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Week 1 Quiz Solutions

1 point
In the code fragment below, first and last are integer values and composite(x) is a function that returns true if x is not a prime number and false otherwise.

i := 0; j := 0; k := 0;
for (m := last; m >= first; m := m-1){
k := k + m;
if (composite(m)){
i := i + m;
}else{
j := j + m;
}
}

At the end of the loop:

k < i+j

k = i+j

k > i+j

The relationship between i, j and k depends on the values of first and last

Correct answer: (b) k = i+j


In each iteration, k is incremented and exactly one of i or j is incremented. This is independent of the values of first and last.

1 point
How many times is the comparison i >= n performed in the following program?

int i = 200, n = 110;


main(){
while (i >= n){
i = i-1;
n = n+1;
}
}

45

46

47

90

Correct answer: (c) 47


After j iterations, i is 200-j, n is 110+j. Solve 200 - j = 110 + j to get j = 45. Add one test each for the initial iteration (j = 0) and the final exit check (j = 46).

1 point
An algorithm has two phases. The first phase, initialization, takes time O(n2 log n). The second phase, which is the main computation, takes time O(n3). What is the most
accurate description of the complexity of the overall algorithm?

O(n2 log n)

O(n3)

O(n3 log n)

O(n3 + log n)
Correct answer: (b) O(n3)
The least efficient phase is O(n3).

1 point
Let f(n) = 560n4 + 3651n3 + 3n+107 and g(n) = 3n4 + 15n2. Which of the following is true?

f(n) is O(g(n)), but g(n) is not O(f(n))

g(n) is O(f(n)), but f(n) is not O(g(n))

f(n) is not O(g(n)) and g(n) is not O(f(n))

f(n) is O(g(n)) and g(n) is O(f(n))

Correct answer: (d) f(n) is O(g(n)) and g(n) is O(f(n))


Both functions are O(n4) and are hence of the same order.

1 point
if T(n) = n2 n then

T(n) = O(n2)

T(n) = O(n2 log n)

T(n) = O(n3)

None of the above

Correct answer: (c) T(n) = O(n3)


n is O(n) but is not O(log n), so O(n 3) is the best option.

Week 2 Quiz Solutions


1 point
Assume that a CPU can process 108 operations per second. Suppose you have to sort an array with 10 6 elements. Which of the following is true?

Selection sort will always take more than 2.5 hours while merge sort will always take less than 1 second.

Insertion sort will always take more than 2.5 hours while quicksort will always take less than 1 second

Insertion sort could take more than 2.5 hours while merge sort will always take less than 1 second.

Selection sort could take more than 2.5 hours while quicksort will always take less than 1 second.

Correct Answer: (c) Insertion sort could take more than 2.5 hours while merge sort will always take less than 1 second.
O(n2) is an upper bound for insertion sort and selection sort, not a lower bound. O(n log n) is an upper bound for merge sort, but not for quicksort.

1 point
Suppose our aim is to sort an array in ascending order. Which of the following statements is true?

Input in ascending order is worst case for both selection sort and insertion sort.

Input in descending order is worst case for both selection sort and insertion sort.

Input in ascending order is worst case for insertion sort but not for selection sort.

Input in descending order is worst case for selection sort but not for insertion sort.

Correct Answer: (b) Input in descending order is worst case for both selection sort and insertion sort.
All inputs are worst case for selection sort. Descending order is worst case for insertion sort.

1 point
Suppose we want to sort an array in ascending order and we implement quicksort so that we always choose the last element in the array as the pivot element. Assume that the
input is a permutation of {1, 2, , n}. Which of the following would definitely be a worst case permutation of this input for this implementation of quicksort?
{1, 2,, n} with all even numbers in random order followed by all odd numbers in random order.

{1, 2, . . . , n} in ascending order.

{1,2,...,n} in some random order.

{1, 2, . . . , n} with all odd numbers in ascending order followed by all even numbers in random order.

Correct Answer: (b) {1, 2, , n} in ascending order.


If the input sorted in ascending order, the pivot will split the input at each stage into one segment of size n1 and one empty segment.

1 point
Which of the following statements is not true?

For every fixed strategy to choose a pivot for quicksort, we can construct a worst case input that requires time O(n 2).

If we randomly choose a pivot element each time, quicksort will always terminate in time O(n log n).

If we could find the median in time O(n), quicksort would have worst case complexity O(n log n).

Quicksort and merge sort are both examples of divide and conquer algorithms.

Correct Answer: (b) If we randomly choose a pivot element each time, quicksort will always terminate in time O(n log n).
(a) We can always reverse engineer a worst case input for a fixed pivot strategy. (c) If we can find the median, we would split the array into two equal halves each time, like
merge sort, so the worst case would be O(n log n). (d) Yes, they are both divide and conquer algorithms.

1 point
We have a list of pairs [("Tariq",71),("Brinda",85),("Shweta",71),("Sunita",85),("Salma",72),("Uday",60)], where each pair consists of a student's name and his/her marks in a
course. We sort these pairs in ascending order of marks. Which of the folllowing corresponds to a stable sort of this input?

[("Uday",60),("Tariq",71),("Shweta",71),("Salma",72),("Brinda",85),("Sunita",85)]

[("Brinda",85),("Salma",72),("Shweta",71),("Sunita",85)("Tariq",71),("Uday",60)]

[("Uday",60),("Shweta",71),("Tariq",71),("Salma",72),("Brinda",85),("Sunita",85)]

[("Uday",60),("Tariq",71),("Shweta",71),("Salma",72),("Sunita",85),("Brinda",85)]

Correct Answer: (a) [("Uday",60),("Tariq",71),("Shweta",71),("Salma",72),("Brinda",85),("Sunita",85)].


(b) Not sorted by second coordinate. (c) ("Tariq",71) should come before ("Shweta",71). (d) "Brinda",85) should come before ("Sunita",85)

Week 3 Quiz Solutions


1 point
An undirected graph G has 128 nodes and there is a path from every vertex to every other vertex in G. Suppose v 1 and v2 are two vertices in G. Then, what can we say about
the shortest path from v1 to v2?

The path has at most 2 edges.

The path has at most 63 edges.

The path has at most 127 edges.

None of the above.

Correct Answer: (c) The path has at most 127 edges.


With n vertices, a path cannot be longer than n1 edges without containing a loop.

1 point
An undirected graph G has 96 edges. The degree of a vertex v, deg(v), is the number of edges connected to v. Suppose V = {v 1,v2,...,v30}. What is the value of deg(v1)+ deg(v2) +
+ deg(v30)?

96
192

288

384

Correct Answer: (b) 192


The sum of the degrees counts each edge twice, once from each end, so the sum is 2 96 = 192.

1 point
Which of the following is not true of depth-first search (DFS) starting at a vertex v?

DFS identifies all vertices reachable from v.

Using an adjacency list instead of an adjacency matrix can improve the worst case complexity.

DFS will identify the shortest paths from v in any graph without edge weights.

DFS numbering can be used to identify cycles in the graph.

Correct Answer: (c) DFS will identify the shortest paths from v in any graph without edge weights.
DFS does not identify shortest paths.

1 point
How many topological orderings does the following directed acyclic graph have?

12

16

20

Correct Answer: (b) 12.


Nodes {2,3,4,5} admit 6 linearizations and nodes {7,8} admit 2 linearizations, so 6 2 = 12 in all.

1 point
Lavanya has to complete 12 courses for her degree. There are six compulsory courses: Basic and Advanced Mathematics, Basic and Advanced Physics and Basic
and Advanced Electronics. She also has to complete six Optional Courses. Each course takes one semester to complete. There are some constraints because of
prerequisites.

For Mathematics, Physics and Electronics, the Basic course must be completed before starting the Advanced course.

Advanced Physics must be completed before starting Basic Electronics.

Advanced Mathematics must be completed before starting Advanced Physics.

The Optional Courses can be done in any order, but no more than two Optional Courses can be taken in a semester.

Given these constraints, what is the minimum number of semesters that Lavanya needs to complete her course requirements.

4
5

Correct Answer: (c) 5


The courses can be scheduled as follows: [BM, {AM,BP}, AP, BE, AE]/

Week 4 Quiz Solutions


1 point
Consider the following fragment of code for a graph algorithm on an undirected graph.
for each vertex i in V
mark i as visited
for each edge (j,i) pointing into i
update weight(j,i) to weight(j,i) + k
Which of the following is the most accurate description of the complexity of this fragment. (Recall that n is the number of vertices, m is the number of edges.)

O(n)

O(nm)

O(n+m)

O(m)

Correct Answer: (c) O(n+m)


Each edge is examined twice across all n iterations, so overall O(n+m)

1 point
Consider the following strategy to solve the single source shortest path problem with edge weights from source s.
1. Replace each edge with weight w by w edges of weight 1 connected by new intermediate nodes
2. Run BFS(s) on the modified graph to find the shortest path to each of the original vertices in the graph.

Which of the following statements is correct?

This strategy will solve the problem correctly but is not as efficient as Dijkstra's algorithm.

This strategy will solve the problem correctly and is as efficient as Dijkstra's algorithm.s st

This strategy will not solve the problem correctly.

This strategy will only work if the graph is acyclic.

Correct Answer: (a) This strategy will solve the problem correctly but is not as efficient as Dijkstra's algorithm.
The strategy is sound, but the size of the graph will be proportional to the edge weights in the original graph, so the complexity will increase.

1 point
Consider the following strategy to convert a graph with negative edge weights to one that does not have negative edge weights. Let the maximum magnitude negative edge
weight in the graph be -k. Then, for each edge in the graph with weight w, update the weight to w+k+1. Consider the following claim:
To solve the shortest path problem in the original graph, we can run Dijkstra's algorithm on the modified graph and subtract the added weights to get the original
distances.

Which of the following is not correct.

The claim is not true in general.

The claim is true for all graphs.

The claim is true for connected acyclic graphs.

The claim is not true in general for connected graphs with cycles.

Correct Answer: (b) The claim is true for all graphs.


Adding a weight to each edge increases the weight of a path proportional to the number of edges, so "long" shortest paths get penalized. In a tree (connected acyclic graph),
there is only one path between any pair of nodes, so the shortest path is invariant.
1 point
Consider the following algorithm on a graph with edge weights.
Sort the edges as [e1,e2,...,em] in decreasing order of cost.

Start with the original graph. Consider each edge ej. If this edge is part of a cycle delete it.

Which of the following is not true.

After processing all m edges, the resulting graph is connected.

What remains at the end is a minimum cost spanning tree.

Exactly m-n+1 edges will be deleted.

At most n-1 edges will be deleted.

Correct Answer: (d) At most n-1 edges will be deleted.


This is reverse version of Kruskal's algorithm. Any edge that is part of a cycle can be deleted without disconnecting the graph. In the end we get a minimum cost spanning tree
with exactly n-1 edges.

1 point
Suppose we have a graph with negative edge weights. We take the largest magnitude negative edge weight -k and reset each edge weight w to w+k+1. Which of the following is
true?

Kruskal's algorithm will identify the same spanning tree on the new graph as on the old graph.

Minimum cost spanning trees in the original graph will not correspond to minimum cost spanning trees in the new graph.

Prim's algorithm will not work on the original graph but will work on the modified graph.

There are more minimum cost spanning trees in the modified graph than in the original graph.

Correct Answer: (a) Kruskal's algorithm will identify the same spanning tree on the new graph as on the old graph.
The ascending order of edge weights is unchanged if each edge weight is increased by k+1, so Kruskal's algorithm runs in exactly same way as before and produces the same
tree. In general, since every spanning tree has exactly n-1 edges, the increase in weight uniformly affects all spanning trees, so the minimum cost spanning trees are
unchanged. Prim's algorithm is not affected by negative weights.

Week 5 Quiz Solutions


1 point
Suppose we want to extend the union-find data structure to support the operation Reset(c), which takes as input the name of a component c and then breaks up c into singleton
components, like MakeUnionFind(). For instance if c = 3 and c currently consists of {1,3,7}, then Reset(c) will produce three components called 1, 3 and 7 consisting of {1}, {3}
and {7}, respectively.

Which of the following is correct about the cost of adding Reset(c) to the array and pointer implementations of union-find discussed in the lecture?

Array representation: O(n), Pointer representation: O(n)

Array representation: O(size(c)), Pointer representation: O(n)

Array representation: O(n), Pointer representation: O(size(c))

Array representation: O(size(c)), Pointer representation: O(size(c))

Correct Answer: (b) Array representation: O(size(c)), Pointer representation: O(n).


In the array representation we have the list Members[c] which allows us to update the contents of c in time O(size(c)). In the pointer representation there is no easy way to
identify all elements that belong to component c without scanning the entire set, so it takes time O(n).

1 point
Suppose we want to delete an arbitrary element from a max heap. (Assume we have auxiliary arrays NodeToHeap[] and HeapToNode[] required for the update() operation.)

Consider the following strategies.

Strategy 1: Remove the element from the array, compress the array and reheapify.

Strategy 2: Update the value of this node to the current maximum value in the heap + 1, then delete_max.

Strategy 1 takes time O(n log n) and Strategy 2 takes time O(n)
Strategy 1 takes time O(n) and Strategy 2 takes time O(n log n)

Strategy 1 takes time O(log n) and Strategy 2 takes time O(n)

Strategy 1 takes time O(n) and Strategy 2 takes time O(log n)

Correct Answer: (d) Strategy 1 takes time O(n) and Strategy 2 takes time O(log n).
Compressing the array and heapify both take time O(n), so Strategy 1 takes time O(n). Look up the max value in a heap takes time O(1). Updating the node takes time O(log n),
and so does delete_max(). So the second strategy takes time O(log n).

1 point
Suppose we want to support the operations predecessor and successor in a heap. Given a value v in the heap, pred(v) tells us the next smaller value currently in the heap and
succ(v) tells us the next larger value currently in the heap.

In both min heaps and max heaps, both operations take time O(n).

In both min heaps and max heaps, both operations take time O(log n).

In a min heap, pred(v) takes time O(log n) and succ(v) takes O(n) whereas in a max heap pred(v) takes time O(n) and succ(v) takes O(log n).

In a min heap, pred(v) takes time O(n) and succ(v) takes O(log n) whereas in a max heap pred(v) takes time O(log n) and succ(v) takes O(n).

Correct Answer: (a) In both min heaps and max heaps, both operations take time O(n).
In either case, there is no obvious way to compute pred(v) and suc(v) without scanning all elements, so both cases take O(n).

1 point
Suppose we do merge sort with a three-way split: divide the array into 3 equal parts, sort each part and do a 3 way merge. What would the worst-case complexity of this version
be?

O(n2)

O(n2 log3n)

O(n log2n)

O(n (log2n)2)

Correct Answer: (c) O(n log2n).


The recurrence will yield O(n log3 n), but log3 n = log2 n / log2 3 = O(log2 n).

1 point
In the closest pair of points problem, we have assumed that no two points have the same x or y coordinate. Which of the following steps would become more complicated to
justify without this assumption.

Constructing QY and RY from PY in time O(n) in the divide step.

Constructing QX and RX from PX in time O(n) in the divide step.

Constructing SY from QY and RY in time O(n) the combine step.

Arguing that every d/2 side square in the d-band around the separator can have at most one point.

Correct Answer: (a) Constructing QY and RY from PY in time O(n) in the divide step.
All x-coordinates could be the same, in which case we may need O(n) time for each point in P Y to assign it to QY or RY.

Week 6 Quiz Solutions


1 point
What is the complexity of inorder traversal for a binary search tree with n nodes?

O(log n) whether the tree is balanced or unbalanced.

O(log n) if the tree is balanced, O(n) otherwise.

O(n) whether the tree is balanced or unbalanced.

O(n) if the tree is balanced, O(n log n) otherwise.

Correct answer: (c) O(n) whether the tree is balanced or unbalanced.


Inorder traversal visits and lists each element once, so it is O(n).

1 point
Suppose we do not have a parent pointer in the nodes of a search tree, only left-child and right-child. Which of the following operations can be computed in time O(log n) for a
balanced search tree?

find, insert, delete, but not min, max, pred, succ

find, insert, delete, min, max, but not pred, succ

find, insert, delete, pred, succ but not min, max

All of find, insert, delete, min, max, pred, succ

Correct answer: (d) All of find, insert, delete, min, max, pred, succ.
The only operations explained using the parent link were pred/succ, in the case where the node was a minimum/maximum node in its subtree. But we can find the appropriate
ancestor by a second scan from root to this node by checking where the path takes the last right/left turn.

1 point
Consider the following algorithm to build a balanced search tree from a sorted sequence.
Make the mid-point of the sequence the root of the tree

Recursively construct balanced search trees from elements to the left and right of the midpoint and make these the left and right subtrees of the root.

What is the complexity of this procedure where the sorted sequence is a sorted array?

O(n)

O(n log n)

O(n2)

Depends on the contents of the original sequence

Correct answer: (a) O(n)


The recursive construction has the recurrence T(n) = 2T(n/2) + O(1) since we can find the midpoint of an array in constant time.

1 point
Consider the following algorithm to build a balanced search tree from a sorted sequence.
Make the mid-point of the sequence the root of the tree

Recursively construct balanced search trees from elements to the left and right of the midpoint and make these the left and right subtrees of the root.

What is the complexity of this procedure where the sorted sequence is a sorted list?

O(n)

O(n log n)

O(n2)

Depends on the contents of the original sequence.

Correct answer: (b) O(n log n)


The recursive construction has the recurrence T(n) = 2T(n/2) + O(n), like merge sort, since it takes time O(n) to find the midpoint in a list.

1 point
Which of the following is not a greedy algorithm?
Dijkstra's algorithm for single source shortest paths

Bellman-Ford algorithm for single source shortest paths

Prim's algorithm for minimum cost spanning tree

Kruskal's algorithm for minimum cost spanning tree

Correct answer: (b) Bellman-Ford algorithm for single source shortest paths
Bellman-Ford implicitly tests all possible paths of length upto n-1 from the source node to every other node, so it is not greedy.

Week 7 Quiz Solutions


1 point
We want to write down a recursive expression for Profit[i].

Profit[N] = 0

For 1 i < N, Profit[i] = ??

max(Profit[i+1], Profit[i+2] + Price[i+1] - Price[i] - 2)

max(Profit[i+2] + Price[i+1] - Price[i] - 2, Profit[i+3] + Price[i+2] - Price[i] - 2, ... Profit[N] + Price[n-1] - Price[i] - 2, Price[n] - Price[i] - 2)

max(Profit[i+1], Profit[i+2] + Price[i+1] - Price[i] - 2, Profit[i+3] + Price[i+2] - Price[i] - 2, ... Profit[N] + Price[n-1] - Price[i] - 2)

max(Profit[i+1], Profit[i+2] + Price[i+1] - Price[i] - 2, Profit[i+3] + Price[i+2] - Price[i] - 2, ... Profit[N] + Price[n-1] - Price[i] - 2, Price[n] - Price[i] - 2)

Correct answer: (d) max(Profit[i+1], Profit[i+2] + Price[i+1] - Price[i] - 2, Profit[i+3] + Price[i+2] - Price[i] - 2, ... Profit[N] + Price[n-1] - Price[i] - 2, Price[n] - Price[i] - 2)
Consider all possibilities and take the maximum.

1 point
What is the size of the memo table for this problem?

N-1

N+1

N2

Correct answer: (a) N


One entry per day, N days.

1 point
What is a good order to compute the values of Profit[i] using dynamic programming?

From Profit[1] to Profit[N]

From Profit[N] to Profit[1]

Either from Profit[1] to Profit[N] or from Profit[N] to Profit[1]

None of these

Correct answer: (b) From Profit[N] to Profit[1]


Profit[i] depends on Profit[i+1],...,Profit[N] and Profit[N] is base case.

1 point
How much time will dynamic programming take to compute Profit[1]?

O(N)
O(N log N)

O(N2)

O(N2 log N)

Correct answer: (c) O(N2)


Profit[i] requires time O(N-i), so overall time is 1+2+...N-1

1 point
What is the value of Profit[1] in the example given in the problem statement?

Correct answer: (c) 8


Buy on day 2, sell on day 6, buy on day 7 sell on day 8

Week 8 Quiz Solutions


1 point
Which of the following is not a linear constraint?

8x 3y + 25

5x + 6xy 5

9x 7y + 8z

5y + 3x 33

Correct answer: (b) 5x + 6xy 5


In a non-linear constraint, we have two or more variables multiplied together.

1 point
When we model a graph problem using LP, mapping each path to a variable is not a good strategy because:

Paths can be hard to compute.

We have to be careful to avoid cycles.

A graph has exponentially many paths.

Edges may be directed.

Correct answer: (c) A graph has exponentially many paths.


Graphs have exponentially many paths, so the LP model will have exponentially many variables.

1 point
Suppose we compute the maximum s-t flow F in a network. Then, which of the following is true of s-t cuts?

From F, we can identify a minimum s-t cut in polynomial time.

From F, we can identify all minimum s-t cuts in polynomial time.

From F, we know the capacity of the minimum s-t cut, but identifying such a cut can take exponential time.

F gives a lower bound for the capacity of the minimum s-t cut but not the exact capacity.
Correct answer: (a) From F, we can identify a minimum s-t cut in polynomial time.
From F, use BFS to identify saturated edges that form a min-cut. There may be other min-cuts.

1 point
We have an exponential time algorithm for problem A, and problem A reduces in polynomial time to problem B. From this we can conclude that:

B has an exponential time algorithm.

B cannot have a polynomial time algorithm.

A cannot have a polynomial time algorithm.

None of the above.

Correct answer: (d) None of the above


A reduction can transfer a positive propoerty from B to A or a negative property from A to B.

1 point
Suppose SAT reduces to a problem C. To claim that C is NP-complete, we additionally need to show that:

There is a checking algorithm for C.

Every instance of C maps to an instance of SAT.

Every instance of SAT maps to an instance of C.

C does not have an efficient algorithm.

Correct answer: (a) There is a checking algorithm for C.


The reduction establishes NP-hardness. We have to show that C is in NP, for which a checking algorithm suffices.