Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 18

F16

EPS 80

University of California, Berkeley
Department of Earth and Planetary Science

EPS 80
Environmental Earth Sciences
Fall 2016 Course Syllabus

Ask just about any group of people for a list of global environmental problems and
they are likely to respond with the latest topics featured on the evening news severe
storms, global warming, climate change, sea level rise, melting of the polar ice caps,
eco-terrorism, destruction of the rainforests, loss of biodiversity, and so on. Yet
curiously missing from almost every list is the shrinking supply of topsoil worldwide.

Often taken for granted and viewed as a limitless resource, soil is, in fact, in limited
supply. Many international organizations now place soil loss as the single most critical
global environmental issue followed closely by an adequate supply of water to quench
the thirst of the worlds burgeoning population.

We will use the environs of the Berkeley campus in conjunction with The Presidio and
Muir Woods National Monument as microcosms for an interdisciplinary exploration of
soils to frame our understanding of the integration of Earth systems and their
relationship to environmental issues globally.

This is an applied, hands-on course designed to provide students with a general


understanding of Earth systems and how they interact.

Be prepared to roll up your sleeves, get your hands dirty, and maybe your feet wet.

The goal of this course is to prompt you to initiate environmental change through a
better understanding of the ground beneath your feet.

Change starts from the ground up!

Note: There are no prerequisites for the course other than high school proficiency in
biology, chemistry, and physics coupled with your enthusiasm and genuine curiosity for
better understanding your place on this amazing planet.

This course satisfies the physical science breadth requirement.

This syllabus is a dynamic document. Expect changes as the course progresses.

1
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students enrolled in EPS 80 will

Develop a science literacy skill set to enrich the Berkeley academic experience
and lifelong learning.
Formulate an understanding of Earth systems that promotes critical thinking,
inquiry, and problem-solving.
Recognize and articulate the importance of the interdisciplinary nature of
science as part of a well-rounded, liberal arts education.
Model the Universitys mission of teaching, research, and public service
through collaborative small group project-based learning.
Utilize local environments to learn about the interrelationships of Earth
systems (atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, pedosphere) and
human actions on a global scale.
Become advocates for environmental change by focusing on personal action as
the starting point for change.
Use knowledge of Earth systems to create action networks that promote
environmental quality to support the health of human communities.
Be engaged learners with a desire to put knowledge into action.

_______________________________________________________________________

INSTRUCTOR

Stephen Andrews, sandrews@berkeley.edu



Office hours: By appointment or from 1:00-2:00pm on Tuesdays in Room 608 of the
UC Extension Center, 160 Spear St., San Francisco. Please request an appointment by
email or in-person before class.

Students with special learning needs should consult the Student Learning Center
and/or the Disabled Students Program to make arrangements for reasonable
accommodations.

CLASS MEETINGS

MWF 12:00-12:59pm, 105 Stanley Hall

Note: Class will NOT meet on the following dates:

Monday, September 9 Labor Day Holiday


Wednesday, September 14 Self-Directed Study Day
Friday, November 11 Veterans Day Holiday
Friday, November 25 Thanksgiving Break

2
CLASS FORMAT

Your time is valuable and I want to respect that. As such, each class will start promptly
at 12:10pm and end by 12:59.

Each class session will be organized in the following manner:

Announcements / Reading / Resources*


Lecture / Lab / Activity
Group Discussion / Questions

*All course information will generally be available via the bCourses site or as handouts
distributed in class.

SPECIAL ITEMS

iClicker+ -- Audience Participation System Student Remote
ISBN: 1464120153
Recommended: REEF Polling Access, ISBN: 1498600751
Note: iClicker will be used for quizzes.

Personal laptop, tablet, and/or smartphone with AirBears 2.

Hand cleaning kit: Damp washcloth, hand soap/sanitizer, zipper-type plastic bag.

REQUIRED COURSE READING

Carle, D. 2010. Introduction to Earth, soil and land in California. UC Press. Paperback.
ISBN: 978-0-520-26681-0

Lenton, Tim. 2016. Earth system science: a very short introduction. 1st Ed. Oxford
University Press. Paperback. ISBN-10: 019871887X

Lindbo, D.L., D.A. Kozlowski and C. Robinson, Eds. 2012. Know soil, know life. Soil
Society of America. Paperback. ISBN-10: 091189548

ENGAGEMENT READING

Required engagement reading from professional journals and government documents


will be assigned throughout the course. These materials will generally be available in
electronic form via bCourses and/or the Earth Science and Map Library course site.
Access to engagement materials not available in electronic form will be available via 2-
hour reserve at the Earth Sciences and Map Library in McCone Hall.

Students are responsible for all engagement reading. It will be covered on hour exams,

3
quizzes, and the final.


RECOMMENDED READING[Not required, but great for nerding up.]

Barnosky, Anthony D. 2009. Heatstroke: nature in an age of global warming.


Shearwater Press.

Heinberg, Richard and Daniel Lerch, Eds. 2010. The post carbon reader: managing the
21st century sustainability crises. Watershed Media.

Hillel, Daniel. 2007. Soil in the environment: crucible of terrestrial life. Academic Press.

Ingram, L.B. and F. Malamud-Roam. 2013. The west without water: what past flood,
droughts, and other climatic clues tell us about tomorrow. UC Press. Hardcover.

Kruckeberg, Arthur R. 2006. Introduction to California soils and plants: serpentine,


vernal pools, and other geobotanical wonders. UC Press.

McNeill, J.R. 2001. Something new under the sun: an environmental history of the
twentieth-century world. Norton.

Montgomery, David R. 2008. Dirt: the erosion of civilizations. UC Press.

Ohlson, Kristin. 2014. The soil will save us. Rodale Press. Hardcover.

Sloan, Doris. 2006. Geology of the San Francisco Bay Region. UC Press. Paperback.

GRADING POLICY

Students will be graded on engagement, successful completion of assignments, and


examination scores. Course grades will be determined based on the following:

30% Hour Exams (10% each)


20% Final Exam
20% Group Project/Presentation
20% Engagement Portfolio
10% Quizzes

LATE SUBMISSION POLICY

All assignments are due at the start of class on the specified date. Students will be
allowed to submit late assignments; however, five (5) percent of the value of the
assignment will be deducted for each day past the due date including weekends and
holidays.

EMAIL POLICY

Only assigned berkeley.edu email addresses may be used in the course. Any email
received that is not designated berkeley.edu (i.e., gmail or yahoo) will be deleted.
Take care to ensure that you are submitting all course materials with a berkeley.edu
email address.

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT PORTFOLIO

In and out of class engagement activities intended to help students develop a deeper
understanding of the course content will include field trips, labs, research and public
service. These activities will be scheduled and announced in class and via bCourses.

Off-site activities will generally take place on a weekend day. Other activities may be
done individually at student convenience. Students need to plan ahead for off-site
activities by coordinating transportation in advance. Carpools and public transit are
strongly recommended.

Each student will be pre-assigned to a group for completing in class engagement


activities and the course project. Students may not change groups without prior
instructor approval.

Details about the group project will be given during the fifth week of the course via
bCourses.

Please note that engagement activities are not extra credit. Students must complete all
assigned in class engagement activities plus two out of class activities to complete the
engagement portfolio and receive credit for this portion of the course grade. No
exceptions!

EXAMS & QUIZZES

Regular hour exams will be given in-class and utilize a short answer and/or short essay
format. The typical written response is one to two examination book pages in length.
Diagrams, graphs, and tables are encouraged. Answers may be submitted in a bullet
point text or outline format rather than a narrative, but must be complete to receive
full credit.

I will provide sample questions and the appropriate responses along with study guide
information prior to each exam.

Students are strongly encouraged to take comprehensive notes on the lectures, text,
videos, and engagement reading.

5
Please plan to bring two (2) new examination books and two (2) black or blue ink
pens with you to each exam.

Hour Exam 1: Monday, September 26. This exam will emphasize content with some
problem solving.

Hour Exam 2: Monday, October 17. This exam will emphasize content following the
September hour exam with some problem solving.

Hour Exam 3: Monday, November 14. This exam will emphasize content following the
October hour exam with some problem solving.

Final: Scheduled during finals week December 12-16. This exam will emphasize
applied learning and problem solving. Your complete knowledge of content from the
course will be needed (i.e., the final exam is comprehensive).

Quizzes: Up to five (5) random 10 minute quizzes on assigned reading, administered


via iClicker, will be given during the course. Please bring your iClicker with you to each
class.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Students are responsible for following all University of California and FPF policies and
procedures. Rigorous enforcement of the Code of Conduct and Honor Policy will be
followed during the course. Think like a scholar. Act like a scholar.

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT

All Berkeley students are expected to conduct themselves as responsible adults both
on and off campus.

In order to create a positive learning environmental for all EPS 80 scholars, please
abide by the following classroom rules.

Side conversations: Questions are both expected and encouraged. However,


do not hold side conversations while the instructor or class colleagues are
speaking. Ask questions only during the Q&A period designated by the
instructor.

Language/respect: Please show respect and tolerance to members of our


learning community. This includes refraining from the use of vulgar and profane
language.

Attendance: Upon entry into 105 Stanley, you are expected to remain present
for the full class unless under extreme circumstances. It is distracting to the
instructor and your class colleagues when wandering in and out of the class

6
occurs.

Attentiveness: Students are expected to arrive ready to engage in active


learning. This means come to class well rested, and well prepared. Napping,
internet browsing, reading a newspaper, listening to music, or other such
activities are not permitted. Students who engage in such activities will be call
upon to account for their actions. Repeat offences shall be punishable by a
reduced engagement score from 20 to 10o percent

Electronic devices/phones: Turn off and put away all devices that may make
noise before entering the classroom. If a special circumstance requires that you
have a cell phone turned during class, discuss this with the instructor before
class begins. Never answer a call in the classroom. This is both disruptive and
disrespectful.

______________________________________________________________























7



OUTLINE OF INSTRUCTION

WEEK 1: August 24 & 26, 2016

INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SYSTEMS: USING SOILS AS AN INTEGRATING
CONTEXT
Student Learning Outcomes

Students will

Recognize that Earth systems are highly complex, integrated, and can be
influenced by human action.
Understand the importance of soils to the environment and human civilization.
Know that soil is a limited resource essential to sustaining life on Earth.

Required Reading

Lenton, Chapters 1-4.


Lindbo, Chapter 1.
Science: Wounding Earths Fragile Skin

Self-directed Study: Video Presentation

dirt! The movie. http://www.dirtthemovie.org/ Watch and take notes!

Engagement Assignment

Interview five (5) people and prepare a short written response for each question
below. See assignment details in bCourses. DUE: Friday, August 26.

What importance does soil have to humanity?


What importance does soil have in the environment?
What are the function(s) of soil?
How much soil is on Earth?
What IS soil?

WEEK 2: August 29, 31 & September 2, 2016

USING LOCAL ENVIRONMENTS TO UNDERSTAND ENVIRONMENTAL


EARTH SCIENCE
Student Learning Outcomes

Students will
Create a multi-dimensional perspective of the Strawberry Creek watershed,
Presidio and Muir Woods
Geologic foundation
Environmental attributes
Human history
Develop a skill set for identifying and locating resources to build a sense of
place.

Required Reading

Lenton, Chapters 5-8.

Engagement Assignment

Briefly describe (in one page) your most memorable experience with soil. DUE: Friday,
September 2.

Self-directed Study

Explore Strawberry Creek watershed www.creeks.berkeley.edu
Explore The Presidio https://www.nps.gov/prsf/index.htm
Explore Muir Woods National Monument https://www.nps.gov/muwo/index.htm







9




WEEK 3: September 7 & 9, 2016
Monday, September 5: NO CLASS, Labor Day Holiday

SOIL: PHYSICAL PROPERTIES I

Student Learning Outcomes

Students will
Formulate an independent answer to the question: What IS soil?
Know the essential functions of soil
Understand for process of soil formation and how it relates to Earth systems
Develop the skills to determine soil texture, structure, color, bulk density, and
porosity
Understand soil-water relations: Permeability and infiltration

Required Reading

Carle, 11-20
Lindbo, Chapter 2.

Group Activity / Engagement Assignment

Determination of soil texture and organic matter content by hand. DUE: Monday,
September 12. Results will be collected via iClicker.

Please bring soap and a moist washcloth, hand towel, or paper towels in a ZipLok
type bag to class with you! You will get your hands dirty!


WEEK 4: September 12, 14 & 16, 2016
Wednesday, September 14: NO CLASS, Self-directed Study

SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES II
Required Reading

Bay Nature: Soil Matters


Soil Horizons: Detriots Vacant Lots Provide Natural Laboratory for Studying Soil
Processes.

10

Self-directed Study: Video Watch and take notes!

Secrets of the Soil. http://www.uctv.tv/shows/Secrets-of-the-Soil-23269

WEEK 5: September 19, 21 & 23, 2016

SOIL CLASSIFICATION & MAPPING I


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will
Understand the process used to classify and map soils
Recognize that soil resources are limited and that soils represent 25% of the
worlds biodiversity
Know how to use and interpret results from SoilWeb & WebSoilSurvey

Required Reading

Lindbo, Chapter 5.
Ecosystems (2003) 6:470-482: Soil Diversity and Land Use in the United States.
USDA NRCS California State Soil -- San Joaquin Series Description.

Group Activity/Engagement AssignmentDUE: NO LATER THAN FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9.

SOIL IN CONTEXT: GROUP PROJECT-RAISING AWARENESS OF SOIL

Students in pre-assigned groups, will undertake either 1) the creation of a two minute
YouTube video on the importance of soil to sustaining life on Earth, or 2) create an
interpretive panel explaining the importance of soil to visitors at one of the following:
Muir Woods, The Presidio, or Strawberry Creek.

Note: Please bring your AirBears2 equipped laptop or notebook computer with you for
this class. We will be using internet map resources.

Using the Soil Survey: Comparison of Muir Woods National Monument and the
Presidio.

California Soil Resources Laboratory: http://casoilresource.lawr.ucdavis.edu/gmap/

WebSoilSurvey: http://websoilsurvey.sc.egov.usda.gov/App/HomePage.htm


11




WEEK 6: September 26, 28 & 30, 2016

Monday, September 26, Hour Exam 1
Please plan to bring two (2) new blue books and two (2) black or blue ink pens with
you to the exam.

SOIL CLASSIFICATION & MAPPING II

Group Activity/Engagement AssignmentDUE: NO LATER THAN FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9.

SOIL IN CONTEXT: GROUP PROJECT-RAISING AWARENESS OF SOIL

Students in pre-assigned groups, will undertake either 1) the creation of a two minute
YouTube video on the importance of soil to sustaining life on Earth, or 2) create an
interpretive panel explaining the importance of soil to visitors at one of the following:
Muir Woods, The Presidio, or Strawberry Creek.

Note: Please bring your AirBears2 equipped laptop or notebook computer with you for
this class. We will be using internet map resources.

Using the Soil Survey: Comparison of Muir Woods National Monument and the
Presidio.

California Soil Resources Laboratory: http://casoilresource.lawr.ucdavis.edu/gmap/

WebSoilSurvey: http://websoilsurvey.sc.egov.usda.gov/App/HomePage.htm

12

WEEK 7: October 3, 5 & 7, 2016

SOIL: CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL I

Student Learning Outcomes

Students will
Understand nutrient mobility and soil pH
Understand the properties of soil that influence the development of plant
communities.
Learn how to collect a soil sample for laboratory analysis.
Develop the skills needed to test soils using a retail test kit.
Understand the fate and transport of pesticides in soils.

Required Reading

Carle, 22-27.
Lindbo, Chapter 4.

Group Activity / Engagement Assignment DUE: Monday, October 10. Results will be
collected via iClicker.

Soil testing pH, NPK. Details will be provided in class and on bCourses.
Please bring soap and a moist washcloth, hand towel, or paper towels in a ZipLok.


WEEK 8: October 10, 12 & 14, 2016

SOIL: CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL II

13

WEEK 9: October 17, 19 & 21, 2016

Monday, October 17, Hour Exam 2


Please plan to bring two (2) new blue books and two (2) black or blue ink pens with
you to the exam.

SOIL: BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES I

Student Learning Outcomes

Students will

Recognize soil as a dynamic ecosystem
Understand the role and importance of soil organic matter
Understand the role of the soil foodweb to soil quality

Required Reading

Carle, 30-97
Lindbo, Chapter 3.
Science (2004) 304, 1629L Ecological Linkages Between Aboveground and Belowground
Biota.
Science (2004) 304, 1634: Interactions and Self-Organization in the Soil-Microbe
Complex.
Science (2004) 304, 1620: The Secret Life of Fungi.

Group Activity / Engagement Assignment DUE: Monday, October 24. Results wil be
collected via iClicker.

Exploring the soil underworld! Details will be given in class and on bCourses.

Please bring soap and a moist washcloth, hand towel, or paper towels in a ZipLok
type bag to class with you! You will get your hands dirty!


WEEK 10: October 24, 26 & 28, 2016

SOIL: BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES II


14

WEEK 11: October 31, November 2 & 4, 2016

SOILS AND BIOMES

Student Learning Outcomes

Students will

Recognize the soils associated with each biome: Forest, grassland, tundra,
desert, shrub-land, and wetland
Understand environmental issues associated with soils in each biome

Required Reading

Lindbo, Chapter 7.
Science (2004) 304, 1618: Defrosting the Carbon Freezer of the North.


WEEK 12: November 7, 9 & 11, 2016
Friday, November 11: NO CLASS, Veterans Day Holiday

SOIL CONSERVATION, LAND USE, AND MANAGEMENT I

Student Learning Outcomes

Students will

Recognize the signs of soil and environmental degradation
Understand the principles of resource conservation and how they relate to soil
and environmental quality.

Required Reading

Carle, 71-96
Lindbo, Chapter 6.
International Food Policy Research Institute (2002): Green Revolution: Curse or
Blessing?


15



WEEK 13: November 14, 16 & 18, 2016

Monday, November 14, Hour Exam 3
Please plan to bring two (2) new blue books and two (2) black or blue ink pens with
you to the exam.

SOIL CONSERVATION, LAND USE, AND MANAGEMENT II

Student Learning Outcomes

Students will

Know and understand the principles associated with Integrated Soil
Management (ISM)
Recognize the characteristics of urban soils
Understand the challenges associated with sustaining soil resources locally,
regionally, and globally.

Required Reading

Lindbo, Chapter 8.

Self-directed Study: Video
The American Experience: Surviving the Dust Bowl
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJMidfqiNio Watch and take notes!

16



WEEK 14: November 21, 23 & 25, 2016
Friday, November 25: NO CLASS, Thanksgiving Break

SOILS: SOCIETY, DROUGHT & CLIMATE CHANGE I

Student Learning Outcomes

Students will

Understand the place of soils in human culture.
Understand the role of soils in human health.
Learn best management practices associated with soil sustainability.
Develop a personal strategy for enacting environmental change.
Understand the significance of drought in California.
Understand the role of soils to global food security.
Know the science behind climate change.
Required Reading

Science (2004) 304, 1623: Soil Carbon Sequestration Impacts on Global Climate Change
and Food Security.
AAAS Climate Science Panel: What We Know: The Reality, Risks and Response to
Climate Change

Engagement Assignment

Are we doing enough about climate change? Details to be given in class and on
bCourses. DUE: Friday, December 2. Results will be analyzed using iClicker.


WEEK 15: November 28, 30 & December 2, 2016


SOILS: SOCIETY, DROUGHT & CLIMATE CHANGE II

17

WEEK 16: December 5, 7 & 9, 2016

GROUP PRESENTATIONS

Group Engagement Activity

Group presentations and peer review. Assigned by lottery. Details given in class and on
bCourses.


WEEK 17: December 12-16, 2016

FINAL EXAM Please check the published final exam schedule for date,
time and place.

Please plan to bring two (2) new blue books and two (2) black or blue ink pens with
you to the exam.

18