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TOP 31% WISCONSIN RESULTS 0 DELEGATES 737 TOTAL SEE MORE ELECTION DONALD C O VERAGE
TOP
31%
WISCONSIN RESULTS
0 DELEGATES
737 TOTAL
SEE
MORE
ELECTION
DONALD
C O VERAGE
ON
PAGE
1B
TRUMP

TOP

DEMOCRATS

REPUBLICANS

2,383 DELEGATES NEEDED FOR NOMINATION

1,237 DELEGATES NEEDED FOR NOMINATION

44% 28 DELEGATES 1,740 TOTAL HILLARY CLINTON
44%
28 DELEGATES
1,740 TOTAL
HILLARY
CLINTON
56% 44 DELEGATES 1,055 TOTAL BERNIE SANDERS
56%
44 DELEGATES
1,055 TOTAL
BERNIE
SANDERS
52% 24 DELEGATES 505 TOTAL TED CRUZ
52%
24 DELEGATES
505 TOTAL
TED
CRUZ
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2016
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2016
IN ICELAND, IRE OVER BANKS FUELED PRIME MINISTER’S EXIT PAGE 1B

IN ICELAND, IRE OVER BANKS FUELED PRIME MINISTER’S EXIT

PAGE 1B

POLICE CRACK DOWN
POLICE
CRACK
DOWN

DANIELLE PETERSON/STATESMAN JOURNAL

A damaged Oregon State Police vehicle was on display Tuesday during a press conference to show the impact distracted driving has had on OSP. Officials said an intoxicated, distracted driver

rear-ended the vehicle in February.

OSP adds 40 more patrol vehicles on roads to stop distracted drivers

WHITNEY M WOODWORTH

STATESMAN JOURNAL

From 2010 to 2014, the epi- demic of distracted driving left 58 people dead and more than 14,000 people injured in Oregon, and state officials and law en- forcement are demanding ac- tion. Oregon State Police and the Oregon Department of Trans- portation kicked off National Distracted Driver Awareness Month by showcasing its new

fleet of 40 unmarked patrol ve- hicles designed to target driv- ers texting, talking and tweet- ing on their phones. “Distracted driving has be- come invasive and pervasive,” said ODOT director Matthew Garrett. On average, a person is in- jured in a distracted driving crash every three hours in Ore- gon. Crashes involving cell- phone use injure five people ev- ery week, and 70 percent of drivers admitted to using their

cellphone while driving in the past month, according to ODOT and AAA surveys. Mitchell said these “somber statistics” demand action and announced a multiagency task force to combat distracted driv- ing. Courts, media, academic in- stitutions, AAA, state agencies and law enforcement will come together during 2016 to bring these numbers down, he said. Oregon State Police Captain Dave Anderson highlighted the 40 unmarked vehicles added to

the patrol division in January. He said effective and sustained law enforcement efforts to re- duce distracted driving are vi- tal to keeping roads and high- ways safe, but troopers find it difficult to enforce cellphone laws from marked vehicles. Since the introduction of the unmarked fleet, the state police reported a year-over-year in- crease of 37 percent of enforce- ment actions during February and March. OSP displayed one of the new

patrol vehicles at a Tuesday news conference at the Capitol Mall. The car looked like a stan- dard, newer model, silver Dodge on the outside but was fully equipped with lights, a computer and partitions. A state police vehicle with a crumpled bumper sat near the new patrol car and underlined the impact distracted driving has had on OSP. Lt. Bill Fugate said an intoxi-

See OSP, Page 9A

had on OSP. Lt. Bill Fugate said an intoxi- See OSP, Page 9A SPECIAL TO THE

SPECIAL TO THE STATESMAN JOURNAL

It was Harry Lawson’s dying wish to

play piano one last time.

was Harry Lawson’s dying wish to play piano one last time. TODAY’S WEATHER 73 ° HIGH

TODAY’S WEATHER

73° HIGH 46° LOW Mostly sunny today. Full report, 8C

Bridge

Business

Comics

Editorials

Ending on a sweet and spiritual note

N urses rolled Harry Law-

son up to the piano, ap-

plied the brakes on his

wheelchair, and propped him up with pillows. At that moment, there was no place he would rather have been. “Welcome to my final con- cert,” Lawson told the audi- ence of family members, church congregants and hospi- tal staff.

Lawson’s final wish was to play the piano one more time, and staff at Salem Health

to play the piano one more time, and staff at Salem Health Capi Lynn FORWARD THIS

Capi Lynn

FORWARD THIS

made it

happen on

Thursday,

March 31.

The

80-year-

old Keizer

man

played for

18 min- utes, one hymn after another, on the Bösendorfer grand pi- ano in the lobby of Building A on the hospital campus. Caught up in the moment, forgetting about his hospital

gown gaping in the back and the IV port dangling from his right hand, he was transported back in time to one of the many churches where he played organ, perhaps back to his childhood dreams. “It was like playing at Car- negie Hall,” wife Sylvia Law- son said, prompting chuckles from the family. The stage may have been much smaller, but make no mistake: This was the proud finale of a 60-plus-year career. Harry Lawson taught him-

self to play by ear. He learned to play on an old pump organ in 1942, when he was just 7 years old. His dad bought the organ for his mom for Mother’s Day that year. They lived in Buena Vista in Polk County and by the time Harry was in seventh grade, he was the organist at his church. He has filled that role for sev- eral churches in Oregon and Washington over the decades, most recently for Brooks As-

See FORWARD THIS, Page 9A

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StatesmanJournal.com

Students honored at thespian festival

TOM MAYHALL

RASTRELLI

STATESMAN JOURNAL

The streets of down- town Salem were packed with teens wearing shirts that said “State Wars” last weekend. Nearly 1,300 high school theater and 272 middle school stu- dents from across the state attended Oregon Thespians State Festival. Students participated in educational workshops, watched shows and per- formed. “State Wars” — a play on “Star Wars” — was

“State Wars” — a play on “Star Wars” — was the festival’s theme. Oregon Thespians rec-

the festival’s theme. Oregon Thespians rec- ognized eight Mid-Valley students’ excellence in theater and film. A total of 120 students, who quali- fied at regional competi- tions in February, audi- tioned in 20 categories for the 2016 State Showcase, which is the top honor for drama students in Ore- gon. The following Mid- Valley students were se- lected for and performed in the showcase:

» Solo Musical: Macey Trussell, West Salem High School » Duet Musical: Dylan Lewis and Jacob Es- chette, Central High School, Independence » Duo Dramatic Act- ing: Aric Wood and Max Morter, South Salem High School In the eight design and

technical categories, 92 students made 15-minute

presentations in special- ties such as costumes and makeup. The following Mid-Valley students placed:

» Short Film, second

place: Alicia Scherer, Dal- las High School

» Sound Design, sec-

ond place: Chance Ander- son, McMinnville High School

» Stage Management,

third place: Luke Disney, Dallas High School The festival is orga- nized by the Oregon chap- ter of the Educational Theatre Association, the professional organization for theater teachers. Each year, the association pre- sents the Rae Mona Rey- nolds Humanitarian Award to a business or in- dividual who has fur-

Sharing GoodNews Recognizing positive stories that drive us forward
Sharing
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Recognizing positive stories
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thered the theater activ- ities of secondary educa- tion in Oregon. Pentacle Theatre received the award. TRastrelli@Statesman Journal.com, 503-983- 6030, facebook.com/Ras trelliSJ and on Twitter @RastrelliSJ

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2016

3A

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For more business news, stocks and mutual funds information, go to StatesmanJournal.com.

MONEY GIANT DRUG DEAL AT RISK FROM OBAMA’S ANTI-INVERSION RULES PAGE 4B

MONEY

GIANT DRUG DEAL AT RISK FROM OBAMA’S ANTI-INVERSION RULES

PAGE 4B

Restaurant inspections: La Margarita Company

LA MARGARITA

COMPANY

Details: 545 Ferry St. SE, Sa- lem Date/type of inspection:

Feb. 29; Semi-Annual Score: 97 Priority violations Incorrect methods are used to cool potentially hazardous foods, specifically: Black beans and refried beans filled in large, plastic container about six inch- es deep were placed covered on the bottom shelf of the reach-in refrigerator after being ice bathed. Black beans measured 44F-47F. Refried beans mea- sured 36-42F on the top layer due to ice being added on top to help with cooling; however the beans measured 44F-49F in the bottom layer. Point deduction:

3. Core violations, 2, includ- ing:

Equipment and utensils are not durable, specifically: Spatu- la handle and tip of plastic spoon in the wash room are heat dam- aged. Outside of some plastic containers and lid to cooked chicken container are cracked. The establishment is not cleaned as often as necessary or at a time when the least amount of food is exposed, specifically:

Food and knives under the table in the dish washing room. Food buildup on the floor under the storage rack near the basement door. Old dead insects observed in the basement area near the water heater.

MORE INSPECTIONS

For more restaurant inspections, go to StatesmanJournal.com/Business.

ABOUT RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS

These are a synopsis of restaurant inspections conducted by the Marion County Health Department. To read the full inspection report with correc- tive measures, go to http://apps.co.marion.or.us/RIS. Marion County has more than 700 licensed restaurants. Restaurants receive two unannounced routine inspections a year to determine compliance with the Food Sanitation Rules. Inspections focus on food temperatures, food preparation practices, worker hygiene, dish washing and sanitizing, equip- ment and facility cleanliness. What the scores mean: A restaurant that receives a score of 70 or higher is considered to be in compliance. Any cited “critical violations” are corrected immediately or an approved alternative procedure implemented. A restau- rant that receives a score below 70 fails to comply and must have a full re-inspection within 30 days or be subject to closure or further adminis- trative action. Follow-up inspections are conducted on any facility where a public health risk is identified. A placard on the restaurant entrance in- dicates whether a facility passed the last routine health inspection. About violations: The inspection score is based on 100 points. Critical violations, called priority violations and priority foundation violations, deduct 1 to 5 points. Core violations do not have point deductions, but must be corrected. If the same violation is cited on consecutive semi-annual in- spections, the points deducted will double.

BAD GIRLS COFFEE

Details: 2440 McGilchrist St. SE, Salem Date/type of inspection:

March 1; Semi-Annual Score: 89 Priority violations Potentially hazardous food is not maintained at proper hot or cold holding temperatures, spe- cifically: Cheeses stacked high for two hours inside the sand- wich prep reach-in refrigerator measured 47F-50F. Boiled eggs 45F, ham and cheese salad 47F, tomato salad 47F placed in the display refrigerator since the

previous day. Air thermometer inside reading 45F, digital ther- mometer reading 30F. Point de- duction: 5. A hand washing sink does not provide the minimum water temperature or is not equipped with a mixing valve or combina- tion faucet, specifically: Maxi- mum water temperature of the bathroom sink measured 57F after running the water for over two minutes. Point deduction:

6. Core violations, 2, includ- ing:

Food is not stored to prevent contamination, specifically:

Food is not stored to prevent contamination, specifically: STATESMAN JOURNAL FILE La Margarita at 545 Ferry

STATESMAN JOURNAL FILE

La Margarita at 545 Ferry St. SE in Salem scored 97 on its semi-annual inspection on Feb. 29.

Bag of oats stored on the floor inside the dry storage room. Clean equipment, utensils, lin- ens and single-service items are not stored in a manner to pre-

vent contamination or to facili- tate air drying, specifically:

Plastic lids and to-go containers stored on the ground inside the dry storage room.

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CSVixSh rs4.80

+.44

-23.3

Mattel

33.08

-.73

+21.8

VertxPh

84.16

+1.29

-33.1

Ctrip.com s43.71

-.68

-5.7

Medivat s 43.92

-.26

-9.1

ViacomB 38.75

-.81

-5.9

CypSemi

8.46

-.21

-13.8

MelcoCrwn15.62

-.32

-7.0

Vodafone 30.66

-1.08

-5.0

DaveBuster38.95

Depomed13.92

DiscCmA 28.62

DollarTree80.40

47.37

Dunkin

-.06

-.47

-.26

-2.14

-.50

-6.7

-23.2

+7.3

+4.1

+11.2

MemResDv10.32

Michaels 27.69

Microchp 48.65

Mondelez41.03

Mylan NV45.92

+.18

-.51

+.27

-.19

-1.31

-36.1

+25.2

+4.5

-8.5

-15.1

WalgBoots83.36

Wendys Co10.98

WDigital 44.13

WholeFood30.22

-2.95

+.11

-2.14

-.12

-2.1

+1.9

-26.5

-9.8

E-Trade

23.93

-.75

-19.3

Navient

11.44

-.24

-.1

WisdomTr10.40

-.56

-33.7

eBay s

24.39

+.36

-11.2

NetApp

26.63

+.01

+.4

Wynn

90.92

-2.48

+31.4

Endo Intl 26.91

-1.50

-56.0

Netflix s 104.94

+.59

-8.3

Yahoo

36.41

-.61

+9.5

Ericsson

9.75

-.29

+1.5

NewsCpA12.61

-.15

-5.6

ZionsBcp 23.66

-.48

-13.3

Exelixis

4.26

-24.5

Novavax

5.34

+.02

-36.4

Zynga

2.30

+.01

-14.2

Northwest stocks

 

NAME

DIV YLD P/E

LAST

CHG %YTD

 

NAME

DIV YLD P/E

LAST

CHG %YTD

AlaskaAir

1.10f

1.4

12

79.68

+.76

-1.0

NikeB s

.64

1.1

28

59.67

-.30

-4.5

AllegTch

.32m

2.2

dd

14.78

-.41 +31.4

Nordstrm

1.48a

2.7

16

54.88

-.67 +10.2

Amazon

cc

586.14 -7.05

-13.3

AsburyA

10

56.21

+.82

-16.7

NwstNG

1.87f

3.6

18

51.75 -1.03

+2.3

Avista

1.37f

3.4

21

40.18

-.80 +13.6

NwstPipe

 

dd

8.80

+.24

-21.4

Banner Cp

.84f

2.1

16

40.85 -1.24

-10.9

OraSure

 

47

7.10

-.02 +10.2

BarrettB lf

.88

3.2

9

27.26

-.41

-37.4

 

Boeing

4.36f

3.4

17

127.03

+.69

-12.1

Paccar

.96a

1.8

11

52.83

-.84 +11.5

CascdeBcp

19

5.64

-.08

-7.1

Pixelwrks

 

dd

2.24

+.09

-5.9

ColBnkg

.72a

2.5

17

29.20

-.88

-10.2

PopeRes

2.80

4.9

23

57.55

-.76

-10.2

ColuSprtw

.68

1.1

24

59.32

-.73 +21.7

Costco

1.60

1.0

30

155.99 -1.74

-3.4

PortGE

1.20

3.1

19

39.19

-.81

+7.8

CraftBrew

68

8.18

 

-2.3

RadiSys

dd

3.95

-.03 +42.6

Data IO

ElectSci

.32

4.4

22

dd

2.40

7.21

-4.8

-.04 +38.9

-.08

SareptaTh

 

dd

19.53

-.34

-49.4

FEI Co

1.20

1.4

30

88.31

-.98 +10.7

Schmitt h

dd

2.47

-7.5

FLIR Sys

.48f

1.5

19

32.40

-.23 +15.4

Schnitzer

.75

4.0

dd

18.58

+.01 +29.3

GreenbCos

.80

2.9

4

27.79 +1.23

-14.8

 

HP Inc

.50

4.2

11

11.95

-.15

+.9

Starbucks s

.80

1.3

37

60.04

-.21

Idacorp

2.04f

2.8

19

72.62 -1.87

+6.8

Supvalu

9

5.44

-.10

-19.8

Intel

1.04

3.3

14

31.90

-.10

-7.4

Tegna

.56

2.5

10

22.25

-.13

-12.8

JewettCam

15

11.32

+.12 +12.6

KeyTech

dd

7.00

 

-32.5

Umpqua

.64

4.1

15

15.60

-.29

-1.9

Kroger s

.42f

1.1

19

38.22

+.19

-8.6

US Bancrp 1.02

2.5

13

40.05

-.63

-6.1

Lattice

LithiaMot

.80

1.0

dd

12

5.42

82.53

-.03

+.97

-16.2

-22.6

VBI Vacc

 

23

2.25

+.01

-7.8

LaPac

dd

17.43

-.07

-3.2

Valmont

1.50

1.3

28

119.87 -1.78 +13.1

MentorGr

.22

1.1

25

20.37

-.26 +10.6

WashFed

.56f

2.5

13

22.11

-.42

-7.2

MicronT

11

10.40

-.40

-26.6

Weyerhsr

1.24

4.0

27

30.78

-.41

+2.7

Microsoft

1.44

2.6

35

54.56

-.87

-1.7

Nautilus

21

18.07

-.08

+8.1

WillmValV

 

18

6.96

-.04

-1.7

+8.1 WillmValV   18 6.96 -.04 -1.7 StatesmanJournal . com Connect with your community. YOUR

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COMMODITIES

FUTURES CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE:

 

EXCHANGE UNITS

OPEN INT.

HIGH

LOW

LAST

CHG

Oats

5,000 bu min.-$ per bu

May 16

6,981

189.25

184

184.25

-2.75

 

Jul 16

3,219

198

192.75

192.75

-3.50

Sep 16

193

201.75

-4

 

CHICAGO MERCANTILE EXCHANGE:

 

Feeder Cattle 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb.

Apr 16

5,107

152.62

-4.05

Lumber

80,000 bd. ft.- $ per 1,000 May 16

3,376

292.6

286.0

288.7

-3.9

Stock Footnotes: d - New 52-week low. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - Does not meet contin- ued-listing standards. lf - Late filing with SEC. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. pf - Preferred stock issue. rs - Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. u - New 52-week high. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

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New York Stock Exchange

Most actively traded Stocks in bold change 5% or more in price. NAME P/E LAST
Most actively traded
Stocks in bold change 5% or
more in price.
NAME
P/E
LAST
CHG
NAME
P/E
LAST
CHG
PUVixST rs
q
21.37
+2.20
G-H-I
PrUCrude rs
q
7.86
+.09
Gap
13
28.69
-.83
ProShtVix
q
47.64
-2.92
NAME
P/E
LAST
CHG
GenElec
dd
30.98
-.25
ProctGam
28
83.16
-.05
A-B-C
GenMotors
9
29.60
-.30
ProgWaste
22
29.98
-1.03
GenesWyo
17
61.19
-1.13
ProUShSP
q
19.19
+.37
ADT Corp
AES Corp
AK Steel
AT&T Inc
AbbottLab
AbbVie
Alcoa
Alibaba
Allergan
AlpAlerMLP
Ambev
AEagleOut
AmIntlGrp
AnglogldA
Annaly
ArcelorMit
ArchDan
AstraZen s
Autoliv
BP PLC
BakrHu
BcBilVArg
BcoBrad s
BcoSantSA
BkofAm
BkNYMel
Barclay
B iPVixST
BarrickG
Baxalta n
Baxter s
BerkHaA
BlockHR
BostonSci
CF Inds s
CabotO&G
23
41.27
-.02
Genworth
dd
2.60
-.10
PulteGrp
14
17.56
+.35
9
11.07
-.29
Gerdau
1.79
+.03
Questar
20
25.21
+.37
dd
4.17
+.08
GoldFLtd
3.83
+.20
RegionsFn
11
7.66
-.21
17
39.19
-.17
Goldcrp g
dd
16.24
+.36
RestorHdw
16
43.36
+1.31
14
42.04
-.28
HP
Inc
11
11.95
-.15
18
58.54
-.67
ReynAm s
17
50.50
+.37
Hallibrtn
dd
34.40
+.40
16
9.41
+.01
RiceEngy
dd
13.93
+.12
Hanesbds s
22
26.85
-1.06
30
77.32
-1.76
RiteAid
37
8.14
-.04
HartfdFn
12
45.76
-.56
dd d236.55 -41.00
RuckusW
cc
u13.46
+.22
Hertz
16
9.55
-.46
q
10.27
-.12
Ryder
10
62.49
-1.13
HP
Ent n
cc
17.61
-.43
5.09
-.01
Hilton
15
21.84
-.35
S-T-U
15
16.05
-.34
Hormel s
30
42.24
-1.31
40
53.68
-.72
HostHotls
21
15.44
-.24
SpdrDJIA
q
175.82
-1.30
13.75
+.49
ICICI Bk
6.81
-.26
SpdrGold
q
117.66
+1.51
cc
10.29
+.02
iShGold
q
11.88
+.16
S&P500ETF
q
204.19
-2.06
dd
4.54
-.15
iShBrazil
q
25.39
-.16
SpdrBiot s
q
53.81
-.06
15
35.11
-.93
iShEMU
q
33.36
-.72
SpdrLehHY
q
33.87
-.14
14
28.29
-.27
iShJapan
q
10.89
-.24
SpdrS&P RB q
36.91
-.83
24
112.13
-2.15
iSTaiwn
q
13.39
-.27
SpdrOGEx
q
29.23
-.25
dd
28.93
-.65
iShSilver
q
14.42
+.22
SpdrMetM
q
20.15
+.12
dd
39.36
-2.11
iShChinaLC
q
32.42
-.75
Schlmbrg
22
72.66
+.02
6.26
-.18
iShEMkts
q
33.08
-.66
Schwab
27
27.39
-.60
7.25
-.05
iShiBoxIG
q
119.26
+.38
SeadrillLtd
dd
2.98
-.02
4.10
-.16
iSh20 yrT
q
132.19
+1.43
SiderurNac
2.11
+.17
10
13.19
-.32
iS Eafe
q
55.32
-1.11
SilvWhtn g
31
16.21
+.47
13
36.52
-.52
iShiBxHYB
q
80.87
-.30
SwstnEngy dd
7.81
-.70
d8.26
-.30
iShR2K
q
108.94
-1.25
SpectraEn
25
28.90
-1.39
q
18.58
+1.01
iShREst
q
77.36
-.44
Sprint
dd
3.50
+.06
48
14.01
+.51
Invesco
13
30.69
-.40
SP Matls
q
44.37
-.28
38.50
-3.07
iSh0-5HYCp
q
44.48
-.21
SP HlthC
q
68.47
-.90
23
41.31
-.77
ItauUnibH
8.24
-.08
SP CnSt
q
53.28
-.36
14212340.00-2720.00
J-K-L
SP Consum
q
78.14
-.67
17
d25.42
-.91
SP Engy
q
60.20
-.41
cc
u19.17
-.30
JPMorgCh
10
58.36
-.84
SPDR Fncl
q
22.27
-.32
8
30.11
-1.10
Jarden
53
59.42
-.62
cc
22.32
-.38
SP Inds
q
54.76
-.34
JohnJn
18 u108.95
+.36
CalifRescs dd
1.05
-.11
SP Tech
q
44.10
-.43
JohnsnCtl
17
37.89
-.87
Calpine
15
14.28
-.44
SP Util
q
48.67
-.93
JnprNtwk
15
25.23
+.04
Carnival
20
51.50
-1.53
SunEdison dd
.26
+.05
Keycorp
10
10.80
-.16
Cemex
7.06
-.08
Synchrony
11
28.61
-.36
KindMorg
26
17.01
-.18
Cemig pf
1.97
-.09
TaiwSemi
25.51
-.34
Kinross g
dd
3.53
+.12
CntryLink
20
32.10
-.13
TeckRes g
7.49
+.16
KrispKrm
32
15.90
+.03
ChesEng
dd
3.76
+.04
Kroger s
19
38.22
+.19
TevaPhrm
26
54.55
-.11
Chevron
38
92.67
-.76
LloydBkg
3.86
-.12
TransEntx
dd
u5.17
+.47
Citigroup
9
41.51
-.55
Transocn
dd
8.64
+.09
M-N-0
CitizFincl
13
20.76
-.75
TriContl
q
19.73
-.16
CobaltIEn
dd
2.96
+.03
MGIC Inv
3
7.28
-.26
Twitter
dd
17.05
-.04
CocaCola
26
46.53
-.36
MGM Rsts
32
21.27
-.35
TycoIntl
27
35.42
-1.09
ColuPpln n
25.10
-.01
MarathnO
dd
10.63
+.10
UltraPt g
dd
.30
-.03
ConocoPhil
cc
39.04
-.06
MVJrGold
q
28.31
+.81
UnionPac
14
78.62
+.28
ConsolEngy dd
10.94
MktVGold
q
20.13
+.60
UPS B
19
103.92
-.96
ContlRescs dd
29.49
+.31
MV
OilSvc
q
25.45
-.09
US Bancrp
13
40.05
-.63
Corning
18
20.61
-.17
MktVRus
q
15.91
-.04
US NGas
q
6.61
-.21
CSVLgCrd rs q
17.58
+.29
MasterCrd
27
94.35
-.70
US OilFd
q
9.13
+.05
CredSuiss
13.35
-.65
McDnlds
26
127.38
-.19
USSteel
dd
16.24
+.11
Medtrnic
40
75.49
-.81
D-E-F
Merck
25
54.24
-.16
V-W-X-Y-Z
DeltaAir
9
47.16
+.01
MetLife
10
42.89
-.79
Vale SA
4.13
+.07
DenburyR
dd
2.01
-.02
MizuhoFn
d2.73
-.08
Vale
SA pf
3.17
+.07
DevonE
dd
26.39
+.34
MorgStan
8
24.38
-.66
ValeantPh
dd
28.73
+2.62
DirSPBear
q
15.73
+.46
NRG Egy
dd
12.21
-.60
VangEmg
q
33.57
-.64
DxSCBear rs q
44.85
+1.46
Nabors
dd
8.73
-.02
VangFTSE
q
34.74
-.66
DxGBull rs
q
59.47
+4.77
NewellRub
25
44.77
-.59
Vereit
dd
8.88
+.11
DirDGldBr
q
3.12
-.30
NewmtM
36
27.30
+1.00
VerizonCm
12
u54.09
-.33
Discover
10
51.22
+.46
NobleCorp
41
9.80
+.18
Visa s
29
76.97
-.86
Disney
18
97.00
-1.68
NokiaCp
5.74
-.09
WPX Engy
dd
6.34
DomRescs
21
73.05
-1.53
NorthropG
19 u202.27
+1.09
WalMart
15
68.64
-.46
EMC Cp
21
26.39
-.37
OasisPet
dd
6.95
+.10
EP Energy
27
3.98
+.01
WasteConn 34
62.94
-1.60
Oracle
20
40.53
-.54
Eaton
14
60.39
-2.26
WsteMInc
32
58.25
-.43
P-Q-R
EnCana g
dd
5.74
-.14
WeathfIntl
dd
7.16
-.06
EgyTrEq s
6
6.45
-.10
WellsFargo
11
47.51
-.99
Pandora
dd
8.98
-.24
ENSCO
dd
9.78
+.23
WstnUnion
12
19.29
-.10
ParsleyEn
dd
21.76
-.79
Exelon
13
34.60
-.91
Penney
dd
10.43
-.11
WhitingPet
dd
7.74
-.06
ExxonMbl
21
82.21
-.95
Petrobras
5.32
+.02
WmsCos
74
14.81
-.40
FiatChrys
7.36
-.33
Pfizer
19
31.36
+.64
WTJpHedg
q
40.59
-1.38
Fitbit n
17
15.10
-.41
Potash
11
16.08
-.31
Xerox
23
10.98
-.02
FordM
7
12.77
-.03
PS
SrLoan
q
22.51
-.04
Yamana g
dd
3.10
+.07
FrptMcM
dd
9.34
-.08
ProShtS&P
q
20.54
+.17
Zoetis
39
45.85
+.93

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4A

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2016

StatesmanJournal.com

Holding Court By Michael Davis and Carol McAlice Currie Every Tuesday at noon the community
Holding Court
By
Michael
Davis
and Carol
McAlice
Currie
Every Tuesday at noon the community gathers at the
Court Street Dairy Lunch to share with us stories about
good they’re doing or the help they need. Executive Editor
Michael Davis and Reporter Carol Currie would love to
meet you there.

Learn about birthday chewers, Google viewers

Future viewers

Elizabeth Peters and Tami Lundy from SED- COR stopped by to share what should be national news. The Strategic Eco- nomic Development Cor- poration is hosting Goo- gle’s Darren Pleasance at adinner early next month. Yes, that Google; the search engine that a gazil- lion Internet users chan- nel on their smartphones or computers every time they want to learn more about any and every little thing. Pleasance is the Inter- net giant’s managing di- rector of global customer acquisitions, which means he’s the go-to guy for businesses large and small who want to utilize online marketing. He’s also a private pilot who jets himself to the compa- ny’s Mountain View, Cali- fornia headquarters regu- larly from a home he has in Bend, and accepted SEDCOR’s invitation to speak locally. Lundy said Pleasance is flying over from East- ern Oregon, and will be landing at Garmin’s air- strip. Garmin has also agreed to house Pleasanc- e’s plane overnight. And on Tuesday, May 3, Pleasance has agreed to speak to about 500 stu- dents at the Salem-Keizer School District’s newly opened Career Technical Education Center (CTEC). He is expected to talk to the students about their futures, and every student in attendance will receive one 1,000 Google Cardboard Virtual Reali- ty Viewers. Mountain West Invest- ment Corporation donat- ed the viewers, which will also be shared with each dinner guest at SEDCOR’s ENVISION 2016 corpo- rate dinner later in the evening of May 3. The dinner is open to the public, and will fea- ture a keynote address by Pleasance, who will ex- plore how companies must adapt to meet the fu- ture needs of their cus- tomers and stakeholders. He is also expected to challenge community, civic and business lead- ers’ perspectives of tech- nology’s impact on busi- nesses. SEDCOR is ex- pecting 500 or more busi- ness and community leaders from throughout the valley and Portland to attend the dinner at the Salem Convention Center. Tickets are $75 per per- son for the event, which begins with a social recep- tion at 6 p.m., doors open- ing at 6:30 p.m. and dinner and keynote address (fol- lowed by a question and answer segment) at 7 p.m.

(fol- lowed by a question and answer segment) at 7 p.m. PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DAVIS /

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DAVIS / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Court Street Dairy Lunch patrons hold Google Cardboard virtual reality viewers, which will be given out to guests at a SEDCOR dinner next month.

Registration is re- quired by Tuesday, April 26. To RSVP, go to tlun- dy@sedcor.com or con- tact Lundy at 503-588-

6225.

Sans recruiters

Larry Etzel, who start- ed the ASPIRE Program at Regis High School in Stayton in 2014, was catching up with Alicia Bay, the newish executive director of the Gilbert House Children’s Mu-

seum, the museum’s pro- motions coordinator, Brooke Williamson and Jerry Ambris, executive director of the Habitat for Humanity of the Mid-Wil- lamette Valley. It seemed

a shame to interrupt great

minds working for a com-

mon good. But we did, and we learned from Etzel about

a helpful event coming up

at Regis High School’s Student Center next Wednesday, April 13. The 7 p.m. informational meeting is called Military Opportunities After High School, and Etzel said par- ents as well as students are encouraged to attend because a slate of speak- ers has been assembled to “show students how they can go to school and get the military to pay for it,”

Etzel said. The speakers will dis- cuss the country’s mili- tary academies, the ROTC program, and the National Guard and Re- serves. “This is not a recruit- ing event. It is an informa- tion-sharing event. I had a wonderful 30-year career with the Air Force and I want these young stu- dents to have the same op- portunities I had” said Et-

dents to have the same op- portunities I had” said Et- From left, Jenn Columbus, Lisa

From left, Jenn Columbus, Lisa Harnisch and Karen Fischer are excited about upcoming celebrations about reading and Beverly Cleary.

zel, who also flew planes commercially for US Air- ways while he was in the Reserve. He added that he hadn’t known about how the military could help pay for college his first year. “But the rest of my education was paid for by the military and I want to make sure kids today know about this option, es- pecially in light of the enormous student-loan debt many are facing.” There is no charge to attend the event, which is hosted by ASPIRE. Etzel said the event is targeted toward sophomores and juniors, but all are wel- come. The high school is

at 550 West Regis St., Stayton. For more infor- mation, call 503-302-7320.

No overduers

Karen Fischer, youth services manager at the Salem Public Library, Li- sa Harnisch, executive di- rector of the Early Learn- ing Hub, Inc., and Jenn Columbus, Northwest area manager of SMART (Start Making a Reader Today) were raising their water glasses in celebra- tion of Yamhill County- born author Beverly Cle- ary who turns 100 years young next Tuesday. They were also clink-

ing National Library Week, National Week of the Young Child and the tail-end of Food for Fines. “It’s the perfect com- bo,” said Fischer. “A tri- fecta,” said Harnisch. Although Cleary cur- rently lives in California, Oregonians still consider her a native daughter. Cle- ary was born in McMinn- ville, spent some time on a farm in Yamhill and later moved with her family to Portland. She was once a struggling reader and felt a deep kinship with other readers facing the same challenges as she wrote her first book, which was published in 1950.

Her books, “”Beezus & Ramona,” “Ramona Quimby, Age 8,” “The Mouse and the Motorcy- cle,” and “Henry Hug- gins” are children’s clas- sics, and several have re- ceived the Newberry Medal and National Book Award. And all next week the library will be celebrating all of the above. There will be a set of Beverly Cleary books, including “Beezus and Ramona” raffled off thanks to donations by SMART, and children will have a chance to play in the Discovery Grocery

See COURT, Page 5

off thanks to donations by SMART, and children will have a chance to play in the

StatesmanJournal.com

Court

Continued from Page 4A

store. And the Early Learning Hub, Inc. will be on hand to help parents load a developmentally appropriate app called Vroom for ages 0 to 5 on their smartphones. The free brain-building exer- cises app, made possible by a Bezos (think Jeff Be- zos, CEO of Amazon.com) Family Foundation grant, features kindergarten

readiness activities and “is very interactive,” said Harnisch. “We want parents to think about developing young brains,” Harnisch said. For questions about the library’s programs, send an email to Fischer at

kfischer@cityofsa-

lem.net.

Got good reviews

Dr. Hong Lee, medical ethicist at Salem Health, and John Hofer, an com- munity member who sits on the hospital’s ethics committee, dropped by to talk about free films the hospital is screening to help community mem- bers deal with moral and health issues. The first screening debuts at 6:30 p.m. this Thursday, April 7 in what’s being called the Medical Humanities Film Series. Lee said copyright pro- tections prohibit him from mentioning the film by name, but he said it stars Julianne Moore and portrays the onset of early onset dementia. A

discussion will be held af- ter the film screening, and is being led by retired psychiatrist Michael Mil- ler, MD and Stacy Nelson, executive director of the Salem-based Alzheimer’s Network. Lee said future film ti- tles haven’t been selected yet, so he encourages the public to email ideas at

Hong.Lee@salem-

health.org. “Behind every diagno- sis, there is a human life. Medicine is treated only as a science, but there’s

also a very human ele- ment,” Lee said. “This is an Oregon tra- dition of involving people at the grass roots level,” Hofer said. “These films and discussions will help people to think more clearly about health care.” There is room for 100 people and 40 have signed up so far. Registration is encouraged by not re- quired, Hofer said. Prere- gister at www.ssreg.com/ salemhealth or call 503-

814-2432.

The film will be screened in Building D in the Creekside Room, which is adjacent to Creekside Dining. Food is available for purchase in the dining area. The hos- pital campus is at 939 Oak St. SE.

No switcheroos

Bill Burgess, the Mar- ion County Clerk who oversees property rec- ords and open elections, came by with a message for registered voters:

check to ensure that your party affiliation is correct for the upcoming May 17 Oregon primary. “I’m hoping to avoid some of the frustration other states such as Arizo- na experienced,” said Burgess, who himself is up for election to the non- partisan post, opposed by Tom Chereck, Jr. and Tim Kirsch. Oregon uses a modi- fied closed primary sys- tem, which Burgess said means that the Republi- can and Democrat parties chose to close their elec- tion to only registered party voters while the In- dependent Party chose to open itself to the county’s 38,000 unaffiliated voters. But since there is no Inde- pendent Party candidate for president, these vot- ers may only write in a candidate’s name. These unaffiliated vot- ers received a card in the mail, Burgess said, which allows them to do nothing, and vote for all measures and nonpartisan offices, or they can choose to align with the Republican or Democrat parties or they can vote the Independent Party ticket, which would enable them to vote for lo- cal representatives. He said hundreds of

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2016

5A

He said hundreds of WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2016 5A PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DAVIS / STATESMAN JOURNAL

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DAVIS / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Tony Biasi with Cooper, a black lab, and Darla Biasi with Cooper’s litter mate, Cody, a chocolate lab, came down to invite the public to the dogs’ 13th birthday party Saturday at Pet Etc. in West Salem.

13th birthday party Saturday at Pet Etc. in West Salem. From left, Greg Gregg, Fred Hamann

From left, Greg Gregg, Fred Hamann and Margrethe Gregg invite the public to the Willamette Art Center Saturday for an exhibit of Hamann’s pottery.

the cards have been re- turned for the Indepen- dent Party, and he said while the office usually sees an uptick this time of a voting year, there “has been quite a bit of move- ment among political par- ties.” “And I just want to be sure no one is left behind,” Burgess said. Current voter registra- tion affiliation can be checked online at www.o- regonvotes.gov. Burgess urges voters to ensure that they are registered with the political party that has the candidates desired. He also asks vot- ers to check that their res- idential and mailing ad- dresses are correct. Reg- istration can be updated at the same website, but changes must be made by April 26 for the May 17 Primary Election. For voters without ac- cess to a computer, regis- tration forms are also available at the public li- brary branches, from the clerk’s office and at many post offices, Burgess said. Mailed formed must be postmarked by April 26 as well.

And now to the chewers; well sort of

The Holding Court crew was getting its party hats on this week at the Court Street Dairy Lunch restaurant. Two lovable Labrador retrievers, one chocolate lab named Cody and his sibling, Cooper, a black lab, were outside waiting for the Holding Court crew when it arrived. The gentle English Labradors are turning 13 on Wednesday, April 6, but Darla Biasi, who owns Cody and the Pet Etc. store in West Salem, and Tony Biasi, who owns Cooper and manages the store, are throwing the sweet dogs a Lucky 13 birthday party on Satur- day, and the public is get- ting most of the presents. Beginning at 10 a.m. April 6 and continuing through 4 p.m., the store will be giving away goody bags brimming with swag for dogs and cats as well as other prizes. Pet food representatives will also be on hand at the store to give away free samples of pet products.

Darla said the store will also discount all of Co- dy and Cooper’s favorite toys and treats 30 percent throughout the party. When asked which specif- ic toys and treats will be on sale, Darla said “all of it.” “Every toy and treat is their favorite treat,” Dar- la said of the two loves who have no ribs showing. “So all of them will be 30 percent off.” Cody and Cooper, who will be wear- ing their party hats, will share the store with its four residents cats, 3- year-old litter mates Scoo- by and Daphne (named by Darla’s 5-year-old grand- son Vance Biasi after cer- tain cartoon characters) and almost 15-year-old siblings Cali and Baloo. Pet owners are encour- aged to bring their well- behaved, housebroken and currently vaccinated dogs on leashes to the event. Pet Etc. is at 1145 Edge- water St. NW.

Pottery

rendez-vous-ers

Potter Fred Hamann will be feted Saturday evening during an artist’s reception at the Willam- ette Art Center. Fred, toting a teapot, visited Holding Court Tuesday accompanied by art center board mem- bers Margrethe and Greg Gregg. The pot is a sample of new work that will be dis- played at the center, a col- lection of “contemporary, utilitarian stoneware and pottery,” he said. This will be the first ex- hibit of his work since Fred returned from a nine-year stint in Nicara- gua with Potters for Peace. The two-hour event in his honor begins at 6 p.m.

Lemonade stand newsers

Attention kids (and their folks) gearing up for Lemonade Day:

There will be a hands- on workshop this Satur- day morning at LCG Pence to provide pointers on how to build a lemon- ade stand. The two-hour build event will begin at 10 a.m. Lemmy, the ubiquitous Lemonade Day spokes-

citrus, hopped aboard a stool Tuesday and remind- ed us that the Salem-Keiz- er Education Foundation still needs to hear from lo- cal merchants who will agree to have kids set up shop in front of their busi- nesses on Sunday, May 1, Lemonade Day. For those who have no idea what this item is about, imagine a day with hundreds of elementary and middle-school entre- preneurs spread across Salem and Keizer. Now imagine being thirsty and purchasing a cup of icy cold lemonade from stu- dents who have spent weeks learning about fi- nance, marketing, promo- tion, advertising, account- ing, budgeting and philan- thropy. LCG Pence Construc- tion is located at 2747 Pence Loop SE in Salem. For more information on Lemonade Day call 503-364-2933 or visit ske- ducationfoundation.org.

Benefit brewing

Courthouse Tennis Center will host a fund- raiser for Leukemia & Lymphoma Society on Friday, April 15 from 5:30-9 p.m. For a tax-deductible $25 (adults) or $15 (stu- dents), players of all abil- ities, including beginners, can join in group drills conducted by local tennis pros. Among the instruc- tors will be local high school coaches Nancy Cox and Brett Hull. Nancy coaches the young women of South Salem High; Brett coaches the boys at West Albany High. Brett, a leukemia sur- vivor, joined survivor Pam Johnson at Holding Court to remind all that research conducted in re- cent years has extended their lives and countless others. The tennis event will also include a raffle and pot luck dinner. Courthouse Tennis Center is located at 1379 Madison St. NE in Salem. The number there is 503-

364-6262.

Scholarship

pursuers

Six area high school students will receive scholarships Friday morning at the African

will receive scholarships Friday morning at the African Marion County Clerk Bill Burgess is reminding residents

Marion County Clerk Bill Burgess is reminding residents to check their voter registration affiliation.

American Youth Leader- ship Conference for mid- dle and high school stu- dents, sponsored by the Salem-Keizer NAACP. Pastor Marilyn Wil- liams said the confer- ence, to be held at West- ern Oregon University, will award $15,000 in grants to six scholars with a GPA of 3.5 or higher. The awardees are Xa- vier Chenault of McNary; LaTrece Cooper of West Salem; Zamira Leaks of South Salem; Juana Rojas Hernandez of North Sa- lem; Julissa Montero of North Salem, and Alison

See COURT, Page 6

Montero of North Salem, and Alison See COURT, Page 6 Marilyn Williams will be at Western

Marilyn Williams will be at Western Oregon University for a youth conference.

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6A

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2016

StatesmanJournal.com

Court

Continued from Page 5A

Acosta-Vega of McNary. A total of $15,000 will be awarded at the 15th an- nual conference, the theme of which is “What is My EMOJI (Educational, Motivational, Opportuni- ties, Journeys that In- spire). Marilyn said the stu- dents went through a rig- orous application process that included an inter- view, an essay and sub- mission of references and an unofficial transcript. Social entrepreneur Lou Radja, a motivational speaker who wowed the audience at last year’s TED-x Salem, will pro- vide keynote address at the conclave. Benny Williams, Presi- dent of the Salem-Keizer NAACP, will be among the dignitaries on hand. Marilyn is pastor at Sa- lem Mission Faith Minis- tries in South Salem. Benny and Marilyn have been united in matri- mony for many moons, and have the grandchil- dren to prove it.

Vegetables and

fruiters

More than 70 varieties of tomatoes and 39 varie- ties of peppers will be available for purchase May 6-7 at the annual Polk County Master Garden- ers sale. Jean Nielsen and Ei- leen Shaffer, sisters of the soil, swung by the Dairy Lunch to tout the big sale at the Polk County Fairgrounds. This year shoppers can pick up watermelon and cantaloupe varieties that do well in the Oregon sum- mer. Among the more exotic plants this year will be the Mexican gherkin, a cu- cumber “about an inch- and-a-half long that looks like a little watermelon,” Jean said. She makes re- frigerator pickles of them and swears they add zest and zip to a bloody mary. The two-day sale, open from 9 a.m.- 4 p.m., will

mary. The two-day sale, open from 9 a.m.- 4 p.m., will PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DAVIS /

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DAVIS / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Lemmy, the traveling mascot for Salem-Keizer Lemonade Day, wants kids to know about a build workshop this Saturday morning at LCG Pence Construction.

workshop this Saturday morning at LCG Pence Construction. From left, Pam Johnson, Brett Hull and Nancy

From left, Pam Johnson, Brett Hull and Nancy Cox tout an opportunity for tennis players to learn from the pros.

stock annuals, perennials, herbs, hanging planters, house plants, trees, shrubs, grasses and fruits. If you are eager to plant a German Johnson Pink tomato, head for the Fairgrounds. If you’re looking to pick up a Chia pet, reset the GPS. Proceeds from the sale go to the many projects supported by the master gardeners, including the Dallas Youth Garden pro-

gram. You can learn more about the Polk master gar- deners by visiting http:

//extension.oregonstate

.edu/polk/mg.

Oregon’s excluders

Beverly Davis, a board member of A Community for Human Equality, came with news about a free public event this Sat- urday evening from 6:30 to 8:30 at Western Oregon

this Sat- urday evening from 6:30 to 8:30 at Western Oregon Polk County master gardeners Jean

Polk County master gardeners Jean Nielsen and Eileen Shaffer are preparing for a huge turnout May 6-7 at the Polk County Fairgrounds.

University’s Werner Cen- ter. What’s being billed as a “free guided conversa- tion” will address the top- ic of Oregon’s history of exclusion and discrimina- tion against African Americans. Portland author and educator Walidah Imar- isha will be the featured speaker.

A concert featuring hip-hop artist Warren Snipes, known as Wawa, will immediately follow in the Werner Center’s Pa- cific Room. The Polk County-based Community for Human Equality promotes “edu- cation as a method to get people to know about oth- er religions and cultures,” Beverly said. “Sometimes

when you have an under- standing of your neighbor you are not so frightened of him.” ccurrie@statesman journal.com; (503) 399- 6746 or follow on Twitter at @CATMCurrie or mda

vis4@statesmanjournal

.com; (503) 399-6712 or fol- low on Twitter at @MDavisSJ.

Carole Smith is running for Mayor!
Carole Smith is running for Mayor!

I will not vote to add fees to your water/sewer bills! I will listen to what you want - and make you a priority. I will remove the parking meters at the library. Lets work together to build a brighter future for Salem

April 9th, 2016 at 10:00 AM OR-0000375167
April 9th, 2016 at 10:00 AM
OR-0000375167

StatesmanJournal.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2016

7A

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Global warming is a hot topic for Oregon students

NATALIE PATE

STATESMAN JOURNAL

Consistently, people are told to save the planet so future generations can enjoy it as well. Well, some youth aren’t willing to wait. Dozens of university students from across the state gathered at the Capi- tol on Tuesday to talk about taking matters into their own hands. The purpose of the Oregon Higher Education Climate Policy Forum was to ask, “What are we doing to lower emissions in Oregon and what might we be doing in the fu- ture?” Willamette University organized the forum, which brought students from several universities, such as Oregon State Uni- versity, Southern Oregon University, and Lewis and Clark College. More than 80 people were in attendance, crowding the hearing room. About 10 experts came to present to and speak with attendees. Organizers said stu- dent learning was the pri- ority, for students to leave more informed and en- gaged. Attendees first learned about Oregon’s emissions and then about Oregon’s implementation of the Clean Power Plan and re- lated state, national, and international policy. The Clean Power Plan is a policy aimed at com- bating global warming. It was first proposed by the Environmental Protec- tion Agency in June 2014. The final version of the plan was unveiled by President Barack Obama on Aug. 3, 2015. The Supreme Court stayed implementation of

on Aug. 3, 2015. The Supreme Court stayed implementation of MOLLY J. SMITH/STATESMAN JOURNAL University students

MOLLY J. SMITH/STATESMAN JOURNAL

University students and faculty attend a discussion on clean energy and Oregon's implementation of the Clean Power Plan at the Capitol on Tuesday.

the Clean Power Plan in February pending judi- cial review, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In Oregon, tens of mil- lions of metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions are dissipating into the environment every year, caused by factors such as electricity generation, natural gas, transporta- tion, agriculture and more, said Elizabeth Elbel of the Oregon Depart- ment of Environmental Quality. Jason Eisdorfer of the Oregon Public Utilities Commission said to re- duce these emissions and move toward a more envi- ronmentally-friendly fu- ture, Oregon is looking to first increase coal plant efficiency, then convert more coal energy to gas, and finally convert the gas to renewable energy resources. He said what he pre- sented to the students Tuesday were “the kind of

things we are showing our legislators.” Armed with informa- tion, attendees broke into two groups — one to dis- cuss effective, equitable implementation of the Clean Power Plan, and the other to discuss aligning local, state, federal and in- ternational policy. Jake Kornack was the student coordinator for the event. He said this opportuni- ty for students to engage with this information and seek solutions is vital for progress. “(Tuesday) was about giving students a chance to engage with key stake- holders in Oregon who are crafting our response to the Clean Power Plan,” he said. “Students rarely have a chance to interact deeply with the people who are actually making the decisions — the people who are translating our international vision to combat climate change into actionable policy.”

Kornack said this next year is critical for Ore- gon’s future. “We’re likely to see a

to re-

duce our greenhouse gas emissions,” he said. “Be- cause our state has rela- tively low emissions, Ore- gon has the opportunity to create visionary policy that can act as the stan- dard-bearer for other

states; it makes sense that we create the most pro- gressive, proven policy

instead of falling

in line by joining Califor- nia or Washington’s car-

bon market.” npate@StatesmanJour nal.com, 503-399-6745, or follow her on Twitter @Nataliempate, on Face- book at www.facebook.c om/nataliepatejournalist or on the Web at nataliepate.com

statewide policy

model

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8A

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2016

8A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2016 Wednesday, April 6, 2016 Flowers Sr. , Ireland E. : Graveside

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Flowers Sr., Ireland E.: Graveside Service 1 p.m., Aumsville Cemetery.

Pruett, Carra: Funeral 1 p.m., Fisher Funeral Home.

Pruett , Carra : Funeral 1 p.m., Fisher Funeral Home. DEATH NOTICES Randahl Lee Schaffner June

DEATH NOTICES

Randahl Lee

Schaffner

June 16, 1958 - April 2, 2016

SALEM – A Memorial Service for Randahl L. Schaffner is planned for 2:00 pm, Thursday April 7th at Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service.

Stella Relph

July 22, 1935 - April 1, 2016

ALBANY, OREGON – Memorial Service will be held at 2pm, Saturday April 9, 2016 at Mennonite Home Chapel 5353 Columbus Street SE Albany, OR.

PEARL LUCY

EMBREE

July 22, 1919 - March 30, 2016

DALLAS – A memorial service for Pearl will be announced in the coming weeks. The Dallas Mortuary Tribute Center is caring for the family.

ELMER STOLLER

October 18, 1929 - March 29, 2016

INDEPENDENCE – Funeral Sat. 4/9 at 11am Salt Creek Baptist Church. Visitation Thurs & Fri 10am- 7pm at Dallas Mortuary Tribute Center who is caring for the family.

Ireland E. Flowers Sr.

May 7, 1922 - April 1, 2016

AUMSVILLE – Graveside Service to be held on Wednesday, April 6th, 2016 at 1:00PM at Aumsville Cemetery. Arrangements entrusted to Weddle Funeral Services.

JAMES OTIS “JIM” FOSTER II

June 16, 1926 - April 1, 2016

DALLAS – Funeral Services are currently pending. Dallas Mortuary Tribute Center is caring for the family.

Nancy Crane

December 9, 1933 - March 31, 2016

SILVERTON – Keizer Funeral Chapel is handling Arrangements. There are no services scheduled at this time.

LeMar “Pete” Noyd

June 20, 1932 - March 15, 2016

SALEM – A celebration of life will be on Saturday, June 25th, at 2pm at Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service.

Capital Monument Co.

140 Hovt St. S • 503-363-6887

Paul James Hutchinson

April 7, 1964 - December 2, 2015

Paul Hutchinson, a late resident of Klamath Falls, died in December 2015, after visiting with many relatives. He lived most of his adult life in Portland. He worked for Kaiser, Safeway, and Woolworth Lunch Counter. He was a member of the Boston Terrier and Kennel Clubs. He survived his father, Clyde; and brother, Bob. He is survived by his mother, Jean; siblings, Susan (Vaughn), Mary, Mike; aunts, Vivian, Ruby, Marie, and Joann; uncles, Bill and Don; 5 nieces and nephews, 5 great-nieces and -nephews; friends, Sonjia, Gary B. and childhood friend Becky; and his beloved dog, Otis.

DENNIS ALAN DURANCEAU

April 2, 1947 - April 1, 2016

DALLAS – Dennis Alan Duranceau, of Dallas, Oregon, passed away on April 1, 2016 at the age of 68, one day before his birthday. He was born on April 2, 1947 in Green Bay, Wisconsin, to Jane and LaVere Duranceau and joined

a family of life-long Packer fans.

When he was still a young child, the family moved west, first to Palm Springs, before finally settling permanently in Redlands, California, where he spent his school years, graduating from Redlands High School in 1965. At age sixteen Dennis began

a lifelong career in the grocery

industry starting as a box boy for

a local market. Over the years he

managed a number of different supermarkets before being promoted to buyer at a large grocery chain. In 1991, Dennis and his wife, Carol and daughter Celeste, moved to Oregon, settling in Dallas. Three years later a job change took the family up to Cheney, Washington, but they had already developed a love for Dallas and returned four years later. So in 1998, they purchase the Dallas IGA (later Dallas Select Market) in downtown Dallas which they owned and operated for the next eight years. During these years he was active in many community organizations, and a longtime member of the Rotary. He loved participating in the Summerfest Parade with the store personnel and always made sure to have some entries, including several floats. Upon selling the store, Dennis took a position with Unified Grocers where he continued his career. One of his favorite organizations was the Boy Scouts of America where he served many times in various capacities often scoutmaster but also in district positions and scout committees. Many weekends over his life were spent on scout campouts, hikes, service projects and other activities with these young men. He considered helping them achieve their goals in life among his greatest accomplishments. Active in The Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter-day Saints, he served in many leadership capacities over the years including as bishop in Cheney, but his favorite assignments were working with the youth and young adults. Along with anything related to the Green Bay Packers, he loved fishing, golfing, restoring cars and going to garage sales. He is survived by his wife of 38 years, Carol; son Chris Duranceau of Australia; daughter Alecia Everett (David) of Flower Mound, Texas; daughter Celeste Van Wie (Matt) of Hillsboro, Oregon; stepmother Shirley Duranceau of McMinnville, Oregon; brother David Duranceau of Sun City, California, and Dale Duranceau (Lindy) of Indio, California; sisters Debbie Young (Bob) of Pahrump, Nevada, and Dawn Hone (Phil) of Redlands, California. He also leaves five beloved grandchildren, Amanda, Stephen, Nicole, Danielle and Aislynn and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services will begin at 10:00am Friday, April 8th inThe ChurchOf Jesus ChristOf Latter-daySaints inDallas. Interment will follow in the Dallas Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to the Cascade Pacific Council of the Boy Scouts of America in care of the Dallas Mortuary Tribute Center at 287 SW Washington St. Dallas, Oregon 97338.

To leave a message or memory for the family please go to www.dallastribute.com.

or memory for the family please go to www.dallastribute.com. MARGARET M. HILTS August 8, 1929 -
or memory for the family please go to www.dallastribute.com. MARGARET M. HILTS August 8, 1929 -
or memory for the family please go to www.dallastribute.com. MARGARET M. HILTS August 8, 1929 -

MARGARET M. HILTS

August 8, 1929 - March 29, 2016

MARGARET M. HILTS August 8, 1929 - March 29, 2016 DALLAS – Margaret Lou Marksbury Speulda

DALLAS – Margaret Lou Marksbury Speulda Hilts slipped from this world on March 29, 2016. Margie, as she was known, was born in Kansas City, Missouri on August 8, 1929. She was adopted by Margaret and Otto Marksbury and grew up in Sioux City, Iowa. Margie attended Central High School and graduated from Morningside College in 1951. She exhibited her spunky spirit as a cheerleader during college. In 1947 Margie joined the Sisterhood of P.E.O., beginning an enduring theme of her life of service to churchand community. Shemarried RaymondSpeuldain 1951, moving first to Clearwater, Nebraska where he was a teacher and coach. In 1958 they left their mid-western roots and moved to Oregon, first to the McKenzie River- area, then Salem, and finally settling in Dallas in 1971. While in Salem, she completed her degree in Library Science and began working as a librarian. After moving to Dallas, Margie worked at the Education Service District (ESD) office processing books for the school libraries. After retiring she and Ray began traveling; enjoying trips to England, Washington D.C., Hawaii, and several cruises before Ray’s death in 1999. In 2003 she married Robert Hilts. She loved books and was an ardent reader, usually with a dog on her lap. Margie had a wonderful sense of humor and created a warm wonderful life for her family. She had a beautiful smile which will be missed by all who knew her. Margie is survived by her husband, Robert Hilts; her son Mark (Susan) Speulda; her grandson Nathan (Katie) Speulda and two great-grandchildren, Benjamin and Abigail; her daughter Lou Ann (Mike) Drews; and step- grandchildren Jessie, Kilee, Carson, Casey, Cody, and Catherine and eight great-grandchildren. Bob’s family became like her own and includes Barb Jones, Cheryl Austin, Chris Flaming, and Bob Hilts Jr. (Melinda), and their many grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at Dallas United Methodist Church on Saturday; April 9th, at 1:00pm, followed immediately by a reception at the church. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Humane Society of the Willamette Valley. Dallas Mortuary Tribute Center is caring for the family. To send an online tribute, visit www.dallastribute.com

Donna Barlow

August 10, 1937 - April 2, 2016

Donna Barlow August 10, 1937 - April 2, 2016 ALBANY – Donna Barlow, 78, of Albany
Donna Barlow August 10, 1937 - April 2, 2016 ALBANY – Donna Barlow, 78, of Albany

ALBANY – Donna Barlow, 78, of Albany died Saturday at her home. Born to Robert J. and C. Marie (Embrey) Groshong at Albany General Hospital, Donna’s family lived in many places throughout Oregon during her younger years including Corvallis, Dever, Halfway, Baker, Roseburg, Medford and finally back to Dever. At that time, Donna started attending Dever Grade School, a one room building with a bell, where her father had attended, and where Donna’s children would eventually attend. Family farming in the area included raising crops such as filberts, cherries, peaches, and starting a dairy. Donna attended Madison Jr. High School and Albany High School. In 1952 she married James Harold Grate. On March 29, 1953 their daughter Linda Christine was born, and Jim entered the military service. In 1954 Donna and

Linda moved to Anchorage, Alaska where Jim was stationed during the Korean War. On their return to the

states on June 16, 1955, Jim Jr. was born and they lived in the Albany-Jefferson area until, in 1960, they were able to buy a farm in the Dever area where she lived for the rest of her life. In 1970 James Sr. died of cancer, and the next few years were spent raising her children and working at JC Penney department store in Albany. In 1976 she started working for Fisher Implement Co. in Albany, where she was employed for 18 years before retiring. In 1980 she married Robert (Bob) L. Barlow, whom she had met at a Christian singles group in Salem. They enjoyed many trips with their camper and boat, traveling in Oregon, Idaho, Washington, California, Canada and Mexico, attending such events as the World’s Fair. During this time, granddaughters Amy and Angela Grate, and Grandson Byron Davis were born, adding to the family tree. In 1994 her son James Jr. passed away from heart failure while hiking in the mountains. Donna was a founding member of the Dever-Conner Community Church, where she had attended since she was a teenager. Later she was actively involved in the “Keenagers,” a program for older adults. Donna’s favorite activities included being at the Oregon Coast and watching the storms and rough ocean waters, as well as reading, especially mysteries. One of her favorite times of the year was Easter dinner, getting all the family together-what a housefull! Also as one of her hobbies, she rented spaces in several antique store in Salem, Newberg, and Aurora. She was preceded in death by her husband James Grate, Sr.; son James Grate, Jr.; and both of her parents. Donna is survived by her husband Robert “Bob” Barlow; daughter Linda (Larry) Davis, grandson Byron (Rachel) Davis; and great granddaughters Audrey and Olive Davis; granddaughters Amy (Jason) Rowley of St. Helens, and Angela (Sean) Leahy of Scappoose. Also surviving are sisters Carol (Chuck) Banks of Albany, and Janice Erickson of Redding, CA, as well as many nieces and nephews. Further survivors include stepchildren Bob Jr. (Debbie) Barlow, Gary (Christina) Barlow, and Laurie Barlow (Donald) Longanecker; step grandchildren Kristen Barlow (Michael) Chamberlain, Kelli Barlow (Bryan) Clark, Benjamin (Thai) Barlow, Kara Barlow, and Alecia Barlow, as well as step great grandchildren Brianna Clark, Ryder Barlow, and Langston Barlow. Private interment will be at Willamette Memorial Park. Contributions may be made to Samaritan Evergreen Hospice in care of Fisher Funeral Home, 306 SW Washington St., Albany, OR 97321. Online condolences for the family may be posted at www.fisherfuneralhome. com. Viewing 4-6pm Friday at Fisher Funeral Home. Memorial Service at 2pm Saturday, Dever-Conner Community Church.

StatesmanJournal.com

Carl Cooley

August 26, 1933 - March 31, 2016

Carl Cooley August 26, 1933 - March 31, 2016 SALEM – Carl Richard Cooley, a resident

SALEM – Carl Richard Cooley, a resident of Salem, Oregon, died on March 31, 2016 in Silverton. He was 82 years of age. Carl was born on August 26, 1933 in Salem, Oregon and was the son of Victor and Martha (Jaquet) Cooley. He graduated from Salem Academy and served in the United States Army during the Korean Conflict. While stationed in Germany, Carl was able to visit his mother’s ancestor’s home town in Switzerland. He later received an honorable discharge. Upon his return from the service, Carl helped his parents run Cooley’s Dairy until it closed in 1962. He later farmed grass seed in the Victor Point area south of Silverton and raised Hereford Cattle. After his mom’s death in 1990 he bought the family home. He was a lifelong member of the First Free Methodist Church in Salem. He enjoyed his church life, raising his Hereford cattle, farming and volunteering with the Gideon’s North Salem Camp. Carl is survived by his brothers Robert Cooley of Dallas and Paul Cooley of Aumsville along with many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents and his brothers Lloyd Cooley and David Cooley. A visitation will be held on Thursday, April 7, 2016 from 10 am – 5 pm at Howell, Edwards, Doerksen Funeral Home. A memorial service will be held on Friday, April 8, 2016 at 4:00 p.m. at the Free Methodist Church on Silverton Road in Salem. Burial will be at City View Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in memory of Carl to The Gideon’s International or the COPD Foundation. Arrangements entrusted to Howell, Edwards, Doerksen.

Thelma Miller

August 26, 1929 - April 3, 2016

Doerksen. Thelma Miller August 26, 1929 - April 3, 2016 SOUTH WEBER, UT – Thelma K.
Doerksen. Thelma Miller August 26, 1929 - April 3, 2016 SOUTH WEBER, UT – Thelma K.

SOUTH WEBER, UT – Thelma K. Miller previously a long-term resident of Silverton died April 3 surrounded by her family. Thelma graduated from nursing school in 1949. She worked full-time until her retirement in 1992. Her last 27 years of her career were spent at Salem Hospital. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband Howard L. Miller. She is survived by her daughter Kate Madge of South Weber, UT, her son Geoff Miller of Federal Way, WA and six grandchildren. Services will be private. Interment will be in Emmett, ID.

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Continued from Page 1A

sembly of God.

Lawson wasn’t sure he could play one song that afternoon. His health had been declining since he was ad- mitted to the hospital three days prior. He had a clogged artery in his left leg, the one needed to oper- ate the foot pedals of an organ, and his kidneys were shutting down. He refused amputation — telling his doctor, “I’m dying with all my parts” — and he refused dialysis. Medically, there was nothing more that could be done. Lawson was transferred to palliative care and asked if he had any last wishes. His family considered bringing a keyboard into his room, and then his pastor, Darrell Arneson, re- minded them of the piano in the lobby of Building A. Not just any piano, but a Bösendorfer purchased in 2009 by the Salem Hospital Foundation for $54,000, thanks to a generous donation from the Hogg family estate. Margaret Hogg was a longtime Salem piano teacher who died in 2005.

A nurse contacted Dr. Everett Mozell, who gave

the green light. The staff acted fast, because Lawson wasn’t ex- pected to make it through the day. They waited until after his daughter arrived in town, and by then word had spread so that about 20 people from Brooks Assembly of God had showed up to hear him play. Lawson might have been a bit rusty. He had been laid up in bed because of his leg, and it had been more than a week since he had played the Roland digital intelligent piano he has at home. “That’s how we knew how sick he was,” his niece, Connie Jo Yutzie, said. Other members of Lawson’s church were dis-

appointed they couldn’t be there, but Arneson video- taped all 18 minutes, 3 seconds of it. It's on YouTube, and can be found by searching “Harry Lawson’s Last Concert.” Two nurses stood or sat beside him at all times, including one who snapped a few photos with a cell- phone. On his other side was his wife, who occasion- ally dabbed her eyes with a tissue. Lawson opened with one of his favorite hymns, “No One Ever Cared For Me Like Jesus” and fol- lowed it up with “It is Well With My Soul.” “That is when the tears started coming,” his daughter, Vangie Osborn, said. “We thought we’d be good to get through one.” He played 10 songs, with family and church mem- bers singing along with many of them. “It just rang through the corridor,” Arneson said. “It was just one of those magic moments, a special God moment. Harry’s a very godly man. He loves the Lord with all his heart. He’s not afraid to die.” After Harry played his last note, his wife held his hand and his daughter kissed him on the head. He just sat there for a moment, savoring what he had just done, and then raised his right hand in praise. “It was just an overwhelming situation with me that I was able to do that,” he later said. “The Lord gave me such an anointing to do it. He gives you the strength that you need for the occasion.” Surrounded by family, and having spoken that day by phone with his three surviving siblings who all live out of state, Lawson was at peace. “He had full closure,” his niece said. “But playing just recharged him. He was a total different patient after the concert.” During a visit with Lawson on Monday in his hospital room, he was alert and smiling as he remi- nisced about learning to play the organ and piano and about meeting his wife at what was then Can- yonville Bible Academy in Southern Oregon.

“I was so bashful, I went a whole year dreaming

and drooling,” he said, making me wonder whether he was talking about her or the organ he so desper- ately wanted access to. Turns out it was both. Dr. Mozell said while Lawson seems to have ral- lied, his prognosis has not changed. Infection from the lack of circulation in his leg will spread. His kidneys will continue to fail.

Mozell skipped a tax appointment to attend the concert and shared video he captured on his cell- phone. “It was so poignant, and it was really heartbreak- ing,” Mozell said. “I thought it was beautiful.