Century
Optional Recommended Text: 3 graduate credits
Gospel According to St. John, Rudolf Schnackenburg. (3 In the twentieth century, Catholics were persecuted and
Volumes) martyred in greater numbers than at any time in history. From
The Gospel According to John, Raymond Brown. (2 Mexico to Spain, China to the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany
volumes: Anchor Bible 29 and 29A) to El Salvador, governments and individuals sought to destroy
The Constitutions on Divine Revelation (Dei verbum), the faith and its institutions. This course will guide you
Vatican Council II through the inspiring and little known story of the modern
martyrs. Special attention is given to St. Maximilian Kolbe,
206-0452 Online St. Theresa Benedicta of the Cross (Edith Stein), Charles de
Synoptics Foucauld, and many other heroic men and women of our time.
3 graduate credits
Future course under development
46 Graduate Course Descriptions

Required Text: Required Text:


Catholic Martyrs of the Twentieth Century, Robert Royal Christian Spirituality in the Catholic Tradition, Jordan
Four Witness: The Early Church in Her Own Words--Clement Aumann, O.P.
of Rome, Ignatius of Antioch, Justin Martyr, Irenaeus of Lyon, The Imitation of Christ, Thomas à Kempis
Rod Bennett
Dogmatic Constitution on the Church (Lumen Gentium),
On the Teaching of Christian Doctrine (Acerba Animi), Pius XI Vatican II
On the Persecution of the Church in Mexico (Iniquis Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation (Dei Verbum),
Afflictisque), Pius XI Vatican II
On Atheistic Communism (Divini Redemptoris), Pius XI Anthology of Readings
On Oppression of the Church in Spain (Dilectissima Nobis),
Pius XI
206-0902 Online
On the Church and the German Reich (Mit Brennender Sorge),
Pius XI Leadership for Catholic Adult Faith Formation
3 graduate credits
Graduate Courses

This course is designed to assist participants as both adult learners


206-0602 Online
and facilitators of adult faith formation in identifying and appro-
The Role of the Laity in the New Evangelization priating key knowledge, skills, and methodologies in their
3 graduate credits approach to and administration of effective adult faith formation.
Since the Second Vatican Council, the Church has empha- Students will be engaged in reflection on their own adult faith
sized the importance of the laity to the Church in carrying out formation experience, and that of others, through assigned read-
the full Christian mission in the modern world. This course ings and lectures, self assessment exercises, interaction with role
describes in concrete terms how the Catholic laity should models, and project design and/or delivery experiences. Those
understand and carry out their special vocation in their who complete this course should be able to describe and apply
everyday lives. Students who complete this course should be what constitutes good praxis in Catholic Adult Faith Formation,
able to trace the history of Church teaching about the laity, and some of the related skills and methodologies for effectiveness
identify current issues related to the role of the laity in the in organizing, implementing, and evaluating it.
mission of the Church, and define the responsibilities of the Required Text:
laity for evangelizing culture. Co-Workers in the Vineyard of the Lord. Washington, D.C.:
Required Text: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2005.
To Hunt, To Shoot, To Entertain: Clericalism and the Catholic Adult Learning Methods – a Guide for Effective Instruction, 3rd
Laity. Russell Shaw. Ignatius Press, 1993. edition, Michael W. Galbraith,. Malabar, FL: Krieger
Personal Vocation: God Calls Everyone by Name. Germain Publishing, 2004.
Grisez and Russell Shaw. OSV Publishing, 2003. The Adult Learner, 5th ed, Knowles, Malcolm, Holton,
Understanding Your Rights: Your Rights and Responsibilities in Elwood and Swanson, Richard. Woburn, MA: Butterworth-
the Catholic Church. Russell Shaw . Servant Publications, Heinemann Publications, 1998.
1994. National Directory for Catechesis. Washington, D.C.: United
Ministry Or Apostolate: What Should the Catholic Laity Be States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2005.
Doing? Russell Shaw. OSV Publishing, 2002. Leader’s Guide to Our Hearts Were Burning Within Us—A
Pastoral Plan for Adult Faith Formation in the United States.
Washington, D.C.: United States Catholic Conference, 2000.
206-0701 Online Recommended Text:
Survey of Catholic Spirituality Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2nd ed. Libreria Editrice
3 graduate credits Vaticana
This course is an introduction to the evolution and develop- General Directory for Catechesis. Washington, DC: United
ment of Catholic spirituality from the earliest days of the States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 1997.
Church to the present time. Beginning with the teachings of United States Catholic Catechism for Adults. Washington,
Christ as recorded in the Gospels, the lessons of this course D.C.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2006.
offer a testimony to the rich variety of Christian practices
illustrated in the lives and teachings of the outstanding masters 206-1001 Online
of the spiritual life. Students who complete this course should Theology of the Church
be able to identify the common thread that constitutes the 3 graduate credits
authentic tradition of Catholic doctrine and life. The Theology of the Church (Ecclesiology) course explains
how the Church understands herself as the Spouse of Christ
and how she understands her mission to the world. The vision
of the Church that is offered is that of the Second Vatican
Council and it looks towards our participation in the Wedding
Graduate Course Descriptions 47

Feast of the Lamb in the New Jerusalem. Students who 206-1202 Online
complete this course will better understand the Church and so
Special Topics in Christian Thought
will be able to see more clearly the role of the Church in their
3 graduate credits
life, in the life of their family, and in society at large. Future course under development
Please note: Because this course uses audio and flash technology, it is highly
recommended that students have a high-speed internet connection and a flash
player such as Adobe Flash or the Safari flash plug-in (MAC). Most will find 206-1203 Online
that they already have flash. Otherwise, it is freely available on the web at Philosophy for Theology I: Augustine’s and the
http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/. Download assistance is available. Alternatively,
a written transcription of each lesson is provided online in the course room. Platonic Tradition
Required Text and documents: 1 graduate credits
Splendor of the Church, Henri de Lubac,Ignatius Press , 1999. This is the first in a sequence of three one-credit courses in
Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, Lumen Gentium, Vatician II philosophy that must be taken by all students in the MA
On the Study of Holy Scripture, Providentissimus deus, Leo XIII program. It gives an overview of the thought of St. Augustine,
Church of the Eucharist, Ecclesia de eucharistia, John Paul II its debt to ancient and Neo-Platonism, and its importance

Graduate Courses
during the first millennium of Western Christianity.
Apostolic Exhortation on the Laity, Christifideles laici, John Paul II
Required Text:
The Gift of the Redemption, Redemptionis donum, John Paul II
Augustine of Hippo: A Biography, 2nd edition, Peter Brown
Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World,
(Gaudium et spes), Vatican II A History of Philosophy, Vol. II. Medieval Philosophy,
Frederick Copleston, S.J.
The Role of the Christian Family in the Modern World
(Familiaris consortio), John Paul II Augustine, Confessions, Trans. Chadwick
On Social Concern (Solicitudo rei socialis), Pius XI
206-1204 Online
206-1101 Online Philosophy for Theology II: Aquinas and the
Catholic Apologetics Aristotelian Tradition
3 graduate credits 1 graduate credits
Apologetics is the branch of theology concerned with an The second in the sequence of required philosophy courses for
explanation and defense of the Catholic Faith. While exam- the MA, this course will look at the rediscovery of Aristotle in
ining the foundations, authoritative sources and modern the Middle Ages, the ways in which St. Thomas sought to
problems associated with belief, as well as the relationship of harmonize that new knowledge with the Biblical and
apologetics to faith, theology, catechesis, liturgy, spirituality Augustinian traditions, and some of the ways that synthesis
and the Church's mission, at the graduate level the course will was utilized in the Church down to our own day.
focus more intensely on how an apologetic is developed and Required Text:
presented. Emphasis will be given to the study of practical
A History of Philosophy, Vol. II.Medieval Philosophy,
methodology associated with actually conducting an apologetic Frederick Copleston, S.J.
in contemporary society. Note: this is not an apologetic
A Shorter Summa: The Most Essential Philosophical Passages of
methods course, but rather a study of apologetics. St. Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologica, Peter Kreeft
Required Text: St. Thomas Aquinas, Vol. 1: The Person at Work, Jean-Pierre
Vatican Council II, Volume 1, Austin Flannery, O.P. Torrell, 2005.
Handbook of Christian Apologetics, Peter Kreeft and Ronald God, philosophy, universities, Alastair MacIntyre, 2009.
K. Tacelli
Catholicism and Reason, Fr. Edward J. Hayes, Msgr. Paul J. 206-1205 Online
Hayes, and James J. Drummey
Philosophy for Theology III: Modern Philosophy
Catholicism and Fundamentalism, Karl Keating
1 graduate credits
On Evangelization in the Modern World (Evangelii Nuntiandi),
This is the last course in the required philosophy sequence and
Paul VI
will look at some modern philosophical currents that have
On Catechesis in Our Time (Catechesis Tradendae), John Paul II
touched the Church, especially personalism, existentialism,
Mission of the Reedemer (Redemptoris Missio), John Paul II
and phenomenology as they have appeared in various figures,
To Teach as Jesus Did, USCCB including Edith Stein and Karol Wojtyla (John Paul II).
To Reach Full Knowledge of the Truth, Bishop John J. Myers Required Text:
Anthology of Readings Philosophy for Understanding Theology, Diogenes Allen
100th Anniversary of Rerum novarum, Centesimus annus,
206-1201 Online John Paul II
Truth of the World Fides et ratio [available at Vatican website], John Paul II
3 graduate credits God, philosophy, universities, Alastair MacIntyre, 2009
Future course under development
48 Graduate Course Descriptions

206-1401 Online The Pastoral Companion: A Canon Law Handbook for Catholic
Ministry, Third Edition. John M. Huels, J.C.D. Quincy:
Introduction to the Church’s Social Teaching Franciscan Press, 2002.
3 graduate credits One of the Following Recommended Text:
This course offers an introduction to modern Catholic social
Code of Canon Law Annotated, Second Edition. Edited by
teaching (CST), a rich current of thought that began with Ernesto Caparros and Helene Aube. Montreal: Wilson &
Pope Leo XIII and has continued down to Pope John Paul II. It Laflreaur, 2004;
explores CST’s foundations in the Holy Trinity, the Church, The Canon Law: Letter and Spirit. Prepared by the Canon
Sacred Scripture, and Tradition, and focuses on papal writings Law Society of Great Britain and Ireland in association with
of the last hundred years. Key Catholic concepts such as soli- the Canadian Canon Law Society. Collegeville: Liturgical
darity, subsidiarity, the common good, Christian anthropology, Press, 1995; [currently out of print]
and a culture of life receive special attention. In addition to New Commentary on the Code of Canon Law. Edited by John
social, political, and economic questions, this course aims to P. Beal, James A. Coriden, and Thomas J. Green. Mahwah:
help students understand CST’s consistency and originality, as Paulist Press, 2002.
Graduate Courses

well as its special opportunities for everyone to respond to


Vatican II’s universal call to holiness. 206-1701 Online
Required Text: Graduate Academic Skills
Catechism of the Catholic Church (Revised Vatican Edition), 1 graduate credits
Libreria Editrice Vaticana.
This course is designed to help master’s degree students succeed
On the Christian Meaning of Human Suffering (Salvifici in graduate level coursework. By building on the writing and
Doloris), John Paul II.
information management skills taught in undergraduate
On the Condition of the Working Classes (Rerum Novarum), Academic Skills, the course prepares students for writing
Leo XIII.
comprehensive exams, researching capstone project papers,
On Establishing Universal Peace in Truth, Justice, Charity, and and mastering the communication skills they need at the post-
Liberty, (Pacem in Terris), John XXIII.
graduate level. The atmosphere in the Academic Skills course
The Gospel of Life (Evangelium Vitae), John Paul II. room is designed to be helpful and welcoming, and to provide
On Human Work (Laborem Exercens), John Paul II. each student with a motivational support system. Assignments
On the Hundredth Anniversary of Rerum Novarum are evaluated on a pass/fail basis.
(Centesimus Annus), John Paul II.
Note: Students post one short assignment per month, ten months a year. There
Letter to Families from Pope John Paul II, February 2, 1994. are no July and August lessons. They enroll in the course at the beginning of
Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World their academic programs and pay for 1 credit of graduate tuition. After that,
(Gaudium et Spes), Vatican II. students maintain enrollment in this course by paying the annual technology fee.

The Redeemer of Man (Redemptor Hominis), John Paul II. Required Text: none
The Role of the Christian Family in the Modern World
(Familiaris Consortio), John Paul II. 206-1801 Online
The Social Agenda: A Collection of Magisterial Documents, Latin I
Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, Libreria Editrice
3 graduate credits
Vaticana, 2000.
This course begins with the fundamentals of grammar
On Social Concern (Sollicitudo Rei Socialis), John Paul II.
including the definitions of terms that are used as well as the
On Social Reconstruction (Quadragesimo Anno), Pius XI. concepts of conjugations and declensions. These are applied to
The Splendor of the Truth (Veritatis Splendor), John Paul II. the Latin language with the following:: all four conjugations;
all five declensions— masculine, feminine and neuter; all six
206-1501 Online tenses in both the active and passive voices of the indicative
Introduction to Canon Law mood; agreement of nouns and adjectives; the irregular verb
3 graduate credits “to be”; increasing vocabulary with each lesson.Essential to this
This course discusses canon law within the context of the is the importance of drill, memorization, and appreciation of
Church’s daily ministry. Major topics include general principles the benefits of a highly inflected language. In addition to
used in the application of canon law, definition of key terms mastering basic sentence construction, students should also be
employed by canonists, the Church’s structure, the Church’s able to apply these grammatical concepts to some basic prayers
teaching office, and the sacraments. This course will help of the Church.
students understand not only the basics of canon law but how Required Text:
to apply it within their day-to-day ministry and apostolate. New First Steps in Latin, Lee Pearcy, Mary Allen, Thomas
Required Text: Kent, Michael Klaassen, Mary Van Dyke Konopka,
Alexander Pearson
Surprised by Canon Law, Pete Vere and Michael Trueman,
Servant Books, 2004.
Graduate Course Descriptions 49

206-1802 Online Required Text:


Latin II The Complete Vocabulary Guide to the Greek New Testament,
Warren C. Trenchard, Zondervan; Revised edition
3 graduate credits (November 1, 1998)
This course builds on the grammar and vocabulary already
A Primer of Biblical Greek, N. Clayton Croy, 1999.
studied in Latin I, and demonstrates the essential importance
of drill, memorization, and appreciation of the benefits of a
highly inflected language. Students will read brief selections of 206-1804 Online
prayers, psalms, Christian authors, and liturgical texts while Biblical Greek II
honing their skills in the ancient language of the Roman 3 graduate credits
Catholic Church. Students who complete this course should be This course builds upon the foundation of Biblical Greek I.
able to translate and use demonstrative, personal, relative, and Students will receive reinforcement of basic Greek grammar
intensive pronouns and adjectives; understand and form the and morphology learned in the first course. The practice of
infinitive mood and the participle; form adverbs, compare hearing and reciting paradigms and principal parts will be

Graduate Courses
adjectives and adverbs, use the irregular verbs possum, volo, continued throughout this course. Students who successfully
nalo, malo, eo; understand and use deponent verbs and indi- complete this course will have the ability to read (with the aid of
rect statement; identify and use cardinal and ordinal numerals; a dictionary) the four Gospels of the New Testament and any
use a more extensive vocabulary , and apply the grammatical narrative section of the Septuagint. With practice, students will
conceptions studied to ecclesiastical and liturgical Latin. eventually be able to “graduate” to more discursive texts of the
Required Text: Bible, such as the Pauline epistles; and poetic texts, such as the
New Second Steps in Latin, Michael Klaassen, Mary Allen, psalms and the prophets.
Thomas Kent, Elizabeth Kennedy Klaassen, Mary van Dyke
Konopka, Lee T. Pearcy Please note: All students are required to download and install Greek fonts to allow
for full participation in typing the Greek language in the online course room.
Instructions will be provided (the downloaded file is "zipped" and will require
206-1803 Online unpacking with a compression utility such as WinZip or 7-Zip).In addition, to play
Biblical Greek I the audio files all students must have media player software such as RealPlayer,
Windows Media Player, or QuickTime Player, or else have an MP3 player such as
3 graduate credits an iPod. It is highly recommended that students have a high-speed Internet
This course is an introduction to the Greek language as it connection to allow for downloading the large audio files used in this course.
appears in the texts of both the Old and New Testaments. Required Text:
While emphasis will be on the basic morphology of nouns and The Complete Vocabulary Guide to the Greek New Testament,
verbs and most frequently used words in Biblical Greek, the Warren C. Trenchard, Zondervan; Revised edition
students will also learn all the basic pronouns and prepositions, (November 1, 1998)
the three noun declensions, all the tenses in which finite A Primer of Biblical Greek, N. Clayton Croy, 1999.
Greek verbs appear, many of the basic rules of Greek syntax,
and, finally, the commonly used Greek participle. 206-2102 Online
The Mind of John Paul II: Theology of the Body
Following the traditional deductive model of learning an
3 graduate credits
ancient language, the focus will be on learning paradigms and
John Paul II’s Theology of the Body is rightly recognized as a
principal parts of Greek verbs, gaining fluency in reading
milestone in the Church’s response to the problems of the
Biblical texts, as well as hearing, pronouncing, and reciting the modern age. Using Pope John Paul II’s Wednesday audiences
Greek words using audio files. Students will also experience an dealing with this topic together with a introduction, this
inductive “feel” for how the language works in practice by course offers a methodical study of the Pope’s rich teaching.
working through translation and grammar exercises drawn The first half of this course will focus on the main aspects of a
from both Old and New Testaments of the Greek Bible. theology of the body that is respectful of the profound under-
standing of the body that lies in the Scriptures. This half
The course assumes no previous knowledge of Greek. The first concludes with a study of the body and purity in art and the
lesson begins with the alphabet. The course only assumes media. Then in the second half of the course students will
ability to read English. examine the Sacrament of Marriage and how it reveals and, at
the same time, relies on, a theology of the body.
Please note: All students are required to download and install Greek fonts to
allow for full participation in typing the Greek language in the online course Please note: Because this course uses audio and flash technology, it is highly
room. Instructions will be provided (the downloaded file is "zipped" and will recommended that students have a high-speed internet connection and a flash
require unpacking with a compression utility such as WinZip or 7-Zip). In addi- player such as Adobe Flash or the Safari flash plug-in (MAC).
tion, to play the audio files all students must have media player software such as
RealPlayer, Windows Media Player, or QuickTime Player, or else have an MP3 Required Text:
player such as an iPod. It is highly recommended that students have a high-speed Man and Woman He Created Them: A Theology of the Body,
Internet connection to allow for downloading the large audio files used in this John Paul II, archives by Michael M. Waldstein. Boston:
course.
Pauline Booksand Media, 2006.
50 Graduate Course Descriptions

206-2202 Online 210-0000 Online


Catholic Imagination Thesis Direction
3 graduate credits
A research project of approximately thirty pages to be focused on
Future course under development
the concentration and to be submitted after all course work is
206-2203 Online completed. Students must consult their program advisor to select
Modern Catholic Literature a topic and will then have six months to finish. Papers that go
3 graduate credits beyond that period will require re-enrollment and additional fees.
Future course under development
211-0901 Paper
206-2204 Online General Catechetics: Methods and Materials
Art, Architecture, and Sacred Spaces 3 graduate credits
3 graduate credits
At the masters level, this course offers a more extensive study of
Future course under development
the principles of catechetics as developed in the Catechism of the
Graduate Courses

206-2205 Online Catholic Church and significant encyclicals related to catechetical


Sacred Music activity. The student is provided with practical opportunities for
3 graduate credits reviewing materials and programs presently used in the work of
catechetics. This enables students to become acquainted with
Future course under development
methodologies that utilize the analysis of media, the rites of the
206-2206 Online sacraments, and one's own parish catechetical and social
Dante concern activities. Through this course, the student should be
3 graduate credits equipped with information and skills to develop and direct a
Future course under development catechetical program.
Required Text:
206-2301 Online The First Catechetical Instruction, St. Augustine
Introduction to Christology The Mystery We Proclaim, 2nd Ed., Catechesis for the Third
3 graduate credits Millennium, Monsignor Francis D. Kelly
This course provides an introduction to Catholic theology of
On Evangelization in the Modern World (Evangelii Nuntiandi),
Jesus Christ. Upon completion of this course, you will have
Paul VI
probed the biblical witness to the mystery of Jesus; read impor-
tant selections from the history of Christology, including those Our Hearts Were Burning Within Us, United States
from the great councils of the first centuries of the Church; Conference of Catholic Bishops
and examined contemporary systematic questions. Introduction Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, II Vatican Council
to Christology will provide a catechetical overview of the General Directory for Catechesis, Congregaton for the Clergy
Church’s teaching on Christ, as well as an opportunity to National Directory for Catechesis, USCCB
engage in mature theological inquiry concerning this great Catechesis in Our Time (Catechesi Tradendae), John Paul II
mystery of the faith. Anthology of Readings
Required Texts:
Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church,
216-0101G Online
(Available at www.vatican.va)
Holy Bible (The Ignatius Bible), 2nd ed., recommended) God, Man, and Universe
Jesus Christ: Fundamentals of Christology, 2nd ed. Roch 3 graduate credits
Kereszty, O. Cist.NY: Alba House, 2002. This course is a systematic presentation of fundamental princi-
Mystery of the Kingdom: On the Gospel of Matthew, Edward P. ples for studying the Faith based on the three essential tools:
Sri, Emmaus Road Publishing, 2000. Sacred Scripture, Sacred Tradition, and the Magisterium.
Redemptor Hominis, Pope John Paul II, (Available at Supplementary readings enable the student to understand
www.vatican.va)
God's knowledge of man and man's knowledge of God. This
Dominus Iesus, Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, includes the nature of God, creation, and the fall of man.
(Available at www.vatican.va)
Required Text:
Redemptoris Mater,John Paul II (Available at www.vatican.va)
The Teaching of Christ, Bishop Donald W. Wuerl, Ronald
Jesus of Nazareth, Benedict XVI
Lawler, O.F.M. Cap., Thomas Comerford Lawler
The Catholic Catechism, Fr. John A. Hardon, S.J.
206-2501 Online A Tour of the Summa, Msgr. Paul J. Glenn
Principles of Ecclesial Service On the Study of the Sacred Scripture (Providentissimus Deus),
3 graduate credits Leo XIII
Future course under development Promotion of Biblical Studies (Divino Afflante Spiritu), Pius XII
Some False Opinions Which Threaten (Humani Generis), Pius XII
Anthology of Readings
Undergraduate Course Descriptions 51

the effect of one's presuppositions on interpretation. Readings


Undergraduate Courses from Scripture are used as illustrations.
101-0104 Paper Required Text:
Madonna: Mary in the Catholic Tradition On the Study of the Sacred Scripture (Providentissimus Deus),
Leo XIII
3 undergraduate credits
Promotion of Biblical Studies (Divino Afflante Spiritu), Pius XII
This course studies Mary as a Madonna for today’s Christians
that our teaching Church assures us is a faithful likeness of what On Divine Revelation (Dei Verbum), Vatican II
has been handed down by the Tradition from the biblical Biblical Exegesis and Church Doctrine, Fr.. Raymond E. Brown
portraits of Mary, through the patristic madonnas of the Fathers Recent Discoveries of the Biblical World, Fr.. Raymond E. Brown

Undergraduate Courses
of the Church, of the great medieval theologians, especially of The Critical Meaning of the Bible, Fr.. Raymond E. Brown
Marian doctrine and devotion. Anthology of Selected Readings
Required Text:
101-0502 Paper
Madonna: Mary in the Catholic Tradition, Fr. Frederick M. Jelly,
O.P. Early and Medieval Church History
Dogmatic Constitution on the Church (Lumen Gentium), 3 undergraduate credits
Vatican II This course is an introduction to the Church's history from
Devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary (Marialis Cultus), Paul II apostolic times to the fourteenth century focusing on the time
Mother of the Redeemer (Redemptoris Mater), John Paul II of the apostles and the Church Fathers, development of the
papacy, early persecutions, first councils, monasticism and the
Behold Your Mother, National Conference of Catholic
Bishops cult of the saints, the Dark Ages, Byzantium and the
Separation of the Christian churches, the Crusades and the
Guardian of The Redeemer (Redemptoris Custos), John Paul II
Middle Ages.
Anthology of Selected Readings
Required Text:
How to Read Church History, Vol. 1, Jean Comby
101-0203 Paper
Historical Development of Marriage in the 101-0601 Paper
Church Vocation and Mission of the Laity
3 undergraduate credits 3 undergraduate credits
This course is a comprehensive presentation of marriage: as a This course explores the nature of the Church and how the lay
natural institution, the history of marriage in the Church and members of the Faithful share in the priestly, prophetic and
the development of marriage theology through Vatican II and kingly mission of Christ. The rights, duties and spirituality of
Pope John Paul II. It includes lessons on marriage in Canon Law, the laity are examined in the light of the mission of the
wedding liturgies, and the vocation of marriage and family. Church as a whole, and in the light of individual and group
Required Text: apostolates in the world today.
What God Has Joined, Fr.. Peter J. Elliott Required Text:
Theology of Christian Marriage, Walter Kasper On the Front Lines, Fr. Jordan Aumann, O.P.
On Christian Marriage (Casti Connubi), Pius XI Vatican Council II, Volume 2, Fr. Austin Flannery, O.P.
The Church in the Modern World (Gaudium et Spes), Vatican II The Lay Members of Christ's Faithful People (Christifideles
Of Human Life (Humanae Vitae), Paul VI Laici), John Paul II
The Role of Christian Family in Modern World (Familiaris Catechism of the Catholic Church (Revised Vatican Edition),
Consortio), John Paul II Libreria Editrice Vaticana
Anthology of Selected Readings Anthology of Selected Readings

101-0901 Paper
101-0401 Paper
General Catechetics: Methods and Materials
Introduction to Sacred Scripture
3 undergraduate credits
3 undergraduate credits
This course provides fundamental, broad-based principles and
This course offers a comprehensive preparation in essential
methods with suggested applications for the teaching of cate-
scriptural concepts for biblical studies and for use in catechesis:
chetics. Each lesson draws upon Scripture for reflection and
inspiration, inerrancy, and canonicity. Course lessons trace the
origin of the Bible and the transmission of the text, explain the provides real life examples of the lesson's theme in action.
different versions of the texts, explore the major Church docu- Themes include: the catechetical ministry, principles of human
ments on Scripture, introduce the science of hermeneutics and and moral development, sacramental preparation, guidelines for
its various disciplines, describe scientific contributions, analyze preserving authentic content while adapting the presentation,
)
52 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

incorporation of liturgy and prayer, components of lesson plan- Letter to Families From Pope John Paul II, John Paul II
ning and effective class management, and the significance of Splendor of Truth (Veritatis Splendor), John Paul II
catechetics for acting upon the social teachings of the Church. Pocket Catholic Dictionary, Fr. John A. Hardon, S.J.
Required Text: Anthology of Selected Readings
General Directory for Catechesis, United States Catholic Also available in paper format 101-0304
Conference
National Directory for Catechesis, United States Conference
of Catholic Bishops 106-0305 Online
Undergraduate Coursesn

On Catechesis in Our Time (Catechesi Tradendae), John Paul II Catholic Fundamental Moral Theology, Part B
An anthology of selected readings, worksheets and practical 3 undergraduate credits
suggestions for teaching the Catholic Faith Building on the study of the foundations of Catholic morality
in Part A, this course explores the three components of
106-0101 Online Catholic morality: motives (the cardinal and theological
God, Man, and the Universe virtues), actions (the various dimensions of the human act that
3 undergraduate credits call for
moral responsibility), and norms (the eternal, natural, civil and
An introduction to doctrinal theology, this course examines
the fundamental teachings of the Catholic Church as divine laws). The course's climax includes a synthesis of the
contained in the First Article of the Apostles' Creed — God three components in the Church's teaching about the forma-
the Creator, original sin, and the fall of man. Lessons include tion and operation of conscience and a look at the challenge of
an introduction to Revelation, the relationship between being Catholic in the third millennium.
Scripture and Tradition, the development of doctrine, the Required Text:
Trinity, Divine Providence, the Angels, Satan, forms of Of Human Life (Humanae Vitae), Paul VI
atheism, the origin and fall of man, and the dignity of the The Holy Spirit in Life of Church & World (Dominum et
human person. Vivificantem), John Paul II
Required Text: Declarations on Euthanasia, Sacred Congregation for the
The Catholic Catechism, Fr. John A. Hardon, S.J. Doctrine of the Faith (SCDF)
The Teaching of Christ, 5th Edition, 2004, Bishop Donald W. The Gospel of Life (Evangelium Vitae), Pope John Paul II
Wuerl, Ronald Lawler, OFMCap, Thomas Comerford Anthology of Selected Readings
Lawler
Some False Opinions Which Threaten (Humani Generis), Pius Also available in paper format 101-0305
XII
Online anthology of selected readings 106-0404 Online
Also available in paper format 101-0101 Survey of the Old Testament
3 undergraduate credits
106-0203 Online This is a survey course of the Old Testament. First, it will famil-
iarize the student with the basic structure and contents of the
Sacraments: Masterworks of God
Old Testament, studying its basic divisions, major characters,
3 undergraduate credits
themes, and its principal events. Secondly, this course will
Future courses under development
provide the student with a way to understand the meaning and
purpose of the Old Testament providing a framework which will
help the student bring order to the many events in the Old
106-0304 Online Testament as well as appreciate the purpose and meaning of
Catholic Fundamental Moral Theology, Part A these events and their overall design. As the first Word of God
3 undergraduate credits to His people, the Old Testament lays the foundation for the
This course is an introduction to the foundations of Catholic Christian faith. It is in this Hebrew narrative that such concepts
morality in the creating, redeeming and sanctifying activity of as covenant, messiah, salvation history, and creation are first
the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Course lessons explore how encountered and explained. By going through this course, the
Catholic morality is our graced response to God as members of student will become familiar with the basic plan of salvation
the Body and Bride of Christ, the Church. It emphasizes the history.
intimate link between spirituality and morality.
Required Text:
Required Text:
The Holy Bible
On the Christian Meaning of Human Suffering, John Paul II
Mother of the Redeemer (Redemptoris Mater), John Paul II
Undergraduate Course Descriptions 53

106-0406 Online describe the different elements of authentic participation in


Survey of the New Testament the Church’s worship of God.
3 undergraduate credits Please note: Because this course uses audio and flash technology, it is highly
The New Testament is the record of the definitive historical recommended that students have a high-speed internet connection and a flash
player such as Adobe Flash or the Safari flash plug-in (MAC). Most will find
intervention of God in human history and the subsequent that they already have flash. Otherwise, it is freely available on the web at
continuation of this incarnation by means of the Church. This http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/. Download assistance is available. A written
course carries out a detailed analysis of the content and the transcription of each lesson is provided in the course room.

theological meaning of the primary texts of the Church—i.e., Required Text:


Vatican II: Renewal Within Tradition, edited by Matthew L.

Undergraduate Courses
the New Testament. This course has four major emphases. The
first area of study examines the historical record of Jesus’ life Lamb and Matthew Levering, Oxford University Press (2008).
through the three Synoptic Gospels, which will be supple- Dogmatic Constitution on the Church (Lumen Gentium)
mented by the theological analysis provided by the Gospel of Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation (Dei Verbum)
John. The second area studies the life of the early Church Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy (Sacrosanctum Concilium)
(Acts of the Apostles), which will examine the structures and Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World
(Gaudium et Spes)
self-understanding of the early Church as well as its funda-
mental grasp of the nature and work of Christ. The third area
106-0701 Online
of study examines the epistles, especially their contribution to
the development of Christology, soteriology, and ecclesiology. Survey of Catholic Spirituality
The final area looks at the apocalyptic book, Revelation, and 3 imdergraduate credits
its meaning for the Church. Through this course, the student This course provides an introduction to the origin and develop-
ment of Christian asceticism, identifying the early and
will become familiar with the texts and theology of the New
subsequent spiritual schools and their leaders. Lessons trace the
Testament, basic interpretations of key Biblical ideas, and their
emergence of western monasticism with emphasis on Augustine
interrelationship.
and Benedict. and continues with the development of spiritu-
Required Text: ality through the subsequent centuries to modern times.
The Holy Bible Required Text:
Christian Spirituality in the Catholic Tradition, Fr. Jordan
106-0603 Online Aumann, O.P .
The Four Constitutions of Vatican II Anthology of Selected Readings
3 undergraduate credits
The second Vatican Council (1963-1965) was the major event
106-1101 Online
in the Church in the twentieth century. It is also perhaps the
Catholic Apologetics
most misunderstood event as well. This course will examine
3 undergraduate credits
the four constitutions (the highest ranking documents issued
Apologetics seeks to give the reasons for what we believe as
by a council): two on the Church, one on divine Revelation,
Catholic Christians. This course examines the foundations for
and one on the Sacred Liturgy.
belief, the authoritative sources for belief, and the modern
problems associated with belief. Consideration is also given to
The two constitutions on the Church deal with the way the
how apologetics is related to faith, theology, catechesis, liturgy,
Church works (People of God, Hierarchy, Laity, Religious and
and the Church's mission. A few of the most important apolo-
so on) and then the way in which the Church carries the
gies are noted and treated briefly. Note: This is not an
mission of Christ to the world.
apologetic methods course, but rather a study of apologetics.
Required Text:
The Constitution on Divine Revelation takes up the way God
Vatican Council II, Volume 1, Fr. Austin Flannery, O.P.
reveals himself to us through the Sacred Scriptures and the
Handbook of Christian Apologetics, Peter Kreeft and Ronald
Tradition of the Church. A person’s faith is the response to
K. Tacelli
God’s revelation so this is an important constitution and by
On Evangelization in the Modern World (Evangelii Nuntizndi),
the end of this part of the course students should be able to Paul VI
explain the role of Scripture and the role of Sacred Tradition On Catechesis in our Time (Catechesis Tradendae), John Paul II
and see how these impact each person. To Teach as Jesus Did, United States Conference of Catholic
Bishops
The Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy explains what the
Anthology of Selected Readings
Church’s liturgy is and how a person participates in it. Upon
completion of this part of the course students should be able to
54 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

106-1701 Online able to translate and use demonstrative, personal, relative, and
Undergraduate Academic Skills intensive pronouns and adjectives; understand and form the
1 undergraduate credits infinitive mood and the participle; form adverbs, compare
This course is designed to help bachelor’s degree students adjectives and adverbs, use the irregular verbs possum, volo,
succeed in their college coursework. By the end of this course, nalo, malo, eo; understand and use deponent verbs and indi-
students should be able to meet attainable goals in four areas: rect statement; identify and use cardinal and ordinal numerals;
grammar, composition, information organization, and time and use a more extensive vocabulary , and apply the grammatical
task management. .The atmosphere in the Academic Skills conceptions studied to ecclesiastical and liturgical Latin.
course room is designed to be helpful and welcoming, and to Required Text:
Undergraduate Courses

provide each student with a motivational support system. New First Steps in Latin, Lee Pearcy, Mary Allen, Thomas
Kent, Michael Klaassen, Mary Van Dyke Konopka,
Assignments are evaluated on a pass/fail basis.
Alexander Pearson

Please note: Students post one short assignment per month, ten months a year.
There are no July and August lessons. They enroll in the course at the begin- 106-1803 Online
ning of their academic programs and pay for 1 credit of undergraduate tuition.
Biblical Greek I
After that, students maintain enrollment in this course by paying the annual
3 undergraduate credits
technology fee.
This course is an introduction to the Greek language as it
Required Text:
appears in the texts of both the Old and New Testaments.
None
While emphasis is on the basic morphology of nouns and verbs
and most frequently used words in Biblical Greek, the students
106-1801 Online will also learn all the basic pronouns and prepositions, the
Latin I three noun declensions, all the tenses in which finite Greek
3 undergraduate credits verbs appear, many of the basic rules of Greek syntax, and,
This course begins with the fundamentals of grammar finally, the commonly used Greek participle.
including the definitions of terms that are used as well as the
concepts of conjugations and declensions. These are applied to Following the traditional deductive model of learning an
the Latin language with the following:all four conjugations; all ancient language, the focus will be on learning paradigms and
five declensions— masculine, feminine and neuter; all six principal parts of Greek verbs, gaining fluency in reading
tenses in both the active and passive voices of the indicative Biblical texts, as well as hearing, pronouncing, and reciting the
mood; agreement of nouns and adjectives; the irregular verb Greek words using audio files. Students will also experience an
“to be”; increasing vocabulary with each lesson. inductive “feel” for how the language works in practice by
working through translation and grammar exercises drawn
Essential to this is the importance of drill, memorization, and from both Old and New Testaments of the Greek Bible.
appreciation of the benefits of a highly inflected language. In
addition to mastering basic sentence construction, students The course assumes no previous knowledge of Greek. The first
should also be able to apply these grammatical concepts to lesson begins with the alphabet. The course only assumes
some basic prayers of the Church. ability to read English.
Required Text:
Please note: All students are required to download and install Greek fonts to
New First Steps in Latin, Lee Pearcy, Mary Allen, Thomas allow for full participation in typing the Greek language in the online course
Kent, Michael Klaassen, Mary Van Dyke Konopka, room. Instructions will be provided (the downloaded file is "zipped" and will
Alexander Pearson require unpacking with a compression utility such as WinZip or 7-Zip). In addi-
tion, to play the audio files all students must have media player software such
as RealPlayer, Windows Media Player, or QuickTime Player, or else have an
MP3 player such as an iPod. It is highly recommended that students have a
106-1802 Online
high-speed Internet connection to allow for downloading the large audio files
Latin II used in this course.

3 undergraduate credits Required Text:


This course builds on the grammar and vocabulary already The Complete Vocabulary Guide to the Greek New
studied in Latin I, and demonstrates the essential importance Testament, Warren C. Trenchard, Zondervan; Revised
edition (November 1, 1998)
of drill, memorization, and appreciation of the benefits of a
A Primer of Biblical Greek, N. Clayton Croy, 1999.
highly inflected language. Students will read brief selections of
prayers, psalms, Christian authors, and liturgical texts while
honing their skills in the ancient language of the Roman
Catholic Church. Students who complete this course should be
Undergraduate Course Descriptions 55

106-1804 Online 106-2701 Online


Biblical Greek II Western Civilization, Part I
3 undergraduate credits 3 undergraduate credits
This course builds upon the foundation of Biblical Greek I. Western Civilization I is the first of two undergraduate survey
Students will receive reinforcement of basic Greek grammar courses covering the whole of Western history. This first course
and morphology learned in the first course. The practice of examines the central themes in the development of Western
hearing and reciting paradigms and principal parts will be Civilization from the rise of the major cultures in the Near
continued throughout this course. East to the Crusades and the flowering of medieval life and
culture. Students will study the great civilizations of

Undergraduate Courses
Students will become proficient in both grammar and vocabu- Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece and Rome, the
lary. In grammar, they will be skilled in working with the conversion of the Roman Empire, and the emergence of
widely-used participles, infinitives, verbs in subjective mood, Christendom during the Middle Ages.
and imperatives. Furthermore, they will master the conjuga- Required Texts:
tions and principal parts of the most common irregular verbs. How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization, Thomas
In vocabulary, students will have learned all the words that Woods
occur more than twenty times in the New Testament, as well Recommended Texts:
as words which occur often in the Gospels. Students will also The Making of Europe: An Introduction to the History of
be able to read block selections from the Gospels and be taught European Unity, Christopher Dawson
to analyze the basics of the New Testament critical apparatus
to form their own educated judgments concerning its textual 116-0102 Online
problems. Jesus Christ: God, Man, and Savior
3 undergraduate credits
Students who successfully complete this course will have the
This course examines the fundamental teachings of the
ability to read (with the aid of a dictionary) the four Gospels of
Catholic Church as contained in the second article of the
the New Testament and any narrative section of the Septuagint.
Apostles' Creed— Jesus Christ. Students who complete this
With practice, students will eventually be able to “graduate” to
more discursive texts of the Bible, such as the Pauline epistles; study of Christ should be able to readily describe the scriptural
and poetic texts, such as the psalms and the prophets. foundations for Church teaching on Christ, be able to explain
the doctrinal and historical developments on the natures and
Please note: All students are required to download and install Greek fonts to allow person of Jesus Christ, trace Mary’s role in salvation history,
for full participation in typing the Greek language in the online course room.
Instructions will be provided (the downloaded file is "zipped" and will require
and identify the grace of the Holy Spirit as an application of
unpacking with a compression utility such as WinZip or 7-Zip).In addition, to play Christ’s redemptive work. The course culminates in offering
the audio files all students must have media player software such as RealPlayer,
students insights on how to apply the reflections of this course
Windows Media Player, or QuickTime Player, or else have an MP3 player such as
an iPod. It is highly recommended that students have a high-speed Internet to their own individual spiritual lives.
connection to allow for downloading the large audio files used in this course.
Required Text: Please note: This Course has a prerequisite course. Students are to have
The Complete Vocabulary Guide to the Greek New Testament, completed God, Man, and the Universe
Warren C. Trenchard, Zondervan; Revised edition Required Text:
(November 1, 1998) Catechism of the Catholic Church (Revised Vatican Edition),
A Primer of Biblical Greek, N. Clayton Croy, 1999 Libreria Editrice Vaticana
The Teaching of Christ, Bishop Donald W. Wuerl, Fr. Ronald
106-2501 Online Lawler, O.F.M. Cap., Thomas Comerford Lawler
Basic English Grammar & Composition I The Father's Son, Fr. James T. O'Connor
3 undergraduate credits Redeemer of Man (Redemptor Hominis), John Paul II
This course is part one of a two part series. Students who
Also available in paper format 111-0102
complete this course will be able to demonstrate an under-
standing of the basic elements of English grammar and apply
its principles to the writing of sentences and paragraphs for
college level study.
Required Text:
Turabian, Kate L. A Manual for Writers. 7th ed. Chicago,
University of Chicago Press, 2007
56 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Required Text:
116-0800 Online The Catechism of the Catholic Church, Liberia Editrice
Vaticana, 1997
Fundamentals of Catholic Doctrine
Compendium: Catechism of the Catholic Church, USCCB,
3 undergraduate credits
2006
Fundamentals of Catholic Doctrine presents an organic synthesis of
Some Aspects of Christian Meditation, Sacred Congregation
the essential content of Catholic doctrine as presented in The for the Doctrine of the Faith Use following link: It is no
Catechism of the Catholic Church. The structure of the course longer available in booklet form.
is built on the four pillars of faith: Part One, the Profession of http://www.ewtn.com/library/curia/cdfmed.htm
Undergraduate Courses

Faith; Part Two, the Celebration of the Christian Mystery; Part


Three, Life in Christ; and Part Four, Christian Prayer. Students
who complete this course should be able to present Catholic
teaching using accurate language and appropriate documenta-
tion. Students should also be so familiar with the Catechism and Online seminars may be taken for undergraduate credit and earn
its significance for catechesis and spirituality that they are able to 1 undergraduate credit. Please page 59 of this catalog or visit
integrate it into every aspect of their lives, whether it be their cdu.edu for a schedule. of upcoming seminars.
prayer life, their relationships, their parish service, or their
professional careers.

CDU offers inspiring courses


and programs to meet every
educational need and level.
Our courses are annotated to
the Catechism of the Catholic
Church and many recent
magisterial documents.
Continuing Education Course Descriptions 57

historical development of catechisms with particular emphasis


Continuing Education on the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and identify the role of
301-0401 Paper this Catechism for the work of evangelization. This course
provides helpful background information for anyone involved
Introduction to the Bible: Part I
with the RCIA and other faith formation ministries.
25 clock hours/2.5 continuing education units
Required Text:
Part 1 is a study of the concepts of inspiration, inerrancy, the
On Catechesis in Our Time (Catechesi Tradendae), John Paul II.
development of the official list of the books of the Bible, and
Catechism of the Catholic Church,1997 Edition.
the various versions of the Bible. It also examines briefly the
major pronouncements of the Church regarding the Bible and
306-0801 Online Individual
begins to study interpretation.
The Profession of Faith

Continuing Education
301-0402 Paper 20 clock hours/2.0 continuing education units
Students will explore the deeper meaning behind the words we
Introduction to the Bible: Part II
say in the Nicene Creed (every Sunday) and in the Apostle’s
30 clock hours/3.0 continuing education units
Creed (before each Rosary) and learn how and why these
Part II is devoted to the study of Bible interpretation. It will
creeds, which represent the profession of Faith of traditional
cover the various types of criticism and analyses, which are
Christianity were written. Students who complete the three
used to interpret biblical texts and will summarize the various
lessons of this course should be able to explain the historical
schools of exegesis.
and dogmatic development of the creed, and to relate the
301-0403 Paper heretical fads of the early Church with similar heresies still
with us today.
Wisdom: A Journey with God to God
Required Text:
35 clock hours/3.5 continuing education units
Catechism of the Catholic Church,1997 Edition.
This course provides a brief overview of the seven books which
Recommended Text:
comprise the Wisdom Literature in the Old Testament. A
The Faith Explained,, 3rd ed, Fr. Leo J. Trese, Princeton:
lesson on each book provides an explanation of the text and
Scepter Publishers, 2000.
describes how this ancient literature can be applied to one's
daily life experience. 306-0802 Online Individual
The Celebration of the Christian Mystery
301-0601 Paper
30 clock hours/3.0 continuing education units
Mary: Mother of the Redeemer, Mother of the Christ instituted, for our justification, the seven Sacraments,
Church which were foreshadowed in the Old Testament. This course
20 clock hours/2.0 continuing education units provides an overview of the Sacraments in light of their three
Using Chapter Eight of Lumen Gentium and John Paul II’s categories: Sacraments of Initiation, Sacraments of Healing,
encyclical: Mary Mother of the Redeemer, students who success- and the Sacraments at the Service of Communion. Students
fully complete this course should be able to explain the who complete the three lessons of this course should be able to
movement of the Church’s teachings about Mary from privilege- explain in detail the content of each Sacrament within the
centered to sharing-oriented, interpret and describe the concept context of liturgy and Scripture, and to describe the emphasis
of Mary’s role as model and archetype of the Church, and, apply that catechesis should place on teaching the communal dimen-
criteria described in these documents for an authentic devotion sion of the Sacraments.
to Mary as Mother of our Savior and all the redeemed, and Required Text:
summarize the spiritual benefits of such a devotion. Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1997 Edition.
Required Text: The Faith Explained, 3rd ed, Fr. Leo J. Trese, Princeton:
Dogmatic Constitution on the Church (Lumen Gentium) Scepter Publishers, 2000.
Mother of the Redeemer (Redemptoris Mater)
306-0803 Online Individual
306-0800 Online Individual Life in Christ
Introduction to the Catechism 30 clock hours/3.0 continuing education units
20 clock hours/2.0 continuing education units Living a life in Christ entails the transformation of our intel-
This introductory course takes an interesting look at the cate- lect and will by the Holy Spirit so that we put on the mind of
chetical apostolate (the work of teaching the Faith) and traces Christ and will what Christ wills. The course on pillar three of
its development from the early Church to Vatican II. Students the Catechism is devoted to man’s vocation of life in the Spirit
who complete this course should be able to explain the and examines how to live the Christian life within the context
58 Continuing Education Course Descriptions

of the call to holiness. Students who complete this course ment; apply the various models and methods for teaching
should be able to explain the sources of Christian morality and moral development; and integrate a catechesis of the Church’s
the moral responsibilities required by the Ten Commandments social teachings with appropriate social action
and the teachings of the Church. They will also be able to Required Text: none
identify many important concepts that illuminate God’s loving
purpose behind the gift of His Commandments. 301-0903 Paper
Required Text: Catechetical Foundations: Part III
Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1997 Edition. 35 clock hours/3.5 continuing education units
The Faith Explained, 3rd ed, Fr. Leo J. Trese, Princeton: Part III of this four-part series focuses on teaching prayer, the
Scepter Publishers, 2000.
sacraments, and liturgy. Students who complete this course
should be able to clarify the fundamentals for the first recep-
Continuing Education

306-0804 Online Individual


tion of the sacraments of Penance, Eucharist, and
Christian Prayer Confirmation as well as for a life-long devotion. They should
20 clock hours/2.0 continuing education units be able to prepare groups for liturgical celebrations, and teach
This course invites students to make the objective realities of prayers appropriate for each level of catechetical formation.
doctrine, worship, and life in Christ an integral part of the Required Text: none
personal relationship we should all have with the living God.
Students who complete these four inspiring lessons will be
301-0904 Paper
given new understandings to help them adapt their own way of
praying so that it transforms their relationship with God. They
Catechetical Foundations: Part IV
35 clock hours/3.5 continuing education units
will be able to relate prayer to living the Christian life; to
Part IV examines some fundamental catechetical skills neces-
explain the revelation of prayer in the Old and New
sary to evangelize effectively. Students who complete this
Testaments; to trace the development of prayer in the
course should be able to describe the guidelines for adapting
Christian tradition; to identify ways of overcoming obstacles to
the Christian message to different learning styles, ethnic back-
prayer, and finally to summarize the main truths that are
grounds, etc. They should also be able to explain the
contained in the Our Father.
fundamentals for preparing and giving effective catechetical
Required Text:
presentations, including the basic principles of classroom
Catechism of the Catholic Church,1997 Edition.
management and discipline.
The Faith Explained,, 3rd ed, Fr. Leo J. Trese, Princeton:
Scepter Publishers, 2000. Required Text: none

301-0901 Paper 303-0501 Paper


Catechetical Foundations: Part I Great Moments in Church History (EWTN)
35 clock hours/3.5 continuing education units 50 clock hours/5.0 continuing education units
Part I of a four-part series concentrates on the vocation of the Based on the popular book Triumph: The Power and the Glory of
catechist and the attention to the developmental level of those the Catholic Church, this video-course explores the spectacular
who are being catechized for an effective teaching of the Faith. story of the Catholic Church from the early Church to the
Students who complete this course should be able to define the twilight years of Pope John Paul II. In this video-based course,
role of catechesis in the work of evangelization, identify the Fr. C. John McCloskey interviews Triumph's author, H.W.
characteristics and formation of a catechist, explore effective Crocker, about the history of the Catholic Church and how
teaching principles related to the various stages in human the Church has shaped world history over the past 2000 years
development, review catechetical resources, and analyze the as no other institution has. These two master communicators
reflection needed for teaching the Faith. bring history alive with verve, humor and insight. Lessons are
Required Text: none presented in 13 video interviews.
Required Text:
301-0902 Paper Triumph: The Power and the Glory of the Catholic Church, H.
W. Crocker, III
Catechetical Foundations: Part II
Recorded video series broadcast on EWTN or purchase of
35 clock hours/3.5 continuing education units
video tape set from CDU fro additional $30. If you wish to
Part II of this catechetics series addresses the stages of moral purchase the videos, please contact CDU (888) 254-4238.
development and the Christian vocation to put Faith into 303-0805 Paper
action. Students who complete these lessons should be able to
The Catholic Moral Challenge for the New
adapt a catechesis that follows the principles of moral develop-
Continuing Education Course Descriptions 59

Millennium: Part I (EWTN) 303-0806 Paper


15 clock hours/1.5 continuing education units The Catholic Moral Challenge for the New
This is the first of a two-part series based on Part Three of the Millennium: Part II The Ten Commandments
Catechism of the Catholic Church, "Life in Christ." It provides a
(EWTN)
general overview of the principles of morality as taught by the
20 clock hours/2.0 continuing education units
Catholic Church. It consists of five lessons and four audio/CD
This is the second of the two-part series based on Part Three of
lectures that cover: the meaning of moral acts; the difference
the Catechism of the Catholic Church, "Life in Christ." It builds
between good and evil; and the formation of conscience.
on the principles taught in the first course by applying these
Required text:
precepts specifically to the Ten Commandments. It consists of
Optional audio/CD tapes $10 additional
ten lessons and nine video lectures, which explain the
meaning of the commandments and describe the virtues
needed to respond to God's call to live in Christ.
Required text
Optional audio tapes/CDs $20 additional

Online Seminars
Online seminars may be taken for undergraduate credit and earn
1 undergraduate credit. Please page 59 of this catalog or visit
cdu.edu for a schedule. of upcoming seminars.

Online learning at
CDU offers quality
course instruction
in a convenient,
flexible format.
60 2009 Online Seminars

2009 Online Seminars 102-0462, 202-0462, 302-0462 Online


The Letters of St. Paul, Part II
102-0461, 202-0461,302-0461 Online April 20 - May 11 with Fr.Thomas Lane, Ph.D.
The Letters of St. Paul, Part I This second of two online seminars on St. Paul’s Letters will
Jan. 19 – Feb. 9, 2009 with Fr. Thomas Lane, Ph.D. provide participants with an overview of Paul’s letters to
This seminar provides an overview of the Acts of the Apostles, Philippians, Ephesians, Colossians, Timothy, and Titus as well
the life of St. Paul and his first letters to the Thessalonians and as St. Paul’s second letter to the Corinthians and
Corinthians, as well as his letters to the Galatians and Thessalonians.
Romans.
102-0463, 202-0463, 302-0463 Online
102-0602, 202-0602, 302-0602 Online
Humanae Vitae and the Culture of Life: Paul St. Paul’s Letters to the Romans
June 15 - July 6 with Peter Brown
VI’s Prophetic Voice Forty Years Later
This three week study approaches Romans as Paul's interpreta-
Jan. 26 – Feb. 16 with Patrick Fagan, Ph.D.
tion and exposition of the story of the Jewish Bible, a story
Examine the philosophical and theological principles within
Online seminars

that has reached its climax in Jesus and the restored people of
Humanae Vitae – Paul VI’s famous encyclical that upholds the
God.
traditional teaching of the Church on contraception, as well as
the social effects of contraception over the four decades since
102-2005, 202-2005, 302-2005 Online
the encyclical was promulgated.
Marriage and the Complementarity of Men and
102-0522, 202-0522, 302-0522 Online Women
Early American Catholic History 1492-1808 July 13 - August 3 with William May, Ph.D.
Jan. 26 – Feb. 16 with Matthew Bunson, Ph.D. This online interactive seminar course looks at the comple-
Follow the course of history in this seminar that explores early mentarity of man and woman as revealed in marriage, in the
Catholic history in North America. Seminar topics include the roles of motherhood and fatherhood, and in the community of
planting of the faith in the vast wilderness of North America, the world, Church, and family. John Paul II’s exhortations,
the labors of the great Spanish missionaries, the challenges faced letters, and encyclical related to the family will be integrated
by Catholics in the English colonies, the heroic participation of with each of the themes. Students who complete this seminar
Catholics in the American Revolution, and the legacy of John course should be able to describe the complementarity of man
Carroll, the first bishop (and later archbishop) of Baltimore. and woman in relation to the marital act, to the receiving and
welcoming of new human life, and to the locus of authority in
102-0484, 202-0484, 302-0484 Online the family.

Liturgical Readings for Lent


102-0523, 202-0523, 302-0523 Online
Feb. 23 – Mar. 16 with Fr. Bevil Bramwell, OMI, Ph.D.
The season of Lent is a time for growing in an understanding The Rise of American Catholicism: 1808-1908
of oneself in the Church and for service to society at large. August 10 - August 31 with Matthew Bunson, Ph.D.
This seminar draws on the spiritual riches of the Scripture This three-week online seminar continues the survey of
readings that will be heard on the Sundays in Lent to show Catholic history in North America. It focuses on the remark-
how each person can walk to the foot of the Cross, so that one able development of the Catholic community in the United
can join the Church in its great mission to the world, to show States throughout the 19th century. Students who complete
how God pours out his love for the whole world on the Cross. this seminar should be able to discuss the phenomenal growth
of the Catholic population through immigration and the efforts
of the Church to provide immigrants with pastoral care,
102-1203, 202-1203, 302-1293 Online
describe the role of Catholics in the American Civil War,
St. Augustine: Confessions and The City of God assess the work of the Baltimore Councils, identify the
March 16 - April 6 with Robert Royal, Ph.D.
achievements of such Catholic leaders as St. Elizabeth Ann
This seminar presents a great opportunity to read and discuss two
Seton, Fr. Frederic Baraga, Cardinal John Gibbons, and Fr.
of the most influential texts in Western Christianity, written by
Michael McGivney, detail the threats of Anti-Catholicism and
one of greatest thinkers and saints. Students who complete this
the crisis of Americanism, and summarize the establishment of
seminar should have a firm grasp of Augustine’s vision of the
American Catholic education
dynamics of human life as it is lived in both its personal and
communal dimensions.
2009 Online Seminars 61

102-0707, 202-0707, 302-0707 Online all involved in the process of catechesis. Those who complete
Lead Kindly Light: The Spirituality of this seminar will not only be acquainted with the content of
Cardinal Newman this National Directory,--its implications and applications--but
September 21 - October 12 with Fr. Bevil Bramwell also, be enthusiastic about bringing the transforming message
John Henry Cardinal Newman was one of the luminaries of of God’s Word/revelation into contemporary culture within the
the 19th century Church. His writing in both technical context of the new evangelization. Students will identify and
theology and spirituality had no equal in that period. This confront present day elements that are roadblocks to evange-
seminar examines a few aspects of his spirituality starting with lization and catechesis, and examine roles and responsibilities
his homilies on some basic Catholic themes in the first week. that are critical for revitalizing the catechetical ministry in the
The second week reviews some of his very short devotions on United States.
the theme of God with Us followed by a look at one of his
longer writings The Dream of Gerontius. Throughout the third 102-0524, 202-0524, 302-0524 Online
week, a study of his hymn Lead Kindly Light and his notes on Modern American Catholic History: 1908-2009
The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and on Divine Providence. November 9 - 30 with Matthew Bunson, Ph.D.
Students who complete this seminar should have a deeper This three-week online seminar course concludes the three-part
grasp of the spiritual life of the Christian and its implications survey of Catholic history in the United States. It will focus on
in day-to-day life. the remarkable development of the Catholic community in
America throughout the 20th and early 21st centuries. Students
102-0926, 202-0926, 302-0926 Online who complete this seminar should be able to discuss the activi-
Basic Principles and Skills for Catechists ties of the Church during the Great Depression and the two
October 6 -27 with Sr. Mary Anne Linder, F.S.E., Ph.D. World Wars; identify the areas of progress for Catholics in
This three week online seminar highlights some of the most American political life and society in the 1940’s to the 1960’s;
important principles and skills for catechists who are looking for assess the impact of the Second Vatican Council (1961-65);
the very basics needed to carry out their vocation. The major discuss the importance of immigration and diversity to the
topics to be addressed include the vocation, ministry and sources Catholic community in the new century; address the prophetic
for catechists, the planning and execution of a catechetical voice of the Church for the culture of life in modern American
session, and the support skills needed to manage the class, envi- society and politics; and forecast the possible keys areas of
ronment, discipline and building of community within the concern for the Church in the 21st century and beyond.
catechetical session. Participants who complete this seminar
should be able to confidently prepare and carry out basic cate- 304-1303 Online
chetical responsibilities effectively and efficiently. Reflections on the Liturgical Year for Spanish
Speaking Adults
102-2501, 202-2501, 302-2501 Online
Reflexiones Sobre el Año Litúrgico: Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe
Pioneers of American Catholic Education y la Temporada de Adviento
October 19 - November 9 with Carolann Cirbee, Ph.D. December 1 -22 with Sergio A. Castillo,
This visually rich seminar introduces students to five superior The liturgical cycle of our Church is rich in history,
generals of women’s religious orders and five diocesan bishops symbolism, and wisdom. The season of Advent, which
whose vision, determination, and faith enabled them to over- begins the cycle, is a season that is seldom understood and
come the challenges of pioneer life to bring education to an appreciated in all its depth of meaning and value. To
emerging nation. These ten Americans brought the light of better appreciate it, Our Lady of Guadalupe, Patroness of
education to America, serving Catholics, Protestants, frontier the Americas, offers us a spiritual model of life for the season
settlers, city dwellers, Native Americans, African Americans, of Advent. Participants of this seminar will have a greater
and European immigrants. The ten visionaries profiled are familiarity with the different feasts and seasons of the liturgical
John Carroll, John Dubois, Elizabeth Seton, Rose Duchesne, year, will have a (better) more active participation during the
Catherine Spalding, Ann Therese Guerin, John Neumann, Advent celebrations, and will be able to recount in great detail
Martin Spalding, James Gibbons, and Katherine Drexel. the story and symbolism behind the miraculous image of Our
Lady of Guadalupe.
102-0922, 202-0922, 302-0922 Online
Vitalizing the Catechetical Ministry in the U.S. Online seminars are offered at the graduate, undergraduate and continuing
November 2 - 23 with Daniel Mulhall, M.A. education level. Course numbers beginning with 202 are graduate level;
This online interactive seminar revolves around the challenges course numbers beginning with 102 are undergraduate level; course beginning
and confidence that the National Directory for Catechesis offers with 302 are taken as noncredit. See cdu.edu more on seminar requirements.
62 Faculty

Faculty Fr. Paul deLadurantaye, S.T.D., Ph.D.


Ph.D. in Sacred Theology, Pontifical John Paul II Institute for
Studies on Marriage and the Family
Joseph C. Atkinson, Ph.D.
B.A., King’s College, Nova Scotia; B.Ed., Acadia University,
Patrick Fagan, Ph.D.
Nova Scotia; B.Th., McGill University, Quebec; M.Div.,
.B.S.S. in sociology and social administration, Dip. Psych. in
Montreal Diocesan Theological College, Quebec; S.T.L.,
psychology, University College, Dublin; Ph.D., American
S.T.D., Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage
University
and Family, Washington, D.C.

Heather Erb, Ph.D.


Fr. Robert A. Batule, M.Div.
B.Phil., Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium; M.A. and
B.A., Cathedral College of the Immaculate Conception, Lloyd
Ph.D. degrees in philosophy from the University of Toronto
Harbor, NY; M.A., Adelphi University, NY M.A. in theology
from Saint John University, NY; M. Div., Immaculate
Angela Franks, Ph.D.
Conception Seminary, Lloyd Harbor, NY
B.A., University of Dallas, Dallas, TX; M.A.in philosophy from
The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC; Ph.D.
Brian Benestad, Ph.D.
in theology from Boston College, MA
B.A., Assumption College, Worcester, MA; S.T.L., Gregorian
University, Rome; Ph.D., Boston College, Boston, MA Fr. Richard M. Guest, M.Div.
B.S. in biology, A.B. in theology, Loyola University, Chicago;
Fr. John Michael Beers, Ph.D. M.A. (Hebrew Bible), Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN;
B.A., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC; M.Div., Mount St. Mary’s Seminary, Emmitsburg, MD
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; Ph.D. in Medieval
Studies, Catholic University of America; Post Doctoral studies, Josha Hood, B.A.
Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Pontifical Institute of B.A in classics with concentration in Latin literature and
Christian Archaeology; S.T.D. Candidate, Pontifical University minor in religious studies, University of Alabama; currently, a
of Saint Thomas Aquinas, Rome doctoral candidate at the Catholic University of America,
Washington, DC
Fr. Bevil Bramwell, O.M.I., Ph.D.
U.Ed and B.Sc., University of Natal (South Africa); S.T.B. Stephene Kass, M.A.
Gregorian University; S.T.L. Weston Jesuit School of B.A. in geology, University of Rochester, NY; M.S. in nuclear
Theology; Ph.D. Boston College, MA engineering with a minor in materials science, North Caroline
State University, Raleigh, NC; M.A. in systematic theology,
Peter Brown, M.A. Immaculate Conception Seminary and School of Theology at
B.A., Yale University; M.A. in Theology, Franciscan University Seton Hall University, NJ
in Steubenville; currently working on Ph.D. in Biblical Studies,
The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC Fr. Thomas Lane, Ph.D.
B.A. in ancient classics;, BA in theology, diploma in coun-
Matthew E. Bunson, Ph.D. seling, National Seminary and Pontifical University, Ireland,
B.A. in History; M.A. in theology with specializations in St. Patrick’s College, Kildare; license in Sacred Scripture,
Pastoral Theology and Church History; Ph.D. of Ministry, Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; Ph.D. degree in Theology,
Graduate Theological Foundation, Notre Dame; currently Pontifical Gregorian University.
working on Ph.D. in Church history
Susan Fournier Matthews, Ph.D.
Carolann Cirbee, Ph.D. A.B. with a major in theology, St. Anselm College,
B.A. in history, Catholic University of America, Washington, Manchester, NH; with a major in theology; M.A. and Ph. D. in
DC; M.A. in theology from The Catholic Distance University; Biblical Studies, Catholic University of America, Washington,
Ph.D. in education from Capella University in Minneapolis, MI DC
Faculty 63

William E. May, Ph.D. Russell Shaw, M.A.


B.A. and M.A. in philosophy, Catholic University of America, B.A. and M.A., Georgetown University, Washington, DC
Washington D.C.; Ph.D., Marquette University, MI
Fr. Stephen F. Torraco, Ph.D.
Daniel Meola, B.A. B.A., St. Francis de Sales College, Milwaukee, WI.; M.Div.,
B.A. in theology with a minor in philosophy, Catholic Divinity School, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.; M.A.,
University of America, Washington, DC; currently a graduate Boston College, Boston, Mass.; Ph.D., joint doctoral program,
student at the John Paul II Institute for Marriage and Family in Boston College and Newton Theological School, Boston, MA
Washington, D.C. studying for his M.T.S. in Person, Marriage,
and Family Elizabeth Turcic, Ph.D.
B.A. in psychology , Boston College, Boston, MA; M.A. in
Robert Miller, Ph.D. psychology with a concentration in marriage and family
B.A. in biblical and Near Eastern studies, Kent State studies, Boston University, Boston, MA; Psy.D. in clinical
University; M.A in biblical and Near Eastern studies, psychology, Regent University, VA
University of Michigan; Ph.D in biblical and Near Eastern
studies, The University of Michigan. MI t Peter Vere, M.D.
B.A., Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada; Licentiate and
Daniel Mulhall, M.A. M. D. in Canon Law from Saint Paul University, Ottawa,
B.A. in political science from Bellarmine University,
Canada
Louisville, KY; M.A. in adult christian community develop-
ment, Regis University, Denver, CO; M.A. in theology from
Jeremy Wilkins, Ph.D.
Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.
B.A. in religious studies; Washington University, St. Louis,

Owen Phelan, Ph.D. MO; B.A. in sacred theology and a M.Div, Regis College at

Ph.D. in medieval history, University of Notre Dame, Notre University of Toronto, Ontario; Ph.D. in systematic and histor-

Dame, IN ical theology, Boston College, MA; currently completing a


Licentiate in sacred theology from St. Mary's Seminary and
Donald Prudlo, Ph.D. University, Baltimore, MD
B.A. in history, Christendom College, Front Royal, VA.; M.A.
in Systematic Theology, Notre Dame Graduate School of Fr. Jerry Wooton, M.A.
Christendom College, Alexandria, VA.; Ph.D. in Religious B.S., St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, Philadelphia, PA, M.Div.
Studies, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA and M.A., St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, Philadelphia, PA

Fr. Michael Roach, M.A. Sr. Mary Brendon Zajac, S.N.D., D.Min.
B.A.in history, Loyola College, Baltimore, MD; M.A,. Catholic B.S., Notre Dame College of Ohio, South Euclid, Ohio; M. A.
University of America, Washington, DC in theology, Walsh University, North Canton, OH; M.Ed.,
Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH; D.Min., St. Mary
Robert Royal, Ph.D. Seminary and Graduate School of Theology, Wickliffe, OH
B.A. and M.A., Brown University, Providence, RI; Ph.D. in
comparative literature, Catholic University of America,
Washington, DC; fellowships to study in Italy from the
Renaissance Society of American

Sister Mary Margaret Ann Schlather, S.N.D.,


B.A. in elementary education, Notre Dame College, South
Euclid, Ohio; M.Ed. in elementary administration, Cleveland
State University, Cleveland, Ohio; M.A. in religious educa-
tion, Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas, Rome.
64 Adminstration and Departments

Academic Adminstration Departments


President Admissions
Marianne Evans Mount, Ph.D. ext. 700/ admissions@cdu.edu
mmount@cdu.edu
B.A., Skidmore College, N.Y.; M.A., Teachers College, Alumni & Friends
Columbia University; M.A., Pontifical University of St. ext. 715/ jdee@cdu.edu
Thomas Aquinas; Advanced Catechetical Diploma,
Continuing Education Registrar
Congregation for the Clergy; Ph.D. in human development,
ext. 713/ kwooddell@cdu.edu
Continuing Education

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.


Finance
Dean of Catechetical Programs ext. 702/ thoward@cdu.edu
Sister Mary Margaret Ann Schlather, S.N.D., M.A.
srschlather@cdu.edu Graduate Registrar
B.A., Notre Dame College, South Euclid, OH.; M.Ed.,
ext. 716/ gradregistrar@cdu.edu
Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH.; M.A., Pontifical
Institutional Advancement
University of St. Thomas Aquinas, Rome ext. 715/ jdee@cdu.edu

Dean of Graduate Studies Marketing


Robert Royal, Ph.D. ext. 710/ tcashen@cdu.edu
rroyal@cdu.edu
B.A. and M.A., Brown University, Providence, RI; Ph.D. in
Printing and Shipping
ext. 714/ cbranley@cdu.edu
comparative literature, Catholic University of America,
Washington, DC; fellowships to study in Italy from the
Technology
Renaissance Society of American (1977), president of the ext. 705/ cdaley@cdu.edu
Faith and Reason Institute, Washington, DC
Undergraduate Registrar
Dean of Students ext. 713/ kwooddell@cdu.edu
Carolann Cirbee, Ph.D.
ccirbee@cdu.edu
B.A. in history and education, Catholic University of America, phone 1.888.254.4238
Washington, D.C.; M.A. in religious studies, The Catholic
fax 540.338.2700
Distance University, Hamilton, VA.; Ph.D. in education
120 East Colonial Hwy
history, Capella University, Minneapolis, MN
Hamilton, VA 20158-9012
Dean of Undergraduate Studies
Rev. Bevil Bramwell, O.M.I., Ph.D.
frbramwell@cdu.edu
U.Ed. and B.Sc. University of Natal, South Africa; S.T.B.
Gregorian University; S.T.L. Weston Jesuit School of
Theology; Ph.D., Boston College, Boston, MA
Board of Trustees Trustees
Chairman of the Board Monsignor William J. Awalt
The Most Reverend Paul S. Loverde, D.D., S.T.L., J.C.L. Archdiocese of Washington
Bishop of Arlington Retired

Vice-Chairman for External Affairs The Most Reverend Michael J. Bransfield, D.D.

Joy
Russell B. Shaw Bishop of Wheeling-Charleston
Washington, DC
The Most Reverend John M. Dougherty, D.D., V.G.
Vice-Chairman for Mission Auxiliary Bishop of Scranton

from the
The Reverend. Paul F. deLadurantaye, S.T.D.
Secretary for Religious Education and Sacred Liturgy Jude P. Dougherty, Ph.D.
Diocese of Arlington Dean Emeritus,

Truth
Department of Philosophy
Secretary and Treasurer The Catholic University of America
Marianne Evans Mount, Ph.D.
President James P. Downey, Esquire
The Catholic Distance University Downey and Mayhugh
Warrenton, VA
The motto of CDU is Joy from the Truth, gaudium de veritate. In his
The Most Reverend Joseph W. Estabrook, D.D.
Apostolic Constitution Ex corde ecclesiae, John Paul II described ­Catholic Auxiliary Bishop
Archdiocese for Military Services, USA
­universities as coming from the heart of the Church. He stated that
Patricia F. B. Guntle
“[a Catholic university] shares that gaudium de veritate, so ­precious to
Great Falls, VA
St. Augustine, which is that joy of searching for, discovering and
Clarence Eugene Martin, III, K.M., Esquire
­communicating truth in every field of knowledge.” (Ex corde ecclesiae, art. 1) Martin and Seibert
Martinsburg, W VA

Judith Poppalardo, Esquire


Arlington, VA

Monsignor Peter J. Vaghi


Archdiocese of Washington
Pastor, Church of the Little Flower
Bethesda, MD
Program and Course Catalog

CDU
CDU at a Glance
CDU serves Catholics and non-Catholics who
wish to learn more about the Catholic Church,
deepen their Faith, or pursue professional
­development in religious studies and
theology. For 25 years, CDU has
educated adults, including lay people, religious 25 Years of Leadership in Distance Education
sisters and brothers, priests, deacons, and
missionaries in 57 countries. Our unique
approach to learning provides adults an
accredited, high-quality academic experience
without the commute to a university campus.

CDU courses and programs include:


• M.A. in Theology with concentrations
in ­Ecclesial Service, Sacred Scripture,
­Philosophy/Theology, and Catholic Culture
• B.A. Completion Degree in Theology
• Catechetical Diploma
• Advanced Catechist Certificate
• Professional development in religious studies
• Catechist formation
• Adult faith enrichment

120 East Colonial Highway


Hamilton, Virginia 20158-9012
Toll Free: 1-888-254-4238 ext. 700 n Fax: 540-338-4788 n E-mail: admissions@cdu.edu n www.cdu.edu