Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 6

Jacob Shull

Mrs. Szymczak

ALA 7

5 February 2017

Flowers for Algernon Argumentative Essay

In Flowers for Algernon, by Daniel Keyes, Charlie Gordon, a man with a 68

intelligence quotient score. gets a life changing surgery that triples his intelligence. The author,

Daniel Keyes, got the idea for the short story when a young disabled boy asked him, Mr. Keyes,

if I try really hard and become smart, will they put me in a normal class like all the other kids

(Keyes 433)? Charlie Gordon is like this boy, he has the drive to become smart, and wants to be

like others around him. Since he had the motivation to become smarter, he was chosen to

undergo the operation. Charlie happily accepted when the doctors offered to perform this surgery

on him, despite knowing the negative effects. In the end, Charlie gains almost superhuman levels

of intelligence, but he is soon stripped of it, and returns to his former intelligence level. Charlie

was better off gaining the intelligence, because he had more knowledge after the surgery, he was

happier

Charlie was better off gaining the intelligence. He had more knowledge after the surgery

than before the surgery. He had lots of knowledge, he learned many other languages, and his

reading and writing skill improved greatly. Quotes from Charlie before surgery, This test lookd

easy becus I coud see the picturs (Keyes 411). progris riport 2-martch (Keyes 410). Here are

two quotes from Charlie after surgery, As you see, my experiments are completed. I have

included in my report all of my formulae, as well as mathematical analysis in the appendix. Of

course, these should be verified (Keyes 426). The surgical stimulus to which we were both
subjected has resulted in an intensification and acceleration of all mental processes. The

unforeseen development, which I have taken the liberty of calling the Algernon-Gordon

Effect (Keyes 426). Charlie also became multilingual after the surgery, I thought there was

something wrong with my eyes. Then I realized I could no longer read German. I tested myself

in other languages. All gone. (Keyes 428).

Another reason Charlie was better off gaining intelligence is because he was happier

post-surgery. On page 427 in Flowers for Algernon, by Daniel Keyes, Charlie states, Oh,

God, please don't take it all away. This statement proves that Charlie liked having his high

intelligence. Charlie also said, Please ... please let me not forget how to read and write (Keyes

429). Charlie also remarks, I guess the same thing [regression of intelligence] is or will soon be

happening to me. Now that it's definite, I don't want it to happen (Keyes 427). This again, proves

that once Charlie gained the intelligence, he didnt want it taken away. However, it can be argued

that Charlie was actually happier before the surgery, and was therefore better off not gaining

intelligence. However, the post-surgery Charlie states, I see that even in my dullness I knew that

I was inferior, and that other people had something I lacked-something denied me (Keyes 424).

In this sentence, Charlie is saying that despite his former lack of knowledge, he knew all along

that he was different, and had less intelligence than others all along. Charlie could not have been

happier knowing he was less intelligent compared to others, then having superior knowledge

when compared to others, and knowing it too.

The final reason Charlie is better off gaining the intelligence, is that he was practically

better off with the intelligence. This is proved in Charlies realization, that Joe Carp and Frank

Reilley, two of Charlies co-workers, were not his friends, but in fact bullies who took advantage

of his low intelligence for their own pleasure. This is proved when Charlie states, We had a lot
of fun at the factery todayTheir really my friends and they like me. Sometimes somebody will

say hey look at Joe or Frank or George he really pulled a Charlie Gordon. I dont know why they

say that but they always laft. This morning Amos Borg who is the 4 man at Donnegans used my

name when he shouted at Ernie the office boy. Ernie lost a packige. He said Ernie for god sake

what are you trying to be a Charlie Gordon. I dont understand why he said that. I never lost any

packiges (Keyes 414). Using this paragraph, it can be very easily inferred that people at

Charlies workplace, a factory, make fun of him, and take advantage of his naiveness. Charlie

also says, Joe Carp said I shoud show the girls how I mop out the toilet in the factory and he got

me a mop. I showed them and everyone laffed when I told that MrDonnegan said I was the best

janiter he ever had because I like my job and do it good and never come late or miss a day except

for my operashun. I said Miss Kinnian always said Charlie be proud of your job because you do

it good. Everybody laffed and we had a good time and they gave me lots of drinks...I cant wait to

be smart like my bestfrends Joe Carp and Frank Reilly. I dont remember how the party was over

but I think I went outA nice cop brot me back home. Thats what my landlady Mrs Flynn says.

But I got a headache and a big lump on my head and black and blue all over. I think maybe I fell

but Joe Carp says it was the cop they beat up drunks some times (Keyes 415-416). Again,

people use Charlies low common sense to trick him, this time into getting drunk. When he was

drunk, he was probably lured into hurting himself, or doing something dangerous, for the

amusement of other people. It can be argued, that what Charlie learns about Frank, Joe, and

others hurts him more than it helps him. However, a minor Oh, what was I thinking, is a lot

better than Charlie getting tricked into hurting himself, and embarrassing himself publicly.

Charlie was better off gaining the intelligence he received from the operation. He had

more knowledge and awareness after, he was happier, and he was practically better off gaining
the intelligence. Charlie goes from misspelling common words, and having a very limited

vocabulary, to spelling everything right, using large, uncommon words, and writing a thesis

about the regression of artificial intelligence. He came to the realization that his friends Joe

Carp and Franck Reilly were in fact not his friends, but instead bullies, who took advantage of

his ignorance to squeeze every ounce of fun out of Charlie, at his cost. He was better off learning

about Joe and Franks true colors, then falling for their tricks every time he was around them.

Charlie was better off gaining the intelligence, because he had more knowledge after the

surgery, he was happier post-surgery, and he was practically better off gaining the intelligence.

Charlies intelligence tripled after the surgery, his spelling grammar, and train of thought

improved greatly, and Charlie became multilingual after the surgery. Charlie preferred having a

high intelligence, over having a low intelligence, as proved by these two quotes, I have often

reread my progress reports and seen the illiteracy, the childish naivete, the mind of low

intelligence peering from a dark room, through the keyhole, at the dazzling light outside

(Keyes 424). Oh, God, please don't take it all away (Keyes 427). Charlie was practically better

off gaining the intelligence. Everyday tasks such as reading and writing became easier. Charlie

also came to the realization that Joe Carp and Frank Reilly were not his friends, they were

bullies. They took advantage of Charlies former lack of knowledge to have fun at his expense.

This is apparent is this paragraph, Their really my friends and they like me. Sometimes

somebody will say hey look at Joe or Frank or George he really pulled a Charlie Gordon. I dont

know why they say that but they always laft. This morning Amos Borg who is the 4 man at

Donnegans used my name when he shouted at Ernie the office boy. Ernie lost a packige. He said

Ernie for god sake what are you trying to be a Charlie Gordon. I dont understand why he said
that. I never lost any packiges (Keyes 414). It was better for Charlie to realize Joe and Frank

were manipulating and bullying him, and recognize his former naiveness, then not.
Work Cited

Keyes, Daniel, et al. Explorations in Literature. Explorations in Literature, Classic, Scott,

Foresman, Glenview, IL, 1991, pp. 410-433.