Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 113

UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH-HUMBER

HONOURS BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE


EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDIES
AND
DIPLOMA IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

ECS 2040 EARLY LEARNING ENVIRONMENT


FIELD PLACEMENT MANUAL
2017

All rights reserved.

This document may not be reproduced, stored or transmitted in any form


without written permission from the University of Guelph-Humber, Early
Childhood Studies.

207 Humber College Blvd., Toronto, ON M9W 5L7

Telephone: (416) 798-1331 Fax: (416) 798-3293


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page | 2
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part 1 Overview of Placement


Introduction
Page 6
Mission Page 6
Field Placement Progression
Page 7
Field Placement Hours Page 8
Policies Regarding Make-Up Days
Page 9

Part 2 Responsibilities
Responsibilities of Students
Page 11
Responsibilities of Site Supervisor
Page 12
Responsibilities of Course Instructor
Page 13
Responsibilities of Field Placement Coordinator
Page 13

Part 3 Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice


Preamble Page
15 Code of Ethics
Page 16
Standards of Practice
Standard I: Caring and Nurturing Relationships that Support Learning
Page 17
Standard II: Developmentally Appropriate Care and Education
Page 18
Standard III: Safe, Healthy, and Supportive Learning Environments
Page 18
Standard IV: Professional Knowledge and Competence
Page 19
Standard V: Professional Boundaries, Dual Relationships, and Conflicts of
Interest Page 21
Standard VI: Confidentiality and Consent to the Release of Information
Regarding
Children and their Families
Page 22
Standards of Practice: Endnotes
Page 25

Part 4 Procedures

Page | 3
Field Placement Selection Process
Page 28
Change of Field Placement Sites
Page 29
Conditions for Course Failure
Page 30
Reporting Suspected Child Abuse
Page 30
Procedures for Addressing Issues of Concern Related to Child Abuse
Page 31

Part 5 Education Strategies and Planning Forms


Developmental Domains
Page 34
Teaching Strategies
Page 35
Early Learning Experience Planning Sheet
Page 37
Early Learning Experience Planning Sheet Example
Page 41
Group Learning Experience Planning Sheet
Page 45
Group Learning Experience Planning Sheet Example
Page 49
Full Environment Set-Up Planning Sheet
Page 52
Full Environment Set-Up Planning Sheet Example
Page 58
Part 6 Orientation to Field Placement
Initial Meeting Checklist Page
64
Contact Information
Page 65

Part 7 Required Documentation


Vulnerable Sector Screen Description
Page 67
Health Passport Description
Page 67
First Aid (Level A) / CPR (Level C) Description
Page 67
Insurance Claims Procedure
Page 67
Field/Clinical Pre-Placement Health Form
Page 69
Student Declaration of Understanding
Page 74

Page | 4
Field Placement Agreement Form
Page 75
Placement & Internship Student Agreement Form
Page 76
Placement & Internship Partner Agreement Form
Page 77
Pledge of Confidentiality
Page 78
Placement Time Sheet Page
79

Mid Semester Field Placement Self-Evaluation


Page 82

End of Semester Field Placement Evaluation


Page 91

References
Page 99

Page | 5
OVERVIEW OF PLACEMENT

Page | 6
PART 1 - OVERVIEW OF PLACEMENT
INTRODUCTION
MISSION
The University of Guelph-Humbers Early Childhood Field Placement Program
provides students with the opportunity to incorporate current research,
theories, and practical experiences, in preparation to work collaboratively
with Early Childhood professionals, children, and families with integrity,
commitment, and professionalism.

Welcome to Early Childhood Studies


The Honours Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.Sc.) in Early Childhood Studies
and Diploma in Early Childhood Education focuses on the physical, social,
emotional, and cognitive development of young children within the context
of the family and community. The program curriculum has been designed to
ensure that students are provided the breadth and depth of knowledge
necessary to be able to work confidently with and create programs for
children and families, and to be eligible to pursue further studies, such as
Bachelor of Education, graduate studies, and/or specific therapeutic
approaches.

Field Placement is an integral part of the curriculum in this program. It


represents a variety of experiential learning opportunities across the four
years of study through which students develop knowledge, skills and values,
progressing toward competence in their practice as early childhood
professionals. Further, each placement opportunity enables students to
develop skills as reflective professionals, reflecting both in and on their
practice.

Upon graduation, students will be prepared for registration with the College
of Early Childhood Educators, and will have skills necessary to work with
children and their families in a variety of settings. The academic rigor of our
program also ensures that graduates are well positioned to pursue graduate
studies in a variety of interdisciplinary programs.

The purpose of this manual is to outline the progression through field


placements; the requirements and expectations of students, faculty and
sites; and the policies and procedures guiding students success.

Dr. Nikki Martyn, Ed.D. Elena Merenda, MA ECS.


Program Head Assistant Program Head

Toronto, ON M9W 5L7 Toronto, ON M9W 5L7

Page | 7
FIELD PLACEMENT PROGRESSION
Progressing will build on the knowledge and skills developed through
placement experiences.

Year, Semester;
Field
Days; Description
Placement
Hours
ECS 1030 1st Year, Winter This course will introduce the students
Field Varies to the field of early childhood. Students
Placement I 42 hours will complete a job shadow experience
within an early childhood setting.
ECS 2040 2nd Year, This course will focus on the early
Field Winter learning environment, providing
Placement II Thursday students with opportunities to
105 hours (15 participate in many areas of the
days) centre.
ECS 3030 3rd Year, Fall This course will focus on the area of
Field Thursday special needs. Through this experience,
Placement III 105 hours students will further their knowledge of
services for children and families.
ECS 3060 3rd Year, Winter This course will focus on the community.
Field Thursday Students will further their knowledge of
Placement IV 105 hours services offered to children and families
within the community.
ECS 4070 4th Year, Fall This course allows students to further
Field Thursday & explore an area of the field which
Placement V Friday interests them.
175 hours
ECS 4080 4th Year, Winter This course continues to enhance the
Field Thursday & students experiences. Taken in
Placement VI Friday sequence with Field Placement V, it
175 hours provides students with valuable
continuity in their field placement over
the academic year.

Page | 8
FIELD PLACEMENT HOURS
Students in Early Childhood Studies typically complete at minimum 700
hours in field placement. The total placement hours for any student may
exceed 700 and vary for each student, depending on the hours required by
their specific placement settings.

Early Childhood Studies requires formal placement training at four different


community sites during years two, three, and four of the program. For field
placements II to IV, students will be required to spend a minimum of 7 hours*
per week in placement, typically provided over a prescribed 10-week period,
and a designated 5-day Block Week. For field placements V & VI, students
will be required to spend a minimum of 14 hours* per week in placement,
typically provided over a prescribed 10-week period, and a designated 5-day
Block Week. Refer to Field Placement Progression on page 7.

During Placement Block Week, students are not expected to attend their
regular classes, as they are to be at their field placement setting for the
course of the week. It is the students responsibility to notify all
faculty (of other courses they are taking) of their intended absence
from class, and to discuss coursework arrangements, if necessary.

Students are expected to complete the full term of their placement at the
designated field placement site. Students need to carefully consider their
ability and availability to consistently attend their placement setting during
these designated days and times, as inability to meet the required
expectations will jeopardize their standing in the course and program.

Students must complete the Field Placement II hours during the winter
semester (e.g., if a pass is not obtained in this course at the first attempt, a
repeat can only be done in the following winter semester, thereby delaying
the students graduation for a full academic year).

Placement represents a learning experience rather than a part-time job,


students are not paid a salary. At times, students may be offered part-time
employment at their field placement setting, however, it is to be clearly
understood that paid work hours are to be executed only if such hours are
scheduled over and above a students minimum weekly required placement
hours. There is to be a clear distinction made between the students
placement activities and paid work activities. The Field Placement
Coordinator must be consulted with respect to arrangements for part-time
employment.

Please note: Students must accumulate the required minimum number of


hours each semester; hours accumulated from one semester cannot be
carried over into the subsequent semester.

* Not including breaks and meal times.

Page | 9
POLICIES REGARDING MAKE-UP DAYS
Students are expected to attend all Field Placement days assigned. However,
in the event of illness or other circumstances, preventing students from
attending placement, the following policies pertain to make-up days:

Days Required to Make-Up:

All Professional Development days and school/site holidays, as they are


not standard for all students in field placement (e.g., March Break or
staff training days); and
Sick time.

Days Not Required to Make-Up:

Statutory holidays (e.g., Thanksgiving, Family Day, and Good Friday);


Any day that the university is officially closed (e.g., snow day); and
If a student is sent home for reasons not his/her own, and he/she has
managed to get as close as possible to 4 hours.

Important Information:

All make-up days MUST be negotiated with the Site Supervisor. The
Course Instructor must be made aware by the student of any days
missed and intended time line of make-up days.
Students must ensure all days are made up prior to or by the end of
the exam period for the respective semester.
Students are not permitted to schedule make-up days during days
dedicated to other university courses.
Students may not miss more than 3 consecutive days and/or 5 days in
total as this could result in being withdrawn from field placement.
There is a one-week period during the winter semester that is
designated as Reading Week for all University of Guelph-Humber
students. Students will not be required to attend their field placement
during this week except in certain circumstances (e.g., complete make-
up hours for previously missed hours). Arrangements for attending
field placement during reading week must be made in consultation
with the Course Instructor and Site Supervisor.

Page | 10
RESPONSIBILITIES

Page | 11
PART 2 RESPONSIBILITIES
RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENTS
During each field placement, students are required to fulfill the following
responsibilities:
Attend placement for 7 hours per day for a total of 105 hours;
Arrive 15 minutes before the shift begins;
Contact the Site Supervisor and/or Course Instructor prior to expected
arrival time if unable to attend placement on time or unexpected
absences;
Make arrangements for missed field days due to illness. Refer to Policies
Regarding Make-up days on page 9;
Complete all required documentation at the beginning of placement in
order to continue collecting hours towards the successful completion
towards placement. Refer to Required Documentation on page 62;
Must sign and adhere to the confidentiality agreement. Refer to Pledge of
Confidentiality on page 72;
Maintain an attendance log, absences are to be made up. Refer to
Placement Time Sheet on page 73;
Make available Field Placement Manual to Site Supervisor (electronically
or in print)
Must review manual and evaluation with Site Supervisor at the beginning
of placement
Demonstrate initiative by participating in all aspects of the program;
Work both independently and as a team member;
Build positive relationships with the children in the early learning
environment;
Demonstrate positive communication with children, professionals,
parents, and peers;
Anticipate behaviour and respond appropriately using child guidance
strategies;
Continue to develop a safe environment, ensuring the well-being of all;
Engage in reflective practice, reflecting on all aspects of the placement
experience;
Plan and implement developmentally appropriate Learning Experiences
using a variety of Teaching Strategies and resources. Refer to Teaching
Strategies on page 35. Refer to Learning Experience Planning Sheet on
page 37;
All planning must be done ahead of time, and all planning forms must be
provided to the Site Supervisor prior to implementation;
Students arriving to placement unprepared with incomplete learning
experience plans and/or materials will be unable to complete the planned
experience, which must be made up on the next placement day. Hence,
the student will be doubling up on experiences the next day;
Meet with Site Supervisor on a daily basis to discuss observations,
concerns, and progress. 10 15 minutes per placement day is
recommended;

Page | 12
Act on and incorporate feedback provided by Site Supervisor to ensure
progress and success;
Must review this manual with Site Supervisor at the start of placement;
and
Actively participate in the and final evaluation process by meeting with
the Site Supervisor and Course Instructor during the semester
If any concerns arise in regards to placement, contact the Course Instructor,
Field Placement Coordinator, and/or Program Head. Although responsibilities
may vary according to the nature of the field placement site, the overall goal
is to provide a positive and stimulating environment for children in turn
facilitating the growth and development of each child while supporting
families.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF SITE SUPERVISOR


The Site Supervisor acts as a mentor/guide to the students by fulfilling the
following professional responsibilities:
Introduce the students to the children, staff, and families and give
them a tour of the centre;
Make the student feel welcome and comfortable in the centre;
Provide the student with important background information about:
o The philosophy and policies of the centre,
o The program, and
o The children;
Review manual and evaluation with student
Encourage the student to participate in all aspects of the daily
program.
Facilitate the students effective use of child guidance strategies;
Include the student in staff meetings, special event and parent
meetings whenever possible;
On a weekly basis, discuss the learning experience the student will
plan and implement for the following placement day. Please note
Student MUST provide the Site Supervisor with completed planning
forms prior to implementing experiences. If the student fails to provide
such forms, the student will be unable to implement the learning
experience. This learning experience must be implemented on the
students next regular day of placement together with the schedule
planned learning experience for that day effectively, doubling up on
planned experiences;
Observe and provide written constructive feedback on the
implementation of the students learning experiences. Such feedback
promotes the students growth and development. Please note The
student MUST complete his/her self-evaluation on the implemented
experience PRIOR to submitting it for written feedback to the Site
Supervisor;
Meet on a daily basis with the student to discuss observations,
concerns, and progress. 10 15 minutes per placement day is
recommended;
Page | 13
Sign students Placement Time Sheet at the end of each placement
day
Meet with the Course Instructor during the semester; and
Complete and meet with the student at the end of the semester to
discuss the Field Placement Evaluation.

Page | 14
RESPONSIBILITIES OF COURSE INSTRUCTOR
The Course Instructor facilitates the field placement experience by fulfilling
the following professional responsibilities:

Make available Field Placement Manual to students (on course


website);
Discuss with students the parameters of the respective placement to
ensure all are aware of expectations and obligations;
Encourage students to take full responsibility for fulfilling the
expectation of the field placement;
Offer on-going support to the student throughout the placement;
Liaise with sites to ensure all placements are progressing without
concern;
Address all concerns both in field and in seminar class in a timely
manner with appropriate action;
Once during the semester, visit each field placement site to meet with
the student and Site Supervisor;
Document all missed placement and make-up days by respective
students;
Review and initial student Placement Time Sheet; and
Review all required student course assignments, assigning grades, and
the final course grade.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF FIELD PLACEMENT COORDINATOR


The Field Placement Coordinator facilitates the field placement experience by
fulfilling the following professional responsibilities:

Recruit prospective field placement sites, visit, and present the


parameters of field placement and the university;
Place students in settings appropriate to respective field focus and
geographical location;
Send confirmation to students and sites prior to semester start-up;
Provide course instructors with student and placement contact
information in addition to all necessary paperwork;
Ensure all students have current documentation at commencement of
placement;
Record and retain copies of student documentation;
Make electronic copies of Field Placement Manual and Evaluation Forms
available to Site Supervisors, if requested; and

Page | 15
CODE ETHICS AND
OF
STANDARDS OF PRACTICE

Page | 16
PART 3 - CODE OF ETHICS AND STANDARDS
OF PRACTICE

PREAMBLE
This section of the manual outlines the Code of Ethics and Standards of
Practice set out by the College of Early Childhood Educators. As professionals
in the making, students are to abide by this document.

Students must exemplify attitudes, attributes, and actions that demonstrate


competence consistent with the Early Childhood Educators Act 2007, Ontario
College of Early Childhood Educators, and the Day Nurseries Act of Ontario.
Students are also required to abide by the policies and procedures of their
field placement agencies, the regulations and procedures of the Honours
Bachelor of Applied Sciences Early Childhood Program and those of the
University of Guelph-Humber.

It is the responsibility of students to understand and act in accordance with


the code of ethics and practice standards. Upon graduation, students should
be able to demonstrate that they are qualified professionals conducting
themselves in an ethical and professional manner as they may elect to
register with the College of Early Childhood Educators.

Page | 17
CODE OF ETHICS
Members (Early Childhood Educators or members) of the College of Early
Childhood Educators are committed to the Code of Ethics. The Code of Ethics
reflects a core set of beliefs and values of care, respect, trust and integrity.
These beliefs and values are fundamental to members of the profession and
guide their conduct.

A. Responsibilities to Children
Early Childhood Educators make the well-being and learning of all children
who are under their professional supervision their foremost responsibility.
They value the rights of the child, respecting the uniqueness, dignity and
potential of each child, and strive to create learning environments in which
children experience a sense of belonging.

Early Childhood Educators are caring, empathetic, fair and act with integrity.
Early Childhood Educators foster the joy of learning through play-based
pedagogy.

B. Responsibilities to Families
Early Childhood Educators value the centrality of the family to the health and
well-being of children. They recognize and respect the uniqueness and
diversity of families.

Early Childhood Educators strive to establish and maintain reciprocal


relationships with family members of children under their professional
supervision. These relationships are based on trust, openness and respect for
confidentiality. Early Childhood Educators collaborate with families by
exchanging knowledge and sharing practices and resources.

C. Responsibilities to Colleagues and to the


Profession
Early Childhood Educators interact with colleagues and other professionals in
ways that demonstrate respect, trust and integrity. Through their conduct,
Early Childhood Educators strive to enhance the status of the profession in
their workplaces and in the wider community.

Early Childhood Educators value lifelong learning and commit themselves to


engaging in continuous professional learning to enhance their practice. They
support experienced colleagues, those who are new to the profession and
students aspiring to the profession.

D. Responsibilities to the Community and to


Society
Early Childhood Educators value and engage in collaboration with community
agencies, schools and other professionals.
Page | 18
Early Childhood Educators recognize that they contribute to community and
society by advocating for and promoting an appreciation of the profession,
children and early learning.

(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 11)

Page | 19
STANDARDS OF PRACTICE
Standard I: Caring and Nurturing Relationships
that Support Learning
A. Early Childhood Educators recognize that families are of primary
importance in childrens development and that children are best
understood in the context of their families.
B. Early Childhood Educators make reasonable efforts to familiarize
themselves with available informationi regarding the relevant family
circumstances of children under the members professional supervision
(including, but not limited to, relevant information concerning the childs
health, legal custody and/or guardianshipii).
C. Early Childhood Educators strive to establish and maintain ongoing and
open communication regarding the development and learning of a child
under the members professional supervision with the childs parents
and/or legal guardians.iii
D. Early Childhood Educators are attuned to the needs of children and
families and advocate with families on behalf of children. They provide
nurturing learning environments where children thrive and families are
welcome.
E. Early Childhood Educators establish professional and caring relationships
with children and families. They engage both children and their families
by being sensitive and respectful of diversity, equity and inclusion. Early
Childhood Educators are receptive listeners and offer encouragement and
support by responding appropriately to the ideas, concerns and needs of
children and families.
F. Early Childhood Educators ensure that in their relationship with the childs
family, the needs and best interests of the child are paramount.

(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 13)

Page | 20
Standard II: Developmentally Appropriate Care
and Education
A. Knowledge and Application of Theory and Practice
1. Early Childhood Educators demonstrate a thorough knowledge of
child development theories. They use this knowledge to plan,
implement and assess developmentally appropriate learning
strategies.
2. Early Childhood Educators recognize childrens unique
characteristics, and access the resources necessary to adapt the
early learning environment to suit the child. Early Childhood
Educators recognize that child development milestones and
behaviours vary and they acknowledge and respect those
differences.
B. Consideration of Childrens Needs
1. Early Childhood Educators provide care and education to
individuals, small groups and large groups. They make ongoing
decisions concerning childrens need for support and assistance.
2. Early Childhood Educators foster childrens independence and inter-
dependence. They provide opportunities for children to develop the
skills needed to regulate their behaviour and to make decisions.
C. Support of Learning Styles
1. Early Childhood Educators recognize that children have different
learning styles. They focus on the whole child and plan caring and
creative learning opportunities that reflect individual learning styles.
Early Childhood Educators, through these learning opportunities,
foster the development of a childs sense of self.

(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 15)

Standard III: Safe, Healthy, and Supportive


Learning Environments
A. Safe
1. Early Childhood Educators maintain safe and healthy learning
environments.
B. Healthy
1. Early Childhood Educators obtain and familiarize themselves with
information concerning any relevant medical conditions,
exceptionalities, allergies, food restrictions, medication
requirements and emergency contact information relating to
children under their professional supervision. This information is
obtained and reviewed in a timely manner, when a child comes
under the members professional supervision or as soon after that
time as the information becomes available.
2. Early Childhood Educators provide opportunities for young children
to experience nature, and to understand their relationship to their
natural environment and to the world.

Page | 21
3. Early Childhood Educators promote a healthy lifestyle including but
not limited to nutrition and physical activity.
C. Supportive
1. Early Childhood Educators support children in culturally,
linguistically and developmentally sensitive ways and provide
caring, stimulating and respectful opportunities for learning and
care that are welcoming to children and their families, within an
inclusive, well-planned and structured environment.
(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 17)

Standard IV: Professional Knowledge and


Competence
A. Knowledge
1. Early Childhood Educators are current in their professional
knowledge about the continuum of child development and the
pedagogy related to early learning, curriculum, program planning,
parenting and family dynamics. They apply this knowledge in their
practice with individual children, and in small or large group
settings. Early Childhood Educators know and demonstrate how to
address the childs physical, cognitive, language and
emotional/social development and well-being in an integrated and
holistic way.
2. Early Childhood Educators know, understand and abide by the
legislation, policies and procedures that are relevant to their
professional practice and to the care and learning of children under
their professional supervision.
3. If there is a conflict between the Colleges Code of Ethics and the
Standards of Practice and a members work environment and/or the
policies and procedures of his or her employer, Early Childhood
Educators have an obligation to comply with the Colleges Code of
Ethics and the Standards of Practice.
B. Practice
1. Early Childhood Educators plan and develop play-based curricula
and programs along a continuum of early childhood development.
They plan and prepare a child-centred program that provides
learning opportunities for all the developmental domains. Early
Childhood Educators provide individualized assistance and
opportunities for children to develop a sense of belonging to a group
and provide safe and secure supervision of children based on age
and stage of development.
2. Early Childhood Educators assess, obtain information about and
familiarize themselves with the levels of development of the
children under their professional supervision for the purpose of
planning and developing curriculum and programs which are
appropriate to and meet the needs of the children.
3. Early Childhood Educators observe and monitor the learning
environment and anticipate when support or intervention is
required.
Page | 22
4. Early Childhood Educators observe, assess, evaluate, document and
report on childrens progress along all domains of child
development. As they work with children, families and other adults,
Early Childhood Educators set goals, make decisions, resolve
challenges, decide on developmentally responsive activities and
experiences, provide behaviour guidance and work collaboratively
in the best interest of the children under their professional
supervision.
(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 19)
5. Early Childhood Educators ensure that their decisions and actions in
their professional practice are appropriately supported by a credible
body of professional knowledge in the field of early childhood
education. Early Childhood Educators are able to explain the
foundations of their practice and their decision-making processes
and to communicate to parents and other professionals the benefits
of play for child development.
(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 20)

Page | 23
C. Professionalism with Colleagues and Other Professionals
1. Early Childhood Educators work collaboratively with colleagues in
their workplaces in order to provide safe, secure, healthy and
inviting environments for children and families. By supporting,
encouraging and working collaboratively with their co-workers, Early
Childhood Educators enhance the culture of their workplaces. They
build effective relationships with colleagues and other professionals
by using clear verbal and written communication, and positive
interpersonal skills.
2. Early Childhood Educators build a climate of trust, honesty and
respect in the workplace. They respect the privacy of colleagues
and handle information with an appropriate level of confidentiality.
Early Childhood Educators support experienced colleagues, those
who are new to the profession and those students aspiring to the
profession.
3. Early Childhood Educators who are responsible for supervising
students, volunteers and/or other staff (collectively referred to as
supervisees) provide guidelines, parameters and direction to
supervisees that respect their rights. Early Childhood Educators
ensure a level of supervision which is appropriate in light of the
supervisees education, training, experience and the activities being
performed.
4. Early Childhood Educators, working collaboratively with community
resource persons and members of other professions, access the
resources and expertise available in their communities. They strive
to facilitate community partnerships for the benefit of children and
families.
D. Professionalism with the College
1. Early Childhood Educators have a duty to co-operate fully with all
the Colleges policies and procedures and conduct themselves in a
manner which demonstrates respect for both the College and other
individuals involved. This duty applies where, among other things,
an investigation of a complaint or mandatory report regarding a
member is underway, a matter has been referred to the Discipline
Committee or the Fitness to Practise Committee for a hearing or
there are other assessments, reviews, investigations or proceedings
before the College which involve a member.
(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 20)
E. Professionalism as an Individual
1. Early Childhood Educators strive for excellence in their professional
practice and critical thinking. Early Childhood Educators access
current evidence-based research and are able to transfer this
knowledge into practice. They are aware of the need to enhance
their own learning in order to support both children and families.
Early Childhood Educators demonstrate their commitment to
ongoing professional development by engaging in continued
learning.
2. Early Childhood Educators recognize that they are role models for
children, families, members of their profession, supervisees and
Page | 24
other colleagues and avoid conduct which could reasonably be
perceived as reflecting negatively on the profession of early
childhood education.
(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 21)

Page | 25
Standard V: Professional Boundaries, Dual
Relationships, and Conflict of Interest
A. Early Childhood Educators are in a position of power and responsibility
toward children under their professional supervision. This necessitates
that care be taken to ensure that these children are protected from the
abuse of such power during, after, or referable to the provision of
professional services.
1. Early Childhood Educators do not abuse physically, sexually,
verbally, psychologically or emotionally a child who is under the
members professional supervision.
2. Early Childhood Educators do not use information about a child or
family obtained in the course of a professional relationship, and do
not use their professional position of authority, to coerce,
improperly influence, harass, abuse or exploit a child who is under
the members professional supervision, or the childs family.
3. Early Childhood Educators do not solicit or use information from a
child who is under the members professional supervision or the
childs family to acquire, either directly or indirectly, advantage or
material benefits.
B. Early Childhood Educators establish and maintain clear and appropriate
boundaries in professional relationships (including relationships with
children under the members professional supervision and/or their families
and/or superviseesi) and do not violate those boundaries. Boundary
violations include sexual misconduct and other misuse and abuse of the
members power. Non-sexual boundary violations may include emotional,
physical, social and financial violations. Members are responsible for
ensuring that appropriate boundaries are maintained in all aspects of
professional relationships.
C. Early Childhood Educators do not engage in professional relationships that
constitute a conflict of interest or in situations in which members ought
reasonably to have known that the child under their supervision would be
at risk in any way.ii Early Childhood Educators do not provide a
professional service while the member is in a conflict of interest.
1. Early Childhood Educators evaluate professional relationships and
other situations involving children under the members professional
supervision and the families or guardians of those children for
potential conflicts of interest and seek consultation to assist in
identifying and dealing with such potential conflicts of interest.
(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 24)
2. Early Childhood Educators avoid conflicts of interest and/or dual
relationships with children under the members professional
supervision and/or their families or with colleagues or supervisees
that could impair the members professional judgment or increase
the risk of exploitation or harm to children under the members
professional supervision.iii
3. If a conflict of interest situation does arise, Early Childhood
Educators declare the conflict of interest and take appropriate steps
to address the conflict.iv
Page | 26
(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 24)

Page | 27
Standard VI: Confidentiality and Consent to the
Release of Information Regarding Children and
their Families
A. Early Childhood Educators respect the privacy of children under their
professional supervision and the families of those children by holding in
strict confidence all information about them and by complying with any
applicable privacy and other legislation. Early Childhood Educators
disclose such information only when required or allowed by law to do so or
when the necessary consent has been obtained for the disclosure of the
information.
1. Early Childhood Educators provide parents and/or legal guardians,
on request, with access to records maintained by the member in
respect to their child or such parts of those records as are relevant,
unless there is reasonable cause for refusing to do so.
2. Early Childhood Educators comply with any applicable privacy and
other legislation. Early Childhood Educators obtain consent to the
collection, use or disclosure of information concerning children
under their professional supervision, or their families, including
personal information unless otherwise permitted or required by law.
3. Early Childhood Educators employed by an organization maintain a
thorough understanding of the organizations policies and practices
relating to the management of information.i
B. Early Childhood Educators who are responsible for complying with privacy
legislation establish clear policies and practices relating to the
management of client information and make information about these
policies and practices readily available in accordance with any applicable
privacy or other legislation.ii
C. When Early Childhood Educators are employed by an agency or
organization, College standards of confidentiality may conflict with the
organizations policies and procedures concerning confidentiality. Where
there is a conflict, College standards take precedence.
D. Early Childhood Educators shall not disclose information concerning or
received from children under their professional supervision, or the families
of those children, except in accordance with the following requirements:
1. When in a review, investigation or proceeding under the Act in
which the professional conduct, competency or capacity of a
College member is an issue, the member may disclose such
information concerning or received from a child under the members
professional supervision or the childs family as is reasonably
required by the member or the College for the purposes of the
review, investigation or proceeding, without the consent of the
individuals to whom the information relates. Early Childhood
Educators do not divulge more information than is reasonably
required.
(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 26)

Page | 28
2. When disclosure is required or allowed by law or by order of a court,
Early Childhood Educators do not divulge more information than is
required or allowed.
3. Early Childhood Educators have individuals (or, in the case of
children, their parents or guardians) sign completed consent forms
prior to the disclosure of information relating to them, where
consent is required. In urgent circumstances, a verbal consent by
the individual (or, in the case of a child, the childs parent or
guardian) to the disclosure of information may constitute proper
authorization. The member should document that this consent was
obtained.
4. When consent to the disclosure of information is required, Early
Childhood Educators make reasonable efforts to inform the person
whose consent is being sought of the parameters of information to
be disclosed and to advise that person of the possible
consequences of such disclosure.
E. Early Childhood Educators inform the parents or guardians of children
under the members professional supervision early in their relationship
about the limits of confidentiality of information. For example, Early
Childhood Educators explain the need for sharing pertinent information
with supervisors, co-workers, administrative staff and volunteers.
F. Early Childhood Educators obtain consent from the parents or guardians
of the children under their professional supervision before electronically
recording, photographing, audio or video taping or permitting third party
observation of the childrens activities. Early Childhood Educators comply
with the requirements regarding use or disclosure of information for
research or educational purposes set out in any applicable privacy and
other legislation.
G. Early Childhood Educators may use public information and/or non-
identifying information for research, educational and publication purposes.
(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 26)

Page | 29
STANDARDS OF PRACTICE:
ENDNOTES

Page | 30
STANDARDS OF PRACTICE: ENDNOTES
Standard I: Caring and Nurturing Relationships
that Support Learning
i
See: Standard III. B(1): Early Childhood Educators obtain and
familiarize themselves with information concerning any relevant medical
conditions, exceptionalities, allergies, food restrictions, medication
requirements and emergency contact information relating to children under
their professional supervision. Such information is obtained and reviewed in
a timely manner, when a child comes under the members professional
supervision or as soon after that time as the information becomes available.
ii
Throughout the Standards of Practice contained in this document, the
term parent includes parents and/or legal guardians, except where
otherwise indicated.
iii
See Standard VI. Confidentiality and Consent to Release of
Information Regarding Children and their Families, subparagraphs A(1) and
D(3) regarding access to records maintained by a member in respect of a
child by the childs parents and/or legal guardian.

Standard V: Professional Boundaries, Dual


Relationships and Conflicts of Interest
i
See: Standard IV. C(3): Supervisees include students, volunteers
and/or other staff supervised by the member.
ii
Conflict of Interest is defined as a situation in which a member has
a personal, financial or other professional interest or obligation which gives
rise to a reasonable apprehension that the interest or obligation may
influence the member in the exercise of his or her professional
responsibilities. Actual influence is not required in order for a conflict of
interest situation to exist. It is sufficient if there is a reasonable apprehension
that there may be such influence.

One of the hallmarks of a conflict of interest situation is that a reasonable


person, informed of all of the circumstances, would have a reasonable
apprehension (in the sense of reasonable expectation or concern) that the
interest might influence the member. The influence need not be actual but
may simply be perceived. However, a mere possibility or suspicion of
influence is not sufficient to give rise to a conflict of interest. The interest
must be significant enough to give rise to a reasonable apprehension that
the personal, financial or other professional interest may influence the
member in the performance of his or her professional responsibilities.
iii
Dual Relationship is defined as a situation in which an Early
Childhood Educator, in addition to his or her professional relationship, has
one or more other relationships with a child under the members professional
Page | 31
supervision, the childs family, a colleague or a supervisee, regardless of
whether this occurs prior to, during, or following the provision of professional

(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 27)

Page | 32
services. A dual relationship does not necessarily constitute a conflict of
interest; however, where dual relationships exist, there is a strong potential
for conflict of interest and there may be an actual or perceived conflict of
interest. Relationships beyond the professional one include, but are not
limited to, those in which the College member has a personal, familial or
business relationship with a child under the members professional
supervision, the childs family, a colleague or a supervisee. Members embark
on an evaluation of whether a dual relationship might impair professional
judgment or increase the risk of exploitation or harm to a child under the
members professional supervision.
iv
It may be extremely difficult or impossible for members working in
certain small communities or remote locations, or in certain ethnic or
religious communities to entirely avoid dual relationships or situations which
may give rise to a conflict of interest. In those circumstances, members
should declare the conflict of interest, take appropriate steps to address it,
attempt to eliminate the conflict if possible and take steps to reduce or
eliminate any resulting risk of harm or exploitation to children under the
members professional supervision.

Standard VI: Confidentiality and Consent to the


Release of Information Regarding Children and
their Families
i
The member must maintain a thorough understanding of the
organizations information management policies and practices, including
those regarding:

1. When, how and the purposes for which the organization routinely
collects, uses, modifies, discloses, retains or disposes of information;
2. The administrative, technical and physical safeguards and practices
that the organization maintains with respect to the information;
3. How an individual may obtain access to or request correction of a
record of information about the individual; and
4. How to make a complaint about the organizations compliance with its
policies and practices.

ii Privacy legislation currently includes the federal Personal Information


Protection and Electronic Documents Act, the federal Privacy Act, the
Personal Health Information Act, 2004, the provincial Freedom of Information
and Protection of Privacy Act and the Municipal Freedom of Information and
Protection of Privacy Act.

(College of Early Childhood Educators, 2011, p. 28)

Page | 33
Page | 34
PROCEDURES

Page | 35
PART 4 PROCEDURES
FIELD PLACEMENT SELECTION PROCESS
1. For each field placement all students are to complete a Field Placement
Application Form (provided by the Field Placement Coordinator) and
submit it to the Field Placement Coordinator by the designated due date.
2. At the designated time during the semester, students may arrange for an
appointment and/or interview with the Field Placement Coordinator to
discuss potential placement sites and further clarify the
application/selection process, if required.
3. Students are not permitted to apply to or enter into an organization for a
field placement site where they have previously been a student, a client,
or know a staff member on personal terms.
4. Once authorized, the student will contact, by telephone, the designated
site contact person to arrange a mutually agreeable time for an initial
meeting/orientation prior to field placement commencing. Refer to Initial
Meeting Checklist on page 59.
5. When calling the designated field placement site, the student should do
the following:
Give his/her name and the name of the university and program.
Please give full names of the university and the program
(University of Guelph-Humber, Early Childhood Studies).
Identify that he/she is interested in completing a field placement
with the site and that he/she would like to arrange a convenient
time for a meeting.
Confirm the sites address, time of meeting/orientation, contact
persons name, dress code, and documentation to bring.
6. The student should confirm when to arrive for his/her first day and discuss
with the site contact person the days and times that he/she will be at
placement. The student will complete the Contact Information form and
keep a copy in their manual. Refer to Contact Information on page 60.
7. Students must complete a Field Placement Agreement Form and submit it
to the Field Placement Coordinator within two (2) working days of the
initial meeting with the Site Supervisor. Refer to Field Placement
Agreement Form on page 69.
8. Please note the following expectations. Failure to comply with these
requirements may result in the student forfeiting this course for the
semester, as placement must commence on semester start-up date.
As each field placement experience is structured and focuses on
different age groups/settings, students will not shop for
preferred placement sites as best efforts are made to
accommodate student needs and requirements.
Students must be prepared to begin placement at the designated
time during the semester, or be considered ineligible for field
placement. This includes having all required documentation

Page | 36
complete and submitted by the start of the semester. Refer to
Required Documents on page 62.
Students must attend their placement on Thursdays of every
week, unless approved otherwise for exceptional circumstances
by the Program Head.

Page | 37
CHANGE OF FIELD PLACEMENT SITE
Changes of the placement site can only occur (without forfeiting hours
already completed) under the following circumstances:
1. The site in question can no longer provide the student with the
experiences required to fulfill field placement expectations outlined in
this manual. Refer to Responsibilities of Student on page 11.
2. Due to substantiated concerns around student safety and health issues
of placement duties.

Please note: If a site should close or announce its impending closure during
a student's placement, the student must contact his/her Course Instructor
and Field Placement Coordinator promptly to explore arrangements for a
change of placement to ensure that he/she will be able to complete the
required minimum hours for the semester. It should be noted that the
student would not lose hours acquired at the former placement site.

Student Request

If the student wishes to transfer to another placement site for any reason,
other than those listed above, or against the recommendation of his/her
Course Instructor, he/she must send a request in writing, with rationale, to
the Field Placement Coordinator. The Field Placement Coordinator may
further discuss the request with the Site Supervisor, the Course Instructor,
and/or the student. The Program Head will make the final decision after
consultation with the Field Placement Coordinator. If the request is denied,
and the student still insists on moving the student will forfeit all hours
accumulated at the site.

Site Request

After the first four weeks of placement (but before the completion of the
required minimum hours), if a site insists that a placement be discontinued
due to the student's lack of suitability and poor conduct, as evidenced by the
students performance at the placement, the student will fail the placement.

If a site refuses at any time, including within the first month of placement, to
continue with a student due to concerns arising out of the student's
professional misconduct, and the Course Instructor and Field Placement
Coordinator support these concerns, the student will be considered to have
been unsuccessful in this placement. If the student disagrees with this
decision, he/she will need to follow appeal procedures as outlined in the Early
Childhood Studies Policy Guidelines and the Code of Ethics and Standards of
Practice found within this manual. Refer to Code of Ethics and Standards of
Practice on page 15.

Page | 38
CONDITIONS FOR COURSE FAILURE
The Course Instructor under any of the following circumstances will assign a
failing grade:
When a student has not completed, or confirmed completion of, the
minimum required hours per semester in each placement course;
When a student has not submitted, or submits inadequate required
placement documents and/or other course assignments;
Students who withdraw or have been withdrawn from field placement
after the official university designated course drop dates will be
considered to have failed the course;
Students who withdraw or have been withdrawn from placement after the
first month of placement will be considered to have used one of their two
opportunities to complete this requirement; and
Students who fail Field Placement Course will not be allowed to carryover
accumulated placement hours into a subsequent placement.
Please note: A student who fails placement twice may be required to
withdraw from the program. In extraordinary circumstances, a student will be
required to submit compelling evidence in a written format to the Program
Head, who will make a decision, in consultation with other Early Childhood
Studies faculty and staff, regarding whether or not the student will be
withdrawn.

REPORTING SUSPECTED CHILD ABUSE


The Province of Ontario Child and Family Services Act requires that every
person who suspects that a child (up to age 16 years) has been abused, or is
at risk of being abused, must report the suspicion to a designated authority
(e.g. local Childrens Aid Society) as it is a duty. Make sure you are aware of
the placement sites policies and procedures for reporting abuse. Regardless,
your legal responsibilities as a student in field placement are as follows:

1. Any person who suspects that a child may have been abused or is at risk
for abuse must report to a child protection agency, and cannot ask
anyone else to report for him/her.
2. Do not confront the alleged perpetrator. If you suspect that a child has
been abused or neglected, or is at risk, you must report your suspicions
immediately to the local child protection agency. Report your
observations; do not interpret, judge, or overreact. Confidentiality is
essential; do not discuss your concerns with other staff, students, or
volunteers in placement, or fellow students at the University.
3. If you have apprehensions about making a report of suspected abuse, you
should consult with a worker from a child protection agency. Do not
discuss your suspicions with anyone else until you have consulted with a
child protection worker.
4. Inform your Site Supervisor of your intent to contact a child protection
agency with suspicions of child abuse or neglect.
For more information please visit: www.torontocas.ca

Page | 39
Observing and reporting suspected child abuse can be an upsetting
experience and it is important that you consider your own emotional well-
being. You may wish to inform your Course Instructor of your actions;
however, remember the details of the incident must remain confidential.

PROCEDURES FOR ADDRESSING ISSUES OF CONCERN


RELATED TO CHILD ABUSE
Rationale:

Early Childhood Studies prepares students to work with vulnerable


populations and places students in a unique relationship of trust with
children and families in addition to fellow students, faculty, and site staff. For
this reason students are required to demonstrate competence consistent
with the expectations of their profession. Students are also required to be
aware of what is expected of them as professionals in training in field
placement by the University of Guelph-Humber, and to be cognizant of
academic policies and the Early Childhood practices as outlined in this
Manual. In addition, students are expected to be aware of all policies and
procedures relevant to their academic and field experience.

Early Childhood Studies faculty are responsible to students, the University of


Guelph-Humber, and their professional bodies. This is to ensure those
graduating from the Early Childhood Studies have knowledge, ability, and
ethical understanding required of the profession they are entering. As such,
the Program Head, Field Placement Coordinator, and faculty have a
responsibility to the profession to ensure students are ready to meet the
challenges of the profession.

Grounds for Action:

Failure to meet the Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice in field


placement will initiate a review of the students performance in accordance
with the procedures outlined in this section.

Process: If a Site Supervisor and/or Course Instructor raise concerns about a


students level of professionalism and performance, the following process will
be initiated:

1. The Course Instructor (and Site Supervisor, if deemed appropriate) will


explain the concerns and assist the student to address any areas of
underperformance. Documentation (signed letter or signed memo)
concerning this process and resolution will be completed by the Course
Instructor with copies provided to the student and the Program Head and
placed in the students placement file. A plan for success may or may not
be required at this time. Students have a right to an appeal of any
decision to the Program Head, and the right to provide their own written
letter.

Page | 40
2. If the resolution includes a plan for success, outlining the steps the
student will take to address underperformance. The plan for success will
be drafted by the Course and discussed the plan for success with the
Program Head. The plan for success will clearly outline the issues of
concern and goals/objectives to be taken by the student to rectify the
situation. A clear time line (involving attainment of goals and follow up
meetings) will also be included to guide students progress. The plan for
success will be reviewed in full with the student ensuring he/she is aware
of the terms and actions he/she needs to take. Follow up meetings will
take place throughout the duration of the contract to track the students
progress. Copies of this contract will be placed in the students placement
file and provided to the Program Head.
3. If the students conduct is considered severe enough to necessitate a
temporary or permanent removal from field placement, the Course
Instructor will initiate a process for the student to be withdrawn from
placement until further notice. The Course Instructor will discuss the
situation with the Program Head to ascertain that such removal of the
student from field placement is the most appropriate course of action. An
in-depth investigation of the situation will take place, involving a site
meeting with the Site Supervisor, the Field Placement Coordinator, and if
appropriate for the situation the Program Head. A final decision regarding
temporary or permanent removal will be made at that time and conveyed
to the student verbally and in writing. If the removal is temporary, a time
indicating return to the field will be included in all documentation. The
student has the right to appeal to the Program Head.

Please note: Any substantiated situation involving a serious


occurrence or endangerment to children or adults will result in
the immediate removal of the student from field placement.

4. If a situation arises where a Site Supervisor and/or site refuses to have a


student return, withdrawal from field placement is required. The sites
request for removal will be documented by the Course Instructor and/or
Field Placement Coordinator and discussed with the Program Head. It will
then be reviewed with the student.
a. If it is determined that the students action or inaction led to the
removal, the student will receive a failing grade in the course.
b. If the sites decision to refuse the students is a result of no action
or inaction of the student, a new placement site will be found.
c. The student has the right to file a written appeal of the decision
asking that the Program Head review it.
5. The Program Head will provide an opportunity for any student to appeal a
decision made regarding status of field placement and will make a
decision appropriate to the situation within five business days.
6. The student has the right of further appeal options as defined by the
University of Guelph-Humber Academic Policies and Procedures.

Page | 41
EDUCATION STRATEGIES
AND PLANNING FORMS

Page | 42
PART 5 EDUCATION STRATEGIES AND
PLANNING FORMS
DEVELOPMENTAL DOMAINS
When planning a Learning Experience (child directed and/or small/large
group), it is important to reflect on the domains of development the
experience is focused on. At times a Learning Experience can zero in on one
domain or focus on several domains. These domains of development form
the basis of the objective of each Learning Experience. The following chart
details the domains and the developmental focus:

Domain Developmental Focus


Appreciation of the arts; nature; and enjoyment of sensory
Aesthetic
experiences

Trust; autonomy; initiative; industry; self-awareness; competence; self-


Affective
esteem; and emotional awareness

Perception; general knowledge; logical-mathematic; scientific


Cognitive
understanding; and critical thinking skills

Receptive language (listening); expressive language (speaking);


Language
writing skills; and non-verbal communication

Fine motor skills; gross motor skills; body awareness; balance; and
Physical
physical health

Social Social skills; socialization; and perspective of others

Page | 43
TEACHING STRATEGIES
Sensory Engagement
Firsthand experience, contact with real objects
Children learn best by using their senses
Seeing, hearing, touching, tasting, and smelling
Performing Task Analysis
Breaking whole tasks into smaller parts
Using logical sequence of small steps and introducing new steps as
children master previous steps
Child experiences success all along
Environmental Cues
Children learn from observing the environment
Signal expectations for tasks
Non-verbal signals support objectives related to independence,
cooperation, and self-regulation
Scaffolding
Supports withdrawn based on childrens needs
Task isnt changed, but how the child participate in the tasks is make
easier
Educator provides maximum support and gradually takes on a passive
role, providing fewer and fewer cues
Helps children move from level of assisted performance to independent
functioning
May be verbal or physical
Guided Practice
As children learn new skills, educators provide varying degrees of
difficulty
Children need opportunities to generalize their learning to new
situations
Most beneficial when the conditions vary only slightly from one time to
the next
Basic premise children learn through repetition
Provide space, time, and materials to practice new learning
Real learning doesnt occur in a single episode
Invitations
Motivates children to try activities
Come and see what we are doing; Here is a place for you
Behaviour Reflections
Information talk, descriptive feedback
What they are doing

Page | 44
Verbal non-judgmental statements made to children regarding their
actions
Exposes them to new vocabulary that describes their behaviour
Prompts children to focus on their actions
Helps to solidify and internalize new learning
Increases childrens self-awareness and understanding

Paraphrase Reflections
Restatements in your words of something that a child has said
What they are saying
Non-evaluative comments active listening
Broaden vocabulary and grammatical structure
Prompt children to expand on what they are saying
Help refine and clarify concepts and messages
Modeling
Children learn many things by imitating others, extremely powerful
Provides children with examples of behaviour
Models have greatest impact when behaviour is obvious and pointed
out to the children
Telling, Explaining, and Informing
Information such as the name of things, facts, and customary
behaviours are learned through social interaction
Must by tied to childrens experiences and requires involvement
beyond listening
Do-It Signals
Dont ask a question, make a statement
Tell me about it; Guess how many there are
Positive statements give children a clearer idea of what to do
Demonstrates what children do and do not know
Challenges
Open-ended variation of the do-it signal
Motivates children to create their own solutions
Show me how you can...; Find a way to make...
Questions
Basic instruction tool
Different question for different areas (i.e., science, math, language)
Tied directly to objectives, goes beyond the obvious, understandable,
and brief
Silence
Effective when coupled with attentive observation
Too much adult talk distracts from the learning environment
Waiting time
Page | 45
Avoid interrupting when children are engaged in communicating with
one another
Hand-Over-Hand
Direct contact between educator and child
Educators hands over the childs hands
Provides assistance in completing a task (Slater, 2000)
May be used when fostering a new skill (Slater, 2000)

EARLY LEARNING CENTRE LEARNING


EXPERIENCE
Student Name: Date: Age Group:

Purpose: Purpose:
Reason for developing
learning experience. This
could be in response to an
observation, discussion with
the site supervisor, Ontario
Curriculum Objective, etc.

Observation
- Document what you saw
and heard
- Document non-verbal
communication (i.e.,
body language, facial
expressions and voice
tone)
- Document in detail: who,
what, where, and when
- Documentation should be
written in past tense,
objective, and in
anecdotal format
OR
Discussion
Document the discussion
between you and your site
supervisor that led to the
planning
OR
Curriculum Objective
Page | 46
Describe the curriculum
objective youre aiming to
meet/enhance through this
experience
Learning Experience
What are you planning in
response to your purpose?
- Label your experience (e.g.
Painting with cars).
- What are your 3 objectives
for this experience? (i.e.
What interests are you
extending? What
strengths and
opportunities for growth
are you
enhancing/supporting?)
Please Note: You should
refer to appropriate
pedagogy to support your
discussion around
strengths and
opportunities for growth
(e.g. ELECT, How Does
Learning Happen,
Ontario FDK
Curriculum, etc).

Describe the experience:


- Who will be involved in the
experience?
- Where will the experience
take place? (e.g. Indoors
or outdoors? In the
dramatic centre, the
creative table, etc).
- List the materials and
resources you will use
- Describe the
implementation of the
experience, with a step by
step description
- List and describe 2 teaching
strategies. How will you
Page | 47
use them? Why have you
chosen these strategies?

Reflection:
- What went well? Provide
examples for how you
know it went well.
- What didnt go well?
Provide examples for
how you know it didnt
go well.
- What did you learn?
- What might you do
differently next time you
implement this same
experience and why?
- Did you have to make any
adaptations or
modifications? If so,
what were they?
- What type of experience
might you plan to extend
on this one?

Field Supervisor Feedback:

Page | 48
Signature:______________________________________Date
:______________________

EARLY LEARNING CENTRE LEARNING EXPERIENCE


SAMPLE
Purpose: Purpose:
Reason for developing
learning experience. This Observation Sample:
could be in response to an Gurpreet and Brandon were playing in the dramatic centre.
observation, discussion Gurpreet was sitting at the table with a bowl in her left hand
with the site supervisor, and a spoon in her right hand. She scooped the spoon into the
Ontario Curriculum bowl, brought the spoon to her mouth and said, Yummy, this
Objective, etc. Rajma tastes sooo good. Brandon then asked, What is
Rujma? Gurpreet answered, Its called Rajma and it is a
Observation soup made with kidney beans and gravy. Brandon yelled,
- Document what you saw Yuck! That sounds disgusting! We dont eat that in our home.
and heard We eat pasta, chicken and potatoes. Thats what normal
- Document non-verbal children eat. Youre weird Gurpreet. Gurpreet frowned and
Page | 49
walked to the book centre.
communication (i.e.,
body language, facial
expressions and voice Discussion Sample:
tone) My site supervisor asked me to help him plan a pot luck. He
- Document in detail: who,
wants to teach the children about diversity, so that they learn to
what, where, and when
- Documentation should be appreciate different cultures as well as appreciate the
written in past tense, uniqueness of their own culture.
objective, and in
anecdotal format Curriculum Objective Sample:
OR According to the FDK curriculum, children should be able to:
Discussion 3.3 talk about events or retell stories that reflect their own
Document the discussion heritage and cultural background and the heritage and cultural
between you and your site backgrounds of others (e.g., traditions, birthdays, cultural
supervisor that led to the events, myths, Canadian symbols, holidays) (The Full-Day
planning Early Learning Kindergarten Program, 2010, p. 58)
OR
Curriculum Objective
Describe the curriculum
objective youre aiming to
meet/enhance through this
experience

Learning Experience
What are you planning in I am going to organize and facilitate a pot luck for all of the
response to your purpose? children in my FDK classroom.
- Label your experience (e.g. The experience will take place during lunch time.
Painting with cars). Last week I sent home a newsletter telling parents about the
- What are your 3 objectives potluck and asking if they could send a traditional cultural dish
for this experience? (i.e. with their child to share with their peers. Participation in this
What interests are you experience is voluntary because I understand that some parents
extending? What and caregivers dont have time to cook a dish to share, do not
strengths and have the financial resources to do so, or do not want their
opportunities for growth children to participate because of food allergies/restrictions.
are you
enhancing/supporting?) Objectives:
Please Note: You should 1. The children will practice the skill of (3.3) talking about
refer to appropriate events or retell stories that reflect their own heritage
pedagogy to support your and cultural background and the heritage and cultural
discussion around backgrounds of others as they talk about the cultural
strengths and opportunities dish they brought to class to share with their peers (The
for growth (e.g. ELECT, Full-Day Early Learning Kindergarten Program, 2010,
How Does Learning p. 58).
Happen, Ontario FDK 2. The children will enhance their ability to (3.2)
Page | 50
Curriculum, etc). demonstrate respect and consideration for individual
differences as they taste different cultural dishes and
Describe the experience: learn about different cultures (The Full-Day Early
- Who will be involved in the Learning Kindergarten Program, 2010, p. 57).
experience? 3. The children will (2.2) demonstrate a willingness to try
- Where will the experience new activities as they try food they have not been
take place? (e.g. Indoors exposed to before (The Full-Day Early Learning
or outdoors? In the Kindergarten Program, 2010, p. 64).
dramatic centre, the
creative table, etc). Materials:
- List the materials and - Food will be brought in by the children
resources you will use - Paper plates
- Describe the - Plastic forks
implementation of the - Napkins
experience, with a step
by step description Implementation:
- List and describe 2 teaching 1. I will ask the children to wash their hands for lunch
strategies. How will you 2. I will lay the different dishes out on the main lunch table
use them? Why have you 3. Once the children are sitting at their seats, I will have
chosen these strategies? the children label the dish they brought in and describe
it to their peers
4. One by one, I will invite the children to bring their plate
to the main lunch table and select the dishes they want
to try (buffet style)
5. Once everyone has their food, I will prepare my plate,
sit with the children and model eating lunch
6. I will ask them questions like:
a. What does it taste like?
b. What do you like about it?
c. What dont you like about it?
d. Does your family eat this or something like this?

Teaching Strategies:
Invitations:
I will motivate the children to try a new dish by saying, Come
and see what kind of food your friends have brought in for you
to try. I will invite them because the children might be
apprehensive to try something new and will require some
encouragement.

Modeling:
I will try the different dishes the children bring to class because
children learn by imitating others. If I dont hesitate to try a
new dish then the children may not either.

Page | 51
Reflection:
- What went well? Provide
examples for how you
know it went well.
- What didnt go well?
Provide examples for
how you know it didnt go
well.
- What did you learn?
- What might you do
differently next time you
implement this same
experience and why?
- Did you have to make any
adaptations or
modifications? If so,
what were they?
- What type of experience
might you plan to extend
on this one?

Field Supervisor Feedback:

Page | 52
Signature:______________________________________Date:
______________________

GROUP LEARNING EXPERIENCE PLANNING SHEET


Student Name: Course Code: ECS 2040

Age Group: Date:

Learning Experience:

Programming Purpose:

Objective:
Children will

Materials:

Page | 53
Opening (Introduction)

Body (Content)

Closing (Ending)

Transition

Page | 54
Overall Group Learning Experience Evaluation:

What worked during this learning experience? Why?

What did not work during this learning experience? Why?

What might you do differently in the future?

Page | 55
What theory might you use to support these changes? (Optional)

Site Supervisors Feedback:

Provide the student with constructive feedback on his/her Group Learning


Experience
Indicate aspects the student did well
Comment on aspect the student could keep in mind when planning and
implementing future experiences

Page | 56
Site Supervisors Signature: ____________________________

Date: ____________________________

GROUP LEARNING EXPERIENCE PLANNING SHEET


EXAMPLE
Student Name: Gurpreet Dhaliwal Course Code: ECS 2040

Age Group: Fourteen months to Three years of age Date: September 30th, 2015

Learning Experience: Music: Rhythm Sticks

Programming Purpose:

Last week, the class visitor was a drummer and the children enjoyed listening to the various
drumming styles. Following the visit, the children spent a great deal of time spontaneously
drumming with objects in the classroom. The purpose is to provide an additional music
experience that includes instruments.

Objective:

Children will:
Develop auditory discrimination skills as they repeat the different tapping patterns with the
rhythm sticks.

Page | 57
Materials:

- 9 sets of rhythm sticks


- 1 musical sign Stop light with green and red lights
- 1 decorated shoebox to store the rhythm sticks
- 1 CD Rhythm Stick Activity
- 1 CD player

Opening (Introduction)

Sing Everybody sit down, sit down, sit down, everybody sit down just like me
Last week, Peter, our visitor, taught us how to tap on his drum. Today we are going to play
rhythm sticks, first without music and then with music.

Body (Content)

1) Show children Musical Sign (Red means stop and Green means tap your sticks)
2) Call childrens names one at a time to get a pair of rhythm sticks
3) Allow children time to experience and explore tapping with rhythm sticks. (Sensory
engagement)
4) Show the Red Sign
5) Acknowledge appropriate behaviour (i.e., you all stopped tapping when you saw the red
sign) (Behaviour Reflection)
6) Model how to use the rhythm sticks
7) Using a Do-It Signal, children will begin to tap slowly, quickly, softly, loudly, high, and low.
Show stop sign
8) Challenge children to imitate simple patterns. Watch the teacher and copy
9) Play Rhythm Stick Game. Ask individual children to demonstrate a tapping pattern and
everyone will copy
10) Play Rhythm Sticks Activity. Ask the children to listen and follow the directions in the
song. When the music stops the children will place their sticks on the floor in front of
them;
11) Acknowledge the childrens tapping and listening as I repeat the rhythm each
produces.
Closing (Ending)

Today we made music with rhythm sticks. When we have our next music circle, we`ll make

Page | 58
music with a different instrument.
Sing song, JK put your sticks away, put your sticks away, put your sticks away. JK put your
sticks away and thank you very much. (Tune: Mary had a little lamb)
Sing this song until all the children have had a turn.

Transition

Children will be invited to put their sticks away and line up for outdoors in small groups at a
time. For example: Everyone wearing blue, put your sticks away and line up to go outside.
Everyone wearing pink, put your sticks away and line up to go outside.

Page | 59
Overall Group Learning Experience Evaluation:

What worked during this learning experience? Why?

During this group learning experience, the objective was facilitated. I believe this learning
experience was very successful in supporting my objective through the observations I made
during the learning experience. My objective was supported as children were observed to
begin to develop auditory discrimination skills as they repeated the different tapping
patterns with the rhythm sticks. Children were using sensory engagement during their
exploration, and it was observed as Child A tapped the rhythm sticks four times
consecutively and Child B copied the pattern immediately.
The transition I used at the end of the Group learning experience was effective because it
allowed children to smoothly transition to going outside for outside time.

What did not work during this learning experience? Why?

During this group learning experience what did not work was that children were not always
able to quickly see the red and green sign for stop and go. This is behavior reflection
teaching strategy did not work as I originally sought out it to be because the children were
too focused on making the rhythm with the rhythm sticks that they did not look up to see the
red and green sign that was being held up.
When I was distributing the rhythm sticks to the children, the children were eager to get their
pair of sticks and did not want to wait for their name to be called. Children began to stand up
and crowd around the box that I had the rhythm sticks in, I asked the children to wait for
their name to be called, but with the amount of excitement and positive energy I was feeling
from the children, my site supervisor and I thought it would be the best if I took out a pair
from the box and stated a childs name that I was giving it to. For example, I took out a pair
and stated Child As name and said, Child A here are your rhythm sticks.

What might you do differently in the future?

For the future, I would let the children explore the rhythm sticks for a longer time period
(sensory engagement). It was a very exciting experience but also a very difficult experience
for some children to settle and follow the music sign. Although I did provide them with some
time for sensory engagement, a longer time for sensory exploration would provide the
children with an opportunity to play spontaneously before beginning to learn some patterns
on the rhythm sticks.
I will also verbally say the words stop and go as I display the red or green sign to further
begin to develop their auditory discrimination. I believe by providing the children with visual
and oral instructions, they would be better able to understand what is being expected.

What theory might you use to support these changes? (Optional)


The theory I will use to support the changes in the future is from the, Early Learning
for Every Child Today: A framework for Ontario early childhood settings Pagedocument.
| 60
FULL ENVIRONMENT SET-UP PLANNING SHEET
TO BE COMPLETED IN FULL DURING BLOCK WEEK
Student Name: Course Code: ECS 2040

Age Group: Date:

When planning a full room set-up, you should incorporate a minimum of four (4) centres and/or
Learning Experiences. In completing the write up of your full room set-up, you must make a list of
the areas with a general description of each. You must also plan and implement one (1) Learning
Experience in addition to the four (4) centres.
The purpose of the centres and/or Learning Experiences may derive from:
(a) Observations of children
(b) Extension of a previous experience
(c) Providing a new experience.
Objective:
Children will:

Centre or Learning Experience #1:


Purpose:

Materials:

Centre or Learning Experience #2:


Purpose:

Materials:

Page | 61
Centre or Learning Experience #3:
Purpose:

Materials:

Centre or Learning Experience #4:


Purpose:

Materials:

Page | 62
Centre or Learning Experience #5:
Purpose:

Materials:

Set-Up:

Page | 63
Role of the Educator:

Teaching Strategy #1:

Teaching Strategy #2:

Page | 64
Supportive Strategies:

Overall Full Environment Set-Up Evaluation:

What worked during this learning experience? Why?

What did not work during this learning experience? Why?

Page | 65
What might you do differently in the future?

What theory might you use to support these changes? (Optional)

Site Supervisors Feedback:

Provide the student with constructive feedback on his/her Group Learning


Experience
Indicate aspects the student did well
Comment on aspect the student could keep in mind when planning and
implementing future experiences

Page | 66
Site Supervisors Signature: ____________________________

Date: ____________________________

FULL ENVIRONMENT SET-UP PLANNING SHEET


EXAMPLE
TO BE COMPLETED IN FULL DURING BLOCK WEEK
Student Name: Raj Prashar Course Code: ECS 2040

Age Group: Fourteen months to Three years of age Date: September 30th, 2015

Page | 67
When planning a full room set-up, you should incorporate a minimum of four (4) centres
and/or Learning Experiences. In completing the write up of your full room set-up, you must
make a list of the areas with a general description of each. You must also plan and implement
one (1) Learning Experience in addition to the four (4) centres.
The purpose of the centres and/or Learning Experiences may derive from:
(a) Observations of children
(b) Extension of a previous experience
(c) Providing a new experience.
Objective:
Children will:
Further develop their social skills as they engage in parallel play and social interest. The
children will play in proximity of their peers with similar objects (Ontario Ministry of
Education, 2007). In centres one, two, and five, children will be likely playing without any
exchanges in things or idea (Ontario Ministry of Education, 2007). In centres three and four,
children will be engaged in social interest as they offer one another toys, props, or play
dough tools. In the dramatic centre, children will be engaged, in short group activities
(Ontario Ministry of Education, 2007, p. 35).
Centre or Learning Experience #1: Creative: Mouse Puppets

Purpose:
The purpose of this experience is to give the children an opportunity to develop an
appreciation of art by linking what they have listened to in circle (If You Gave a Mouse a
Cookie) to a hands-on creative experience
Materials:
- Paper bags
- Construction paper
- Felt pieces
- Buttons
- Glue
- Scissors (4)
- Smocks (4)

Centre or Learning Experience #2: Cognitive: Counting Chocolate Chips on Cookies

Purpose:
The purpose of this centre is from observation of children. Some students are having
difficulty in number representation to number symbols
Materials:
- Light brown felt cookies with number printed on the bottom
- Dark brown felt chocolate chips
- 1 table, 2 chairs, 2 place mats

Centre or Learning Experience #3: Sensory: Play Dough Pretend Cookies

Purpose:
The purpose of this experience is to give the children a direct opportunity to manipulate

Page | 68
materials to create their own cookies

Materials:
- 3 plastic trays
- Light brown dough
- Dark brown dough
- Play dough tools (i.e., cutter, crimper, stamps, etc.)

Centre or Learning Experience #4: Dramatic Play: Bakery Shop

Purpose:
The purpose of this experience is to provide a play-based opportunity for children to extend
their learning of the story and its prime concept in a staged setting.

Materials:
- Baking trays
- Muffin tins
- Aprons
- Cash resister with pretend money
- Boxes
- Pretend bread, muffins, cakes
- Dress up clothes

Centre or Learning Experience #5: Language: Story Sequencing

Purpose:
The purpose of this experience is for children to continue developing their memory skills by
putting the picture cards in sequence while also learning the hand washing routine.

Materials:
- Long strips of construction paper
- Picture cards (dirty hands, washing, soap, washing soap, wipe, clean hands)
- Glue pots with brushes
- Crayons to colour pictures

Page | 69
Language Centre

Set-Up:
Creative Centre
Glue Container
Chairs with Smocks

Felt Pieces
Buttons
Construction Paper
Scissors
Paper Bags

Cognitive Centre
Chairs

Cookies with Numbers


Printed On

Table

Chocolate Chips

Dramatic Centre
Aprons
Dress Up Clothes

Baking Trays
Boxes
Table
Muffin Tins
Cash Register with
Pretend Money
Pretend Bread,
Muffins, and Cakes

Page | 70
Page | 71
Role of the Educator:

Teaching Strategy #1:

Invitation

I will use the invitation teaching strategy to engage all children to the different centres and
learning experiences set out for them. By using this teaching strategy, I will be motivating
children to engage in the wide variety of centres and experiences set out for them. I will call
the child and ask them to observe what other children are doing. I will also ask the child if
they would like to have a seat at a centre or experience that they have yet to try.

Teaching Strategy #2:

Challenges

I will use the challenges teaching strategy with the children as it will further enhance their
cognitive skills. This teaching strategy will be observed throughout all centres. I will
challenge children in centre one as they will be asked to use a colour that they currently
have not used. In centre two, I will ask children to count more complex chocolate chip cookie
numbers, like three, four, and five. In centre three, I will challenge the children to use specific
colours of play dough with specific shapes, as this will allow children to think about the colour
of the play dough and the different shaped tools. In centre four, children will be challenged to
find different materials. For example, the children will be challenged to find an apron, by
doing this, children will be expanding their vocabulary. In centre five, I will at first scaffold the
children and model how to wash hands, but as children repeat the process they will be
challenged to rely on their memory and their hand washing routine.

Supportive Strategies:

I will acknowledge the childrens efforts by encouraging them to discuss their process using
the following prompts:
I noticed...
I heard...
Tell me about...

Page | 72
Overall Full Environment Set-Up Evaluation:

What worked during this learning experience? Why?


During this full environment set-up children were provided many opportunities to begin to
develop skills in various domains through the different experiences set out for them. The purpose
for each experience was met as children encountered and participated in the experience.
In centre one, the children were very interested in this experience as it gave them the
opportunity to create what they listened to and learned about. The children were given some
creative freedom to create their own unique mouse puppets. The children used the materials
well to create their puppets.
Centre three, the children seemed to enjoy this activity. The children were able to discriminate
between the materials and that was observed as they understood that the dark brown play dough
represented the chocolate chips and the light brown dough represented the cookie.
Centre four, children loved this centre as well. Children used the materials properly and
understood to take turn and assume different roles. The children extended their learning by
pretending to work in/shop at a cupcake shop. PA asked if there was an icing bag because she
wanted to put frosting on the cupcakes.
My teaching strategies worked very well. The children loved the invitation I used as they felt
welcomed and excited to join the centres. They enjoyed the centres and once they were finished
they were excited to tell other children to try the experience or visit the centre. Children were
challenged at all the centres and learning experiences, some children accepted the challenge and
worked independently while some enjoyed the challenges posed with another child.
My objective was met, children were developing their social skills and it was observed through
the different types of play. Children were engaged in parallel play and social interest as
hypothesized. My supportive strategies went very well, children were excited to share their
different creations and thoughts.

What did not work during this learning experience? Why?


I had set out three experiences, which required a lot of adult supervision. This was a little difficult
because it was very hard for me to be at all three at one time. Although, I received help from the
early childhood educators it continued to be difficult. I initially positioned myself at the creative
table because the children required the most guidance with this experience as it required many
steps to complete. However, I had to move between centres to support children at other centres.
If I had set out two experiences which required adult supervision, it may have been easier to
continue with the full environment set-up and perhaps even having the children side by side
would have allowed me to support the children.
In centre two, the numbers printed on the bottom of the cookies were not noticed which
presented a challenge for children.
Page | 73
In centre three, there werent enough materials, this is because rolling pins and cookie cutters
were popular. Children wanted to use these materials and not share with their peers.
In centre five, the children were having difficulty recalling some steps, but after modelling for the
children they began to understand and recall their hand washing steps.

ORIENTATION TO FIELD
My modifications for centre three did not go as planned. This is probably because I limited four
play dough tools per tray, but as the experience developed, the children began to put all the tools
in one tray. Child A, the child with special needs, had a difficult time as the experience was no
longer simplified.

PLACEMENT
What might you do differently in the future?
In the future, during a full environment set-up I will set out 2 of the 5 experiences that require
adult supervision. To ensure the flow between the centres is smooth I will convene on the carpet
prior to the children participating in the experiences and explain in greater detail what experience
is at each centre, how to use the materials and expectations.
For experience three, I think something I would do differently next time is to colour coordinate the
play dough tools and the trays, so it is simple for the children with special needs.

What theory might you use to support these changes? (Optional)


The theory I used to support the future changes is from the document, How Does Learning
happen? Ontarios Pedagogy for the Early Years. The foundation Engagement is described as,
[a] state of being involved and focused. When children are able to explore the world around
them with their natural curiosity and exuberance, they are fully engaged. Through this type of
play and inquiry, they develop skills such as problem solving, creative thinking, and innovating,
which are essential for learning and success in school and beyond. (Ontario Ministry of
Education, 2014, p. 7). Children will experience engagement as they participate in the
experiences in the full environment set-up.

Page | 74
PART 6 - ORIENTATION TO FIELD
PLACEMENT
INITIAL MEETING CHECKLIST
Within the first 2 days of receiving placement confirmation from the Field
Placement Coordinator, students will be expected to contact their Site
Supervisor to arrange a meeting. This meeting should take place prior to the
first day of placement. At this meeting, the following items need to be
addressed:

Policies and procedures of field placement setting:

Daily hours of placement


Dress code
Site policies
Site calendar (e.g., holidays, professional development days, events,
themes)
Mandate, philosophy, structure, services, and goals for the school/site
Children/families/population served

Student documentation:

Students resume/profile if applicable


Students Vulnerable Sector Screen, Immunization Clearance Card, First
Aid/CPR Certificate, Student Declaration of Understanding, Field
Placement Agreement Form, Placement & Internship Student
Agreement Form, Pledge of Confidentiality, Placement Time Sheet,
Contact Information Form
Field Placement Manual for Site Supervisor to review (electronically or
in print)
Complete all forms in the second bullet and upload to GHWorks for
approval by your Field Placement Coordinator

Student and Course Instructor to discuss:

Student job description, responsibilities, and role


Student goals for field placement (to be done at a later date)
Set regular time for informal feedback
Responsibilities of student, site supervisor, course instructor, and
placement coordinator

*Refer to Responsibilities of Students on page 11.

Page | 75
CONTACT INFORMATION

Student Name:

Students Phone:

Students Email: @guelphhumber.ca

Placement Name:

Placement Address:

Major Intersection:

Site Supervisor:

Director/Principal:

Site Phone:

Site Email:

The student will typically be present at placement on the following days:

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday


Friday

What are the students typical hours during these days? (E.g., 9 am - 5 pm):

*Student: Please keep a copy of the Contact Information in your Field Placement

Binder

Page | 76
REQUIRED
DOCUMENTATION

Page | 77
PART 7 REQUIRED DOCUMENTATION
To participate in field placement, and in accordance with the Day Nurseries
Act, Ontario, Humber ITAL, and the University of Guelph, students must have
necessary documentation. It is important that this documentation be current
prior to the beginning of each placement. Failure to do so will result in a
students inability to begin placement on time. All days missed due to
incomplete documentation must be made up in full. Refer to Policies
Regarding Make-Up Days on page 9. The documents are to be completed
accurately and then uploaded to GHWorks. Below is a list of the documents
to be completed:

1. VULNERABLE SECTOR SCREEN


Students completing field placements are required to complete a
satisfactory Vulnerable Sector Screen (VSS) prior to having direct
contact/interaction with vulnerable populations.
Early Childhood Studies students are to apply for their VSS through
their local police detachments. The receipt of the VSS application
and the completed VSS form must be submitted by the due
dates provided by the Field Placement Coordinator during the
preceding winter semester. Students should also check
GHWorks for these due dates.
Students who are applying for a VSS through the OPP must apply to a
detachment in the area they reside. Students applying for a VSS
through the OPP must contact the detachment prior to completing an
application to inquire if a Confirmation of Enrollment letter is required.
The Confirmation of Enrollment letter must be requested by the
student directly to the university. The university will work to ensure the
letter is expedited in a timely manner however confirmations should be
requested five days in advance of when they are required.
Students who are applying to the Toronto Police Services for their VSS
must obtain the appropriate form from Guelph Humber Career &
Placement Services. The completed form must be mailed to:
Police Reference Check Program, Toronto Police Services
40 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2J3
Students living in Peel, York, Halton, and Durham Regions must apply in
person. Please refer to websites below:
o Peel Region
http://www.peelpolice.on.ca/en/services/vulnerablesectorchec
k.asp
o York Region https://www.yrp.ca/en/services/vulnerable-sector-
check.asp
o Halton Region
http://www.haltonpolice.ca/recordscourts/records/policerecord
sChecks/Pages/default.aspx

Page | 78
o Durham Region
http://www.drps.ca/internet_explorer/over_the_counter/index.a
sp?Do_What=fetch&Page=1&ID=5&Category_ID=3
2. IMMUNIZATION CLEARANCE CARD
As students will be working with young children and their families it is
of utmost importance to have all immunizations fully updated,
including TB skin test, Hepatitis B, MMR, Chickenpox, and Adacel.
An Immunization Clearance Card must be obtained from the Humber
ITAL Student Wellness and Accessibility Centre located in LRC. To obtain
this card, an Immunization Record (Field/Clinical Pre-Placement Health
Form) must be completed by each student annually (unless otherwise
specified) with his or her doctor and submitted to the Student Wellness
and Accessibility Centre. Refer to Field/Clinical Pre-Placement Health
Form on page 64.
3. FIRST AID (LEVEL A)/ CPR (LEVEL C) CERTIFICATION
Students must have current Standard First Aid (Level A) and CPR (Level
C
Infant/Child/Adult CPR and choking).
First Aid/CPR certification may be done through Humber ITAL. Students
may complete this certification in the community; however, the course
MUST be an exact fit with the courses offered at Humber ITAL.
4. INSURANCE CLAIMS PROCEDURES
In the rare instance of a student injury or related illness at their placement,
the following procedure must be followed:
1. The student should seek medical attention.
2. The student must report the incident to their Site Supervisor
immediately, and as soon as possible to their Course Instructor. The Site
Supervisor (or designate) will be required to complete a written account
of the incident.
3. The student must report the incident by telephone and/or e-mail within
24 hours to the University contact:
Susan Thomas, Manager, Career & Placement Services
susan.thomas@guelphhumber.ca AND/OR 416-798-1331
ext.6223 or ext.6062
If the student is physically unable to report the incident to the
university, it is the responsibility of the placement & internship partner
to do so.
4. The university contact, in conjunction with the student and the Site
Supervisor (or designate) completes an incident report and files it with
the insurance and/or WSIB office.
5. The student is to keep the university contact, their Site Supervisor, and
Course Instructor informed of their health and to schedule a date to
return to the placement site.
Please note that, in the event of an accident, the University of Guelph-Humber
has only 72 hours (from the time the incident/accident occurred) to submit the
required documentation to the WSIB or private insurer. Keeping in mind that this
documentation must be collected from a number of sources and submitted in a
written report, it is imperative that the above procedures are strictly followed.

Page | 79
5. STUDENT DECLARATION OF UNDERSTANDING (Page 68)
6. FIELD PLACEMENT AGREEMENT FORM (Page 69)
7. PLACEMENT & INTERNSHIP STUDENT AGREEMENT FORM (Page 70)
8. PLACEMENT & INTERNSHIP PARTNER AGREEMENT FORM (Page 71)
9. PLEDGE OF CONFIDENTIALITY (Page 72)
10. FIELD PLACEMENT TIME SHEET (Page 73)

Page | 80
Page | 81
Page | 82
Page | 83
Page | 84
Page | 85
Page | 86
EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDIES
FIELD PLACEMENT AGREEMENT

I, (print name) have read and understand the program expectations and
responsibilities as articulated in the Early Childhood Studies Field Placement
Manual.

I understand that I am required to complete 105 hours during Field Placement II.

I understand that I am expected to attend and participate in placement seminars


and this participation comprises a portion of my placement grade.

I understand that documentation, assignments, and other related materials must be


submitted in a timely manner at the required submission dates. Failure to do so will
compromise student success of the placement.

I understand that I am considered a professional-in-training and as such will carry


out my responsibilities in a professional manner consistent with the Code of Ethics
and Standards of Practice of the Ontario College of Early Childhood Educators and in
accordance with the Days Nurseries Act of Ontario.

I understand that failure to follow through with the expectations and responsibilities
of the field placement may result in removal from the field placement.

________________________________
Student name Student signature

Date

Page | 87
EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDIES
PLACEMENT & INTERNSHIP STUDENT AGREEMENT
DUE: At the start of placement

I, the undersigned, understand and accept the following responsibilities and


conditions:
To actively search for a placement and have it approved by the Career &
Placement Services Coordinator before I begin my placement *
To make every effort to conduct myself as a regular employee in the site
where I am completing my placement/internship term, and to adhere to site
policies and regulations regarding working hours, office conduct and
communication, ethics, dress code and matters of confidentiality
To inform my work placement supervisor and the Career & Placement
Coordinator of any problems that occur while onsite
To complete the minimum required number of hours, as dictated by my
program
That once I accept a position, I will honour the commitment
I give permission to the University of GuelphHumber to contact my employer
at any time to discuss my placement


Students Name (Please print) Students Signature

Early Childhood Studies ECS 2040

Program of Study Field Placement Course Code


Student Number Date


Students Address Street City

@guelphhumber.ca
Postal Code Telephone GuelphHumber EMail


Emergency Contact Name Emergency Contact Telephone
Relationship

Identify 3 learning objectives you will achieve during your placement or internship term:
1)
2)
3)

Page | 88
*Students in ECS are to consult with their Field Placement Coordinator to obtain a
placement, and are not to approach employers without prior consent

Page | 89
EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDIES
PLEDGE OF CONFIDENTIALITY
Name of Student

Year/Semester Second Year/ Fourth Semester

I hereby pledge to maintain professional and ethical standards with respect to


observing the strictest confidentiality at all times regarding any information
acquired by me through my involvement with (name of field placement site) to
the limit of legal requirements.

This will apply to all matters relating to:

a) personal information about children and/or their families


b) the current affairs and activities of the site
c) all future projected affairs and activities of the site
d) information regarding staff and allied professionals

______________________________ ________________________________
Signature of Student Signature of Witness


Printed Name of Student Printed Name of Witness


Date Date

Page | 90
PLACEMENT TIME SHEET
Please ensure the information is completed accurately each time you submit
this form.
Student:
First Name Last Name

Placement Site:

Site Supervisor:

Course Instructor: Course Code: ECS 2040 Semester:


04

Date Numb Cumulati Site Supervisors Signature


(Month/Day) er of ve Hours (please sign each line to verify the hours worked)
Hours Total

Page | 91
MID SEMESTER FIELD
PLACEMENT SELF-
EVALUATION

Page | 92
Preface
The following section of the manual includes the self-evaluation form that is
to be used at mid semester of field placement to allow the Early Childhood
Studies student to reflect on his/her performance. The self-evaluation is in
accordance with the Ontario College of Early Childhood Educators as the
student is to abide by the Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice
throughout the progression of his/her academic career. The student is also
required to abide by the policies and procedures of his/her field placement
agencies, the regulations and procedures of the Honours Bachelor of Applied
Sciences Early Childhood Program and those of the University of Guelph-
Humber.

The University of Guelph-Humbers Early Childhood Field Placement Program


provides students with the opportunity to incorporate current research,
theories, and practical experiences, in preparation to work collaboratively
with Early Childhood professionals, children, and families with integrity,
commitment, and professionalism.

The self-evaluation form includes competencies specific to Standards of


Practice set out by the College of Early Childhood Educators allowing
students to understand and act in agreement with the Code of Ethics and
Standards of Practice.

Page | 93
Early Childhood Studies
Mid Semester Field Placement Self-Evaluation
ECS 2040 Early Learning Environment

Students are expected to complete this self-evaluation form at mid


semester. Please check mark () each competency with the rating that is
most applicable. If a competency does not apply, please indicate a check
mark in the NO (No Opportunity) column for that specific row. The
evaluation will form 10% of the students final grade for this placement. It is
expected that the student and Site Supervisor meet to discuss the students
self-evaluation before it is submitted to the Course Instructor.

Students Name:

First Last

Name of Practicum Site:

Site Address:

City/Town: Postal Code:

Telephone: Email:

Name of Site Supervisor:

Position of Site Supervisor:

Students Job Title:

Page | 94
Demonstration of Competencies: Please assess all items as applicable by
placing a check mark () in the appropriate level of competency. Please do not
skip any competencies. For items not applicable, place a checkmark in the NO
(No Opportunity) column. The final calculation is to be completed at the end of
the evaluation as it is explained in detail.

Competency Rating Scale

Exceptionally Excels in ability to independently perform the


Demonstrated (ED) competency with initiative, creativity, innovation,
(1.0 point) and meets the unique needs of each situation.
Consistently demonstrates the competency with
Demonstrated (D)
independence and skill, in all situations, at all times.
(0.75 points)
Requires little or no direct supervision.
Demonstrates learning in progress in this
competency, however, does not independently
In Progress (IP)
perform skill with consistency in all situations at all
(0.5 points)
times. Student requires further practice, prompting,
and supervision in development of this aspect.
Did not demonstrate the competency. Requires
Not Demonstrated (ND)
extensive practice, prompting, and supervision in
(0 points)
this competency area.
Competency does not apply to the setting therefore
unable to observe, or there was limited or no
No Opportunity (NO)
opportunity for student to demonstrate the
competency.

Calculations will be explained at the end, the point value is not


required at this stage.
NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =
Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

Standard I:
Caring and Nurturing Relationships that Support NO ND IP D ED
Learning
Initiates communication and responds appropriately to
children and their families
For example, greets and communicates with families when the
opportunity arises
Body Language is open, approachable, and warm
Body language reflects verbal message
Voice tone is reflective of verbal message
Facilitates childrens expression of feelings
For example, assisting children to showing empathy towards
the student or a child when resolving conflict
Initiates communication and responds appropriately
Practices active listening skills

Page | 95
Anticipates childrens actions by observing childrens
cues and responds appropriately
Evident that the student has developed positive
relationships with children

Total

NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =


Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

Standard II:
Developmentally Appropriate Care and NO ND IP D ED
Education
Implements teacher-directed and child-directed
learning experiences in a variety of curriculum areas
For example, drama, science, cognitive, literacy, and outdoor
play
Incorporates a variety of teaching strategies during
implementation of learning experiences
For example, sensory engagement, scaffolding, challenges,
and do-it signals
Assist children in observing limits
Maintains flexibility and adaptability in various
situations
For example, adapts planned experiences with changing
environments/number of children, various learning styles, and
needs of children as required
Plans specific and/or unique learning experiences
based on childrens interests
For example, creative and/or original experiences
Shows flexibility in modifying and expanding learning
experiences based on childrens interests, strengths,
and needs to extend childrens learning
Supports childrens self-help skills in dressing
seasonally appropriate
For example, encouraging children to zip up jacket/put on
boots
Encourages and promotes self-help skills in play
situations
For example, picking up and placing toys where they belong
Exhibits creativity and innovation in the creation of
learning experiences based on childrens interests
Uses verbal and non-verbal communication to
encourage childrens positive behavior
For example, body language and gestures (getting down to
childs level)
Provides appropriate alternative activities and
redirects children when necessary
Page | 96
Encourages problem-solving strategies among
children
Fosters independence by providing choices for the
children
Plans a variety of developmentally appropriate
learning experiences

Total

NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =


Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

Standard III:
Safe, Healthy and Supportive Learning NO ND IP D ED
Environments
Maintains an inclusive, safe, and healthy environment
Demonstrates knowledge of sites fire drill, lockdown,
and emergency situations procedures when/if
necessary
Responds appropriately to unsafe and/or emergency
situations
For example, if a child hurts himself/herself
Demonstrates awareness of universal precautions and
implements them appropriately as required
For example, WHMIS symbols
Positions self to maximize supervision of all children
in the environment
Assists staff in examining indoor and outdoor
environments for unsafe material or equipment and
takes appropriate action if required
For example, scans indoor and outdoor play areas regularly
and consistently
Uses a daily baseline health observation of children
and discusses observations with staff
For example, if a child is showing symptoms of illness then
student advises staff of observations
Aware of and responds to any health, medical, and/or
cultural/religious needs of children
For example, allergies, illness, and food restrictions (halal or
vegetarian)
Initiates and supervises daily routines including

Page | 97
indoor and outdoor activities
Follows appropriate hygiene procedures when
cleaning and sanitizing the environment
For example, sanitizing tables, toys, and other play
equipment, sweeping when necessary
Follows the sites hand washing, diapering, and/or
toileting policies and supports children appropriately
For example, hand washing, diapering, and/or toileting
policies
Demonstrates preparation and organization in
preparing the environment for learning
For example, helps set-up the environment for morning and/or
afternoon and/or program for outdoor play
Takes initiative and acts independently
For example, disinfects tables and chairs before and after
meals and snacks

Total

NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =


Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

Standard IV:
NO ND IP D ED
Professional Knowledge and Competence
Demonstrates awareness and understanding of
licensing, legislation, and regulation that effect the
field placement site
For example, understand staff ratio
Has knowledge of and adheres to the guiding
principles (philosophy, policies, and procedures) of
the site
Uses observations to inform programming based on
the interests and needs of the children
Plans for individual needs based on observation of
childs interests and areas of growth
Incorporates a variety of strategies for guiding actions
and/or behaviour
For example, transition songs, redirection
Functions as a member of the team
Maintains a positive disposition and attitude
Initiates communication and responds appropriately
to staff on site
Uses clear, concise, and grammatically correct written

Page | 98
communication
Uses clear, concise, and grammatically correct verbal
communication
Demonstrates initiative in completing assigned
responsibilities
Demonstrates self-confidence in completing assigned
responsibilities
Uses observation and asks questions when learning
new programs for children/families
Continues to develop skills in meeting the learning
needs of the participants in the program/setting
For example, considers individual and group limitations and
strengths when planning learning experiences
Punctual arrival (Start of shift, break, lunch)
Contacts the site when unable to attend, late, etc.
Acts upon direction and constructive feedback
For example, Site Supervisors feedback from learning
experiences, and daily feedback on progression
Demonstrates professional attitudes, skills, and
knowledge
Sets clear and consistent limits and follows through in
a positive manner
Has positively contributed to the placement site
Demonstrates positive growth and professional
development since the beginning of placement

Total

NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =


Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

Standard V:
Professional Boundaries, Dual Relationships
NO ND IP D ED
and Conflicts
of Interest
Shows respects towards children, families, and site
staff
Displays the use of age-appropriate language with
children, families, and site staff
Maintains appropriate professional boundaries
For example, Distinct separation between home and
work/placement life
Maintains a clear, appropriate, and professional
relationship with children, families, and site staff
For example, avoiding dual relationships
Represents organization in a professional manner

Total
Page | 99
Standard VI:
Confidentiality and Consent to the Release of
NO ND IP D ED
Information Regarding Children and their
Families
Respects rights of children, families, staff site, and
field site
Maintains confidentiality when documenting written
and verbal information about children, families and
field site
Obtains parent/guardian consent prior to
photographing, audio, or video recording children

Total
Comments from Site Supervisor:

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

Evaluation Summary: Please transfer Total from each Standards row to the
chart below. Then transfer Total Check Marks to the second chart to calculate
Total Points.

NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =


Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

NO ND IP D ED
Standard I:
Caring and Nurturing Relationships that Support
Learning
Standard II:
Developmentally Appropriate Care and
Education
Page | 100
Standard III:
Safe, Healthy and Supportive Learning
Environments
Standard IV:
Professional Knowledge and Competence
Standard V:
Professional Boundaries, Dual Relationships and
Conflicts of Interest
Standard VI:
Confidentiality and Consent to the Release of
Information Regarding Children and their
Families

Total Check Marks

Exceptiona
No Not
Demonstra lly
Opportunit Demonstra In Progress
ted Demonstra
y ted
ted

Total
Check
Marks

65 - 0 x _________ 0.5 x 0.75 x 1x


Total ________ =0 ________ _______ _________
Points = = = =

Not Demonstrated 0 + In Progress + Demonstrated +


Exceptionally Demonstrated .
= Subtotal .

Subtotal out of Total Points from No Opportunity out of


.

Total Percentage (%) =


_______

Student Signature: ________________________________________ Date:


________________

Site Supervisor Signature: __________________________________ Date:


________________

Page | 101
Course Instructor Signature: ________________________________ Date:
________________

END OF SEMESTER FIELD


PLACEMENT EVALUATION

Page | 102
Preface
The following section of the manual includes the evaluation forms that are
used at the end of field placement to provide a final evaluation of the Early
Childhood Studies students performance. The final evaluation is in
accordance with the Ontario College of Early Childhood Educators as
students are to abide by the Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice
throughout the progression of their academic career. Students are also
required to abide by the policies and procedures of their field placement
agencies, the regulations and procedures of the Honours Bachelor of Applied
Sciences Early Childhood Program and those of the University of Guelph-
Humber.

The University of Guelph-Humber anticipates that the field placement


student has incorporated the latest research and theories as they study how
children develop in all domains. Through this practical experience the
student must demonstrate that they are capable of working collaboratively
with Early Childhood professionals, children and families.

The evaluation forms include competencies specific to Standards of Practice


set out by the College of Early Childhood Educators allowing students to
understand and act in agreement with the Code of Ethics and Standards of
Practice.

When evaluating the field placement student please remember to evaluate


with a prejudice- free approach, allowing the University of Guelph-Humber to
understand the progress and achievements the individual student has made
throughout this placement experience. The evaluation form further explains
the process to be utilized when evaluating the field placement student.

Page | 103
Early Childhood Studies
End of Semester Field Placement Evaluation
ECS 2040 Early Learning Environment

Site Supervisors are expected to complete this evaluation form with their
placement student at the end of the semester. Please check mark ()
each competency with the rating that is most applicable to the placement
student. If a competency does not apply, please indicate a check mark in the
NO (No Opportunity) column for that specific row. At the end of each
standard, calculate each columns check marks and place in the Totals row.
The evaluation will form 40% of the students final grade for this placement.
It is expected that the student and Site Supervisor meet to discuss the
students evaluation before it is submitted to the Course Instructor.

Students Name:

First Last

Name of Practicum Site:

Site Address:

City/Town: Postal Code:

Telephone: Email:

Name of Site Supervisor:

Position of Site Supervisor:

Students Job Title:

Page | 104
Demonstration of Competencies: Please assess all items as applicable by
placing a check mark () in the appropriate level of competency. Please do not
skip any competencies. For items not applicable, place a checkmark in the NO
(No Opportunity) column. The final calculation is to be completed at the end of
the evaluation as it is explained in detail.

Competency Rating Scale

Exceptionally Excels in ability to independently perform the


Demonstrated (ED) competency with initiative, creativity, innovation,
(1.0 point) and meets the unique needs of each situation.
Consistently demonstrates the competency with
Demonstrated (D)
independence and skill, in all situations, at all times.
(0.75 points)
Requires little or no direct supervision.
Demonstrates learning in progress in this
competency, however, does not independently
In Progress (IP)
perform skill with consistency in all situations at all
(0.5 points)
times. Student requires further practice, prompting,
and supervision in development of this aspect.
Did not demonstrate the competency. Requires
Not Demonstrated (ND)
extensive practice, prompting, and supervision in
(0 points)
this competency area.
Competency does not apply to the setting therefore
unable to observe, or there was limited or no
No Opportunity (NO)
opportunity for student to demonstrate the
competency.

Calculations will be explained at the end, the point value is not


required at this stage.
NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =
Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

Standard I:
Caring and Nurturing Relationships that Support NO ND IP D ED
Learning
Initiates communication and responds appropriately to
children and their families
For example, greets and communicates with families when the
opportunity arises
Body Language is open, approachable, and warm
Body language reflects verbal message
Voice tone is reflective of verbal message
Facilitates childrens expression of feelings
For example, assisting children to showing empathy towards
the student or a child when resolving conflict
Initiates communication and responds appropriately
Practices active listening skills

Page | 105
Anticipates childrens actions by observing childrens
cues and responds appropriately
Evident that the student has developed positive
relationships with children

Total

NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =


Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

Standard II:
Developmentally Appropriate Care and NO ND IP D ED
Education
Implements teacher-directed and child-directed
learning experiences in a variety of curriculum areas
For example, drama, science, cognitive, literacy, and outdoor
play
Incorporates a variety of teaching strategies during
implementation of learning experiences
For example, sensory engagement, scaffolding, challenges,
and do-it signals
Assist children in observing limits
Maintains flexibility and adaptability in various
situations
For example, adapts planned experiences with changing
environments/number of children, various learning styles, and
needs of children as required
Plans specific and/or unique learning experiences
based on childrens interests
For example, creative and/or original experiences
Shows flexibility in modifying and expanding learning
experiences based on childrens interests, strengths,
and needs to extend childrens learning
Supports childrens self-help skills in dressing
seasonally appropriate
For example, encouraging children to zip up jacket/put on
boots
Encourages and promotes self-help skills in play
situations
For example, picking up and placing toys where they belong
Exhibits creativity and innovation in the creation of
learning experiences based on childrens interests
Uses verbal and non-verbal communication to
encourage childrens positive behavior
For example, body language and gestures (getting down to
childs level)
Provides appropriate alternative activities and

Page | 106
redirects children when necessary
Encourages problem-solving strategies among
children
Fosters independence by providing choices for the
children
Plans a variety of developmentally appropriate
learning experiences

Total

NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =


Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

Standard III:
Safe, Healthy and Supportive Learning NO ND IP D ED
Environments
Maintains an inclusive, safe, and healthy environment
Demonstrates knowledge of sites fire drill, lockdown,
and emergency situations procedures when/if
necessary
Responds appropriately to unsafe and/or emergency
situations
For example, if a child hurts himself/herself
Demonstrates awareness of universal precautions and
implements them appropriately as required
For example, WHMIS symbols
Positions self to maximize supervision of all children
in the environment
Assists staff in examining indoor and outdoor
environments for unsafe material or equipment and
takes appropriate action if required
For example, scans indoor and outdoor play areas regularly
and consistently
Uses a daily baseline health observation of children
and discusses observations with staff
For example, if a child is showing symptoms of illness then
student advises staff of observations
Aware of and responds to any health, medical, and/or
cultural/religious needs of children
For example, allergies, illness, and food restrictions (halal or
vegetarian)
Page | 107
Initiates and supervises daily routines including
indoor and outdoor activities
Follows appropriate hygiene procedures when
cleaning and sanitizing the environment
For example, sanitizing tables, toys, and other play
equipment, sweeping when necessary
Follows the sites hand washing, diapering, and/or
toileting policies and supports children appropriately
For example, hand washing, diapering, and/or toileting
policies
Demonstrates preparation and organization in
preparing the environment for learning
For example, helps set-up the environment for morning and/or
afternoon and/or program for outdoor play
Takes initiative and acts independently
For example, disinfects tables and chairs before and after
meals and snacks

Total

NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =


Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

Standard IV:
NO ND IP D ED
Professional Knowledge and Competence
Demonstrates awareness and understanding of
licensing, legislation, and regulation that effect the
field placement site
For example, understand staff ratio
Has knowledge of and adheres to the guiding
principles (philosophy, policies, and procedures) of
the site
Uses observations to inform programming based on
the interests and needs of the children
Plans for individual needs based on observation of
childs interests and areas of growth
Incorporates a variety of strategies for guiding actions
and/or behaviour
For example, transition songs, redirection
Functions as a member of the team
Maintains a positive disposition and attitude
Initiates communication and responds appropriately
to staff on site
Page | 108
Uses clear, concise, and grammatically correct written
communication
Uses clear, concise, and grammatically correct verbal
communication
Demonstrates initiative in completing assigned
responsibilities
Demonstrates self-confidence in completing assigned
responsibilities
Uses observation and asks questions when learning
new programs for children/families
Continues to develop skills in meeting the learning
needs of the participants in the program/setting
For example, considers individual and group limitations and
strengths when planning learning experiences
Punctual arrival (Start of shift, break, lunch)
Contacts the site when unable to attend, late, etc.
Acts upon direction and constructive feedback
For example, Site Supervisors feedback from learning
experiences, and daily feedback on progression
Demonstrates professional attitudes, skills, and
knowledge
Sets clear and consistent limits and follows through in
a positive manner
Has positively contributed to the placement site
Demonstrates positive growth and professional
development since the beginning of placement

Total

NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =


Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

Standard V:
Professional Boundaries, Dual Relationships
NO ND IP D ED
and Conflicts
of Interest
Shows respects towards children, families, and site
staff
Displays the use of age-appropriate language with
children, families, and site staff
Maintains appropriate professional boundaries
For example, Distinct separation between home and
work/placement life
Maintains a clear, appropriate, and professional
relationship with children, families, and site staff
For example, avoiding dual relationships
Represents organization in a professional manner

Page | 109
Total

Standard VI:
Confidentiality and Consent to the Release of
NO ND IP D ED
Information Regarding Children and their
Families
Respects rights of children, families, staff site, and
field site
Maintains confidentiality when documenting written
and verbal information about children, families and
field site
Obtains parent/guardian consent prior to
photographing, audio, or video recording children

Total
Comments:

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

Professional Growth for Future Placements:

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

Evaluation Summary: Please transfer Total from each Standards row to the
chart below. Then transfer Total Check Marks to the second chart to calculate
Total Points.

NO = No Opportunity; ND = Not Demonstrated; IP = In Progress; D =


Demonstrated; ED = Exceptionally Demonstrated

NO ND IP D ED
Standard I:
Caring and Nurturing Relationships that Support
Learning
Standard II:

Page | 110
Developmentally Appropriate Care and
Education
Standard III:
Safe, Healthy and Supportive Learning
Environments
Standard IV:
Professional Knowledge and Competence
Standard V:
Professional Boundaries, Dual Relationships and
Conflicts of Interest
Standard VI:
Confidentiality and Consent to the Release of
Information Regarding Children and their
Families

Total Check Marks

Exceptiona
No Not
Demonstra lly
Opportunit Demonstra In Progress
ted Demonstra
y ted
ted

Total
Check
Marks

65 - 0 x _________ 0.5 x 0.75 x 1x


Total ________ =0 ________ _______ _________
Points = = = =

Not Demonstrated 0 + In Progress + Demonstrated +


Exceptionally Demonstrated .
= Subtotal .

Subtotal out of Total Points from No Opportunity out of


.

Total Percentage (%) =


_______

Overall Assessment: The student met the expectations of the


placement: Yes No

Student Signature: ________________________________________ Date:


________________

Page | 111
Site Supervisor Signature: __________________________________ Date:
________________

Course Instructor Signature: ________________________________ Date:

END OF SEMESTER FIELD


________________

REFERENCES
PLACEMENT EVALUATION

Page | 112
REFERENCES

College of Early Childhood Educators. (2011). Code of ethics and standards


of practice: Recognizing and honouring our profession. Toronto, ON:
College of Early Childhood Educators.

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2007). Early learning for every child today: A
framework for Ontario early childhood settings. Retrieved form
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/oelf/continuum/continuum.pdf

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2014). How does learning happen?: Ontarios


pedagogy for the early years. Retrieved from
https://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/HowLearningHappens.pdf

Slater, J. M. (2000). Hand-over-hand method. Retrieved from


http://www.suncastletech.com/presentations/Hand-Over-Hand%201.pdf

Toronto Childrens Aid Society. (2015). What is child abuse? Retrieved from
www.torontocas.ca/?t=what-is-child-abuse

WebMD. (2015). Piaget stages of development. Retrieved from


http://www.webmd.com/children/piaget-stages-of-development

Page | 113