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Lesson Plan

8 Grade Civics: Protecting the Rights of the Accused


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SOLs:
CE.10 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the judicial systems established by the
Constitution of Virginia and the Constitution of the United States by
d) explaining how due process protections seek to ensure justice.
Essential Questions:
How do the due process protections ensure justice?
Essential Understanding/Knowledge:
The right to due process of law is outlined in the 5th and 14th Amendments to the Constitution of
the United States of America.
Due process of law is the constitutional protection against unfair governmental actions and laws
Due process protections:
The 5th Amendment prohibits the national government from acting in an unfair manner
The 14th Amendment prohibits state and local governments from acting in an unfair manner
The Supreme Court has extended the guarantees of the Bill of Rights, based upon the due
process clause.
Learning Targets:
I can explain the significance of landmark Supreme Court cases.
I can explain the role of the Bill of Rights in protecting the rights of the accused.
I can explain how due process protections seek to ensure equal treatment under the law.
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Morning Procedures:
1. Greet students at the door and ask them to go directly to their seats to start working on the
daily review question. Todays question: What is the difference between a civil and a
criminal case? What is the difference between a felony and a mistometer? Provide an
example of each.
2. Go over the warm up question together as a class, pull sticks with the student names on it
to ensure that all students are prepared to answer. Resolve any questions that arise.
3. Go over the worksheet they had for homework the previous night. Pull sticks with the
student names on it to determine who answers. Resolve any questions that arise.
4. Pull up Powerpoint that outlines the importance of the Rights of the Accused and pass out
a guided notes sheet for the students to follow along with and write down notes as
needed.
5. After going over all of the rights that an accused person has in a criminal trial, show the
PBS video clip about the Miranda trial which led to the creation of Miranda rights. On
the provided note sheet will be some video comprehension questions for them to answer
afterwards.
6. Go over each of the Miranda rights one by one and have the students discuss its
importance and then share out to the whole class.
7. After discussing the implications of the trial, break the students into groups of 3-4 for the
next activity. Different clips will be shown from famous movies and TV shows detailing
a situation when one or more of the rights of the accused are not provided. After the clip
is shown, the students will work together to figure out which of the rights was not
provided and then write out an explanation as to why that particular right is important.
This will go on for about five short clips until the activity is done.
8. Wrap up with questions. Open up the floor to the students to clarify anything that is being
misunderstood.
9. Exit ticket: check the students understanding of the Rights of the Accused by passing out
a half sheet of paper with questions about the U.S vs. Miranda trial and the Rights of the
Accused.

10. After the students leave, read over the exit tickets and see which questions they are
missing. Make these questions the warm up for the following class to reinforce the
information.

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