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TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

CHARACTER ANALYSIS
In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird the narrator was Scout Finch in which

there was a huge changes took place like for example she was very rude to

people and she was very short tempered girl in starting of the of the story

and then as she grows, she turns into a young girl who is still rude, hot-

headed, and quick-tempered, but knows how to restrain her anger and not

resort to physical violence. And the author of this book Harper Lee mostly

uses figurative language to characterize Scout with analogy in which she

compares similarities to create a huge meaning.

She uses analogy is when Scout and Miss Maudie were discussing with

Atticus in chapter 5 and scout says Atticus don't ever do anything to

Jem and me in the house that he don't do in the yard. Here, the

similar comparison between the closed, private doors of a house and an

open, public place like a yard. This way Atticus behaves in both helps to

explain his admirable character.

When Scouts calls Boo Radley a malevolent phantom in the chapter 1

and this is metaphor that to imply and compare with an evil figure living in a

haunted house. This also brings a creepy atmosphere to the readers for the

setting. This imagination of ghost thing is again visited when Jem asks

Atticus if Mr. Radley keeps Boo chained to the bed and Atticus responds by

saying there were other ways of making people into ghosts. This

puzzling answer still brings the creepy mood to the reader. And this thing
moves along as Scout discusses about the strange Radley and her haunted

house.

And in chapter ten during the mad dog scene. Scout mentions that the

mockingbirds are silent, in which it suggests that they sense danger and

don't have a happy song to sing at the moment. Also mentioning that

mockingbird is representative to the story as a whole because it is the theme

that carries with it. It's also an allusion to danger. Scout describes the danger

that surrounds the dog as follows: He seemed devoted to one course and

motivated by an invisible force that was inching him toward us as a reader.

We could see him shiver like a horse shedding flies; his jaw opened

and shut; he was a list, but he was being pulled step by step toward

us. This phrase shows a comparing simile the sick dog's body behaving like

that of a horse when its muscles shake to get flies off it.

When Mr. Underwood writes a newspaper article about how Tom Robinson

died in chapter 25. Scout summarizes by saying that Mr. Underwood

simply figured it was a sin to kill cripples, be they standing, sitting,

or escaping. He likened Tom's death to the senseless slaughter of

songbirds by hunters and children". Like Atticus taught his children

about not to kill mockingbird because they are no harm to anyone, and Mr.

Underwood carries the same theme further and applies it to Tom Robinsons

death. But not only is a simile used in this, but the image of Tom Robinsons
disability united with song birds is symbolic and it ties up to the major lesson

of the story.

In conclusion, the author uses various analogies to characterize scout and

uses various literary devices to show scout as a narrator and as a character

in this story To kill A Mockingbird.

In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird the narrator was Scout Finch in which there was a huge changes took place
like for example she was very rude to people and she was very short tempered girl in starting of the of the story
and then as she grows, she turns into a young girl who is still rude, hot-headed, and quick-tempered, but knows
how to restrain her anger and not resort to physical violence. And the author of this book Harper Lee mostly
uses figurative language to characterize Scout with analogy in which she compares similarities to create a huge
meaning. She uses analogy is when Scout and Miss Maudie were discussing with Atticus in chapter 5 and scout
says Atticus doesnt ever do anything to Jem and me in the house that he don't do in the yard". Here, the
similar comparison between the closed, private doors of a house and an open, public place like a yard. This way
Atticus behaves in both helps to explain his admirable character. When Scouts calls Boo Radley a malevolent
phantom in the chapter 1 and this is metaphor that to imply and compare with an evil figure living in a
haunted house. This also brings a creepy atmosphere to the readers for the setting. This imagination of ghost
thing is again visited when Jem asks Atticus if Mr. Radley keeps Boo chained to the bed and Atticus responds by
saying there were other ways of making people into ghosts. This puzzling answer still brings the creepy mood
to the reader. And this thing moves along as Scout discusses about the strange Radley and her haunted house.
And in chapter ten during the mad dog scene. Scout mentions that the mockingbirds are silent, in which it
suggests that they sense danger and don't have a happy song to sing at the moment. Also mentioning that
mockingbird is representative to the story as a whole because it is the theme that carries with it. It's also an
allusion to danger. Scout describes the danger that surrounds the dog as follows: He seemed devoted to one
course and motivated by an invisible force that was inching him toward us as a reader. We could see him
shiver like a horse shedding flies; his jaw opened and shut; he was a list, but he was being pulled step by step
toward us. This phrase shows a comparing simile the sick dog's body behaving like that of a horse when its
muscles shake to get flies off it. When Mr. Underwood writes a newspaper article about how Tom Robinson
died in chapter 25. Scout summarizes by saying that Mr. Underwood simply figured it was a sin to kill cripples,
be they standing, sitting, or escaping. He likened Tom's death to the senseless slaughter of songbirds by hunters
and children". Like Atticus taught his children about not to kill mockingbird because they are no harm to
anyone, and Mr. Underwood carries the same theme further and applies it to Tom Robinsons death. But not
only is a simile used in this, but the image of Tom Robinsons disability united with song birds is symbolic and
it ties up to the major lesson of the story. In conclusion, the author uses various analogies to characterize scout
and uses various literary devices to show scout as a narrator and as a character in this story To kill A
Mockingbird.