Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 52

JJazz

azz
Teachers Handbook JA-117

A Swingin Celebration
by Teresa Jennings
JJazz
azz

A Swingin Celebration
by Teresa Jennings
2010, 2011 Plank Road Publishing,Inc.
International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved
Credits
Music, Script, Teaching & Production Notes Teresa Jennings

Orchestrations Paul Jennings

Our Production Team Nancy Belongia, Katie Ebel, Julie Gaulke, Sean Gill,
Karl Hitzemann, Paul Jennings, Teresa Jennings, John Riggio, Candy Schill,
Mark Schroeter, Dan Thieman

Music fonts were created exclusively for Plank Road Publishing by Mark Riggio
and based on the engraving artistry of Bruce Kling.

Music Engravers Sean Gill, Bruce Kling, Dan Thieman, Katie Ebel

Cover Illustration Jennifer Vulpas

Cover Design Katie Ebel, Paul Jennings

Interior Illustrations Jennifer Vulpas, Donald Riggio, Teresa Jennings

Recording Production Teresa & Paul Jennings, John Riggio, Anne Ellsworth, Karl Hitzemann

Recording Engineers David Price, Mike Wilson, Ben Vawter; Aire Born, Inc.

Recording Singers Clara Abel, Carrie Barnthouse, Savannah Belt, Megan Byers, Abigail Clark,
Anne Ellsworth, Benjamin Ellsworth, Celia Ellsworth, Dawson Harris, Jenson Harris, Mary Harris,
Avery Huffman, Rachel Huffman, Holly McDaniel, Kelsey Montgomery, Grace Morgan, Matthias Murphy,
Lydia Rhea, Margaret Rhea, Melissa Schott, Brynn Stebbe, Claire Stebbe, Diane Stebbe

Recording Instrumentalists Rhythm: Dane Clark, Steve Dokken, Steve Hanna, Paul Jennings,
Steve Millikan, Sandy Williams; Winds: Scott Belck, James Paul De La Garza, Rich Dole, Jim Farrelly,
Loy Hetrick, Greg Imboden, Anthony Kniffen, Kent Leslie, Jared Rodin, John Rommel, Joey Tartell;
Strings: Alfred Abel, Colette Abel, Davis Brooks, Susan Chan, Pam Close, Kara Day, Marjie Hanna,
Dennis McCafferty, Debbie Rodin, Pam Williams; Synthesizers: Paul Jennings

Products Available For


Jazz
JA-116 PERFORMANCE KIT - Teachers Handbook/CD
JA-111 Teachers Handbook with Reproducible Student Parts
JA-115 Performance/Accompaniment CD
JA-117 DOWNLOADABLE KIT - Teachers Handbook/Recording
JA-119 Convenience Combo Kit (Print and Downloadable Kit)
Jazz
Table of Contents
Page Full/Tracks
Script 1 Sequence 1 ................................................................................................ 4
JAZZ Piano/Vocal Score .......................................................................................... 5 1/7
Reproducible Student Part.............................................................................. 12
Reproducible Lyric Page ................................................................................. 15
Script 2 Sequences 2 & 3 ..................................................................................... 16
THE BLUES Piano/Vocal Score .......................................................................... 17 2/8
Reproducible Student Part.............................................................................. 20
Reproducible Lyric Page ................................................................................. 15
Script 3 Sequences 4 & 5 ..................................................................................... 22
JAZZ IS ON ITS WAY Piano/Vocal Score......................................................... 23 3/9
Reproducible Student Part.............................................................................. 27
Reproducible Lyric Page ................................................................................. 37
Rehearsal Extra .................................................................................................. q
Script 4 Sequences 6, 7, & 8 ............................................................................... 30
TO SWING OR NOT TO SWING Piano/Vocal Score................................... 31 4/0
Reproducible Student Part.............................................................................. 35
Reproducible Lyric Page ................................................................................. 37
Script 5 Sequences 9, 10, 11, & 12 ..................................................................... 38
ODE TO JAZZERS Piano/Vocal Score............................................................... 40 5/-
Reproducible Student Part.............................................................................. 43
Reproducible Lyric Page ................................................................................. 37
Rehearsal Extras ................................................................................................. wer
Bow Music.......................................................................................................... 40 6/=
Teachers Guide ................................................................................................. 44
Poster Reproducible .............................................................................................. 48
Program Cover Reproducible .............................................................................. 49
CD Information Sheet Reproducible ................................................................. 50
Survey Reproducible ............................................................................................. 51

An Important Notice About Your Rights To Duplicate


With the purchase of this product, you (one teacher or director) may legally duplicate the reproducible
poster, program, student parts, lyric pages, and illustrations for use with your students, no matter how
many students you have, even if you teach in more than one school. Permission to duplicate and/or
share this book or recording with anyone else is not granted and is considered a copyright infringement.
Permission is granted to duplicate the accompanying recording for back-up purposes only.
Please dont teach your students to steal.
The people who write and publish this music depend on its sales for their livelihood. Not only is it
illegal for you to freely duplicate their work without their permission, it is also unfair and it sets a bad
example for your students. We will always fight for your rights to better pay and working conditions,
and as one of the few publishers of childrens music, we invest most of our profits in new music and
resources for you. We also take care to provide real value in our products. In return, we ask for your
support of our rights. Thank you.
3
Jazz
A Swingin Celebration
by Teresa Jennings

CHARACTERS: Students of Jazz


SETTING: Wherever theres music
TIME: Today and yesterday, with an ear toward tomorrow

SEQUENCE 1
Opening Song: Jazz

4
Jazz
CD Full Performance - track 1;
Accompaniment only - track 7

Teresa Jennings


arr. Paul Jennings
up-tempo swing (=200; =100)

## j F7
F7 F#7
j F#7 F7 F#7
c
n.c.

& n . # n # . n . # .
j > F- build
j . . f
? ## c n . # n # . n #
drums


set-up

>...
C#mi7(5)
# ^
F#7(9)
F 0 F#0 G#0 A 0# F#7(9)
# # n > . # > n > # > . n . # .
5 G#0
n#
F7(9) F#7(9) F7(9) F#7(9) F7(9) F#7(9)
& J J ..

? ##
bass

# w
w
>
# # .
bs. tbn., pno.
9
f
& .








Jazz. Jazz.

## .
Bmi
F7 F#7
Bmi
F 0 F#7(9)
& .

n#

f

? # # ..
(piano comp)

n # n #
bass - walk sim.

# j j
& #



n . # n # . n #
..
Jazz. Play - in, sing - in, swing - in.

##
Bmi

F7 F#7 F7
j F7F#7
j F#7 F7 F#7 ..
&

n# n . # n # . n . # .


? ## ..
drums accent ens.

n # n . # .

2010 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.
International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved 5
#
17
Jazz
& #

Jazz.
## Bmi

(n.c.)


&

? ## j j


(+pno.) fill

n #

(bass)

# # .
21

& .

Born in A - mer - i - ca, oh so long a - go,
Down in New Or - leans,* peo - ple heard the sound.

# # . Bmi G9 F#9 Bmi F#sus F#7


& .

? # # .. j
# n


?_______| _______
## j ..
& . n # n #

jazz is mu - sic ev - ry - one should know.
Jazz was happ - nin all a - round the town.

## Bmi A7/E
j
B0 F7 F#7 F7 F#7 Bmi
..
Bmi
& . n # n #

? ## ..
n n # n #

# #
30
..
& n # n #
It was a blend - ing, it was an ev - o - lu - tion.
It spread a - round, this mu - sic rev - o - lu - tion,
# # . Emi Bmi
& . n # n #
? # # ..

walk
6 *pronounce leans as lnz
Jazz
?________________________|
## ..
& . n # n #
.
It was a style that sim - ply came to be.
till it was played from
#
Emi
..
& #
F7 F#7 F7 F#7 Bmi
. n # n #
.
? ## ..
n # n #
walk

______
##
39

& w w

sea to jazz - y sea. Oh!

F 0 F#0 G 0 G#0A 0 F#7(9)


n # # #
(orchestra)

## C#mi7(5) B/F# F#

& . .
# # #

v
? ##
w w w w
> w > w
> >
# #.
43

& .






Jazz. Jazz.

#
Bmi

Bmi

& # ..
F7 F#7 F 0 F#7(9)

n#

(piano comp)

? # # ..
n # n #
sim.
bass - walk

7
Jazz
## j j ..
&


n . # n # . n #

Jazz. Play - in, sing - in, swing - in.

##
Bmi

F7 F#7 F7
j
F#7 F7
j F#7 F7 F#7 ..
&

n# n . # n # . n . # .


? ## ..
n #

##
51


decresc.

&

Jazz.

# >
Bmi
& #
drum solo - decresc. Z
? ##
w w
w w


55 subdued
## . P
j
& . n . #

Jazz. Rhy - thm.
Jazz. Blue notes.

## .
2nd time -

& .
saxes:

n . # #
J
P
? # # ..
drums, rims
1st time - drum solo:

n #

8
Jazz
##
&

Jazz.
##
Jazz.

& n j # n




? ##
n

?______________________________| _______________
## optional divisi

..
& n #

Swing. Im - prov - i -

## .. a
F#7 F7 F#7
&
a. sx., tpts.

## n n bnn # n##
n #



? ## ..
w
w
>
##
65 build

& w w
sa - tion.

##
multiple soloists ad lib (winds)
F#7(9) F#7(13)
&
gtr.

# #
w
? ## fill
w w
w .

> >
+bs. walk

## f
b
69

& bb
cresc.

w #
Im - prov - i -
^ n >
G7
##
F#7 )
b
(

# #
n
bb n
F#7 G7
& #






# ..
cresc.
f
fill

? # # ww .
b bb
w . w
> w
> > 9
Jazz
b w
& b b A
sa - tion. Oh!
Bb0 n G7(9)

0 G 0 A b0 n 0
A
b G7(9) G7(13) # F#
& b b b
(end solos)



? b ^ w
bb . w
. w
> >

b
73

& b b ..








Jazz. Jazz.
Cmi

Cmi
b
& b b ..
F#7 G7


? bb
b ..
big time - heavy back beat


#
walk

b
&bb




Jazz.
Cmi
bbb
F#0 G7(9)

F#7 G7

& #

? bb
b # #

?_______________________________| ______________
bbb j j .. #
P
j
& # . . # .
Play - in, sing - in, swing - in. Play - in, sing -

bbb
F#7 j
G7 F#7
j G7. F#7 G7
..
n.c.


& # . # . .
P
j >
? bb .. # .
b . # . .
10
Jazz
b j F
j j
& b b . # # . . #
in, swing - in. Play - in, sing - in, swing - in.

bb
F#7 j
G7 F#7
j G7. F#7 G7
& b # . #
j . . F
? b . #
bb

85

b f
j j
& b b # . . #
Play - in, sing - in, swing - in.

>
b # > . > > > . # . . >
F#7(9) G7(9) F#7(9) G7(9) F#7(9) G7(9)
> .
Dmi7(5)
b
& b J J J
f
? bb
b


A A

b b w w
& b
Oh! Jazz!

n wwww
>
G7(9)
>..
Cmi
b ..
&bb #


? bb
b

b
walk

&bb




J - A - Z - Z. Jazz!

>
Cmi
G+>7 Dmi7(5)
bb > >
Ami7(5)
>
B0

& b




? bb



fill

b n n
n n
>




11



Jazz
up-tempo swing (=200; =100) Teresa Jennings

##
arr. Paul Jennings
5
4 4
drums
set-up & c

##
9 f

..
&






Jazz. Jazz.

## j j ..
&


n . # n # . n #

Jazz. Play - in, sing - in, swing - in.

##
17
3
21

& ..

Jazz. Born in A - mer - i - ca,
Down in New Or - leans,*

## j
& .

oh so long a - go, jazz is mu - sic
peo - ple heard the sound. Jazz was happ - nin

?____________| ____________
## ..
& n # n #

ev - ry - one should know.
all a - round the town.

*pronounce leans as lnz

2010 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.


12 International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved
Jazz
# #
30

..
& n # n #
It was a blend - ing, it was an ev - o - lu - tion.
It spread a - round, this mu - sic rev - o - lu - tion,

?____________________|
## ..
& . n # n #
.
It was a style that sim - ply came to be.
till it was played from

# # _________
39


&
w w
sea to jazz - y sea. Oh!

# # .
43

& .






Jazz. Jazz.

## j j ..
&



n . # n # . n #
Jazz. Play - in, sing - in, swing - in.

subdued

##
55
51
3 P
..
decresc.

&

Jazz. Jazz.
Jazz.

## j
& n . #

Rhy - thm. Jazz.
Blue notes. Jazz.

13
Jazz
?__________________| ___________
## ..
& n #

Swing. Im - prov - i - sa - tion.

##
bbb
65 build

&
cresc.

w w w

f
b w
69

&b b # A
Im - prov - i - sa - tion. Oh!


b
73

& b b ..








Jazz. Jazz.

?_______________________|
b bb j j . ..
&


# . #
Jazz. Play - in, sing - in, swing - in.

_________
bb
P
j j .
F
j j .
& b # . # # . #
Play - in, sing - in, swing - in. Play - in, sing - in, swing - in.


j
85

b b f
j w
& b # . . #
Play - in, sing - in, swing - in. Oh!

b
&b b w



Jazz! J - A - Z - Z. Jazz!
14
Jazz
Jazz. Jazz. Jazz. Playin, singin, swingin.
Jazz. Jazz. Jazz. Playin, singin, swingin. Jazz.

Born in America, oh so long ago,


jazz is music evryone should know.
Down in New Orleans, people heard the sound.
Jazz was happnin all around the town.

It was a blending, it was an evolution.


It was a style that simply came to be.
It spread around, this music revolution,
till it was played from sea to jazzy sea.

Oh! Jazz. Jazz. Jazz. Playin, singin, swingin.


Jazz. Jazz. Jazz. Playin, singin, swingin. Jazz.

Jazz. Rhythm. Jazz. Swing.


Jazz. Blue notes. Jazz. Improvisation.
Improvisation.

Oh! Jazz. Jazz. Jazz. Playin, singin, swingin.


Jazz. Jazz. Jazz. Playin, singin, swingin.
Playin, singin, swingin.
Playin, singin, swingin.
Oh! Jazz!

J-A-Z-Z. Jazz!

The Blues
Oh, when youre down and feelin sad; oh, when youre low and feelin bad;
oh, when you feel so crummy, you dont know what to do;
if crummy was a color, that color would be blue;
heres what you do: you sing the blues, the blues, the blues.
(like crying) Wah wah wah. Boo hoo hoo.
Woe is me. Woe is you.
Whimper whimper. Sigh sigh sigh.
Sniffle sniffle. Cry cry cry.

Oh, when youre down and feelin sad;


oh, when youre low and feelin bad;
oh, when you feel so crummy, you dont know what to do;
if crummy was a color, that color would be blue;
heres what you do: you sing the blues, the blues, the blues.

Heres what you do:


you sing the blues, the blues, the blues.
Heres what you do:
you sing the blues.

You sing the blues.

2010 Plank Road Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved


SEQUENCE 2
Jazz is a unique and exciting kind of music that was born in the United States around the turn of the
20th century.
Thats more than a hundred years ago!
The city of New Orleans, Louisiana, played an important part in the development of early jazz.
Way back then, the people of New Orleans came from many different cultures.
There were African Americans as well as Creoles, who were descendents of mixed African, French, and
Spanish heritage.
There were also people from Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean.
All of these different kinds of people had their own musical traditions.
There were brass bands and ragtime pianists, symphony orchestras and blues musicians, just to name a few.
Jazz began to emerge when different peoples and their music began to blend together.
Early jazz featured syncopation, blue notes, and improvisation.
But jazz is not just one style of music. It includes many styles, like Dixieland, bebop, swing, or blues.
The blues is a musical style that originated in the African
American community.
It came from plantation work songs, spirituals, and field
hollers or calls.
It was used to express sadness or difficulties and challenges
through music.
Not all jazz tunes are blues and not all blues tunes are jazz.
In fact, the blues has found its way into almost every style
of 20th century music from folk to rock, country, pop, and
of course, jazz.
The word blue has even become another way of
saying sad.
So if you find yourself feeling sad, at least you know you
can always sing the blues.
SEQUENCE 3
Song: The Blues

16
CD Full Performance - track 2;

The Blues
Accompaniment only - track 8

Teresa Jennings
arr. Paul Jennings
# c
down-tempo swing/blues (=88)
F
& j
+snap on 2 and 4, optional

Oh, when youre

# c
B7

&
F
drums

?# c j
set-up 3


fill



bass

%
+piano +pno.

#
5

& j j j j
down and feel-in sad; oh, when youre low and feel-in bad; oh, when you

#
Emi (blues)
& j j j j
d.s. only
3

# # . #
. .
.
?#
3





pno. - sim.

#
9
j j j
& b
feel so crum-my, you dont know what to do; if crum-my was a col - or, that

# A7 (blues)
Emi
& j j
3




.

#
#
.
?#

3

2010 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.


International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved 17

The Blues

#
to coda
13

j j j
(after d.s.)

&
col-or would be blue; heres what you do: you sing the blues, the blues, the

#
j j
B7 A7 Emi
& j j
#
#
3

J J
?# j j
3

.

fill


b . w
. b . w
#
17


(like crying)

&
blues. Wah wah wah.
#
alto sax - bluesy solo
Emi

(pno. comp) (winds)

& #


J .
?#
3

j j j j
w
w

(pno.)

# 21 bass - walk

&

#
Boo hoo hoo. Woe is me. Woe is you.
A7 Emi
&

?# j j
w w
j j
w
w w w
#
25


&

Whim-per whim-per. Sigh sigh sigh. Snif-fle snif - fle. Cry cry cry. Oh, when youre

# B7 A7 Emi B7
&

? # j j j j
j j j

fill

b
b
18
The Blues

#
coda

30

& j j

j

blues. Heres what you do: you sing the blues, the blues, the

#
Emi
j j
B7 A7 Emi
& # j
#
#


J . J J

?# j j
3



. b .
fill


w
. b . w

#
34

& w
J
blues. Heres what you do: you sing the blues.

j
#
Bb+7 )
A7

B7 (


Emi

& # J w
J
J .
?# j

3


.
fill

b w
. b w

# U

rit. (sing e, optional)

&
(end snaps)

w w






You sing the blues.

j
U
A7 Emi9(# 7)
# B b0 B7
&
sax - ad lib

# www w

www

J w

U
rit. (piano helps singers cut-off)

?#
b nw
b nw w w
w w
19
The Blues

Teresa Jennings
down-tempo swing/blues (=88) arr. Paul Jennings

# c +snap on 2 and 4, optional


3

F
j
drums
set-up &
Oh, when youre

%
#
5

& j j j j

down and feel-in sad; oh, when youre low and feel-in bad; oh, when you


9
# j j j
& b

feel so crum-my, you dont know what to do; if crum-my was a col - or, that

#
to coda
13

j j j
(after d.s.)

&
col-or would be blue; heres what you do: you sing the blues, the blues, the

#
17


(like crying)

&
blues. Wah wah wah.

#
21

&
Boo hoo hoo. Woe is me. Woe is you.

2010 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.


20 International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved
The Blues

#
25

&


Whim-per whim-per. Sigh sigh sigh. Snif-fle snif -fle. Cry cry cry. Oh, when youre



coda

#
30

j
&
blues. Heres what you do: you sing the

#
34

j j

&
J
blues, the blues, the blues. Heres what you do: you sing the

# U

rit.

&
(end snaps)

w w w





blues. You sing the blues.

21
SEQUENCE 4
One of the earliest styles of jazz is Dixieland.
It came about as a blending of African rhythms and
improvisation with European instruments, like the
trumpet, clarinet, or trombone.
Dixieland musicians combined musical ideas from brass
band marches, ragtime, or blues over a steady rhythm
played by a rhythm section.
A rhythm section usually had a piano, guitar or banjo, bass
or tuba, and drums.
Some of the instruments in a Dixieland group played a
melody while others improvised, or jazzed up the melody.
Dixieland Jazz is also known as New Orleans Jazz or
Traditional Jazz.
It wasnt actually called Dixieland until it started to move north out of New Orleans.
Because New Orleans is on the Mississippi River, it was easy for musicians to travel north, bringing their
music with them.
Other cities that quickly became known for jazz included Kansas City, St. Louis, Chicago, and New York.
Young Americans in particular really liked this new style of music.
They loved to listen to it and dance to it.
Radios and record players were becoming more widely available, which also helped the popularity of jazz.
Almost anyone could listen to it on American airwaves, in dance halls, and even in their own homes.
Jazz truly was spreading across the land.
SEQUENCE 5
Song: Jazz Is On Its Way

22
CD Full Performance - track 3;
Accompaniment only - track 9;

Jazz Is On Its Way


Rehearsal extra - track 13

Teresa Jennings

arr. Paul Jennings
dixieland swing (=92; =184)

b j j
C+7
j j
Ab6 A0 E b/B b C7
&bb C . # A . # n n
n
drum
roll-off f . . . J
? b C
. . n . . . .
accent + fill

bb

5

b Fmi7 F9 B bsus B b7(13) Eb


& b b b
n.c.

ww
n b w
? bb j
time
fill

b n
n b

9 3 times

bb .
f
b n w
sing 1st + 3rd times

& .
J J
Mov - in up the riv - er, lis - ten to that sound.

..
*patsch 2nd time (all)

body
perc. /
3 times

j D Ejb
+dixieland soloists ad lib 2nd + 3rd times (tpt. melody)

b
& b b ..
( )
Eb
# n ww
winds 1st time



? bb
b ..



j

*patsch = slap thighs
optional: alter body perc. with different rhythms, call and response, or different actions such as stomps or claps

optional: let some kids pretend to play the solo instruments - pantomime or use props (2nd and/or 3rd times)

2011 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.


International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved 23

13 Jazz Is On Its Way
b
&bb n
w
Jazz is on its way.


group 1: group 2:

body
perc. /

b E0 Bb
& b b # n
b n www

? b j
bb
n

17

b
&bb n w
J J
Go - in to Chi - ca - go, go - in to New York.


(all)

body
perc. /

j A7 Bjb7
bbb
B b7 ( )

& n w
# n w
? bb
b



j



21

b
&bb n



w
Jazz is here to stay.


group 1: group 2:

body
perc. /
Fmi7
b b
Fmi7/B b B0 B b9 Eb
& b n ww
w
? bb j
b

24

25
Jazz Is On Its Way
b
&bb n w
J J
From Lou - i - si - an - a, spread - ing through the land.


(all)

body
perc. /

j D Ejb
f

bb
Eb ( )

& b # n ww

? b j
bb


29

b w
&bb
Hear that mu - sic play. From


group 1: group 2:

body
perc. /

b
E b7 B bmi7/E b E b7 Ab
& b b b ww
b w
? b
bb


33

b j j j j
&bb . # A . #
Kan - sas Cit - y to Saint Lou-ie, cross the U. S. A., oh!


(all)

body
perc. /

j
bbb
C+7
j j j
Ab A0 E b/B b C7
& . # A .
# n n
n J
. .
? bb
b n
. . n . . . .
25
Jazz Is On Its Way

37
____________|
3. _____
b .. w
1., 2.

&bb
(n.b.)

w w
Jazz is on its way! way! Oh!
body
/ ..
perc.

soloists into ad lib

b Fmi7 F9 B bsus B b7(13) Eb


.. w
B b7 Eb A0
& b b b
ww

ww # n www
n b w w
? b j .. n j
fill

b b n
n b
n

43

b w w
divisi, optional

&bb
w w
Jazz is on its way!

body
perc. /

b ww> b ww> >wA b


E b/B b E 0 Fmi7/B b B b9(13) Eb E b7/G
& b b b n b ww ww www
n . J . J . J


? bb
b
w

w w

bs


bbb
49

j
spoken

& J
Jazz is on its way! Yeah!


(patsch)

body
perc. /
B b7(13)E
b b n n # ww>w
B7/A
>
E b/B b E.0/B b
- . b B -b7
Fmi7/B ^b ^
& b # w b w . . j
. -J . >
. J> . J>
? bb # #

^

fill

b n w w w
w
26
Jazz Is On Its Way
Teresa Jennings
dixieland swing (=92; =184) arr. Paul Jennings


b
5
4 4
drum
roll-off &b b C


3 times

b
9
f
& b b .. n w
sing 1st + 3rd times

J J

Mov - in up the riv - er, lis - ten to that sound.

..
*patsch 2nd time (all)

body
perc.
/


b
13

&b b n
w
Jazz is on its way.


group 1: group 2:

body
perc.
/

*patsch = slap thighs

2011 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.


International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved 27
Jazz Is On Its Way

bb
17

& b n w
J J
Go - in to Chi - ca - go, go - in to New York.


(all)

body
perc.
/


b
21

&b b n



w
Jazz is here to stay.


group 1: group 2:

body
perc.
/


bbb
25

& n w
J J
From Lou - i - si - an - a, spread-ing through the land.


(all)

body
perc.
/
f


bb
29

& b w

Hear that mu - sic play. From


group 1: group 2:

body
perc.
/

28
Jazz Is On Its Way

b j j
33

b j j
& b . # A . #
Kan - sas Cit - y to Saint Lou-ie, cross the U. S. A., oh!


(all)

body
perc.
/


1., 2.__________________|
b
37

b
& b ..
w
Jazz is on its way!

body
/ ..
perc.


3. ________
b
divisi, optional
43

&b b w w
(n.b.)


way! Oh! Jazz is on its

body
/
perc.

b bb w w
& w w
way!

body
/
perc.


bbb
49

j

spoken

& J
Jazz is on its way! Yeah!


(patsch)

body
perc.
/

29
SEQUENCE 6
(optional showcase)
(Refer to Teachers Guide for information and suggestions.)

SEQUENCE 7
As jazz spread across the country and even around the world, it also continued
to evolve.
In the 1930s, a new kind of jazz emerged and the Big Band or Swing Era
became popular.
Swing music was energetic and fun to dance to.
Jazz bands grew to include four trumpets, four trombones, five woodwinds, and
a rhythm section.
They toured all over the United States and filled the radio airwaves with the
sounds of swing.
Yet another new style of jazz called bebop, or bop, appeared in the 1940s.
This was a very complex kind of jazz with fast melodies and improvisations.
Bebop showcased the technical skills of players and had a frantic feel to it.
Some people didnt care for it, while others thought it was genius.
Cool Jazz also appeared later in the 1940s, but it was very different than bebop.
Some think it was kind of a reaction against bebop.
The word cool meant the style was more understated, moody, or subdued.
In the 1950s and 60s, Latin-influenced jazz became particularly strong.
Latin dances such as the samba and the bossa nova were extremely popular in the United States.
Latin Jazz has its own unique sound.
It uses a wide variety of Latin percussion instruments, such as congas, to flavor the music.
It uses syncopation, but it does not necessarily swing.
Clearly, not all jazz music swings.
If you ever wondered what it means to swing or not to swing, let us show you.

SEQUENCE 8
Song: To Swing Or Not To Swing

30
CD Full Performance - track 4;
Accompaniment only - track 10

To Swing Or Not To Swing


Teresa Jennings
arr. Paul Jennings

swing (=144)

>
. b > b b >
Fmi6 Dmi7(5)
> >
G+7
b
n.c.

& c . b b b > b >


f accent

? c
and fill

.. b j j
b .
b b .
. .

5
f sing 1st time only

& b
To swing or not to swing; that is the
f sing 2nd time only
j j
& . w . w
This swings. This swings.
^ (swing)


instrumental interlude 2nd time

Cma7
j
B bma7 Cma7
jD bma7
&

w
b www
w n b b www
? ^ j j
fill

.... b w ..
..
b w
b w
b w
bass walk

2011 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.


International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved 31

9
To Swing Or Not To Swing
&

> >
thing, that is the thing. To
>
& j b b
. w
This swings. Ba da ba da ba da.
Dmi7(5G) +7 tpts.

Cma7 B bma7
& j b b
n.c. melody

b n n www > > >


w
? .. j

fill into latin

b w b b
.. b w b b

13 latin (straight 8ths, same tempo)

& w b w
swing or not to swing; that is the

&
(2nd time)


This does not swing. This does not
(latin)
Cma7 B bma7 Cma7 D bma7
& . ..
.. . b
? j j j j
b
. b . . b .
pedal in latin sections throughout


17

& w
.
thing, that is the thing.

&
b .
swing. This does not swing, cha cha cha.

Cma7 B bma7 Cma7 D bma7 Cma7


& . ... www
.. . b w
? j j j


fill into swing

b
. b . . w n
32 (bass)


21
swing To Swing Or Not To Swing

b b
sing both times

& b b
Jazz does - nt nec - es - sar - i - ly have to swing.
(swing)
Fmi7 B b7(9) E bma7 A bma7 )
& b b n
(+

b b b . b
b b .
b
?

fill into latin

b b b b
b b

j
25 latin as before
j b
& . b . b
G+7 ^
Some - times its true, swing is not the thing. To
(latin)

^
Dmi7(5)/F ^ Dmi7(5)
j
j
Dmi7(5) E b0 G Ab G
& .. b b .. b b
b .. n # .
n b
? ^ ^ j
fill into swing
^

.
j
b .

29 swing

& b
swing or not to swing; that is the
(swing)

j
Cma7 B bma7 Cma7 D bma7
& j
b
www

www
w n b b w
? .. j j

.. b w
fill into latin

b w
.. b w .. b w

33 latin as before ?______________________|
& w ..
w
thing, that is the thing.
>
.
(swing)
(latin)

Cma7 B bma7 Cma7 D bma7 Cma7


& . ... ... .
.. b b
. .
? j j ..
fill - accent +

j
fill

b
. b . . w 33
To Swing Or Not To Swing
___________
39

& w w

thing. That is the thing. That is the

Cma7 D bma7 Cma7 B bma7


& .. w ... ww
.. b ww . w
? j bw j
bw
. bw . bw

> > .
swing

> 43

& b b b
thing. Ba da ba da ba da da dot. To swing or
(swing)
A b 13

G+7
b b b
n.c.

& b wwww
> > > .
? b
b b b w
b b b . w

&

not to swing! Swing!

> ..
Dmi7(5)/G
> ..
G+7 (9) B bjma7
^ ^
b n ww
n.c.


& b .. b ... J
n.c.

w
> b
^
^ j
sxs.

^

^
? b j



fill

w
b w
> bass walk

34
To Swing Or Not To Swing
Teresa Jennings


arr. Paul Jennings
swing (=144)
f
3
& c ..
sing 1st time only


To

& b
swing or not to swing; that is the
f sing 2nd time only
j j
& . w

. w
This swings. This swings.

&

> >
thing, that is the thing. To

>
& .
j b b
w
This swings. Ba da ba da ba da.


13

& w
latin (straight 8ths, same tempo)

b w
swing or not to swing; that is the

&
(2nd time)


This does not swing. This does not

2011 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.


International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved 35
To Swing Or Not To Swing

17

& w
.
thing, that is the thing.

&
b .
swing. This does not swing, cha cha cha.


21 swing

b b
sing both times

& b b
Jazz does - nt nec - es - sar - i - ly have to swing.


j
25 latin as before

j b
& . b . b
Some - times its true, swing is not the thing. To


29 swing
& b
swing or not to swing; that is the


33 latin as before
?___________| _____
& w ..
w w
thing, that is the thing. thing. That is the


> >
swing
39
> .
& w
b b b

thing. That is the thing. Ba da ba da ba da da dot.


43

&

To swing or not to swing! Swing!
36
Jazz Is On Its Way
Movin up the river, listen to that sound. Jazz is on its way.
Goin to Chicago, goin to New York. Jazz is here to stay.
From Louisiana, spreading through the land. Hear that music play.
From Kansas City to Saint Louie, cross the U.S.A., oh! Jazz is on its way!
body percussion/dixieland interlude
Movin up the river, listen to that sound. Jazz is on its way.
Goin to Chicago, goin to New York. Jazz is here to stay.
From Louisiana, spreading through the land. Hear that music play.
From Kansas City to Saint Louie, cross the U.S.A., oh! Jazz is on its way!
Oh! Jazz is on its way!
Jazz is on its way!
spoken: Yeah!

To Swing Or Not To Swing


To swing or not to swing; that is the thing, that is the thing.
To swing or not to swing; that is the thing, that is the thing.
Jazz doesnt necessarily have to swing.
Sometimes its true, swing is not the thing.
To swing or not to swing;
that is the thing, that is the thing.
This swings. This swings.
This swings. Ba da ba da ba da.
This does not swing. This does not swing.
This does not swing, cha cha cha.
Jazz doesnt necessarily have to swing.
Sometimes its true, swing is not the thing.
To swing or not to swing;
that is the thing, that is the thing.
That is the thing. That is the thing.
Ba da ba da ba da da dot. To swing or not to swing!
Swing!

Ode To Jazzers
Armstrong, Basie, Parker, Blakey, Davis, Goodman, Ellington.
Henderson, Gillespie, Coltrane, Mingus, Hancock, Peterson.
Brubeck, Desmond, Smith, Marsalis, Holliday, Corea, Hines,
Kenton, Oliver, Fitzgerald, Morton, Waller, Brown, Bechet.
Hampton, Herman, Evans, Burton, Hawkins, Ellis, Tatum, Monk.
Farmer, Rich, Grappelli, Gordon, Moten, Coleman, Adderley.
Miller, Goodwin, Daniels, Jarrett, Rollins, Powell, Biederbecke,
Garner, Zawinul, McConnell, Dorsey, Baker, Mulligan.
Jazzers!

2011 Plank Road Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved


SEQUENCE 9
Of course, jazz continues to evolve and blend with other types of music.
Whether its jazz-rock, fusion, contemporary jazz or some other new style, jazz
is still growing and changing constantly.
Jazz is about personal expression, emotion, and communication.
But dont just take our word for it. Listen to what some of the jazz greats have
to say.

SEQUENCE 10
(Students enter one at a time with a sign on them that tells who they are. Each one is
a jazz musician. Add or change the names and what they say as you like.)

Louis: Hi. Im Louis Armstrong. I was one of the first well-known jazz
musicians. I played the trumpet and I was a singer with a distinctive voice.
Everybody called me Satchmo.

Duke: Im Duke Ellington. I was a jazz composer, pianist, and a big band
leader for more than 50 years. Many of my works have become jazz standards,
like It Dont Mean A Thing (If It Aint Got That Swing).

Miles: Im Miles Davis. I was also a jazz trumpeter, composer, and bandleader. I
was a real pioneer in jazz styles like bebop, cool jazz, and fusion.

John: Im John Coltrane. I played tenor and soprano saxophone and some still consider me one of the most
influential saxophonists in jazz history. My wife and son were also jazz musicians.

Ella: Im Ella Fitzgerald. I can make any song a jazz song when I sing it. I had a three octave vocal range, and
everybody called me the First Lady of Song.

Dizzy: Im Dizzy Gillespie. I was a trumpeter, a bandleader, and a composer who was big in the modern jazz
scene. But Im probably most famous for my bent trumpet and my puffed out cheeks.

Dave: Im Dave Brubeck. I play jazz piano, and Im a composer who has written a number of jazz standards.
Im probably best known for my use of unusual meters, rhythms, and tonalities.

Herbie: Im Herbie Hancock. Im also a jazz pianist, bandleader, and composer. I was one of the first jazzers to
embrace electronic music. Even today, Im still on the cutting edge of jazz.

Louis: There are a lot more jazzers than us.

Duke: We just happen to be some of the ones you may have heard about.

Miles: In the hundred plus years that jazz has been around, there have been thousands of great jazz musicians.

John: And there will no doubt be thousands more.

Ella: All have contributed to this unique American art form called jazz.

Dizzy: We cant name all of them for you, of course.

Dave: But we can pay tribute to many of them.

Herbie: Beethoven may not have been a jazzer himself, but we think he would have been fine with this
ode to jazzers!
38
SEQUENCE 11

Song: Ode To Jazzers

SEQUENCE 12

Reprise/Bow Music: Ode To Jazzers


(Refer to Teachers Guide for suggestions regarding bows/bow music.)

The End

2011 Plank Road Publishing, Inc. 39


A Includes web extras CD Full Performance - track 5;
Accompaniment only - track 11;
Bow Music - tracks 6 & 12;

Ode To Jazzers
Rehearsal extras - tracks 14, 15, & 16

Ludwig van Beethoven


joyously jazzy double-time feel (=126; =252)
adapted/arr. Teresa & Paul Jennings

> > b > ...


E b 6/B b
n.c.

> ..
B b 6/F Bb6

b .
n.c.
F6

.. ...
+gtr.

&b c J
J
>
> >
drums

?b c .. >
set-up

. .

. .
>
bs.

Csus C 6 Csus C7(9) 6


F^
n
b n
Csus C7
& b

> > > ^ >
? b . j
n w b

. w
bs.


+bs. tbn.,
b. sx.
6

&b
Arm - strong, Ba - sie, Par - ker, Bla - key, Da - vis, Good - man,
Hamp - ton, Her - man, Ev - ans, Bur - ton, Haw - kins, El - lis,

& b .
j
winds

n # n

piano, comp.

F6 Gmi7 F6 Csus F 6/C C7 Dmi Gmi7


&b
sim.


?b




A Rehearsal extras for this work can be found on the recording for this revue as well as under Downloads at MusicK8.com
2011 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.
40 International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved
Ode To Jazzers

j
10

& b .
El - ling - ton. Hen - der - son, Gil - les - pie, Col - trane,
Ta - tum, Monk. Farm - er, Rich, Grap - pell - i, Gor - don,

# n
& b . .
J

j
Csus C7 F6 Gmi7 F6 Csus A7
& b .
?
b #


14
j
&b .
Min - gus, Han - cock, Pe - ter - son. Bru - beck, Des - mond,
Mo - ten, Cole - man, Ad - der - ley. Mil - ler, Good - win,
. b J n
& b . j
n .

F6 F6 F 6/C
j
Dmi7 Bb Gmi7 Csus C7 Gmi7/C
&b .
? b n j j j


>
&b

Smith, Mar - sal - is, Hol - li - day, Co - re - a, Hines, Ken -
Dan - iels, Jar - rett, Rol - lins, Pow - ell, Bie - der - becke, Gar -

& b . n .
n # .
Gmi7/C Gmi7/C
Gmi7/C F 6/C F 6/C Gmi7/C F 6/C A7 A7(9) Dmi7 G7 Csus F6
&b
>
? b j j j j j # j j n j n j
J >
>
41

18
Ode To Jazzers
&b

ton, Ol - i - ver, Fitz - ger - ald, Mor - ton, Wal - ler,
ner, Za - win - ul, Mc - Con - nell, Dor - sey, Ba - ker,
j
& b b .
n

F6 Gmi7 F6 Csus F 6/C C7 F6 Gmi7 F6


&b
?b
b




?_______________| _______________
23
j .. . j
& b .
Brown, Be - chet. Mul - li - gan.
>
n.c.


& b b [ ] .. b

> >
>
n.c.
Gmi7/C F 6/C
> >
F6 F 6/C

Csus Csus F6
j j
n.c.

& b . .. .

>>
j j j
? ..
b

> > > > >
>>
&b
>
Jazz-ers!
C 13 B 13
> >j >
F6
^
Csus
>
C 13
. b n ##n b n > >
F6

n.c.
C7(9) Gmi7 C7(9)
b

.
n.c.

&

> >
> >

> ^j
^
>
j #
fill

? b . . n .
^ ^
. . n .
> > >>>>
> > v>

42
A Includes web extras

Ode To Jazzers
joyously jazzy double-time feel (=126; =252)
Ludwig van Beethoven

5
6 adapted/arr. Teresa & Paul Jennings

drums
set-up & b c ..
Arm - strong, Ba - sie, Par - ker, Bla - key,
Hamp - ton, Her - man, Ev - ans, Bur - ton,


j
10

&b .
Da - vis, Good - man, El - ling - ton. Hen - der - son, Gil - les - pie, Col - trane,
Haw - kins, El - lis, Ta - tum, Monk. Farm - er, Rich, Grap - pell - i, Gor - don,


j
14

&b .
Min - gus, Han - cock, Pe - ter - son. Bru - beck, Des - mond, Smith, Mar - sal - is,
Mo - ten, Cole - man, Ad - der - ley. Mil - ler, Good - win, Dan - iels, Jar - rett,

>18

&b

Hol - li - day, Co - re - a, Hines, Ken - ton, Ol - i - ver, Fitz - ger - ald,
Rol - lins, Pow - ell, Bie - der - becke, Gar - ner, Za - win - ul, Mc - Con - nell,

?_____________| _____________
j .. . j
&b .
Mor - ton, Wal - ler, Brown, Be - chet.
Dor - sey, Ba - ker, Mul - li - gan.


23
> >
&b
Jazz-ers!

A Rehearsal extras for this work can be found on the recording for this revue as well as under Downloads at MusicK8.com
2011 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.
International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved 43
Jazz
Teachers Guide
Jazz was written to be used as an all-school musical the previous section), though you could certainly use
revue. It has enough flexibility to use with one or two resources from anywhere that work for you.
classes or a whole school, as you prefer. We recommend Try to involve singers (solos, duets, choruses, etc.),
mostly middle to upper classes, though the second song instrumentalists (solo players or ensembles), poets,
(The Blues) may be fine for primary students, too. Some dancers, or even comedians. Include kids reading essays or
of the narration could also be used with younger students, giving brief talks. Add your own topical introductions to
though you may wish to adapt or add simpler lines. help tie everything together. Since the topic is jazz,
A revue is not plot specific. It is, rather, a collection consider using language that fits the mood. In fact, maybe
of works (usually songs or musical pieces) connected by have announcements done by students dressed in clich
some type of narration. In this case, the narration is jazz outfits, like dark beatnik berets and turtlenecks. Have
broken into lines for ease of assignment and reading. a second student accompany your announcer freestyle on
When rehearsing these lines with your performers, help congas or bongos playing a subtle rhythm. Do a search
them understand and read the lines to make the most of online for jazz lingo and pick a few juicy words to
them. Emphasis on certain words and syllables makes a punctuate the announcements. Be careful though. Some
difference in the result. words have meanings too mature for kids. Be sure to read
You can assign the narrations to as many or as few the definitions.
speakers as you like. For example, each line could be Here are some examples of how this might work with
spoken by a separate speaker. Or you could combine lines a mellow jazz hipster announcing:
for fewer speakers.
Add your own lines to lengthen the program or You cats are gonna dig this next chart. Ms. Chaconas
remove some to shorten it. You may also wish to add or fourth grade songsters really know how to cook when
change any of the songs we have provided. theyre Feelin Jazzy. (MUSIC K-8, Vol. 19, No. 4)
The hipsters in Mr. Thiemans percussion ensemble
Resources are gonna jam along for you now to the groove of a little
ditty we call He Was A Drummy Boy. (MUSIC K-8,
We have a number of published music resources Vol. 20, No. 5)
songs, recorder pieces, etc. available that might be nice
supplements to your program or jazz studies. To find these, Only cool cats can scat, man. Thats why Mrs.
just visit our web site at MusicK8.com and either check Ganieres cats are the coolest. Check out their scats in...
out our searchable Index or our interactive Index. If you Scat Cat. (MUSIC K-8, Vol. 3, No. 5 or Singles
would like a printed copy of the color version of this latter Reproducible Kit)
full Index and you dont already have one, give us a call
and well send you one for free. (1-800-437-0832). Daddy-o, youre gonna wig out when you hear these
We also have a reproducible Jazz Timeline in PDF solid chops. Mrs. Grohalls recorder class has been doin
form, as well as a fairly extensive set of Jazz Listening some crazy noodlin with Blue Magic Wombat.
Suggestions. These suggestions are from Paul, and while (MUSIC K-8, Vol. 13, No. 5 or Recorder Single)
they may be a bit biased by his listening tastes, there is a This gigs gonna get hot now when Mrs. Matelskis
lot of good music in there that you might enjoy, too. Just burnin 6th grade glee club gets down with Get Up, Get
go to the Downloads section under the Resources Up, Get Up! (MUSIC K-8, Vol. 17, No. 4)
drop-down menu on the home page. While you are there,
be sure to go to the Links page, also under Resources. Sets & Costumes
Go to the Jazz topic for a great collection of jazz links.
Given the nature of this revue, you dont really need
Optional Showcase a setting. You could add one anyway, just for
enhancement of the overall performance. For example,
In the script of the revue, Sequence 6 is labeled mount posters of well-known jazz artists on the walls. Or
optional showcase. This is the place in the revue where pictures of instruments popularly used with jazz like
you might want to bring in other songs or pertinent trumpets, string bass, piano, saxophones, etc. You might
performances to enhance the revue. (You could change even have an ongoing slideshow in the background. Turn
the point in your program during which you do this, if it on and off as needed. Add content or graphics specific
youd rather have it sooner or later. You could also mix it to the sequence or song you are doing at the time.
up doing some at one point, some at another.) You dont need costumes either, but if you want
A showcase can be about talent, demonstrating what something inexpensive for everyone, consider having a
your students have been learning for parents, other design contest (ask the art teacher to handle this) to
students, teachers, etc. It can also be strictly about the come up with a T-shirt graphic. Put the winner or
topic of the revue. Most likely, it will be a combination of winners on shirts that your students wear at the
both. As we mentioned, there are a number of resources performance. Sell some to the audience as a fund-raiser
that we have created over the years (see Resources in
44
for your music program. Or collect the funds and donate quick copy printer for mass reproduction. They are also
them to a charity, such as a local food pantry, that your available online at MusicK8.com as PDFs which you can
students choose together. download and print. There are also full color versions
Have costumes other than your T-shirts for some of online, in case you prefer to use them. (On our
the participants. The beatnik outfit mentioned is home page, go under Resources and select
one approach. Dixieland outfits are also neat Downloads to search for these.) Use
and colorful. There is no singular uniform recycled paper if possible. Customize them
for jazz musicians, but a little online research with your own information and have
might turn up some interesting ideas that you your students put the posters up all over
can adapt. the school and neighborhood.
If you do go online to get the
Helpful Hints color versions of these, you may
notice the listing for a Riverboat
However you plan to go about it, before you poster as well as the Jazz poster. This is an
begin, take time to completely familiarize option we provided when we originally
yourself with the entire revue. Jot down any published this revue in MUSIC K-8 magazine.
ideas or notes you have as you go. Create a list (or Its a fun-loving illustration full of cute, jazzy
several) based on categories. Include every detail big-eyed creatures on a colorful,
you can think of. Leave room for changes and old-fashioned riverboat. (Just like the
additions. Create a timeline for yourself. Go musicians who were movin up the river in
from the beginning planning sessions to the the song, Jazz Is On Its Way!) There are
juice and cookies reception afterwards. Check things off several options such as color or black and white (so your
as you go. (Save for future revues, shows, and students can color their own). Some have type and some
productions.) Get as much help as you can for the whole dont so you can adapt them any way you like for your
production! If the production is an all-school event, classroom or for your performance.
maybe teachers, other students, parents, and
administrators can pitch in, too. It doesnt hurt to ask. Be
sure to delegate freely! (Whos going to set up the chairs?
Publicity
Pick up the programs from the printer?, etc.) Call the local TV, radio, and newspapers, too. Invite
Rehearse from beginning to end as much as you can. them to come take pictures and videos of the rehearsals
Performers will be better prepared and more comfortable and performances. Tell your students to keep an eye out
with the performance. Have a prompter standing by to help for local coverage. Publicity will add to the professional
performers remember their lines (if they are memorizing quality of the experience.
them). Use conducting assistants if you have a large group. Ask someone to take photos or videos of the
Practice with your assistants and performers. production. Offer the option of purchasing copies to the
Emphasize enunciation and projection when singing students so they can have wonderful keepsakes of their
or speaking. Have students concentrate on singing or own. Posting videos on YouTube or other online forums
speaking to the last row in the audience. Let other is acceptable as long as proper publishing credits and
students tactfully critique projection and enunciation copyright information is also included. If you have
during rehearsals. Remind your performers to speak questions, contact us at permissions@musick8.com
slowly! Have them take deep breaths before they begin. Dont forget the cast party! Make it a performers
Also teach them not to upstage each other. only event, or invite the audience, too.
You have our permission to duplicate the script for
your students, so make as many copies as you need and let Lyric Pages and Student Parts
speakers highlight their own lines. You also have our All of the songs we have published for this revue
permission to make a safety back-up of your recording. include a lyric page. Lyrics can be copied as needed. If you
But please dont share with other teachers or schools. prefer to have your students read music, student parts are
included in this handbook. They may also be reproduced
Using Microphones as needed for your students. (This assumes you have
Microphones are often more of a problem than a help purchased this product. Please do not share any
in school productions, but sometimes they are necessary. component of this revue with other teachers, etc., as this
Here are some guidelines to share with your students for is illegal and sets a bad example for students.)
the effective use of microphones:
Before you begin speaking, stop completely The Recording
in front of the microphone. We offer excellent recordings of the music in this
Speak slowly! revue. Each song contains a full performance version and
Wait until youre done speaking to leave. an instrumental only version for maximum flexibility.
Wait for others to finish before you begin. There are also special extra tracks on the recording for two
of the tunes (Jazz Is On Its Way and Ode To Jazzers) to
Posters and Program Covers help with learning and/or enhancement of the revue.
Students may access the isolated parts for Ode To Jazzers
Reproduce the poster and program cover in this book as well at MusicK8.com (On our home page, go under
for your production. Photocopy them or take them to a Resources and select Downloads to search for these.)

45
About the Music in the Revue
Jazz element, such as rhythm. Have them do a slight knee
bend, placing their hands on their knees and bouncing
Born in America, oh so long ago, jazz is music lightly to the beat. As each element is performed, they
evryone should know. Or at least every American should can put their hands to their ears (just one ear at a time is
know! To help you teach this important musical subject to more visually effective) to demonstrate they are listening
your students, we have created this all-school revue called to that element.
Jazz. Of course, the subject is enormous and ongoing so For the final Jazz, they can punctuate it with jazz
theres no way we can cover all of it. But what we can do is hands as usual. But this time, have them put their hands
provide a basic overview of its origins which will hopefully straight up or out in front. If they go up, they can let their
lead to further investigation, discussion, and learning. Jazz hands fall from up to down with the musical fall.
is a fascinating topic, and the more opportunity you have
to dig into it, the more your students will learn just how The Blues
much influence it has had on the evolution of music as a Written as the second song for this revue, The Blues
whole since its inception and not just in America. talks about one of the most recognized forms in jazz music.
To kick it off, we have a sizzling opening song, also This is an excellent opportunity to discuss the notion of
called Jazz. You really should use our superb recording for blue notes as well as the concept of the blues in general,
this tune, if for no other reason than to share Pauls great where it came from, what it means, how it has evolved,
jazz arrangement with your students. In fact, Paul has done etc. FYI, blue notes are what give the blues and other forms
most of the arranging of Teresas songs for this revue of jazz its distinctive sound. The most common blue notes
because, as we have bragged many times in the past, he is a are the flatted third and the flatted fifth. So, for instance, if
world-class arranger whose specialty just happens to be jazz. a player is improvising on a C7 chord, while the normal
Lucky us! scale would be C to C with a Bb added, in a bluesy solo,
Right out of the gate, you could have your students the player could also play Eb and Gb.
listen to the instrumental tracks for the song and identify This particular blues is a 12-bar minor blues and it
various aspects of the tune. What instruments do they swings. Many rock n roll blues, for example, do not swing,
hear? While jazz can be performed by anything from a just to put it in perspective. But the roots of jazz are clearly
soloist to a small group to a large ensemble, in this case, we heard with the use of the blue notes and progressions.
used a typical jazz ensemble or big band. What Thats another excellent topic for discussion: the evolution
instrumentation would this include? (Ours includes the of jazz into other forms of music, such as rock n roll.
basics: saxes, trumpets, trombones, and rhythm.) Can they Specifically in the case of the blues, there are also
hear and identify each group of instruments? subgenres, like boogie woogie or country blues. You could
The song is in unison so that you can focus on the really get carried away delving into it! But for our purposes,
lyrics and style. It talks about what jazz is from the we will keep it simple.
standpoint of history. It also touches on some of the So that it stays within the range of young singers, the
elements that make it jazz, like swing and improvisation. song is unison and fairly easy. The lyrics talk about what
Any of these elements are great jumping off points for you the blues are. The common understanding that the blues
to go deeper, if you wish. expressively reflect emotional distress of some type, like
The best way to teach/learn the piece is to have feeling sad, bad, or unhappy, is something kids can relate
students listen to our singers while reading the music. to. Of course, we make light of it a bit with our song to
Discuss the nuances like the falls, the scoops, and the fact keep it from being too heavy or depressing.
that all eighth notes swing. Another notable thing about the recording for this
Movement tune is the alto sax solo that starts around measure 17. Our
soloist, Jim Farrelly, gives a good example of improvisation,
This song would be a natural for movement if you use or ad lib (same difference).
it in a performance setting. If you have dancers and room
to feature them, all the better. But if you are contained on Jazz Is On Its Way
risers, etc., you may need to keep movements simple and
somewhat basic. For example, every time they sing Jazz Theres a fanciful notion that during the great jazz
with the fall, have them make jazz hands (with arms bent migration of the early 1900s, most of the jazz musicians
rather than straight so they dont inadvertently hit each traveled north on the Mississippi River via riverboat (or
other in close quarters). Jazz hands are hands that are paddleboat, steamboat, showboat, as you prefer). You
opened, palm outward toward the audience, with splayed could almost see them all on deck playing their
fingers. You can embellish on this if you like by having instruments to a lilting Dixieland beat while chugging
them add a little shake to their hands when they do it. along up the river. While its a charming idea, its not
Other times in the song, they can do slight shoulder lifts exactly true. In fact, most of the migration was actually
to the beat, alternating left to right. Or you can have done on trains. Even so, its a lot of fun to romanticize,
them snap their fingers on beats two and four is and the trains did run alongside the river, so its a
appropriate for a swing tune. harmless exaggeration.
During the section at measure 51, they are listening The song Jazz Is On Its Way refers abstractly to the
to what the jazz ensemble is doing as they state each jazz migration. But its more about the movement of the
music itself into other parts of the country. Once again,
46
you could use it as a talking point in your jazz studies back into swing, and so on. The drummer on the
when discussing the expansion of jazz. A few cities are recording helps to lead the changes from one style to
mentioned in the song, but of course, there were others another, so be sure kids are listening for the set-ups.
that were significantly affected by this new kind of music. Another learning opportunity comes from actually
What were they? In what ways did jazz impact them? listening to the grooves to feel the difference between the
To exemplify the sounds of the era, the tune is two. The drums are critical, of course, but so is the entire
written in a lively two-beat Dixieland style. As the script rhythm section. In the swing segments, the bass is an
points out, Dixieland is another name for Traditional Jazz acoustic, or string, bass. It walks in an eighth note
or New Orleans Jazz. The style is immediately pattern. When the groove is Latin, the bass is an electric
recognizable however, whatever its called. A front line bass that plays syncopated chord roots. Auxiliary
of instruments playing the melody and improvising percussion joins in as well with congas, etc., for the Latin
around it usually incorporates trumpet, trombone, and parts. The guitarist plays an acoustic arch top for the swing
clarinet which is what we have also used. The rhythm sections, and jazz electric for the Latin sections, and so on.
section keeps a steady beat behind. For our arrangement, Use the instrumental accompaniment track (track 10) as a
we also added a jazz ensemble background, just for fun. listening guide for optimum analysis and learning impact.
The melody is unison throughout, so its not too Once again, the singers are all in unison throughout.
tricky to learn. It kind of comes off like a partner song in But you will also see that the second time at measure 5,
a way, voices partnering with the Dixieland soloists. But they sing the second line instead of the first one. The
to be sure each has their moment in the spotlight, the instrumental soli line on the recording is demonstrating
voices go first, then the soloists are featured the second the contrast between swinging and not swinging. (Tidbit
time. The third time, both groups perform together. See? for you: the line is actually mostly identical note-wise at
Like a partner song. both measure 5 and 13. Only the style changes.) The kids
During the second time, you have the option of are commenting musically on what they hear: This
adding patsches (thigh slaps) to keep the kids engaged swings or This does not swing.
and moving. The part on the music is a suggestion which
you can alter as you like. Its quite basic, but it does have Ode To Jazzers
a mini call and response that recurs for a touch of pizzazz. This isnt the first time weve borrowed this gem from
The third time through, the patsching is stopped, but good old Ludwig! This time though, weve crafted an
resumes toward the end of the song to bring it on home. uptempo, double-time jazz arrangement that is just a
One performance idea we have mentioned on the delight to listen to and sing. Odds are, your students are
music would be to have students pretend to play the solo already familiar with the melody to this, and again it is all
instruments. (Or really have players join in if you have in unison. So that part will hopefully be easy enough to
such an option in your situation.) Use real or fake teach and learn. The challenge will be learning all the
instruments as props. Dress performers in Dixieland garb names. We had a pretty tough time deciding who to
straw hats, vests, etc. include, as there are so many wonderful jazz musicians to
When we first produced this song, we thought it choose from. And as usual, you can alter any of these to
would make a really neat solo feature. As it so happened, include your own or your students favorite jazzers. To help
we had one of our alumni singers Melissa Schott with learn the names we used, and their pronunciations, we
us at the time, so we asked her to perform this as a solo. have actually isolated the verses and put them on the
What a treat! We have included the recording for you to recording as well as our website as a free download for
share with your students. If you like the idea, consider rehearsal purposes. (See details on page 45.)
using your own soloist. Let her listen to Melissa for ideas As you might expect, the arrangement of this piece is
on how to interpret the style. pretty smokin. We daresay we gave our recording
To Swing Or Not To Swing instrumentalists a good workout with it! You can and
should share the instrumental tracks with your students so
The point of this song is also its biggest challenge: they can hear how exciting the ensemble performance is.
knowing when to swing and when not to swing. Swing But in case youre interested in delving deeper, or just
can be a tough thing to define, especially to children. So enjoying it on your own, we have also isolated the bop
more often than not, its best to show by example. For wind line that floats throughout at breakneck pace (track
this, you really do need our recording. Our big band 16). It cooks. Can you dig it?
arrangement is the perfect way for young singers to hear
and perform a song with such subtle differences. Bow Music
When the song swings, the eighth notes have a Replay the finale (Ode To Jazzers) for bow music, if
triplet-based undercurrent, which gives them a bit of a you like. Let students take bows (rehearse them!) and
lilting effect. When it doesnt swing, the eighth notes are either fade the music out after they leave or let it
even, or straight, with a regular duple feeling. In the case continue. You could also let them join in singing at any
of this song, the sections that do not swing are done in a point in the song, though at this tempo, youll need to
Latin style. help them jump in. Another idea for bow music is to use
There are some terrific teachable moments in here! one of the other tunes instead, either instrumentally or
For one thing, students will need to keep a close eye on with kids singing, as you prefer. For example, if you had a
the style markings as they go back and forth on the music. mock Dixieland group for Jazz Is On Its Way, bring
The first style marking is swing at the beginning of the them back out and do the tune as a partial reprise, fading
song. At measure 13, it goes into Latin. At 21, it goes it out when bows are all done.

47
Jazz

A Swingin Celebration
Date: Time:

Place:
2011 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.
Instructions for using the reproducible poster and
program cover for Jazz
Photocopy or scan a master of the black and white poster and
program art provided here. Add the information for your
production. Include the name of your school, the date of the
program, and the time the program begins, as well as any other
pertinent information you wish to include. Cover, cut out, or
electronically eliminate this instruction box. Make multiple
copies of your masters on colored paper, or have students color
Jazz
and decorate plain white paper copies.
If you prefer to have color posters and/or program covers, you
can get electronic versions of these as well as versions with
a riverboat design on our web site. Just go to MusicK8.com
and select Downloads (under Resources on the home page)
to find them. Customize and print as many as you need for
your program.

A Swingin Celebration
presented by

2011 Plank Road Publishing, Inc.


COMPACT DISC
INFORMATION SHEET
If you purchased the CD with this revue, your CD arrived in a neat little
Safety-Sleeve Binder Page that is padded, and has a pocket in
the back for literature and two holes on the side so that it
will fit into a special binder.
This system is ideal for teachers faced with carrying
around many resources from room to room, school to
school, and all of it back home again. In each binder you
can store up to 15 CDs and their booklets or inserts in their
padded binder pages. This is the most compact, lightweight
way to store or travel with your CDs. We also make extra
binder pages available so that you can use them for other
favorite CDs. These binders are available in four colors: white, Binder
Binder textured black, blue velvet, and textured burgundy. You can actually see Page
color photos of these binders on our web site: MusicK8.com Also note that
the white binder features a clear outer cover into which you can insert a printed sheet. Here
are the details for ordering your binders and extra binder pages:
MP-CDBW White CD Binder (with 3 FREE extra CD Binder Pages)
MP-CDBB Black CD Binder (with 3 FREE extra CD Binder Pages)
MP-CDBU Blue CD Binder (with 3 FREE extra CD Binder Pages)
MP-CDBR Burgundy CD Binder (with 3 FREE extra CD Binder Pages)
MP-CDBP CD Binder Pages - 10 pack
These products are available from dealers who carry Plank Road products, or directly from us. To
order, visit the online store at our web site, or call us toll-free at

1-800-437-0832

Jazz FIRST -
Full Performance Photocopy this page to keep
1 Jazz ..................................................................................... 2:43

k
2 The Blues........................................................................... 2:26 your book intact.
3 Jazz Is On Its Way.............................................................. 2:33
4 To Swing Or Not To Swing .............................................. 2:19
5 Ode To Jazzers.................................................................... 1:33
6 Ode To Jazzers (Reprise/Bow Music) ................................ 1:33
Instrumental Performance Only
7 Jazz ..................................................................................... 2:43
THEN -
8 The Blues........................................................................... 2:26 Just cut out the box to
9 Jazz Is On Its Way.............................................................. 2:33 the left (on the copy)
10 To Swing Or Not To Swing............................................... 2:19
11 Ode To Jazzers.................................................................... 1:33 and slip it into the
12 Ode To Jazzers (Reprise/Bow Music)................................. 1:33 back of your
Rehearsal Extras Safety-SleeveTM

13 Jazz Is On Its Way solo version ........................................... 2:40 Binder Page.


14 Ode To Jazzers verse 1 .......................................................... :38
15 Ode To Jazzers verse 2 .......................................................... :37
16 Ode To Jazzers winds mix ................................................... 1:39
LET US HEAR FROM YOU!
We hope that you and your students are enjoying and learning from JAZZ and that
it will provide you with years of good use. In order for us to better serve your needs
in the future, we ask you to let us know more about how you used this musical revue
and how well it suited your needs. It will be most helpful to wait until after you have
performed it, then return this questionnaire to...
Teresa Jennings
PLANK ROAD PUBLISHING, INC.
P. O. Box 26627
Wauwatosa, WI 53226

NAME ______________________________________________________________________

SCHOOL _____________________________________________________________________

ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________________

CITY ____________________________________ STATE _________ ZIP _________________

Are you a music specialist?


Are you a subscriber to MUSIC K-8 magazine?

With which grades did you use this musical revue?


What were your (and your students) favorite songs?

What parts of the revue did not work well for you?

What improvements would you like to see in future musicals or revues?

What other types of musicals and other resources would you like to see in the future?

Thanks again for buying JAZZ!


P. S. - When you send in this survey, we would love to see a copy of your program and/or any
pictures or videos made from your production.
...Please photocopy this survey to preserve your Teachers Handbook...
PLANK ROAD PUBLISHING, INC. P. O. Box 26627 Wauwatosa, WI 53226 1-800-437-0832 Fax: 1-888-272-0212 MusicK8.com