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REED

by Gary Chester
edited by R'ick Mattingly

Copyright 1985 by M,odern Drummer Publications, Inc.


International Copyright Secured
All Rights Reserved
Printed in U.S.A.

5th Printing April 1995

Published by
MODeRlJ
DRURJlIJeR"Publications, Inc.
12 Old Bridge Road, Cedar Grove, New Jersey 07009

HA :i. NARD
- CC>RPORAT
ION
77'T1w. SLUMOI.1NURo. P.O.Box 131H-9 MILWAUI(EE, WJS32.t3
2

DEDICATION

This boo< is dedicated to my wife, Janice, to my daughters Gayle, Jena, Amanda, and
Katrina, to my son Timothy, and to all of my other "children": the students who have
studied with me over the years, and who helped me prove that my systems work, This
book would not have been possible without the help of Chris Adams, who not only
painstakingly copied all of the systems and examples, but actually made creative
contributions to the project.

Design and layout:


David H. Creamer

Assistant editors:
Susan Hannum
William F: Miller

Photography:
Rick Mattingly
Cover photo taken at Grandslam Studios,
West Orange, NJ

Special thanks to:


Ralph Pace, Danny Gottlieb, Steve Ettleson
and Dick Marcus (Paiste), William F. Ludwig,
Ill, Elaine Cannizzaro, Joe Powers, Alan
.
Douches, and Glenn Weber
3

INTRODUC-rION

All drummers develo p their own patterns, beats and methods of execution as they
-}
grow as musicians, H owt vf,
when playing in the studios they come up against a
variety of vastly different musical situations. During my many years in the studio I
dealt with many different producers, some of whom played a little bit of drums, and
some of whom wanted tricky and unique drum parts. I would take 15 minutes and
write the parts out, then play them in the studio, and then take the parts home and
file them away. I accumulated quite a few of what I call Bsystems"-things that
weren't based on normal1 everyday drum playing. This book iflustrates many of these
systems and is designed to develop coordination, musicalitY1 reading ability, and
confidence. It also provides drummers with new and exciting material to help thern
develop individual creativity.
These systems are not designed to be played strictly as exercises, but used as
tools to develop new musical ideas. In the studio, you must be prepared to play an
incredible variety of musical genres-jazz, rock, Latin, fusion, country, etc. The
material contained within these systems can be applied to any and all musical styles
Another aspect of studio playing is sight reading, You should be able to sight-read
anything without any problem. Of course, even if you are a great reader; if you come
across some tricky patterns aQg ,ou don't have the coordination to go wfth the

reading, it will throw you. Th r8f6re, the systems in this book will promote advanced
reading and coordtnation not only of single-line drum parts, but multi-line drum parts

y, the information,contained in these systems will


as well.
The main benefit of mastering these systems) however, is the development of
}
individual creaUvity. All, ID!J p j pns need inspiration and material to continue their
own musical growth. H op f u n
provide you with new possibilities and ideas for continued musical development. The

I fsed more a more. Once .


systems will prepare you for things you might encounter in the studio-reading,
coordrnation, flexibility. They will also prepare you to be part of current musical
trends, and to create the music of the future. " I i'_,
-reJJ1 v ,
.
It.
Current tfenas in music allow these systems to
. .

number of drummers master the systems and can sight-read multJ-lme drum mUSIC, It

tbp', g of modern music.


is possible that composers and arrangers will write music with this approach in mind.
It is my hope that, by Illustrating these systems, I can help drummers understand
their instrument better and help them become members of the "new breed" of
drummers who will take part in the s
4

CONCEPTS: Part 1
DEVELOPMENT OF AL LIMBS
One of the biggest problems that many drummers have is the fact that they do not
have compJete control over all four limbs. Many drurnmers just practice snare drum
exercises and do not incorporate the feet. By the same token, drummers who do
incorporate the feet often have trouble leading with the left hand (if they are
right-handed). Many drummers come to me and say, 'tMy right hand. t $ ine, but my left
hand is terrible." It's the same thing with the feet-strong bass but Wk hi-hat. My
methods for using these systems cover all aspects of using all four limbs in a
..
A. or J":- "')
practical Sense.

RIGHT- AND LEFT-HA DL AD


All of the systems contained in this book Will involve leading with the left hand as
well as with the right. This will develop better control over the instrument and
eliminate the idea of a weak hand" Most drummers find that, by practicing these
exercises with either hand leading, the weaker side becomes the creative side: Since
this side is not trained, it is easier for it to groov"
left-hand/right-hand lead is especially effective when used with two floor toms and
three hi-hats - 'J tV
concept of ",territorial rig
h ,
of your body, ra t e r than focuslng on your right or left.

MY APPROACH TO DRUM SET P:


"TE R RITO RIAL RIGHTS"
In my drum setup, I use three hi-hats-two in th e traditional position and one on the
side above the floor tom. I also use a second floor tom to the left of the traditional hi
hat. I find that this offers tremendous flexibility, and I recommend using a similar
setup when practicing these systems.

By using three hi-hats, you are opening up a whole new world of possibilities. You can
lead with the right hand on the closed right hi-hat, and play patterns, beats, and
accents on the drums, cymbals, or other hi-hat to create a variety of f eels and tonal
colors. You can also lead with the left and have right-hand flexibility. I call this
approach "open a r ms : right-hand lead on the right hihat; left"hand lead on the left
"

hi-hat. Grossing over the snare drum to pray the hihat seems unnatural to ITle.
This brings us to the second floor tom, and the idea of territorial rights. I use the
second froor tom (on the left side) for many sound possibilities. I find it easy to
5

simulate two bass drums by tuning the torn to the same pitch as the bass drum. It is
also very useful when leading with the left hand.
"Territorial rights" refers to playing the instruments on the left'side with the left
hand, and playing the instruments on the right side with the right hand.

As you can see from the photo, the small tom1 hi-hatt cymbals, snare, and large
tom (on the left) are most naturally played by the left hand, while the snare, small tom.,
large tom, hi-hat and cymbals on the right are played by the right hand. It is simple
and logical. If you put a four-year-old child behind a set of drums, the child would not
.

cross over to play the hi-hat.


I found that one of the biggest problems I had in the studio (as far as technical
execution) was ending a fill on the right side and then getting back to the hi-hat. By
using three hi-hats, two floor toms, and left- and right-hand leads, this is no longer a
problem. Be sure that you use the same setup when you play that you use when you
practice.

BASS DRUM TECHNIBUE


Many drummers wonder whether they should play the bass drum with the heel down
or up. I feel that for today's music you need to be able to play both ways.
I personally play with the heel down, and my power comes from the knee down, not
from the hip. During my years in the studio, we very rarely played very loudly, and
engineers were able to adjust my sound to whatever volume was needed.
However, today's studIO playing, as a rule, is much louder. With the jnvention of
modern recording instruments, such as limiters, and the success of heavy rock
bands, you are often called upon to play very loudly. Studio engineers today call the
bass drum a kick drum, and many times that is what you do-kick it! J find that
playing with the heel up gives you a short, staccato sound, and playing with the heel
down gives you a more rounded sound. You will need to be abte to play at all dynamic
levels, so you should practice both methods. I, however, recommend more
concentrated effort on the heeldown approach for control.

POSTURE
I'm a firm believer in sitting properly when you practice, play in the studio or perform
live. Good posture will help you keep your stamina and endurance, and prevent
possible back injury.
In the studio, I would sometimes work 17- to 20-hour days. In 1969, I suffered a
6

slipped disc'injury and was out of work for six months. Although I felt that my posture
was okay, being rnore aware of specifics in this area might have helped to prevent this
injury.
Another benefit of sitting correctly relates to hearing the instrument. Sitting with
correct posture allows you to hear the entire set, as opposed to when you are leaning
over the hi-hat or snare drum. 11 also enables you to play with a very natural balance
of sound between each par t .
I 8ugg,e8t using a mirror when you practice. You can check your posture, and even
your facial expressions. Some students bite their lips or stick their tongues out. That
just dissipates your energy.

TIME
The most important thing for a drummer is understanding time. This occurs with
experience and dedicated practice. There are three basic time feels: on top, in the
middle, and behind. You have to find out which time feel works in a particular
situation.
On Top-Thrs type of feel generates the most energy and excitement" but there is
always a danger of rushing. In playing on top of the beat, you play with a feel slightly
in front of the center of the beat.
In The Middle-This type of time feel is exactly that: in the middle of the beat.
Behind-This feeJ places the groove slightly behind the center of the beat. Playing
with Count Basie requires playing behind.
In playing good time with a rhythm section, the bass player and drummer must
work weU together. It is great if you can find a bass player who you are comfortable
with-one who feels time in the same place that you do . Then the two of you can
figure out the type of feel required for a given session.
In practicing the systems, you should practice with a click tracl, because in the
studio you must be able to work with it. People say that a metronome doesn't swing.
It doesn't, but what you put with it will swing. Practicing the systems with a click will
help develop a good sense of time, and will help develop the feel of working with a

,S
click. Practice the systems using all three types of time feels.

GROOVE AND ING


The way to make these systems cook is to know them inside out. When reading a
chart for the first time, just about any drum-mer, even one of the greats, will sQund
mechanical. But by the third or f'ollrth time through1it should groove The same idea
applies to these systems. The first time you play it, it's not going to swing. These are
coordInating exercises, and they are hard. They will be ,(for the most part) unfamiliar
to you, and nothing unfamiliar is going to cook right away. After you understand each
systern, sing each line, and hear and understand all the lines and parts. Then you can
work on specifics about the groove.
After you can play each system reasonably well, tape yourself. Listen for spacing,
sound, accents, dynamics, and musical approach. Criticize yourself to the x degree.
Grooving in the studio or with a rhythm section is not a one-person thing. You can
practice grooving at home and play great. However, you rnrght get with a rhythm
section in which the bass player plays something that contradicts what you are
playing, and the groove will be gone. There are many aspects to playing a groove.
Bass, guitar, drums and keyboards all must groove together. Therefore, it is important
to practice so that what you pl ay feels good to you, but it is also important to get
experience with other musicians and work on grooves together.

THE IMPORTANCE OF SINGING


This concept represents one of the most important and beneficial ways of using the
7

systems. As you go through the systems, you will find that you have to sing various
parts of the exercises. You will end up using the voice almost like a fifth Hmb) and this
will help you in many ways. Some of them are:
1. Ability to hear and feel the quarter note. One of the first things you have to sing is
the quarter note, along with the metronome, as you sight-read. The quarter note is
the daddy of the bar; singing it really helps y.ou hear exactly where the quarter is, and
how everything you play relates to it. Thjs will result in better time feel and better
execution.
2. Sight-reading ability. As you advance through the systems, you will find yourself
playing with all four limbs and singing a different part each time you play through an
exercise. As you sight-read, you will sing the quarter note, then the snare drum part,
then the line you are sight-reading, and in some cases, the upbeat and the h-hat or
cymba: part. Practicing in this manner helps you to sight-read without having to sing
the melody I'ine all the time, and enables you to recognize figures and execute them
instinctively.
3. Understanding of individual parts. When playIng complicated figures with al/
four limbs, you must be aware of each individual part that makes up the figure. In the
studio, you may sometimes be asked to play the bass drum louder or the.snare drum
softer: You may find that, by changing just one part of the figure that you are playing,
such as simpltfying the snare drum or playing a part on the hi-hat instead of the
snare" you can create a special effect or please a producer. By practicing these
systems while singing a specific part, you will become acutely aware of each part,
and thus be able to have more control over dynamics and more flexibility when you
are playing.
4. Alleviate mechanical reading. Many drummers sight-read well, but they are not
really hearing and feeling what they are playing because they are playing
mechanically. By mastering the systems and being able to sing each part, sight
reading will become less mechanical and nlore musical. You will be so familiar with
figures that coordination and execution will not be a problem; you will be free to
create a feel within the music you are sight-reading.
5. Awareness of pitch and timbre. When singing each individual part, you should
sing in a tone very close to the part that you are focusing on. The snare drum vocal
part should sound somewhat like a snare, bass drum like a bass drum, etc. Many
drummers are not aware of tones and pitches. Most can hear a snare drum part, but
when asked to play the same figure between tom-toms or on the bass drum, they are
lost. When practicing the systems, you will find melodic lines shifting around among
different instruments. Singing these different parts enables you to understand f ully
each tone COIOf.
6. Awareness of spacing. Singing helps you to be aware of the placement of each
beat and the spaces between each note. A common problem is rushing fills when
excited. Singing will help you develop an accurate awareness of spacing an9 precise
execution. Some of my students) after mastering the singing of each part, sing the
rests while playing the exercise.
7. Energy. Singing can create a cer tain excitement and energy when you are
practicing, playing in an isolatIon booth in the studfo, or playing in a live performance
situation. When you Sing with energy, you play with energy.
8. Breathing. Another benefi't that results from Singing exercises is awareness of
correct breathing. Try to sing a drum fill white breathing in. It is incredibly awkward.
The fill flows naturally when you release the air. f feel that, if you breathe normally,
your playing will flow normally.
A concept that helps many students is the idea of breathing in the same manner
that a horn player breathes. Sometimes I have students write breath marks in each
exercise to promote natural breathing.
The concept of singing will become more understandable as you go through the
systems. Hopefully you will find that this is a very enjoyable and beneficial part of
your practice routine.
8

..... 9 STEMS
The following pages contain 39 basic patterns, called's t ystems,"
pages of reading material, which are to be used as the "melodies" for each
system.
Start by memorizing the system, being careful to play the correct instrument
with the correct hand or foot. You w.ill not be playjng the melody yet., but be sure
to notice where you are eventually to play it. Play the system many times,
striving to make ,t feel as good as possible. While you are playing the system,
sing the click pulse (quarter notes).
After you have memorized a system, turn to the first two Reading pages (14
and 15) and play them as the Melody of the system, on the instrument that is
specified with each system. After you can play both pages from beginning to
ehd comfortably, proceed to the second set of Melodies, and practice them the

VO
same way .pri),;r$... p-t;r "(r:f1!:
tt is not intended that
&.rff riP
rush through any of this materi D'o not proceed
9n.\Vrc;i. until you have ae leved total mental and. physical, independence
J,.H'; ') ,
and
aw'areness with each system. .
To aid your awareness, you should learn to sing each part that you are
playing, in addition to singing the click pulse. In other words, while play'jng the
complete System with Melody, sing (1) the click pulse, (2) the melody, (3) the
snare drum line, (4) the cymbal line, (5) the hi-hat line, etc.
When singing, it helps 10 sing a sound that resembles the particular
instrument, and to sing it as rhythmically as possible out loud. For example, the
bass drum part might sound like "boom," while you might sing the hi-hat part
with a "chick" sound.

The following abbreviations are used in this book:

H.H. :::: hi-hat Ride:::: ride cymbal (or additional closed hi-hat)
Bell = cymbaJ bell B.D. = bass drum FI. tom floor tom
=

Melody = Reading exercise pages

LH. :::: Left hand R.H. = Right hand


L F. = Left foot R.F. = Right foot

Examples:
R.H.lRide Right hand on ride cymbal (or closed hi-hat)
=

.
L.H.fFI. tom Left hand on floor torn
=

R.F./B.D.lMelody Right foot on bass drum plays melody


=

LF./H.H. = Left foot on hi-hat

PRACTICE TIPS FOR SYSTEMS


I suggest practicing each bar at least four times, or as many times as it takes to g et a
good understanding of what you are playing. Start slowly and relax. The tendency is
to rush through each measure and get right to the end. That is not the pOint of the
exerclse, although you will be able to do that after you have mastered each individual
measure.
After you become familiar with the technical-coordination aspect of each system
J
then you can work on feelJ grooveJ dynamics, and application for a variety of musical
situations. For example, you could pretend that the line you are sight-reading on the
bass drum is a horn melody line, and play everything with the hands dynamically as
9

though you were setting up a big band.


When you read these systems in practice, try to read the phrases across as you
would sight-read a page of music-not up and down. By this I mean that most people
relate each note to where it falls in relation to the quarter note. It is good to feel this
when you sing, but I do not recommend trying to read against the quarter.
These systems all work together. Try to work through them in order, as they are
designed to be practiced that way. Master these systems and you will have an

1 J Q Q J J J Q J J J J J J J J J :11
Q
incredible variety of musical ideas, to be called upon as you need them.
I.' r j P . "- "' ' . j.
CD ;
.

LH.+ R.H.!H.H. 12! J Q J J J J J J J J J J J Q Q


R.F'/B.D./Melody _----=_ _____ __ _______'_____ ______ ________
--l
_

Left and right hands play simultaneously on hi-hats in this system. Be careful to
avoid "flamming."

'. .
",

R.H.lH.H.

L.H./S.D.
R.F.lS .D./MeJody
L.F./H.H.

L.H./H.H.
R .H.lS.D.
R.F.lS .D./MIG9y
L. F . /H.H.
;2! JJJJJJfJJJJJJ f J f JJ J J Q I JJ JJJ
J
:11

R.H.lH.H.
L.H.lS.D.
R.F ./9.D .lMftly
L.F./ H . H.
10

.:.:i;J 1?i Jf2i Jf2i 1 R Pf R Pf :11

'I::::;;;;=i? i 8 8 8 8 18 8 8 8:11
:'.:;;; ;2: B t: E; LIE; t:. t:
i
:11

.!;;t.s;? i E; t: E; t: 1 U t: L t: :11

B.ii=5?i Ff F j) pi f .h pi F f pi
1
:11

;"{ fA ,;\ P. 1 1 J; D P :11


o 0 0 0 o 0 0 0

.
@
J'
"{
LH.lH.H.
'I
'7A'ir =
R,H./S.D.
R.f I B DL 7 i i i :
i i
i
. .
__
.

i i
11
@
12

R'F./:.i " i
1 :11
13

R.H::::

i::.
@

j:L...
rJ'""".,l!.-- "J -fIL---
--4'Q _----
. I
. -L Q
lt7--f3
---r- Q----
--
F F F F F F
LF.iK H ./ Melody
14

EA G
The following pages are to be used as the "melodiesH for the systems.

I-A

J ,,pt JI! J "f.DJI)1 .Dfl BJ J [

'1: :J f n I IF n! n I J n J n I J ,p9 ,pJ


1-8
15

-= .. ll

"2 I J I $a
t- E---J I I - J "/) l"i ) J "f .J I __

J I
16

II-A

'1 )7 a I I '1 )7 )1:jJJ J I F J B I l"f )1 JJ J t I


17
18

III-A

,: f D"l JJJ "I. hPl, ), J=tJJ I Bot A 0& ) I JJ fJ-J; B,. jl


19
20

IV-A

fl= t Dllj lJ n1 '1 vJE mn I nJ5'1M


21

IV-B

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=

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22

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23

V-B

m JD@ I m 1ffl ,i! qi! IOf----n :J;j J n I


2:=iDIDm iD IP=tm I JiJ ad
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24

ADVANCED SYSTEMS
The following pages contain ten advanced systems, followed by ten additional pages
of reading. Be sure to f ollow the instructions for each system carefully. Some of them
involve playing the melody on snare drum, while others call upon you to play an
alternating pattern with your hands between the snare drum and hi-hat.
The singing instructions for the first 39 systems apply to this section of the book
as well. Singing is an important part of this entire learning process, and it shouldn't
be overlooked.

The reading examples in this section are based on two-bar phrases, each of which
is repeated. At first, you might want to concentrate on one tWo-bar phrase at a time.
But eventually, you should be able to play straight through the entire page without
stopping.
These reading pages can also be used with the first 39 systems. SJmilarly, reading
pages I-A through V-B can be used with the ten advanced systems. Remember that
the ultimate goal is to be able to Sight-read a melody line while playing a system, so
do not stop with the reading exercises in this book. Take other reading books, such as
Ralph Pace's Variations Of Drumming, Ted Reed's Syncopation, Danny Pucillo's New
Concepts Of Reading Drum Music, or Louie BeHson and Gil Breines' Modern Reading
Text In 414, and practice reading the rhythms in those books while playing the
systems in this book.

la
R.H ./Cym.8.ell
L.H./S.D,
R, F./B.DJ Mloc;iy
L.F./H.H.

3a
: i - $ J J J $ W J J J J J I: J W J J J J J j J J J J J J J J :11::
mJ
R.H.!R.cvrn.
L.H.lS. . - -

R.f ./ B.D.JMJody . - .
....
.. .
_

L.F ./H.H.
I I I I I I I I
25

:J n n:J n
R. H /S.D ;
:7 0
:::> :::>- :.::> :::>- :::::> >- :::::> :::::>
6a
L.H./R C y m
m m :11

. .

0 0 D 0
R.F./B.O.iMelody
L.F./H.H. X x
-t -t 'I 'I x -t -t

a) R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L

PfjJ J J J d J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J d J J J J J J It
b} L RL R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R l R L R L R L R L R
9a

:: :9: j
R.F.iB.D.iMelody _ _ I . _

a) R L R L R L R L R L R l R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L
b) L R LR L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R

lOa
H.H.
S.D.
R.F .JB.D.lMelody
If you have a third hi-hat, you can play upbeats with your ieft foot on systems 9a
and 10a.
ADVAN ED R ADING
26

I JfJ. J ;, I
EXERCISE 1

'1 J ) IJ.
2

"I 1 * -t

-J1 . .
2
:

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2

27

EXERCISE2

N" 1 J n "'I }1 I }1 J nI
2
I I 'I

: J J .D J=a I f
2
-t A 'f :t 'I E c

-9: aJ kM 'f )J I
I 2
*1 I'
I 'f If! ,

9: J ) I ;, ;f) tj .-I t
2
-t eA
I i , "

J J=! ! ) ) J nI If.
2
i 'I IA '/ i

N" )1 ;f1 J I i ;f1 J ;, I .


2
A er ! , ,
;


!Z J J E I :t . n n 1
2
I)
/ '1 .(

'} . 'f ;, ) I -t }1 ;, ;f) -{- .E! I .,


2
'f "1 -t c

2
.=-..... . ..
. ......
... - ............

28

EXERCISE 3

:>= j J '1}1:t n 11 n J '1) I


2

1 1


: -J3 .
2

I
"l

iJ -,;

9: ! i J I !fJ J ! ;, I ,.
2
:t ,
fIl
I -:

1(. 11
2
29

EXER ISE4

f)L --j J ------"'


----#=-i -r -'f---W."'---
[) -" if D I-t---
'--- - 'f___W
-"' .r=)----
. ...;-i_,--- -J
----I--+-
b --'E- ---T- I-*II'"I:-i - .----l

: iJ. I i I ..

2

* :1
30

B . j-,l
EXEReSES

ft4 II J I J J. , ;, .
2
. j A I K

: ,}1 Ij . I
I 2
if -- -,;:. .

-g
2

: . = .-)1 . = I J. = . I 1-
2
..1.
iJ r "".

I
f}= J J. = ! I ) J. = "
2

'f t

.
- }1 J I J. 0 J 1 ,
i 2.
I et -. !
,--
.

-.
2

: . = I . -. =
2

* 11
2


31

EXERC ISES

9:2 J fJ
2

}1 1'1 }1! J ;J SI

! , )1 I .rJ Q -t
2
ts J
I
9: J ;4 ,;

9: : ,;. a J
2
, J I J " S , I-

I }1 I -f'
c

.rJ 0
2
J ) .h J ;J = I
!
II 't t
c

) "= 0 J
2
!)! ! J
I "
=
J , ! tq }1 I
.-
;t
-

=
7): J I "J ,;J 0 "J S J = I
2
J J .
4-

J 0 ,;J 0 ,;J S I ,;J =3 0 J


2
!1 J " "=J =1

= -,;- -,;- = = J =-. = ; =


2
: ,;-
I -r ,;-
I -"11
32

EXE C SE?
711 J .flnJ ,hJ J )1
2
*I $ I "I

2
9" JhJ1 J It J )hJ I

:9: J nJ I "I .fl lEg JE--n--,",,-J--+- __ _-----l


2

2
;>: J J J J I 3 n 3 .t:= J .t:= J
2
9" JJ3 nJ )"1 ) 1"1 )"1 ;Dh 3 h J I

2
:1 J hJ HJ h31nJ hJ J JJJI

2
33

'} i
EXE"RCISEB

J ) J n I J n) J ) I
2
'f I 'I

" Jl J n1 J I t J'I}Jnl
2

,. l ,p I -JJ :.

2
! , ,

'} ) J JEj J I J jEj ;, J I


2
F -t F -t ' "

-f- 44
2


; I A I
2
it'

34

EXERCISES


J .__
I , __
D !
)_J i_ I jt
2

____ __ __ __ __ __ ___

if
2

i
2

l. -il
2

1:-
35

EXERCISE1D

Xj J ) JJ J J J
,J J J J ! J 'f I
}tt--
---=-:JIh------i
2

, ) J fa J a, J a a J J ),
2
t 'i I 'I

9 JJJJJJJJJJJJJ ,JUJOJJJJJ JJWSI


., 11
2 '.
36

co c PTS: Part 2
c CE TRA N
Yo u w i l l fi nd t h at m aste r i n g t h e system s req u i res a lot of c o n c e n t rat i o n . You are
si n g i n g one part and s i g h t-read i ng another. I t is h ard , but you w i l l fi n d i t eas i e r as you
go t h ro u g h t h e syst e m s . '(o u w i l l fi n d t h at i t is a l so very h e l p f u l in d ev e lo p i n g
co ncentrat i o n for p rec i s io n i n t h e st u d i o o r i n perfo r m ance.
One s t u d e n t in descri b i n g a l es so n w i t h m e o n c e said, "Whe n I g o for a l esson w i t h
you , G ary, t h e d o g s c o m e i n a n d o u t , yo u r w i fe c o m es i n , t h e p h o n e r i n gs, t h ree
st udents are i n t h ere h an g i ng a ro u n d for t h e i r l es so n s - a l l in the s a m e roo m w h i le
I ' m h avi n g m y l es so n . Do you ex pect me to concentrate t h ro u g h a l l of t hat ? " My
an swer was, u A bso l u te ly;' Yo u s ho u l d h ave co n fi de n c e in you rs e l f a n d be able to
conce n t rate on w h at yo u are d o i n g , n o m atter who is watc h i n g , o r l iste n i n g , or w h at's
g o i n g o n aro u n d yo u . I t 's h ard , b u t i t 's wo r t h work i n g toward s t h i s g oa l .

CON FIDENCE
After yo u master t h ese syst e m s , you w i l l fee l a certa i n sat i s fact i o n i n know i n g t h at
you can p l ay so m e very c o m p l i cated and exc i t i n g t h i n g s . A p ro b l e m , h owever, i s
re m e m beri n g t h at m a n y ti mes you w i l l b e req u i red t o p l ay s i m p l y. Th i s beco mes a
prob l e m bec a u se you h ave so m u c h t h at you are ab l e to p l ay b u t s o m e th i n g s i m p l e i s
what works. S o m et i m es what yo.u p l ay i s;w hat makes somet h i n g m u s i ca l ; s o m et i m es
i t 's what yo u don 't p l ay. The co n fi d e n ce cotnes i n know i n g t h at yo u can cove r any
m u si c a l s i t u at io n , fro m so met h i n g s i m p le to somet h i n g com p l ex.

TU ING OF DR U MS
St u d i o eq u i p m e n t a n d tec h n iq ues are c o n st a n t l y c h a n g i n g and i m p rov i n g . T h ey h ave
come a l o n g way from the o l d two-, t h ree-, and fou r-t rac k record i n g s of the 1 960s .
W h e n I was act ively i nvolved i n st u d i o p l ay i n g , eac h stud i o h ad a d i ffere n t so u nd ;
each i s olat i o n booth w a s d i ffere n t . f wo u l d b r i n g m y 9w n d r u m s , a n d t u n e s peci fica l l y
for e ach st ud io.
Yo u st i l l n eed to t u n e yo u r d r u m s for eac h st u d i o s i t u at i o n , b u t w it h today's
adva nced st u d i o t ec h n o l ogy, a maj o r factor is t h e e n g i n ee r. My adv i c e is to get as
m u ch p l ay i n g exp e r i e n ce i n t h e st u d i o as pos s i b l e , and learn as m u c h abo u t m oder n
record i n g tech n i q u es as you c a n . Beco me fam i l i a r w i t h m i c ro p h o n es, p l ac e m e n t , and
eq u a l izat i o n . A l so, l i sten to the d r u m so u n d in the booth d u r i n g p l aybacks. Ask
q u es t i o n s and d i sc u ss t h e d r u m so u n d with t h e e n g i n e e r. In t h i s m a n n e r, yo u w i l l
fa m i l i a rize you rse l f w i t h t h e type o f d r u m so u nd t h at yo u need. f n p l ayi n g t h ese
systems, t u n e the d ru fns so t h ey so u n d g reat to yo u , and are e n j oya b l e to p l ay. Yo u
m u st fee l comforta b l e w i t h t h e so u n d of t h e i n stru m e n t .
I 've bee n reco m m e n d i n g t h at my s t u d e n t s get s m a l l , p o r t a b l e P. A, syste m s a n d
m i crop hones for t h e i r d ru m s for s m a l l -c l u b u se and p ract i c e . I n l a rg e c o n certs, of
cou rse, t h i s i s not n eeded, as the P.A. syste m s u s u a l l y cove r dr u m a m p l i f i c at i o n a n d
mon itori n g . H oweve r, today's mod e r n p l aYing d e m a n d s w e l l-defi n ed dru m so u nd s ,
and a s m a l l po rtab le P. A. fits t h e n eed p erfect l y. That w a y yo u do n ot h ave t o s t ra i n to
i n crease yo u r vo l u m e. Yo u can hear every note yo u p l ay no matter how l o u d t h e rest
of t h e band i s, and you can e n j oy a f u l l , ro u n ded d ru m sou n d . A l so, you can add
effects s u c h as d e l ay and reve rb for i n terest i n g so u nd s . Th erefore , yo u can keep t h e
ba lance e n ergy, etc . , t h at yo u wo rked so h a rd t o get R e m e m ber, i t does n ' t h ave t o be
loud to h ave e n ergy.
37

RE ADING
In the st ud i o, you fi nd a large vari ety in the types of d rum parts. You can get a lead
sheet, wh i ch consists of chord s and me l od y" and that is t h e same part for all
members of t h e rhythm section . You may get a d rum part w r t h mi n imal fi g u res and
cues on i t , or you may g et a compli cated , f ully w r i tten out d rum par t It is importan t to
become aware of what these parts represent , and t h en d eve lop sk ills at i n te rp ret i n g
the se charts to play musi cally and creat ive l y.
Arran g e rs w ho know you and know how we fl you read might w r i t e ou t exact ly what
they want you to play. By t h e same token , t h ey m i g ht not write anyth i n g for you ,
because they know that you will come up with a g roove or fee lin g that i s better than
anything t h ey can w ri te . This approach allows t h e i nnovative talent of the d rummer to
su rface. Wri t i n g a simple d r u m part by knowing a particu lar d rumme r's skilJs makes
an arran ger's job a lot eas i e r.
There is another type of arran g e r who w r i tes a very compli cated d rum par t for you ,
fi g u ri n g that if it doesn 't work, parts can be el iminated . Howeve r; I 've found from
expe r i en ce t hat, with a compli cated par t , i t n ormally takes a lot lon g e r to g et a good
groove. Usually, w hat you must do i n a s i t uation li ke this is use you r ears, ahd you r
musi cal and techn i cal ab i l i ty to fi g u re ou t what works for what the arran g e r really
wants. Most of the t ime , you can fi nd somet h i n g that you are comfortable w i t h and
that also works for the arran g e r: M aste r i n g th ese systems w ill i n crease you r
vocabulary of possi b ilit i es.
Very few record i n g arran gers really know what a d rumme r can do, so they usually
write parts t hat t en d to be 'simp l ist i c to protect t h emse lves and the session .
Expe ri en ce, sensi t i v ity, confid en ce and prope r att i t u d e are t h e most importan t
aspects of d ealin g w i th stu d io sit uations.

LISTE I
S uccessfu 1 .st u d i o musi cians don 't lock into on e type of music, They are aware of a l l
types-jazz, f us i on , rock, country, pop, R & B -and can play them all au thent i cally_
Learn i n g abou t t h ese styles comes from listen i n g extensi vely to all types of music,
and knowing what is called for.
A problem in play i n g alon g with records is the fact t hat, s i n ce the d rum part and
time feel are already established , you are following alon g . B u t that can also be
ben efi cial from an analyt i cal pa i n t of vi ew. You can learn what t h e g reat d rummers do
in a particular rn u s i cal s i t u ation1 l earn f rom i t , and "apply it to you r own play i n g .

D EVE LOPING CREATIVITY


You must fi g u re out for you rself how far you want to go. T h e re are no ru l es, j ust
endless possibili t i es for musi cal d evelopmen t. On e pe rson will prqctice j u st a l i t tle ;
oth e rs w ill pract i ce e i ght hou rs a day. Some w i ll be professional musici ans and
musical i n novators; others w ill play for f u n on weekends. It's all up to you to take it to
what ever level you d es i re.
All of you r defi C i en c i es w il l su rface d u ri n g prac t i ce sessions) but that i s what
pract i c i n g is for. Some people g et bored when t h ey pract i ce . f feel that bored om
comes f rom not being able to con cen t rate, for whatever reason . Some people-j u st
don 't l i ke hard thi n gsr others are lazy, wh i le for others, bein g a professional musi cian
is not the r i ght thi n g . It 's all up to you .
N o two d rummers approach musi c t h e same way. N o two d rummers w i ll play and
apply t h ese systems in the same way. W hat I do hope, t h ou g h ) is that these systems
will provid e you w i th some fresh i deas to d evelop you r own creat i v i ty, so t hat you can
take part i n forg i n g new d i rect ions i n music, mak i n g you an importan t part of the
" New B reed ."
38

CDMPDSIT
T h e poss i b i l i t i es f o r c reat i n g n ew syste m s i s e n d l ess. O n e way i s to sel ect a cy m ba l ,
s n a re d r u m a n d h i- h at patte r n fro m o ne o f t h e g i ve n syst e m s , a n d t h e n to s e l ect a
bass d ru m p atte r n f r o m o n e of t h e read i n g exe rci se s . For exam p l e , take t h e cym ba l ,
snare a n d h i-hat p a r t fro m system 28, a n d p l ay t h e fi rst m eas u re o f read i n g I I I -A o n
the b a s s d ru m .

After yo u c a n p l ay t h i s system c o m fortab l y, pract i ce read i n g t h e m e l od i es o n t h e


sn are d ru m . U s i n g t h e syst e m g iven above , and read i n g I I I -A w i th i t t h e fi rst fo u r
meas u res wou l d be p l ayed a s fo l l ows:

'i J i {Qi l iJ J ij
J i J J iJ S j ix' I
Yo u s h o u l d p ract i c e al l of t h e read i n g pages w i t h t h at same c y m b a l , s n a re d ru m
:11
and h i -hat patter n .
Once you are c o m fo r t a b l e w i t h t h at , u se t h e seco n d meas u re o f I I I -A as t h e bass
d ru m patt e r n , and re peat the p roce s s . H e re's how t h at syst e m wou l d l ook w i t h t h e
fi rst fo u r bars of read i n g I t- B .

'ilS JiJi I i7!r i J J '


!P i J i , I ' if !r f J J '
As you go th ro u g h t h e va ri o u s read i n g pages i n t h i s m a n n e r, yo u w i l t d i scover
:11
patter n s t h at yo u parti c u l a r l y l i ke, as wel l as some t h at yo u d o n ' t . Go back to t h e
ones yo u l i ke a n d u se t h e m . A l so , d o n ' t b e afra i d to i nject you r own i d e as - a n extra
note or two o p e n h i - h at effects, or w h at eve r. T h at 's how you devel o p yo u r o w n
creati v ity, and yo u r own m u s i c a r person a l i ty.
The fo l l ow i n g pages c o n t a i n seve ral c o m b i n at i o n s of syst e m s a n d read i n g
exero i ses, t o g i ve yo u a n f d e a of w h at i s poss i b l e. Certa i n l y you s h o u l d s p e n d t i m e
work i n g o n t h e exam p l es t h at are g i ve n , b u t d o n 't stop t h e re . I am o n l y g iv i n g yo u fo u r
meas u res at a t i m e . B e s u re t o g o back t o t h e act u a l read i n g pages a n d deve l o p t h e
abi l i ty t o read t h e e n t i re page w h i l e p l ay i n g t h e syste m . A l so, b e s u re t o c o n t i n u e t o
deve lop yo u r ow n syste m s, based o n t h e p roced u re s h o w n i n t h i s c h apter. I f yo u on ly
p l ay t h e patt e r n s g ive n in t h e book, yo u ' l l j u st be a G a ry Ch est e r c l o n e , a n d f ra n kly,
t h e wo rld doesn 't n eed any of t hose, Be you r own pe rso n by d eve l o p i n g yo u r ow n
id eas.
39

JJ f
COM PDS ITE TEM 1

:11 . i J
:,. i J
System 2 Read i n g I -A, m eas u re 8

J JJJ JJJ JJQ .


,

R . H .l H . H, '

L. H ' !S .D.

L. F .l H , H .

I

Com posite syste m 1

J J
21JJJJ J J J I J J J J J3 J Jr JI
J
Com'p os i te system 1 with fi rst fo u r m eas u res of read i n g I-A o n sn are d ru m .

% J 3 J J J 3 J J r J 1 J J J J J J J f 11 J J J

J
COM POSITE SVST 2

:::;::: if? t Q ; J J ; J ; , J j
System 4 Read i n g 1 - 8 , m eas u re 21

:11 j J n J A :11

J J
CompOSite system 2 w i t h fi rst four meas u res of read i n g 1 - 8 on s n a re d ru m .

: j J J @ f J J E J J f J f J F J f J Fib
1

J J J J
, B f J J r J r J I C J F J C J J) ,
40

,
Read i n g I I-A, mea s u re 12

F . . l'
Co m posite system 3

2j J J J Jd
Com pos ite system 3 w i t h fi rst fou r meas u res of read i n g ! I-A on s n a re d ru m .

21 - Er.d . ij p. Jl1 Er. a J! . Jl1


[r. . "' E. f @. .
J Jl 1 J I II
COM POS ITE SYSTE M 4

R:'Cbm. 4#: t=J f'i t=J Ef


Read i n g 1 1 - 8 , meas u re 9

i :11 " j J . )J
System 8

L. F ./ H. H.
tit Of '

2 i ;;; D
Co m posite system 4 :::> ::>

:11
>- >-

:1i i . I . t p I
Com po s i t e system 4 w i th fi rst fou r measu res of read i n g 1 1- 8 on s n are d ru m .

S i fir I f i ; iJ
2: 11
41

COM POS ITE SYSTE M 5

1 : II 2 j :II .
System 1 0 Read i n g I l l-A, m eas u re 27

RLH.,HJ.RISC'DY q
, _" )

-
-' : . j .

F, r r

L. F ./ H . H.
_ _

:1
Com pos ite system 5

: i t g/ f gl
_______ _______

Com po s i te system 5 w i t h fi rst fo u r meas u res of read i n g 1 1 I-A o n s n a re d ru m .

:n o E1 E @o o f A I O g E' gE?a@"l l
2: : 6 E' L& ffl ' fOo bl Elbl : E1 t &q
l'
COM POS ITE SYSTE M 6

:h 0 -
n
i - ;
F :I :TPc
,{ -- =/: :11
System 1 2 Read i n g 1 1 1 - 8 , m e as u re 29

R.H.lH.H.

F
:
'I - -
,
L H.lS . D .

r
L. F .! H . H . X

:11
Com po s i t e system 6
J

/. @ 8;, n 1 I fo Pl r' u' tj Jj I


Com po s i te syst e m 6 w i t h fi rst fo u r meas u res of read i n g 1 1 1- 8 o n s n a re d ru m .

2 i .

,;, fl 2 @ (j, t P I . ; ; ,J J J J J 11 " '


42

COMPOSITE SYSTEM 7

I::!;;: : i r== p p r== :11 2= ;.


13. 13. E. :11
0 0 0 0 Read i n g IVA, m easure 1 0
System 1 4
n n o o
r
L F .l H . H .

Com posite system 7 w i t h fi rst fou r m e as u res of read i n g I V-A on floor tom .

2 i. j ] Ij. h . J 1 Ef- h . . 5 J .>m



. Q i.n . J 1 .J J j.B &. U .J 11
o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

COMPOSIT E SYSTE M B

Co m posi te system 8

,i g U go; U :11
Com posite system 8 w i t h fi rst fo u r meas u res of read i n g IV-B on s n a re d ru m .

':ie 2J iIJ i i I
2: iEJ i IE 2J g <; 11 <
43

COMPOSITE SYSTEM 9

Co m po s ite syste m

9 Jtl e .
r r r b r 6 r :1
Compos ite system 9 with fi rst fo u r measu res of reading V-A on s n are d r u m .

ljir irir i r ';r&ic& r;c;'


f i-2 f 2 IJ f2 f 2i i 2 fer @tI
-? 1 r r

JJ J J; J
Composite sy ste m 1 0

gj :11

, J 3 J 3 j J = =; = = N =
Com posite system 1 0 with fi rst fo u r mea s u res of readi ng V- 8 on sn are d ru m .

23 1 J,

'? i J;3 Jig 3 1 3t3j3j J 11


BARY S RO
44

Obvi o u s l y, a l ot of t h e syste m s a n d p atte r n s u sed i n t h i s book are m ore fo r p ract i ce


and deve l o p m e nt than t hey are fo r g rooves t h at can be p l ayed in real s i t ua t i o n s. B u t
b y pract i c i n g t hose exerc i ses, yo u wl l l g a i n t h e tec h n i q ue a n d c o n t ro l of t h e
i n stru m e n t n ecessary f o r y o u t o create you r own g ro oves. The fo l l ow i n g are s o m e
grooves t h at I p a r t i c u larly l i ke. They are based o n tec h n i q ues th at a re devel o ped by
the systems, b u t t hey a l s o i n c l u d e th i n g s l i ke accents a n d o p e n/c l osed h j hat effects.
Yo u m ay l i ke' some of t h ese g ro oves; yo u m ay n ot l i ke ot h e rs. T h at's not i m p o r t a n t
What i s i m po r t a n t i s t h at yo u g o o n to create yo u r own g rooves and p atter n s.

a . . :11
I J
'

:#> i :. J.: 13 J 3 . 3.J ; I1


@
J
0 . :::':> ::> .

Q ...
I
0 :::>- ::>

.
.. :

. . .
J J

.
__
1

lJ'

0
,: i
J JJ JJ JJJ JjJ
f f
45

@=': ' ==
J
1 J3 p=3
J1 jJ 1.'
J :
2 i .
:

; t


46

AP LI CATION
The fol l ow i n g g roove was p l ayed by d ru m m e r Dave We c k l i n t h e t u n e H G d a n s k ; ' o n
the Paq u i to Di R ivera a l b u m , Why Not? I t d e m o n s t rates a p ract i c a l a p p l i c a t i o n o f the
systems, espe c i a l l y t h e u se of "te rr i to r i a l ri g h ts."
>-

R . H JH . H . .,...,---
... -.--
-
-i:l"---.JOL-_---"______"'"_______ _ """__"O"_ __"''''_ _.lQ...... ____, _
_ __._.
_ __

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The fo l l ow i n g excerpt, ag a i n by Dave Wec k l , i s from t h e B i l l Ca n ne rs a l b u m Step It.


Th i s sect i o n occ u rs d u r i n g t h e g u it ar s o l o o n t h e t u n e "Cook i e s ," a n d s h o w s a
pract i c a l a p p l i cat i o n of m u l t i p l e h i - hats.

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_-"T-....--Jt1.---e:.
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""9--lt;-:tt----___..------H----+-----T---t-----___---++-_t_-____p_- _ _t
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Dru m m er H oward J o i nes u s ed d o u b l e h i -hats w h e n he p l ayed the Broadway s h o w


L ittle Shop O f Horrors , as s h o w n h e re .

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.. ___-.A---<OI----t'lI{__
---' -IOL...---JC"---ilL--.lOL--"r:lo...----=-'---,___"
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R . F .IB .D . ---+_-_.....,...."..---_1__--::a-f----,*::__---_r_-__:.II...._-----r---___:.-I

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47

CREDITS
G.ary Chester prayed on the fol/o win g hit reeords and I rma Frankl i n - Hr Name Is Irma I He/fo Again The Three Sons - 16 Gre a test Hits / CO(Jntry Music ShIndig I
albums: Astrid G i l berto-I Haven't Got A n ything Better To Do FUfJ /n The Sun
An gels-H My Boyfriend 's B ac k" Bo bby Goldsbo(o- Raindrops Are Fallin g / " I n The A u t u m n T l ppi e & The Clovers - h Bossa N ova Baby"
Paul Anka - " Lel's Sit ThIs One O u t ' 1 "My Broken Heart" I Of You r life" SCI,mmy T u r ne r - " Lavender B l ue"
"f'm C o mi ng Home'' 1 " M l r a nd a " I " I ' l l Never F i nd Le s l l e Gore - " It 's M y Party" J u n e V a l l i - " H u s h l i t t l e Baby" I " I 'm Afraid"
Another You" I " A l l Of M e" I " Cry" , " Esso Basso" I " I t Living G u i t a rs- Teen Bear Bobby V i n ! o n - " A l wyS In My Head" I"! Fa ll To Pieces" / " 1
O n l y I-.asts F o r A Li t t l e W h i le" I " H u sh Hu s h M y Broken Joel Hamel- Fly Me To The Moon Can'l Help I t " I "I C a n 't Stop loving You" I "Please H e l p
Heart" I "I'm Co mi n g Home" ' ''I Need You Now" } "Send Bob Hayley- "Does n ' t Anyb ody Make Short M ovies Any Me ['m Fail i n g " I Blue On B l u e I " Bl u e Velvet" I " Nobody
For Me" , "Pretend<T more" I "To n 1g /lt You Bel o ng To M e" I "The Key To Room Asking Questions') / " Ro ses Are Reel" I "Over And Over" I
The A r c h i es-Sugar, Sugar 303" ' ''You're Nobody T/lI Somebody Loves You" " You ' re Losing Your B a by " ' '' Alone'' I " Mr, Lone(y"
B u r t Bacharac h - " romjses, Pro m isel)" , " Reach Out" I Richard H ayman- Cinemagtc Sounds Adarn Wade-"Tum B ack, The H and s Of Time"
" AWe'" "Make It Easy On You rsel f" Hedge & Donrta-AI! The Friendly Colors I He-dge 8. Donna Dionna Warwick-" Walk On By" { "Do You Know The Way
LWerne Ba ke r- "Saved" I "Y o u 're T h e BoSS" t/ To San Jose" I "Wha! The World NeedS N ow " ' ' ' I ' l l Never
"(ony Barra- Re<1, While A n d B'ue _ Da.phne H e l f m a n - Holiday For Hay Fall ! n Love Ag ai n" , "Say A Utile Prayer" I " Pro m i se s
Vlnnie Bell Or ch est ra - Big Sixteen I Pop Goes The Electric George H u dson-It's TwIsting Time Prom ises" I " A n yo ne Who Had A Hea rt " J " Don't MaJ<e M e
Guitar Brian HylandSealed With A Kiss I ' Pledging M y Love" I Over" J " M a ke I t Easy On Your-self" I "Yo u W i l l Never Get
Belmonts- "When YOllr Lover Has Gone" I "Farewe ll " / " Devotd To Yo u " / " Lel Me Belo.n To You" I "lel lt D ie " To He.aven"
"Walk Down Th Road'" " ! ' I I Be Seeihg You" Is ley Brothers-HTwist And Shout" I " Your Old Lady Is M y D i n a h Was h l n g t o n - " Mood I nd i g o " I " G od B le ss ne
Wl l li e Bobo - Lel 's Go Bobo Old Lady Too" , " W r i t e T o M e " I ' ' I ' m A Fool For You" J Ch i ld " I "I'm A Fool To W a n t Y o u " I " St r an ge r In Town" I
U l l i a n B rI9gs-" 1 Want You" "O n e More T i me" " When Your L over Is Gone"
R u t h Brown - " N a-I u rally" / "A nyone B u t Y ou " I " S u re COOk E. Jarr- Pledging My Love l "Sw.eet Litlle YOIr" Andy Wll l l ams- "Can't Get Used To LOSing You" ( "Hope,
Enough " I " Here H e Comes" Jay & The AmerIcans-Stand By Me I She Cried I " S pan i sh less" I "Tonig ht" I Never On Sunday / "Summer Pl ac e" I
Anlta Bry ant- !'Love Le tt er s I n T he Sand" , "Misty" I All Harlem" J "Come A l i t tle B i l Closer" ! "Cara M i a" "Tender Is The N ight" , " H ('l l p Me" I " Don't You Befieve It"
ne Way Jack Jones-HParty" " <Dreaming: A l l T h e Time" I "Gift Of I "W0rl d Of The You f'lg "
Solomon Burke-"Walking: In The Foo t s t e ps " , " A Te ar Love" / " Pic k Up T he Pieces" Jackle Wfl son -Shake A H an d I "You'd BeUer Know"
Fe l l " , "cry To Me" I " A l most L os t My M i nd " I "I ReaUy Qu i ncy J ones- Hash Brown
Don' t Want To" j " M y He-ar! Is Cryi n g " ' ' ' Hom?'' / "You Sarnmy Kaye-"Charades"
Can Make l i l t Y o u Try" . Jim Kersich & The Jug Band-G arden Of Joy Gary has also rec;orded with the -fO!lowing artists:
Artie B u l l er-Have You Met M rs. Jones f "Free.dom" Ben E. K i n g - "Spanish Harl em" I " Don 't Play That Song" I Frankle Avalon, Tony Be 0 n-e Ut, Tommy Soyce, K!tty Callan,
A I Ca iol a- Th' Bes t 0/ AI Ca/ola I Tuff Guitars I C ove rs Gui , St a n d By Me" I "Here Comes The N i ght"' I "Yes" I Jo An n Campbell, Dlhanne Carrol, Chad &. Je remy, Chubby
tars "Eostasy" I "Amor" Checker, lou Christy, Don Come l l , The Creations, B in g
Cab Cal loway - Cab Cailowa.y '68 Ben Lanzaron i - In Classic Form Crosby, K i ng Cu rt-is, Danny Davis, Sammy Davis, J r . , The
The Ch l fton s - ' 'H e 's So F i n e" Cu rt is Lee - " An- ge l Eyes " / "Beverly Gene" I " Lonely Week J i mmy Dorsey Orchestra, Bob Dyla n , Shelly Fabares, J os e
J i mmy Cfanton-"Jus.t A Drea m " e n d " / " J ust Another Fool" I HA N i g h t Ai Daddy G ' S H Feliciano, The Four Lads, The Fou r Seasons, Sergio Franci,
Pe lula Clark-" Downlown" U t t l e An t h o ny & The I m perials- " O u t Of My H ea d " / "Tears The G Clefs, Scream i n ' Jay H awkins, Joey H ea t herlo n , AI
Buzz Ct ifford - " Magic Circle" I " Mov i ng Day" J " C a s t a O n M y Pi l l ow" H l rt , Llnda Hopkirrs, Lena Horne, Sissy H o u s ton, Tommy
ways" little Eva- ilLocomotton" Hunt, Jan & Dean, Fran Jeffrles, Johnny & The H u rricanes,
The Coas ters- " L i We Eg yp t" I "Wait A M i n u te" I " Thu mb Gloria Lodr g -And Now We Come To Distances Steve Lawrence, Th e Lease Breakers, Brenda Lee, Uttle
ing A Ride" Lay",' Spoon f u l - " Oo You Believe In M ag ic " Richard, Fra nkl e Lymol)., Tril'li Lo pez, Big Maybelle, Johnrty
Amanda Cole - " M iss Ha p p i n e ss " I "The I m age Of M e " , George M ahar i s - " Fools Rush I n " , "Love Me As r love Maest ro , Magu!re S i"s te rs, M i rlam Makeba, Herb! e M an n,
"Heartbreak USA" { " If You Cou l d Re ad My Mi nd " You" I " LQv M e Tender" I "Warm A l l Ove r" Peggy M arc h , Tony M a t t o l a , G l e n n M i l ler O rc h estra,
Cozy CQl e (wfGary Che s te r) - "Swinging Dru mmer" Barry Mann-Bless You J "The Way Of A Clown" / "Foot Mamas & Papas, Ralph Marterie Orchest ra, Art M o o ney
Cy Col em an- The- Age Of Rock Steps" Orch e s t ra, Rose M u rph y , The New Chri s t y M i n{l t rel s ,
Perry Come-No O th er L ove M a.nhattan Transter-Fair And Tender L a dles W i l son Plcke t t , Jan Pie rce , The Rocefe!lers, lommy
The Cookie s-" Ch a in s" ( "Stranger I n My Arms" Ray M a rt i n - Comic Strip Favorites Sands, lon n ! e Satin, Bobby ScoU , Pete Seegef, Del Sha(l'
Don Costa- Hully G ully Time i " H on ey suc kl e Rose" Chuck Marshall- Twist To Songs Everybody Knows non, Rob er ta Sherwood, Nancy Sinat ra, Frank Sinatra,
"Sugar B l u es" Clyde M c Ph a t ler- " W s A Love r' s Question" , "Cry i n g .
J l m my Smi t h, SOU l Machine, Sweethearts O t Rhythm, B.J_
Country J oe & Th e Fish-Dr. Hip ) Rhymes & Reaso ns Won ' t H e l p Y o u N o w " Th o mas, J ohnny Thunder, Cal Tjader. The Tokens; Ha nk
The C rests - "16 Candles" The M el low Klng s - "Walk S o ftl y" / " B ut You li e d " I Turner, TWIggy, Leslie Uggams, Jerry Vale, V i l l age Stomp
Jim C roce - "Tim e I n A Bo tU e" I Ba d, Bad, Leroy BroWf) I "I "Th ings I Love" ! " B roken H eart Symphony" ers, The Wanderers, Baby Washington, Joe Willlams_
Love You Wi th A S o ng" I "O p er ator" I Croce I Photo Garnett M i m s - Cry Baby
graphs And Memories The Monkees - " l ' m A Believer"
The Cryst al s - "Gee Whiz" I " Loo! In My Eyes!' t "Fra,nken Lou Mon te-"What D i d Washi ng ton Say" Gary has worked tor the foJ/o wlng con tractors and leaders;
stein Twjst'" Uptown I "Seventeen" J a ne Morgan- What Now My Love I Jane Morgan In Gold M a llny A l b u m , S la n A p p l ebaum, P a u l An ka, B U f t
J o h n n y Cymba f - " Mr. Bass Ma n" Van Morri son -" S row n Eyed G I rl'" T, B. Sheets Bacharach, S i d Bass, M i ke Bernik er H e r b B er n stei n ,
Bobby Darin-A rtific/a/ Flo wer I " M y Foo l i s h Heart" , Buddy Mo rrow-Beatlemania Ge:orge Brack man , J u l i u s Brandt, ,bol STauon, JOB Brook.s,
"Street Where You Live " I "Theme From Come Sep tem M urray Toe K - " Lonely TWister" I "Tw i st f n g Up A Storm" Arn o.l d Brown , Bert B u rns. Tony Cabot, Joe Caini, Frank
ber" ' '' Moon Ri ver" I "Someone Speci a l " l " D rea m Lover" J i m my M u n dy - On A Mundy Fligh t Carrol l , Paul Case, Cashman & West. Joe- Cinderelfa, M i ke
" 'At Last" t " Al l ln The Game" I ' 'WllI You lov.e M e Tomor Anthony Newl ey- " Wh a t Kind Of Fool Am I" I " C l a i re De Cl ic ki o, Don Costa, Ral p h Cum m i n gs, Clyde Davi s , PhI!
row" f " Ya Ya" Lune" I "A Lock Ot H a i r" ' ''Talk Of The Town" Davis, Pete DeAnglio, Lucien DeJe-sus, M l I ton Delygg, 8urt
Delta Rhythm Boys- " L1 t t l e J l m m y F r o m Texas" I Way ne Newton - " Dad d y Don't You Walk So Fas t " Dlcatoe, Don EWo ! , Ray E l l i s" Jack Fe-ilce, Bob Fel le r, Bob
"Bewitched" Laura Nyro-New York TefJdaberry Finez, Ronnie Frangiopan l, Mark Fredricks, Ray Free, Ed
J0hn Denver-"Rocky M ou nt ai n H i g h " I Pra yers & Prom' Tony Orlando.- Bless You / " Wi l l You love Me Tomorrow" I Friedman, AI Gargon l, J6h nny Gart., Mfckey Ge-nfife, Bill
ises I Fa/ewell Andromeda ! A /rie "My B aby' s A Strang er'" " M y Mother'" " Lovi n g TO UCh'" G i ant, Henry Glover, Le-ray Gloverl J ack Gold, Wal l y Geld,
Jacl<ie OeShannon-"What The World Needs N o w" "Some Kind Of Wonderful" I "Tal ki ng About You" I Goldi Gotdmar, George Golner, Tornmy Goodman, E l l /a
The DevoUons-"How Do You S pea k To An A n gel " " D rea m Lover" Greenwi-ch, Stan Grenberg, M o rt y Gru pp, Ray Haley, Al
The D ia ls - " Th e Start Of A New Romance" Pa t t i La 8elle & The B l u e be l l s - Over The Rainbow Hamm, Art Harris, J l m Ha skel l, J u He H e ld, Lee Holdrl dge,
The Driftets - " U p On The Roof" I " Under The Boa.d wa l k" I Tom Paxton- Heroes Marvin H o l s m a n , F r an k H u nter, George H u n ter, Dick
"I Count The Tears" I " Som e Kind Of Wo nderftJ l" I Johnny Pi napple- Fresh Joh nn y Plnappte Jacobs, J ay & The Americans, Henry Jerome, Jerry Jerome,
"Please $tay" / " RoomfUl Of Tears" ' ' ' I ' l l Take You Where Gene Plt ney-It Hur ts To Be In Love I The Pick. Of G ene Qui ncy Jones, Ed Kaloff, Ar'tie l<aplan, Dave Kapp, Danny
The M u sic Is Playing" , "Save The Last D ance For Me" I Pitney I "Every B reat h I Tak.e" I W0rld Wide Winners K e s l e r, B u rt Keye s, Ca r o l K i n g , LeToy K i rk l a nd , Don
"W hen My L i t t l e G.irl l s Smiling" Platte r s - " M y Prayer" j "Great Prete n der " Ki rsh ne r, Terry K n i ght, S t eve Lawrence & Edie Gorme,
Bobby Oukeoff-On Th e Cuff Arlhur Prysock-" A prl l In Paris" I "When I F a l ! In Love" J Sonn y Lester, Jack Lewis, Jerry l iebe r & M i ke ::;totler,
The Edsels - 'Iyou Know I Do" I " P i l low Cou ld T a l k " / " I ' m G lad There Is You" Ca thy Linn, Sammy Loew, A I L o rber, Joe M a l l n , Matty M a n
" Shake Shake She rry" Johnny Rae- "Walking I n T h e RaIn" n i n g, Trade M artin, Tom Motgan , Van McGoy, Bob Mersey.
les Elg art - The Twist Goes To Colfege Del l a Reese - " A Far Bet 1e r Th i ng " I " A l l Tt1e Wo rl d Loves A 0.8. M essengi l , J o h n n y Me sner, Hal M i les, H e l e n M i ller,
The "Everly Brolhers-"Crylng In Tile R ai n " Lover" H u g o M ont en eg ro, J i m my M u ndy, Charlte N.ai tor, Ed New.
Exclters- "Tell H i m " J l m my Ricks - U H f Lily, Hi Lo" I " Young A t Heart" mark, AI N evi ns, Fred Norman, Laura Nyro, Kl aus Obe rm an ,
Ferrante & Teicher -Kllllng M e Sollly I Midnig h t Cowboy I Slan R u b i n - Open House i "Tiger Town 5" I The Iyy League M i l t Okum, L'e- Packrus, Fe l i x Papp i lardl, Johnny Prke(,
Piano Portraits Jazz Ban d Ball Gene Pesllre, To n y Pi a n o , Ann Phi l l i ps , Jerry Aagavoy, Wal,
The Five Sat i ns - " S t i l l Of Toe N i g h t " Ruby &. T h e Romantics-" Our Day Will Come" l e r Ram, P Ramohe, Ted dy Rando, Joe Ranzet t l , Ha le
TtJe Fo ur Colns- "To Love" / "M o on Of Monacurl" I ",Wide Bobby Ryd o l l - " Forgei H i m" 1 ' ' Wild O h e " J " I ' l l N ver Rood, Jerome Richardsof"l, Paul Robinson, BW Romale,
Wide Worl d" I "Wish You Were Here" I "Windows Of D ance Again'" " I f It Hadn't B e en For You" , " E very L i t t l e Richard Rome, Steve Rossi, Chuck. Sag le , Russ Sava,kis,
H eave n " ! '" Be!ieve" ' ''You W i l l Never Walk Alone-" ' ' ' L it Some-t h in g " I " Don ' t Take Me F o r Granted" Jack Schanland, Don S ebesky, Gary Sherman, J oe Sher
tie Bit Closer" " ' From Your Very Own Li ps" Frect<1le Sco t t - " H ey G i rl " man, Bobby Sl1orl, Phil Spec tor, B l l f y Strange, Barbra
Connie Franei s - " I ' m Gon n a Be Warm This Winter" / Hazel Scott- "St. L O U i s Blue s" I "Aft er Hours'" " M y L i t t l e Streisand, C raig Taylor, Jack Urban, N i c k Venet, J o h n
" Mov ie Queen" I " P l ayi ng Ga mes" f "Saturday N ig h t " I Guy" Wal sh, Jerry Wexler, P a t W i l l i am s, Teacho Wi ls h i re, J er ry
" Giv e Me Back My Heart" / "Ain 'l That Better B aby" I Neil Se-daka - " C a l e ndar Girl" I " Break i ng U p Is Hard To W i l i ner, H u go W i n te r h a l ter, G ret ch en wyler, Max Zeppos
" D on ' t Cry On My Shol,Jl de r" I " Love B i rd" I "Pray For Me" 00" 1 "Hap py Bi rthday Sweet 1 6' " ut fle Devil
1 "lonely Star" I " Plea se Do Go" J "The G i r l l n Me" J "Cas Shangrl .las - " Remember W a l king In The Sand "
tie In The Sky" I " (=f a l l Heaven J Half H ear tache" , "Silver The Sh i re l l s -"W I I I You S t i l l Love Me To morrow" , " ! I 's MO'lles: The LoVe Of Ivy, Sleeping Giant, Viva Max, Tici Tio/,
And Gole " ' ' ' I Do n 't Need You" / " Puddle Of L ove" / " Your Love That Counts" / "What's The Malter" ' " ' l D i d n ' t Mean Daddy You Kill Me, Mon ey Talks, Parade,. The Wrong Damn
S k i es Of Bl ue" To H u rl Y ou " Film, Heartbreak Kfd., Se c re l File,- Targel In Th-e SunLCry Of
Arelh.a Frankl i n - Rockaby My Baby I "God Bl es s The Simon & Garf u nkel- "The Boxer'" " Frank 1 I 0yd Wrig hl" Ttie Wolf, Hotfoot, Jolll1ny We Hardly knew You, }t 's'A 'Mad
Child" r "K iss U nder The M i s t letoe" I 'Ask About You" / J o a n i e Su m m e rs - u t N e ed Your love" I "J o h n ny G.el Mad, Mad, Mad Wo rld, The Shark, Tile Boys In The Band,
"H ow Deep Is The Oceao " I "Si lver Li ni ng" ' ' ' I ' m S i t t i ng A n g ry" I " S u m m er Place" J " Shake H an d s With A Foo l " I Minority By Choice, Law And Disorder, Bob & Carat, Ted &
On Top at The Worl d" l "Lover Come Back" " S i n c e Randy M oved Away" Mice_
48

The drummers wh ose com m en ts are listed belo w are the grea test exponen ts of my m e th o d. In my opinion, these
are the upand-co m in g drumm ers o f today.
- G a ry Ch e s ter

G a r y ' s s y s t e m s h ave h e l p e d m e t o m ak e t re m e n d o u s i m p rove m e n t in m y t i me fe e l , c o o rd i n a t i o n , s t u d i o p l ay i n g ,


a n d overal l a p p roac h t o t h e d r u m s et. I reco m m e n d t h i s b o o k to a l l s e r i o u s s t u de n t s of t h e d r u m s
- Danny G o t tlieb

T h ro u g h w o r k i n g, w i t h G ary Che s t e r ' s syste m s i n c o n j u n c t i o n w i t h a c l i c k t rac k , my t i me h a s i m p roved d ra m a t i


c a l l y . I h ave becom e m uc h m o re a w a re of e a c h n o t e I p l ay, m y l i s t e n i n g s pe c t ru m h a s o pe n ed w a y u p , a n d m y
a m b i d e x t e r i t y h as i m p roved t r e m e n d o u s l y . M os t i m po rt a n t , m y m e a n s o f e x p res s i o n h as b e e n g reat l y e n h a n c e d ,
- G a ry Seligson

G ary C h e s t e r' s syst e m s s t re n g t h e n t i m e c o n c e p t , coord i n a t i o n , a n d m e n t a l a w a r e n e s s .


- R o b G reenfield

G ary's syst e m s a re t h e u l t i m a t e i n coord i n at i o n a n d c o n ce n t rat i o n . I f y o u c a n i m ag i n e o n e d r u m m e r so u n d i n g


l i ke t h ree o r f o u r d ru m m e rs , yo u ' re o n t h e r i g h t t ra c k .
- Tony Cruz

G a r y ' s t e ac h i n g s y s t e m is t h e m o s t c h a l l e n g i n g I ' ve ever see n . It foc u ses on re ad i n g , c o o rd i n at io n , t i m e , fee l , a n d


c o n c e n t ra t i o n l e v e l a l l at t he s a m e t i m e .
- Da ve 'Weekl

G a ry ' s m e t h o d of t e ac h i n g h a s s h o w n me t h e t ru e m e a n i n g of coord i n at io n , a n d h o w to accom p l i s h t h e s a m e


t h i n g s w i t h m y l eft h a n d t h at I c a n do w i t h m y r i g h t .
- Chris Harfenist

From st u d y i n g G a ry Chester's s y s t e m s , m y read i n g h a s i m p roved t o the pa i n t w h e re I c a n read t h ree t o f o u r l i n e s


s i m u l t an eo u s l y at s i g h t . A l so , m y ab i l i t y t o e)(ec u te d H fi c u l t parts h a s i m p roved t o w h e re a n yt h i n g /. p l ay o r read i n
a work i n g s i t u a t i o n s e e m s i n c red i b l y e a s y.
- Roger Post

Th ro u g h G a ry ' s a p p ro ac h , I c a n e x p ress m ys e l f as never before. H e h a s g i ve n m e a c o m p l et e c o n ce p t of my


i nstru m e n t .
- Jim m y ValJjs

Th ro u g h G ary C h e s t e r ' s a p p ro a c h to t h e d ru mse t , I d i s cove red two d i f f e re nt p e r so n a l i t i es i n m y p l ayi n g . By


lead i n g w it h e i t h e r t h e r i g h t h a n d or t h e l e f t h a n d , I c a n c reate two c o m p l et e l y d i f fe re n t s o u n d s. Th i s c o n ce pt h as
'
worked very s u ccess f u l l y i n m y reco rd i n g a n d p e rform i n g w i t h t h e J o h n C o u g a r M e l l e n c a m p ban d .
- Kenny A ronoff

G a ry's syst e m s are e x c e l l e n t for deve l o p i n g t h e s k i l l s a n d c o n c e p ts n e cessary tOl good d ru m m i n g as wel l as


good m u s i c i a n s h i p .
- H o ward Joines

G a ry' s sys t e m s h ave h e l p e d m e d eve l o p a m u c h s t r o n g e r se n se o f t i m e and aware n e s s i n c o n j u n c t i o n w i t h f l ow


a n d s e n s i t i v i ty . M o s t i m p o r t a n t l y t h e s y s t e m s have g i ven me t h e s t ro n g es t s e n se of b a l a n ce a n d c e n t e r I h ave
ever expe r i e n ced beh i n d t h e d r u m s .