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Melanie Peck

Grade 10 Academic History Time: 75 minutes


Strand: Canada 1929-1945 Date: September 28th,
2016
Topic: Japanese Internment

Overall Expectations:

C1- describe some key social, economic, and political events, trends,
and developments between 1929-1945, and assess their impact on
different groups in Canada

C2- analyze some key interactions within and between communities in


Canada, and between Canada and the international community, from
1929-1945, with a focus on key issues that affected these interactions
and changes that resulted from them

Specific Expectations:

C1.4- describe the main causes of some key political developments


and/or government policies in Canada during this period

C2.1- analyze some significant ways in which Canadians cooperated


and/or came into conflict with each other during this period

Learning Goals:
1. Students will be able to describe the political and social events
that led to the internment of Japanese-Canadians during WWII
2. Students will be able to describe what life in the internment
camps were like for Japanese-Canadians

**Learning Goals will be displayed on the whiteboard/chalkboard at the


front of the room doe students to see

Materials:
Projector/Laptop
Chart paper
Markers

Introduction: Life Before The Attack on Pearl Harbor (5


Minutes)

Life Before Pearl Harbor:


Beginning in the late 1800s young Japanese men began
immigrating to Canada to seek new opportunities and a better
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life (Mostly in B.C.- show image of Map of Canada)


Many worked on fishing boats and farms while others worked in
the mines, sawmills, and pulp mills
They did NOT receive a warm welcome
Japanese Canadians were discriminated against within Canada
- Mobs went through Japanese sections of cities to protest their
presence
- People lobbied the gov. to stop Asian immigration
- People of Asian ethnicity were denied the right to vote,
excluded from certain professions (ex. civil service and
teaching), received a lower wage then their white counter
parts
Since they were excluded from Canadian society they created
their own community- social, economic, and religious institutions
- Ex. Christina churches & Buddhist temples, Japanese language
schools, community halls, hospital, etc.

Attack on Pearl Harbor: Picture Slide Show (5 Minutes)


**Thumbs up Thumbs Down- Thumbs Up if you can explain what the
attack on Pearl Harbor was, and Thumbs down if you are unsure

On December 7, 1941 the American naval base Pearl Harbor, was


attacked by the Japanese
Within days of the attack the Canadian Pacific Railways fired all
Japanese workers as did many other industries, Japanese
fishermen in B.C. were not permitted to leave port, and 1200
fishing boats were seized by the Canadian navy
On February 25, 1942 (12 weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor)
Canada implemented the War Measures Act to remove all
Japanese Canadians residing within 160km of the Pacific Coast-
gave the reason of national security

Activity #1: Anti-Japanese Propaganda (10 Minutes per Picture)


Show a picture of an anti-Japanese poster to the class
Give students time to examine it
Ask them what they think it means? Who is the audience? How
does it portray Japanese-Canadians?
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Points to Hit On:


Audience was white Canadian society
1st Image- dehumanizes Japanese-Canadians because they are in
the image of a worm, portrays them as enemy spies (mouth open
eyes shut comment), over exaggerated features (racist imagery)
2nd Image- bring feeling of men having to protect their women
from an enemy, harsh features (scary looking compared to the
Canadian soldiers at the bottom of the poster), purpose is to
promote war bonds to help defeat Japan

Middle: Japanese Internment (1 Minutes)

20 881 men, women, and children of Japanese ancestry were


removed from their homes and moved to internment camps
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Activity #2: First Hand Accounts (20 Group Work, 3 Minute


Presentations)
Split class into groups of 4-5 students (6 groups) Number off
Students
Each group will receive a primary source (quote or photo) that
describes/displays what life was like in internment camps
The groups will then analyze the primary documents and pull out
3 important pieces of information
Each group will then share the information they gathered and
together the class will make a list of what life was like in the
Japanese internment camps

Points to Hit On:


Families were separated- men were separated from women and
children
Housing conditions- no insulation, overcrowded, no electricity, no
running water, etc.
Isolation- men were sent to work camps- not given fair wages,
people didnt want them in their towns and women sent to ghost
towns in the interior
Movements were restricted- not allowed to leave
Mail was censored

Conclusion: (6 Minutes)
Have students complete a one sentence summary about
Japanese internment- there answer should answer the who, what,
where, when, and why
Students will hand these in at the end of class as a formative
assessment tool

Reflection:

Exit Card:

One Sentence Summary (Answer the who, what,


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where, when, how, and why about Japanese


Internment)

Japanese Internment Primary Sources


Group # 1
Question to Consider:
1. How were families treated?
2. Did interned Japanese people have the same rights as
other Canadians?
3. Describe what the camps were like (ex. food, housing,
etc.)

Aside from those days when the haiku club met, many
indistinguishable days now followed. It was not until an afternoon in
late October that it fell to my lot to take part in what for me was a
novel experience. The assignment was to cut wood for the kitchen
stoves. Five guards led ten of us out through the camp gates. It was
the first time I had been allowed out of the compound since my arrival
at the end of August. Walking in a troop of men bearing axes and saws,
I was reminded of happier days in the road camps at Yellowhead and
Descoigne. There too we had not been free to leave, but I had since
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realized how much I had undervalued the semblance of freedom


afforded by the absence of a fence.- Takeo Ujo Nakano

Image of a Kindergarten Class at Lemon Creek Internment

Camp
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Japanese Internment Primary Sources


Group # 2
Question to Consider:
1. How were families treated?
2. Did interned Japanese people have the same rights as
other Canadians?
3. Describe what the camps were like (ex. food, housing,
etc.)

Toshimi [his daughter] had never yet experienced a fatherless


Christmas. How neglected she would surely feel. My immediate desire
was to send her a toy, but I quickly realized that this was impossible
from within the camp. I then wanted to write her a long letter
explaining why father could not send her a present. But even with
letters we were not at complete liberty. I spent the better part of a day
brooding upon the frustration of my situation. That night, toward
midnight, fierce winter blasts hit the roofs and sides of our dormitory
buildings. Once wakened by the sound, I could not stop thinking of

Yukie and Toshimi [his family].- Takeo Ujo Nakano


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Housing at the Tashme Internment Camp

Japanese Internment Primary Sources


Group # 3
Question to Consider:
1. How were families treated?
2. Did interned Japanese people have the same rights as
other Canadians?
3. Describe what the camps were like (ex. food, housing,
etc.)
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I
welcomed 1943
with a silent
prayer to the
first sunrise
of the year. And I
prayed for the
safety of my
beloved fatherland and of my parents and other kin, from
whom I had had no communication since Pearl Harbor.-
Takeo Ujo Nakano
Japanese Internment Primary Sources
Group # 4
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Question to Consider:
1. How were families treated?
2. Did interned Japanese people have the same rights as
other Canadians?
3. Describe what the camps were like (ex. food, housing,
etc.)

Hundreds of women and children were squeezed into the


livestock building. Each family separated from the next by a
flimsy piece of cloth hung from the upper deck of double
decker steel bunks. The walls between the rows of steel
bunks were only five feet high, their normal use being to
tether animals. Yukiharu Misuyabu

Housing at the Tashme Internment Camp

Japanese Internment Primary Sources


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Group # 5
Question to Consider:
1. How were families treated?
2. Did interned Japanese people have the same rights as
other Canadians?
3. Describe what the camps were like (ex. food, housing,
etc.)

No person of Japanese origin in any work camp, village,


town, municipality, or other area to and in which they have
been duly authorized or directed to proceed shall leave
such place without the authority of the commission or the
officially of the R.C.M. Police. Official Declaration
regarding Japanese Canadians Movement

Kindergarten Class at Lemon Creek Internment Camp


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Japanese Internment Primary Sources


Group # 6
Question to Consider:
1. How were families treated?
2. Did interned Japanese people have the same rights as
other Canadians?
3. Describe what the camps were like (ex. food, housing,
etc.)

The walls of our shack were one layer of thin wooden board covered
with two=ply paper sandwiching a flimsy layer or tar. There was no
ceiling below the roof. In the winter, moisture condensed on the inside
of the cold walls and turned to ice. Yukiharu Misuyabu
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