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Department of Decision Sciences and MIS Introduction to Business Application Development BTM 380 (3 credits)

Department of

Decision Sciences

and MIS

Introduction to Business Application Development BTM 380 (3 credits)

COURSE OUTLINE

Fall 2012

Development BTM 380 (3 credits) COURSE OUTLINE Fall 2012 Section: A Room: MB 2.445 Instructor: Dr.

Section: A

Room: MB 2.445

Instructor:

Dr. Rustam Vahidov

Office:

MB 12.107

Telephone:

514.848.2424 extension 2974

E-Mail:

rvahidov@jmsb.concordia.ca

Office Hours:

Thursdays 13:00-15:00

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of developing computer applications. The students will gain knowledge and learn techniques necessary for building business applications. To this end the modern object-oriented development paradigm is adopted in the course. Students will learn the principles of object-oriented programming using a contemporary language, such as C#, and integrated development environment, such as Visual Studio. Topics include control structures, objects, classes, inheritance, class hierarchies, and polymorphism, among others. Using appropriate business examples, this course will enable students to solve business problems using the fundamentals of object- oriented programming.

COURSE OVERVIEW

The objective of the course is to introduce students to basic object-oriented programming skills for developing business applications. Object-Oriented (OO) programming is the current trend in developing serious business applications. MIS students need to have hands-on experience with developing OO applications to grasp the essentials of the modern way of building software solutions. The course will prepare students for the subsequent introduction into the principles of systems design. To achieve the course objectives C# programming language will be used. Students will learn how to build user interface with the use of C# controls; develop code to handle various user-generated events (i.e. button click); how to process numbers and strings; how to use sequence, iteration and decisions to develop the logic of an application; and how to connect and interact with databases. Furthermore, students will learn how to program classes

and their interactions, and make use of the rich arsenal of OO techniques (e.g. polymorphism, event handling, etc.)

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Demonstrate basic programming skills;

Develop applications using object-oriented approach;

Explain such programming concepts as classes, inheritance, and polymorphism;

Work with integrated development environments;

F3.1.2 Explain the current and future issues in Software development (including methodologies and lifecycle;

F3.2.1 Meet business requirements by implementing, and contemporary technologies in modern computing platform.

TEACHING METHOD

The teaching method will rely on lecturing with heavy use of programming examples in the classroom. During a regular class a scheduled topic will be presented first. In order to illustrate the covered concepts example problems will be discussed. Then the programs addressing the problems will be demonstrated. In order to get insight into the workings of the examples, the instructor will walk through the code with the students. Students will be invited to participate actively during code demonstration and contribute towards possible modification of the examples in class.

COURSE MATERIAL AND RESOURCES

Required Textbook:

“Starting out with Visual C# 2010” by Tony Gaddis (2nd Edition), Addison Wesley, 2011.

FirstClass

The main web-site for this course is the BTM 380 folder in FirstClass. Mandatory readings and assignments as well as all class material will be posted in this folder.

COURSE EVALUATION

Course evaluation will be based upon the assessment of the extent to which the students will have mastered covered topics as well as their capability of applying the introduced concepts for developing software applications.

Evaluation

The final grade for the course will be based on the following components:

Midterm Exam

35%

Final Exam

40%

Assignment 1

5%

Assignment 2

5%

Project

10%

Participation

5%

Total

100%

Assignments

The assignments will consist of several programming exercises that will test student’s ability to develop code using the concepts covered in class. The students will hand in their projects using drop box facility of First Class. The assignments are strictly individual! No collaboration between students is permitted in any form!

Project

A project will consist in developing a small business application for a problem chosen by students. The students will do the project either individually or teams of up to 3 people. Prior to developing the application the students will submit the background of the problem and list of requirements the software will address.

Grading scheme

A+

90-100%

4.3

Grade Points

A

85-89%

4.0

Grade Points

A-

80-84%

3.7

Grade Points

B+

77-79%

3.3

Grade Points

B

73-76%

3.0

Grade Points

B-

70-72%

2.7

Grade Points

C+

67-69%

2.3

Grade Points

C

63-66%

2.0

Grade Points

C-

60-62%

1.7

Grade Points

D+

57-59%

1.3

Grade Points

D

53-56%

1.0

Grade Points

D-

50-52%

0.7

Grade Points

FNS

0-49%

0 Grade Points

Assessment of Learning Outcomes:

Core Learning Outcomes

Midterm

Final

Assignment

Assignment

Project

Exam

Exam

1 2

1. Demonstrate basic programming skills

ü

 

ü ü

 

ü

2. Develop applications using object-oriented approach

 

ü

 

ü

ü

3. Explain such programming concepts as classes, inheritance, and polymorphism

 

ü

 

ü

ü

4. Work with integrated development environments

 

ü

ü ü

 

ü

5. Explain the current and future issues in Software development (including methodologies and lifecycle

 

ü

     

6. Meet business requirements by implementing, and contemporary technologies in modern computing platform

 

ü

     

Personal and Interpersonal Skills:

 

Work individually

   

ü ü

   

Work in Team

       

ü

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Academic Integrity:

The Academic Code of Conduct at Concordia University states that “the integrity of University academic life and of the degrees, diplomas and certificates the University confers is dependent upon the honesty and soundness of the instructor-student learning relationship and, in particular, that of the evaluation process. As such, all students are expected to be honest in all of their academic endeavors and relationships with the University" (Undergraduate Calendar, section 17.10).

All students enrolled at Concordia are expected to familiarize themselves with the content of this Code. You are strongly encouraged to visit the following web address:

http://www.concordia.ca/academicintegrity , which provides useful information about proper academic conduct.

Plagiarism:

The most common offense under the Academic Code of Conduct is plagiarism which the Code defines as "the presentation of the work of another person as one's own or without proper acknowledgement" (Article 16 a ).

This could be material copied word for word from books, journals, internet sites, professor's course notes, etc. It could be material that is paraphrased but closely resembles the original source. It could be the work of a fellow student, for example, an answer on a quiz, data for a lab report, a paper or assignment completed by another student. It might be a paper purchased through one of the many available sources. Plagiarism does not refer to words alone - it can also refer to copying images, graphs, tables, and ideas. "Presentation" is not limited to written work. It also includes oral presentations, computer assignments and artistic works. If you translate the work of another person into French or English and do not cite the source, this is also plagiarism. If you cite your own work without the correct citation, this too is plagiarism.

In Simple Words:

DO NOT COPY, PARAPHRASE OR TRANSLATE ANYTHING FROM ANYWHERE WITHOUT SAYING FROM WHERE YOU GOT IT! DON'T FORGET TO USE QUOTATION MARKS!

In class behavior:

All students have the right to expect a class environment that is favorable for learning. As a corollary, each student is responsible to act accordingly. In this perspective, all students are required to arrive to class on time. In addition, class disturbances such as cell phone use will not be tolerated.

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

Session

Topic / Activity

Readings

1

Course Overview. philosophy

Introduction.

.NET

Ch. 1

2

Introduction into Visual C#

 

Ch. 2

3

Data processing

Ch. 3

4

Decision making

Ch. 4

5

Loops & Files

Ch. 5

6

Methods

Ch. 6

Assignment 1 due

 

7

Midterm

 

8

Arrays & Lists

Ch. 7

9

Strings & Structures

 

Ch. 8

10

Classes

Ch. 9

11

Inheritance & polymorphism

 

Ch. 10

12

Working with databases

 

Ch. 11

Assignment 2 due

13

Trends in application development