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Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual

Revision: Final Draft


Document Front Matter: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Cargo Operating Manual Section 2: Properties of LNG 3.2.2d Filter Alarm and Trend Screen Shot
3.2.3a Extension Alarm Panel
List of Contents 3.2.3b Watch Call Screen Shot
2.1 Properties of LNG
Issue and Update CONTROL
2.1.1 Physical Properties and Composition of LNG 3.3 Custody Transfer System (CTS)
mechanical Symbols and Colour Scheme
Illustrations 3.3.1 Saab Radar Primary System (Radar Gauges and
Electrical and Instrumentation Symbols
Custody Transfer System)
Introduction

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2.1.1a Properties of LNG and Methane 3.3.2 Float Level Gauge
2.1.1b Variation of Boiling Point of Methane with Pressure 3.3.3 Omicron EHL and HHL Independent Level Alarms
Section 1: Design Concept of the Vessel 2.1.1c Relative Density of Methane and Air 3.3.4 Trim and List Indicator
3.3.5 Loading Computer

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2.2 Characteristics of LNG Illustrations
1.1 Principal Particulars
2.2.1 Flammability of Methane, Oxygen and Nitrogen 3.3.1a Saab Tank Level Monitor Display
1.1.1 Principal Particulars of the Ship Mixtures 3.3.1b Saab Radar System
1.1.2 Principal Particulars of Cargo Equipment and 2.2.2 Supplementary Characteristics 3.3.1c IAS Custody Transfer Screen Shot
Machinery 3.3.1d Custody Transfer Data
Illustrations
1.1.3 General Arrangement 3.3.1e Certificate of Loading
1.1.4 Tanks and Capacity Plan 2.2.1a Flammability of Methane, Oxygen and Nitrogen 3.3.2a Whessoe Gauge System
Mixtures 3.3.2b Whessoe Float Level Gauge
Illustrations
2.2.2a Structural Steel Ductile to Brittle Transition Curve

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3.3.3a High Level and Overfill Alarm System
1.1.3a General Arrangement 3.3.4a Trim and List Indicators
1.1.3b Cargo Machinery Room Layout 3.3.5a Loading Computer
2.3 Health Hazards
1.1.4a Tank Location Plan 3.3.5b Load Computer (Cargo Screen)
Illustrations 3.3.5c Loading Computer (Load Summary)
1.2 Rules and Regulations 2.3a Methane Safety Card 3.3.5d Loading Computer (Bending Moments)
2.3b Nitrogen Safety Card
Section 4: Cargo and Ballast Systems
1.3


Cargo System Technology
1.3.1
1.3.2
Illustrations
Cargo Containment System Principle
GTT Mark III Cargo Containment
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Section 3: Integrated Automation System (IAS)

3.1 Cargo Control Room Arrangement


4.1


Cargo Manifold
4.1.1
4.1.2
Cargo Manifold System
Cargo Strainers
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Illustrations
1.3.1a Cargo Tank Lining Reinforcement Illustrations
1.3.2a Membrane Cargo Containment (GTT Mark III) 3.1a Cargo Control Room Layout
3.1b Cargo Control Room Console 4.1.1a Cargo Manifold (Port Side)
1.3.2b Interbarrier Space (IBS) Insulation Space (IS) Flat 4.1.1b Drain and Inlet Manifold Pipes and Loading Arms
Panel Junction 4.1.2a Cargo Strainer
1.3.2c IBS IS Section of Longitudinal Corner 3.2 Integrated Automation System (IAS)
1.3.2d Hull Steel Grades
3.2.1 IAS Overview 4.2 Cargo Piping System

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3.2.2 IAS Control Station Operation
1.4 Hazardous Areas and Gas Dangerous Zones 4.2.1 Cargo Piping
3.2.3 Extension Alarm System
Illustrations 4.2.2 Cargo Pipe Insulation
Illustrations Illustrations
1.4a Hazardous Areas and Gas Dangerous Zone Plan 4.2.1a Cargo Piping System
3.2.1a IAS Architecture
3.2.1b Cargo Mimic Index Screen Shot 4.2.1b No.2 Cargo Tank Arrangement
3.2.2a Cargo Plant Overview Screen Shot 4.2.1c Spiral Wound Gasket
3.2.2b Cargo Control Room IAS Annunciator Keyboard
3.2.2c Fuel Gas Network Overview Screen Shot

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Front Matter - Page 1 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Front Matter: British Emerald Date: September 2008

4.3 Cargo Pumps 4.7.2a Natural Boil-Off Mist Separator Screen Shot 4.12.2b IBS and IS Pressure Control Table
4.7.3a Forcing Boil-Off Mist Separator Screen Shot 4.12.2c Cargo Tank Pressure Table
4.3.1 Main Cargo Pumps
4.12.3a Typical Pipeline Relief Valve
4.3.2 Stripping/Spray Pumps

4.3.3 Emergency Cargo Pump 4.8 Nitrogen Generator
4.13 Ballast Level and Ships Draught Gauging System
Illustrations
Illustrations
4.13.1 Ballast Piping System
4.3.1a Main Cargo Pumps

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4.8a Nitrogen Generator 4.13.2 Ballast Level and Draught Indicating System
4.3.1b Main Cargo Pump Start Screen Shot
4.8b Nitrogen Generator Screen Shot 4.13.3 Ballast Exchange System
4.3.2a Stripping/Spray Pumps
4.8c Nitrogen System Screen Shot
4.3.2b Spray Pump Start Screen Shot
Illustrations
4.3.3a Emergency Cargo Pump

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4.9 Inert Gas and Dry-Air Generator 4.13.1a Water Ballast System
4.3.3b Emergency Pump Control Screen Shot
4.13.1b Ballast Pumps Screen Shot
Illustrations 4.13.1c Ballast System Screen Shot
4.4 Cargo Compressors 4.13.2a Pulse Radar Type Draught and Tank Level Indicating
4.9a Inert Gas and Dry-Air Generator
4.4.1 High Duty Compressor System
4.9b Inert Gas Cooler and Dryer System
4.4.2 Low Duty Compressors 4.13.2b Ballast Level Gauge
4.9c Inert Gas System on Deck
4.13.2c Independent Level Alarm System
Illustrations

4.4.1a High Duty Compressor 4.10 Fixed Gas Sampling and Gas Detection Systems
Section 5: Cargo Auxiliary and Deck Systems

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4.4.1b High Duty Compressor Control Screen Shot
4.4.1c High Duty Compressor Monitoring Screen Shot Illustrations
4.4.2a Low Duty Compressor 4.10a Gas Detection System 5.1 Temperature Monitoring System
4.4.2b Low Duty Compressor Control Screen Shot 4.10b Gas Detection Panel
4.4.2c Low Duty Compressor Monitoring Screen Shot 4.10c Gas Detection System Machinery Trip Cause and Illustrations
Effect 5.1a Temperature Sensors in Secondary Barrier, Trunk Deck
4.5 Boil-Off/Warm-Up Heaters and Duct Keel
4.11 Emergency Shutdown System 5.1b Temperature Sensors in Cofferdams
Illustrations


4.5a
4.5b
Boil-Off/Warm-Up Heaters
Boil-Off/Warm-Up Screen Shot
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4.11.1
4.11.2
Illustrations
Emergency Shutdown and Tank Protection System
Ship-Shore Link - Pneumatic
5.1c Temperature Monitoring Screen Shot

5.2 Interbarrier Space and Insulation Space Pressure Control

Illustrations
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4.6 LNG Vaporiser 4.11.1a Emergency Shutdown System Architecture
4.11.1b Fibre-Optic/Electric System Configuration Module 5.2a Nitrogen Pressure Control System Screen Shot
Illustrations 4.11.1c Control Panels 5.2b No.1 Tank Nitrogen Pressure Control System Screen
4.11.1d System Block Shot
4.6a LNG Vaporisers
4.11.2a Emergency Air System
4.6b LNG Vaporisers Screen Shot
4.11.2b ESDS Screen Shot
4.11.2c Control Flow Chart for ESDS 5.3 Cofferdam Heating System
4.7 Forcing Vaporiser and Mist Separator 5.3.1 Glycol Water Heater
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4.7.1 Forcing Vaporiser 4.12 Relief Systems 5.3.2 Cofferdam Heating and Control
4.7 2 Natural Boil-Off Mist Separator 5.3.3 Hull Ventilation
4.12.1 Cargo Tank Relief Valves
4.7.3 Forcing Boil-Off Mist Separator Illustrations
4.12.2 Insulation Space Relief Valves
4.7.4 Spray Pre-Coolers
4.12.3 Pipeline Relief Valves 5.3.1a Glycol Water Heater System in the Cargo Motor Room
Illustrations 5.3.2a Cofferdam Heating Control System Screen Shot
Illustrations
4.7.1a Forcing Vaporiser 5.3.2b Cofferdam Heating System
4.12.1a Pressure Relief Valve Operation 5.3.3a Hull Ventilation
4.7.1b Forcing Vaporiser Screen Shot
4.12.2a Pilot Operated Safety Relief Valve

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Front Matter - Page 2 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Front Matter: British Emerald Date: September 2008

5.4 Fire Fighting Systems 6.2 Post Dry Dock Operation 6.5 Loaded Voyage with Boil-off Gas Burning
5.4.1 Engine Room Fire Main System 6.2.1 Initial Insulation Space Inerting 6.5.1 Gas Burning Overview
5.4.2 Fire and Deck Wash System 6.2.2 Drying Cargo Tanks 6.5.2 Operational Overview of the Fuel Gas System
5.4.3 Sea Water Spray System 6.2.3 Inerting Cargo Tanks
Illustration
5.4.4 Deck Dry Powder System 6.2.4 Gassing-Up Cargo Tanks
5.4.5 CO2 Fire Extinguishing System 6.2.5 Cooling Down Cargo Tanks 6.5.1a Gas Firing (Tank Pressure Control)
5.4.6 Fire Detection System 6.5.2a Gas Firing with Forcing Vaporiser

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Illustrations
5.4.7 Quick-Closing Valves, Fire Dampers and 6.5.2b Gas Firing with Forcing Vaporiser - Return to Shore
Emergency Stops System 6.2.1a Initial Insulation Space Inerting 6.5.2c Gas Combustion Unit Screen Shot
5.4.8 Engine Room Water Mist Fire Extinguishing System 6.2.2a Drying Cargo Tanks (Summer) 6.5.2d Vent Mast Screen Shot
5.4.9 Galley Deep Fat Fryer Wet Chemical System 6.2.2b Drying Cargo Tanks (Winter) 6.5.2e Fuel Gas Management Overview Screen Shot

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5.4.10 First Aid Fire Fighting System 6.2.3a Inerting 6.5.2f Fuel Gas Management Screen Shot
6.2.4a Gassing-Up (Venting) 6.5.2g LD Start Sequence on GCU Screen Shot
Illustrations
6.2.4b Gassing Up - GCU 6.5.2h Forcing Vaporiser Screen Shot
5.4.1a Engine Room Fire Main System 6.2.4c Gassing-Up (Return to Shore) 6.5.2i Forced Gas Sequence Engines Running
5.4.2a Fire and Deck Wash System 6.2.5a Initial Cooling Down
5.4.3a Water Spray System 6.6 Discharging
5.4.4a Dry Powder System on Deck 6.3 Ballast Passage 6.6.1 Preparations for Discharging
5.4.4b Dry Powder System 6.3.1 Cooling Down Cargo Tanks Prior to Arrival 6.6.2 Liquid Line Cooldown Before Discharging
5.4.5a CO2 Fire Extinguishing System 6.3.2 Spraying During Ballast Voyage, Single Tank 6.6.3 Arm Cooldown Before Discharging

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5.4.6a Fire Detection Panel 6.3.3 Sloshing Inside the Cargo Tanks 6.6.4 Discharging With Vapour Return from Shore
5.4.7a Quick-Closing Valves and Fire Dampers System 6.6.5 Discharging Without Vapour Return from Shore
Illustrations
5.4.8a Water Mist Fire Extinguishing System 6.6.6 Ballasting
6.3a Ballast Voyage
Illustrations
6.3.1a Cooling Down Cargo Tanks Prior to Arrival on Ballast
5.5 Cargo Machinery Fresh Water Cooling System
Voyage 6.6.1a Preparation for Discharging
6.3.2a Cooling Down Single Cargo Tank Prior to Arrival on 6.6.2a Liquid Line Cooldown Before Discharge
Illustrations
Ballast Voyage 6.6.3a Arm Cooldown Before Discharge
5.5a Cargo Machinery Fresh Water Cooling System

5.6 Forward Bilge System

Illustrations ft
6.4 Loading


6.4.1
6.4.2
Preparations for Loading
Cargo Lines Cooldown





6.6.4a
6.6.4b
6.6.4c
6.6.5a
6.6.5b
LNG Discharge With Vapour Return from Shore
Four Step Discharge Screen Shot
Eight Step Discharge Screen Shot
LNG Discharge Without Vapour Return from Shore
Manifold Screen Shot
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6.4.3 Loading Cargo with Vapour Return to Shore via One 6.6.6a Ballasting - Pumping
5.6a Forward Bilge System High Duty Compressor 6.6.6b Ballast Pump Screen Shot
5.6b Bilge System on Deck 6.4.4 Draining and Inerting Manifold Pipes and Loading
Arms
6.7 Pre Dry Dock Operations
Section 6: Cargo Operations 6.4.5 Deballasting
6.7.1 Stripping and Line Draining
Illustrations
6.7.2 Tank Warm-Up
6.1 Insulation Space Pressurising 6.4.1a Preparations for Loading 6.7.3 Gas Freeing
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6.1.1 Insulation Space Inerting 6.4.2a Cargo Line Cooldown 6.7.4 Aerating
6.1.2 In-Service Test 6.4.3a To Load Cargo With Vapour Return to Shore
Illustrations
6.4.3b Cargo Manifold Screen Shot
Illustrations 6.4.3c Loading No.1 and No.2 Tanks Screen Shot 6.7.1a Stripping to No.3 Tank while Maintaining Gas Burning
6.1.1a No.1 Tank Nitrogen Pressure Control System Screen 6.4.3d Loading No.3 and No.4 Tanks Screen Shot 6.7.1b Stripping All Tanks without Maintaining Gas Burning
Shot 6.4.4a Manifold/ Shore Lines Draining 6.7.2a Warming-Up -1st Step with Gas Burning
6.1.1b IBS and IS Piping Arrangement 6.4.5a Deballasting - Running 6.7.2b Warming-Up - 2nd Step
6.1.1c Insulation Space Inerting 6.4.5b Deballasting - Pumping 6.7.3a Gas Freeing the Cargo Tanks
6.1.2a In-Service Test 6.4.5c Ballast System Screen Shot 6.7.3b Inert Gas System Valves

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Front Matter - Page 3 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Front Matter: British Emerald Date: September 2008

6.7.3c Gas Freeing Liquid Lines 7.4 Emergency Cargo Pump Installation
6.7.3d Gas Freeing Spray Lines
6.7.3e Gas Freeing Machinery Space and Vapour Line Illustrations
6.7.4a Aerating Cargo Tanks 7.4a Emergency Cargo Pump Installation Sequence

6.8 One Tank Operations 7.5 Fire and Emergency Breakaway

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6.8.1 Warm-Up
6.8.2 Gas Freeing 7.6 Ship-to-Ship Transfer
6.8.3 Aerating 7.6.1 General Safety
6.8.4 One Tank Drying/Inerting 7.6.2 Pre-Mooring Preparations

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6.8.5 One Tank Gassing-Up and Cooling Down 7.6.3 Mooring
Illustrations 7.6.4 Transfer Operations
7.6.5 Unmooring
6.8.1a Warming-Up - One Tank
6.8.2a Gas Freeing - One Tank
6.8.3a Aeration - One Tank 7.7 Cold Spots on Inner Hull
6.8.4a Drying - One Tank
6.8.4b Inerting - One Tank
6.8.5a Gassing-Up - One Tank 7.8 LNG Jettison
6.8.5b Cooldown - One Tank

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Illustrations
7.8a LNG Jettison
Section 7: Emergency Procedures
7.9 Vent Mast on Fire
7.1 LNG Vapour Leakage into Barrier Spaces

Illustrations
7.1a Interbarrier Space Purge

7.2 LNG Liquid Leakage into the Interbarrier Spaces (IBS)

Illustrations ft
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7.2a LNG Leakage to IBS
7.2b Portable Liquid Level Gauge

7.3 Water Leakage to Insulation Space (IS)

Illustrations
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7.3a Water Evacuation from Insulation Space
7.3b Water Evacuation from Insulation Space
7.3c Leakage Pipe

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Front Matter - Page 4 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Front Matter: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Issue and Update Control This manual was produced by:

This manual is provided with a system of issue and update control. WORLDWIDE MARINE TECHNOLOGY LTD.

Controlling documents ensures that: For any new issue or update contact:

Documents conform to a standard format; The Technical Director

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Dee House
Amendments are carried out by relevant personnel; Zone 2
Each document or update to a document is approved before Parkway

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issue; Deeside Industrial Park
CH5 2NS
A history of updates is maintained; UK
Updates are issued to all registered holders of documents;
E-Mail: manuals@wmtmarine.com
Sections are removed from circulation when obsolete.

Document control is achieved by the use of the footer provided on every page

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and the issue and update table below.

In the right-hand corner of each footer are details of the pages section number
and title followed by the page number of the section. In the left-hand corner of
each footer is the issue number.

Details of each section are given in the first column of the issue and update
control table. The table thus forms a matrix into which the dates of issue of the
original document and any subsequent updated sections are located.

The information and guidance contained herein is produced for the assistance
of certificated officers who by virtue of such certification are deemed
competent to operate the vessel to which such information and guidance refers. ft
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Any conflict arising between the information and guidance provided herein and
the professional judgement of such competent officers must be immediately
resolved by reference to the Technical Operations Office.
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Front Matter - Page 5 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Front Matter: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Cargo Symbols and Colour Scheme

Sounding Head with


Stop Valve Storm Valve With Hand Wheel Spool Piece Drain Silencer
Screwed Cap

Sounding Head with Self-


LNG Liquid Screw-Down Non-Return Overboard Discharge Centrifugal Fan Bilge Hat
Closing Cap and Sampling
Valve
Cock (Self-Closing)

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LNG Vapour
P1 P2 Float Type Air Pipe Head FI Flow Meter Fusible Plug
Angle Stop Valve Pressure Reducing Valve
(With Insect Screen)
Warm LNG Vapour

S
Inert Gas Angle Screw-Down Non- Float Type Air Pipe Head Thermometer Pocket
Solenoid Valve Drain Trap
Return Valve (With Flame-Proof Screen)

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Domestic Fresh Water
A Air Trap / Deaerating Valve
Lift Check Non-Return Valve Vent Pipe with Boss
Air Motor Valve Flame Screen
High Temperature Cooling Water

Swing Check Non-Return M


Low Temperature Cooling Water Foot Valve Boss and Plug
Valve Electric Motor Valve Vent Pipe

Nitrogen
Suction Bellmouth Needle Valve and V-Port Valve Simplex Auto
Gate Valve Diaphragm Operated Valve
Backflushing Filter

Sea Water Diaphragm Operated Valve Simplex Water Strainer

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Butterfly Valve with Positioner (3-Way Control) Needle Valve Dublex Oil Strainer

Hydraulic Oil
W Wax Expansion
Ball Valve Sea Chest
Type Control Valve Locked Cock Oil Tray Coaming
Lubricating Oil

A Butterfly Valve With


Saturated Steam 2-Way Cock Mud Box Auto Vent Valve Ullage Stand with Cover
Air Actuator

Condensate
3-Way Cock (L-Type) Piston Valve Rose Box Remote Operated Valve Pressure Reducing Device

Feed Water

Fire/Deck Water
3-Way Cock (T-Type)

ft Hose Valve

Pilot Operated Tank


Y-Type Strainer

Observation Glass
Emergency Shut-Off Valve
(Wire Operated)

Cylinder Operated Valve with


Scupper
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CO2 Safety / Relief Valve Positioner (3-Way Control A Air Horn
Relief Valve
Rotary Plug Type)
Fuel Oil
Valve Locked Water Separator Self-Contained Type
Angle Safety / Relief Valve S Steam Horn
Open Closed Control Valve
Marine Diesel Oil

Regulating Valve Orifice Gear or Screw Type Pump Simplex Oil Strainer Discharge/Drain
Sludge/Waste Oil

Normally Open
Air
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Self-Closing Valve Blind (Blank) Flange Centrifugal Pump Hopper Without Cover N.O or N.C or
Normally Closed
Bilges
Quick-Closing Valve Flexible Hose Eductor (Ejector) Hopper With Cover Tank Penetration
(Hydraulic Operated)
Electrical Signal

Quick-Closing Valve Spectacle Flange Hand Pump Hose Coupling


(Air Operated) Open Shut
Instrumentation

Flap Check Non-Return


Valve

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Front Matter - Page 6 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Front Matter: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Electrical and Instrumentation Symbols


CP Capacitance RI RPM Indicator
A: Ammeter CI Compound Indication RCO RPM Counter
6,600V AC Earth AMC: A series Marine Controller
CO2 CO2 Meter RX Revolution Transmitter
AS: Ammeter Selection Switch
O2 O2 Meter RC Revolution Controller
AVC: Alstom Vessel Control
DP Differential Pressure SAH Salinity Alarm (High)
Battery bank BCS: Emergency Generator ACB Switch
440V AC DPAH Differential Pressure Alarm (High) SI Salinity Indication
BCS-B1: No.1 Bus Tie ACB Control Switch
BCS-B2: No.2 Bus Tie ACB Control Switch DPS Differential Pressure Switch SX Salinity Transmitter

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CB: Circuit-Breaker DPX Differential Pressure Transmitter SM Smoke Indication
220V AC 10M Manual Control
I/O Ethernet Network COS-A: Control Mode Selection Switch DPI Differential Pressure Indicator SMX Smoke Transmitter
COS-BT: Bus Tie Control Mode Key Switch DTAH Differential Temperature Alarm (High) TR Temperature Recorder
COS-M: Control Position Selection Switch (ESB-IAS) EM Electromagnetic Flow Meter TOC Temperature Control
Vacuum Circuit-Breaker Redundant 100M CTT: Current Test Terminals FAL Flow Alarm (Low/Non) TI Temperature Indication

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(Open Position) Ethernet Network ECR: Engine Control Room
FOC Flow Controller TIAH Temperature Alarm/Indicator (High)
ECS: Engine Control Switch - Start/Stop
FX Flow Transmitter TIAL Temperature Alarm/Indicator (Low)
Vacuum Circuit-Breaker 10M Field I/O EGD: Ethernet Global Data
FI Flow/Frequency Indication TIAHL Temperature Alarm High/Low Indicator
(Closed Position) Ethernet Network ETS: Earth Test Switch
F: Frequency Meter FS Flow Switch TS Temperature Switch
FVS: Frequency and Voltmeter Selection Switch FSL Flow Slowdown (Low/Non) TT Temperature Transmitter
Vacuum Circuit-Breaker GCS: Governor Control Switch FLG Float Type Level Gauge TSH Temperature Shutdown (High)
(Closed or Open Position) HM: Run Hour Meter HY Hydrazine Detector/Meter TSL Temperature Shutdown (Low)
IRM: Insulation Resistance Meter H 2O Hydrometer VX Vacuum Transmitter
I/O: Input/Output LAH Level Alarm (High) VS Vacuum Switch
Air Circuit-Breaker LT: Lamp Test Pushbutton LAVH Level Alarm (Very High) VA Vacuum Alarm
MB: Machine Bridge VSH Vibration Shutdown
LAEH Level Alarm (Extremely High)

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NB: Network Bridge
LAHH Level Alarm (High High) VI Viscosity Indication
Moulded Case Circuit- PB: Port Synchroconverter
LAL Level Alarm (Low) VC Valve Control
Breaker PC: Port Propulsion Control Cabinet
PE: Port Propulsion Excitation Cabinet LOC Level Controller VAH Viscosity Alarm (High)
PEC: Power Electronic Controller LCH Level Controller (High Alarm) VAHL Viscosity Alarm (High/Low)
Vacuum Contactor Switch
PHS: Panel Heater Switch LCL Level Controller (Low Level) VAL Viscosity Alarm (Low)
with Fuse
PLC: Programmable Logic Controller LCG Local Content Gauge XA Binary Contact
PLS: Propulsion Power Limitation System LI Level Indication XSH Other Shutdown
Disconnecting Switch PM: Port Propulsion Motor LIAL Level Alarm/Indicator (Low ) XSL Other Slowdown
PMS: Power Management System LIAH Level Alarm/Indicator (High) ZI Position Indication
PSI: Phase Sequence Indicator Meter ZS Limit Switch
LIAHL Level Alarm/Indicator (High/Low)
ST

PD
Starter Panel

Power Distribution Board


ft PST:
PT:
PTM:
PTT:
RPRY:
RTS:
Phase Sequence Test Switch
Port Propulsion Transformer
Port Propulsion Premagnetising Transformer
Potential Test Terminals
Reverse Power Relay (Inside Panel)
Emergency Generator Sequence Test Switch
LR
LS
MS
MC
MI
Level Recorder
Level Switch
Microswitch
Motor Control and Indication
Motor Indication (Run/Normal)
XXX
Function is Locally
Available
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SB: Starboard Synchroconverter OAH Oil Content Alarm (High) XXX Functions are Available
SC: Starboard Propulsion Control Cabinet OI Oil Content / O2 Indicator XXXX in Control Room
LD Lighting Distribution Board SE: Starboard Propulsion Excitation Cabinet PAH Pressure Alarm (High)
SHS: Space Heater Switch PAL Pressure Alarm (Low)
SM: Starboard Propulsion Motor XXX Functions are Available
PIAL Pressure Alarm/Indicator (Low)
Connection Box ST: Starboard Propulsion Transformer XXXX on a Local Panel
PIAH Pressure Alarm/Indicator (High)
STM: Starboard Propulsion Premagnetising Transformer
STR: Short-Circuit Trouble Reset Switch PIAHL Pressure Alarm High/Low Indicator
SY: Synchroscope PICAHL Pressure Alarm High/Low Indicator/Control H
Distribution Transformer SYS: Synchroscope Selection Switch POT Proportional Position Indicator XXX Letters outside the circle
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PX Pressure Transmitter XXXX of an instrument symbol
TIB: Transceiver Interface Board L
TL: Synchro Lamps POC Pressure Controller indicate whether high (H),
V: Voltmeter high-high (HH), low (L)
Propulsion Transformer PR Pressure Recorder
VR: Voltage Regulator or low-low (LL) function
PI Pressure Indication is involved
W: Wattmeter PS Pressure Switch O = Open
WHM: Watt/Hour Meter
DG Diesel Generator PSH Pressure Shutdown C = Closed
PSL Pressure Slowdown
PH PH Detector/Meter

EG Emergency Generator

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Front Matter - Page 7 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Front Matter: British Emerald Date: September 2008

INTRODUCTION Safe Operation Illustrations

The safety of the ship depends on the care and attention of all on board. Most All illustrations that are referred to in the text are located either in-text where
General safety precautions are a matter of common sense and good housekeeping sufficiently small, or above the text, so that both the text and illustration are
and are detailed in the various manuals available on board. However, records accessible when the manual is laid open. When text concerning an illustration
Although this ship is supplied with shipbuilders plans and manufacturers
show that even experienced operators sometimes neglect safety precautions covers several pages the illustration is duplicated above each page of text.
instruction books, there is no single document which gives guidance on
through over-familiarity and the following basic rules must be remembered at

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operating complete systems as installed on board, as distinct from individual
all times. Where flows are detailed in an illustration these are shown in colour. A key of all
items of machinery. The purpose of this one-stop manual is to assist, inform
colours and line styles used in an illustration is provided on the illustration.
and guide competent ships staff and trainees in the operation of the systems Never continue to operate any machine or equipment which
and equipment on board and to provide additional information that may not appears to be potentially unsafe or dangerous and always report
Details of colour coding used in the illustrations are given in the Mechanical
such a condition immediately.

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be otherwise available. In some cases, the competent ships staff and trainees
Symbols and Colour Scheme which is detailed on earlier pages in this Front
may be initially unfamiliar with this vessel and the information in this manual Make a point of testing all safety equipment and devices Matter section.
is intended to accelerate the familiarisation process. It is intended to be used in regularly. Always test safety trips before starting any equipment.
conjunction with shipyard drawings and manufacturers instruction manuals, In particular, overspeed trips on auxiliary turbines must be Symbols given in the manual adhere to international standards and keys to the
bulletins, Fleet Regulations, the ships Captains and Chief Engineers Standing tested before putting the unit to work. symbols used throughout the manual are also given on previous pages in this
Orders, and in no way replaces or supersedes these publications, all of which
Never ignore any unusual or suspicious circumstances, no Front Matter section.
take precedence over this manual.
matter how trivial. Small symptoms often appear before a major
Information relevant to the operation of this vessel has been carefully collated failure occurs. Notices
in relation to the systems of the vessel and is presented in three on board Never underestimate the fire hazard of petroleum products,

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volumes, a CARGO OPERATING MANUAL, a BRIDGE SYSTEMS AND whether fuel oil or cargo vapour. The following notices occur throughout this manual:
EQUIPMENT OPERATING MANUAL and a MACHINERY OPERATING
MANUAL Never start a machine remotely from the cargo and engine
control room without confirming visually that the machine is WARNING
able to operate satisfactorily. Warnings are given to draw readers attention to operations where
The vessel is constructed to comply with MARPOL 73/78. These regulations
DANGER TO LIFE OR LIMB MAY OCCUR.
can be found in the Consolidated Edition, 1991 and in the Amendments dated
1992, 1994 and 1995. In the design of equipment, protection devices have been included to ensure
that, as far as possible, in the event of a fault occurring, whether on the part of CAUTION
The information, procedures, specifications and illustrations in this manual
have been compiled by WMT personnel by reference to shipyard drawings and
manufacturers publications that were made available to WMT and believed to
be correct at the time of publication. The systems and procedures have been
verified as far as is practicable in conjunction with competent ships staff underft the equipment or the operator, the equipment concerned will cease to function
without danger to personnel or damage to the machine. If any of these safety
devices are bypassed, overridden or neglected, then the operation of any
machinery in this condition is potentially dangerous.
Cautions are given to draw readers attention to operations where
DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT MAY OCCUR.

Note: Notes are given to draw readers attention to points of interest or to


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supply supplementary information.
operating conditions. Description
It is impossible to anticipate every circumstance that might involve a potential The concept of this manual is to provide information to technically competent
Safety Notice
hazard, therefore, warnings and cautions used throughout this manual are ships officers, unfamiliar to the vessel, in a form that is readily comprehensible,
provided to inform of perceived dangers to ships staff or equipment. In many It has been recorded by International Accident Investigation Commissions
thus aiding their understanding and knowledge of the specific vessel. Special
cases, the best operating practice can only be learned by experience. that a disproportionate number of deaths and serious injuries occur on ships
attention is drawn to emergency procedures and fire fighting systems.
each year during drills involving lifesaving craft. It is therefore essential that
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all officers and crew make themselves fully conversant with the launching,
If any information in these manuals is believed to be inaccurate or incomplete, The manual consists of a number of parts and sections which describe the
retrieval and the safe operation of the lifeboats, liferafts and rescue boats.
the officer must use his professional judgement and other information available systems and equipment fitted and their method of operation related to a
on board to proceed. Any such errors or omissions or modifications to the schematic diagram where applicable.
ships installations, set points, equipment or approved deviation from published
operating procedures must be reported immediately to the companys Technical The valves and fittings identifications and symbols used in this manual are the
Operations Office, who should inform WMT so that a revised document may be same as those used by the shipbuilder.
issued to this ship and in some cases, others of the same class.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Front Matter - Page 8 of 8
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Section 1: Design Concept of the Vessel

1.1 Principal Particulars

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1.1.1 Principal Particulars of the Ship

1.1.2 Principal Particulars of Cargo Equipment and Machinery

1.1.3 General Arrangement

1.1.4 Tanks and Capacity Plan

Illustrations

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1.1.3a General Arrangement

1.1.3b Cargo Machinery Room Layout

1.1.4a Tank Location Plan

1.2 Rules and Regulations

1.3
1.3.1 ft
Cargo System Technology
Cargo Containment System Principle
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1.3.2 GTT Mark III Cargo Containment

Illustrations
1.3.1a Cargo Tank Lining Reinforcement

1.3.2a Membrane Cargo Containment (GTT Mark III)


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1.3.2b Interbarrier Space (IBS) Insulation Space (IS) Flat Panel Junction

1.3.2c IBS IS Section of Longitudinal Corner

1.3.2d Hull Steel Grades

1.4 Hazardous Areas and Gas Dangerous Zones


Illustrations
1.4a Hazardous Areas and Gas Dangerous Zone Plan
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

British Emerald

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ft
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.1.1 - Page 1 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

1.1 Principal Particulars Summer Freeboard: 7.696m


Alternative Summer Draught: 11.155m
1.1.1 Principal Particulars of the Ship Alternative Displacement: 105,000 mt
Alternative Deadweight: 73,099mt
Ship Name: British Emerald
Alternative Freeboard: 8,761m
Radio Call Sign: MIBR
Ballast Draught: 9.65m

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IMO No: 9333591
Ballast Displacement: 93,558.3mt
Official No: 739297
Ballast Deadweight: 62,358.3mt
MMSI No: 235050369
Ballast Freeboard: 10.266m
Nationality: British
Height (Keel to Mast Head): 63.89m

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Port of Registry: Douglas (Isle of Man)
Distance Bow to Manifold: 146.47m
Type of Cargo: LNG
Distance Stern to Manifold: 141.96m
Type of Ship: GTlll Membrane Gas Tanker
Distance Bridge to Manifold: 84.0m
Navigation: Worldwide
Distance Manifold to Rail: 3500mm
Class Notation: Lloyds Register of Shipping +100A1, Liquefied
Distance Manifold to Maindeck: 4.938mm
Gas tanker, ShipRight (FDA plus), CM, *IWS,
L1, EP, +LMC, UMS, ICC, CCS, NAV1 with Distance Between Cargo Manifolds: 3000mm
descriptive notes (Pt. HT., BWMP(S), SEA(Hss- Distance Between Bunker/Cargo Manifolds: 2000mm
4), SERS, SCM, MCM, MPMS. Distance Keel to Manifold: 30.938m

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Inmarsat-F77 Tel: 761 114 064 (Bridge) Summer Draught Waterline to Manifold: 18.718m
Inmarsat-F33 Tel: 761 114 038 (Bridge) Ballast Waterline to Manifold: 21.288m
Inmarsat-F77 Fax: 761 114 065
Inmarsat-C (1): 423 500 542 Tonnages
Inmarsat-C (2): 423 500 543 Net Registered: 31,576mt
V-Sat Tel: +44 1932 44 3770 - Bridge Gross Tonnage: 102,064mt
+44 1932 44 3771 - General Office Suez Canal Net: 91,206.94mt


E-mail:
Operator:
+44 1932 44 3772 - Conference Room
+44 1932 44 3773 - Telephone Booth (A deck)
britishemerald@bpfleet.com
BP Shipping Limited ft Suez Canal Gross: 105,467.24mt
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Owner: RBSSAF(19)Limited
Shipbuilder: Hyundai Heavy Industries Ltd
Hull Number: 1777
Date Keel Laid: 03 April 2006
Delivered: 25 July 2007
Length Overall: 288.43m
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Length BP: 275.00m
Moulded Breadth: 44.20m
Moulded Depth: 26.00m
Lightship Displacement: 31,901mt at 3.774m
TPC/FWA: 106.5/273mm
Primary Summer Draught: 12.220m
Summer Displacement: 116,204mt
Summer Deadweight: 84,303mt

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.1.1 - Page 2 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

1.1.2 Principal Particulars Of Cargo Equipment Accommodation Capacity: 2 Captain class cabins Fast Rescue Boat
And Machinery 4 senior officer cabins Manufacturer: F.R. Fassmer & Co
7 officer cabins No. of sets: 1
Cargo Tanks 1 superintendent cabin Model: FRR 6.5 ID - SF
4 cadet cabins Dimensions: (L x B x H): 6.10m x 2.23m x 2.56m
Tanks: 4 1 pilot cabin (2 berth) Design draught: 0.37m

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Insulation (Primary and Secondary): 279mm thick 3 petty officer cabins Number of persons: 6 -15
Tanks: 38.00 metres width 12 crew cabins Weight: Light load (including loose equipment) 1,700kg
Design Specific Gravity LNG: 470kg/m3 1 suez cabin (6 berth) Hoisting load: (6 persons) 2,150kg

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Maximum Specific Gravity LNG: 500kg/m3 Engine manufacturer: Bukh and Steyr 144VTI, 144bhp with Hamilton 213
Cargo Capacity @ 20C: 155.045.7m3 100% water jet
Lifeboat
Cargo Capacity @ -163C, SG 0.47: 71,778.4mt 98.5% Engine type: Diesel, two circuit water-cooled
Manufacturer: F.R.Fassmer and Co.
Cargo Capacity @ -163C, SG 0.50: 76,360.1mt 98.5% Starting system: Battery
Model: GAR-T 8.8
Maximum Design Pressure: 25kPa Speed: 28 knots with 3 persons, 23 knots with 6 persons
No. of sets: 1
Minimum Working Tank Pressure: 30kPa Fuel tank capacity: 100 litre
Dimensions (L x B x H): 8.82m x 2.70m x 3.35m
Minimum Design Pressure: -10kPa
Number of persons: 40
Cargo Tanks Cargo Tank Safety Valves

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Weight: Light load (including loose equipment) 5,000kg
Manufacturer: Fukui Seisakusho
Cargo Capacity @ 20C: 155,045.70m3 100% Total davit load for
lowering: 8,150kg Type: PORV 10 *12
Cargo Capacity @ -163C, SG 0.47: 71,778.40mt 98.5%
Model: PSL-MD13-131-NS1(B)
Cargo Capacity @ -163C, SG 0.50: 76,360.10mt 98.5% Engine
Tag No: CR105//405,107//407
Cargo Load Rates with Vapour Return Manufacturer: Sabb No. of units: 8
Model: L3.139 LB No. per tank: 2
All Tanks Maximum Loading Rate:
Engine type: Diesel, water-cooled with header tank and external Set pressure: 25kPaG
2 Manifolds; not more than:
3 Manifolds; not more than:
Single Tank Maximum Loading Rate:
8,500m3/h
12,500m3/h
3,000m3/h
ft
Davit
Manufacturer:
No. of sets:
keel cooler

F.R.Fassmer and Co.


1
Closing pressure:
Blowdown pressure:
Flow rate per valve:
Vacuum setting
22kPaG
3kPa
26,950Nm3/h
-1kPaG
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Cargo Shore Connections System type: D-FH.85
Blowdown pressure: 1kPa
Liquid: 4 x 16" each side Liferafts
Flow rate per valve: 2,716Nm3/h
Liquid Crossover: ND 400ASA 150 raised face, serrated Manufacturer: Viking Lifesaving Equipment Ltd
Vapour: 1 x 16" each side Type: 4 x 25 person davit launch
Fixed Gas Sampling System
Vapour Crossover: D 400 ASA 150c raised face, serrated 1 x 6 person manual launch
Total weight: 258kg each (20 person davit launch) Manufacturer: Consilium Marine AB
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System: Salwico
85kg each (6 person manual launch)
Bunker Shore Connections Salwico model: SW2020
Davit
Diesel Oil: 2 x 14" each side Type: Sample Draw
Manufacturer: Ilho Marine Tech. Continuous 29 min cycle
Diesel Oil Capacity: 6275.5m3 at 95%
Type: D-RC. 21/4.0 Cargo part: 24 - Infrared detectors
Service Speed: 20.0 knots
SWL: 2.1 tonne Sampling range: 0-100% LEL (0-5% vol) methane
Cruising Range: nm Sampling range: 0-100% Vol (0-5% vol) methane
No. of sets: 2
Working radius: 3m

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.1.2 - Page 1 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

High Duty Compressors Cargo Pumps No. of sets: 2


Manufacturer: Cryostar SA Manufacturer: Ebara International Corporation Type: 6-8-10 d42
No. of sets: 2 Type: 16EC-24, fixed vertical Capacity: 300m3/h at 6mwc suction lift
Model: CM 400/55 Liquid LNG Driving water: 230m3/h at 11 bar
Type: Centrifugal, single-stage, fixed speed with adjustable Capacity: 1,800m3/h at 155mth
inlet guide vanes BEP flow: 1,879m3/h (best efficiency point)

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Main Machinery
Volume flow: 32,000m3/h Minimum flow: 658m3/h (continuous)
Mass flow: 48,818kg/h Operating temperature: -163C Diesel Electric
Inlet gas pressure: 103kPa (absolute) Design pressure: 9.6 bar(g) Diesel Generator Engines

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Outlet gas pressure: 196kPa (absolute) Power required: 487kW (rated)
Manufacturer: Wrtsil
Inlet gas temperature: -140C 497kW (best efficiency point)
Model: 12V50DF
Outlet gas temperature: -112.2C 256kW (shut off)
No. of Engines: 2
Shaft speed: 11,200 rpm 520kW (maximum, at 120% rated capacity)
Type: Four-stroke, V type, dual fuel, turbocharged
Inlet guide vane setting: +80 to -30 angular rotation No. of stages: 1
Maximum power: 11,400kW (MCR) in gas mode, 11,400kW (MCR) in
Type: Single speed, asynchronous, 3-phase No. of sets: 8 (2 per cargo tank) diesel mode
No. of poles: 2 Motor rating: 6600V, 559.5kW, 60Hz, 4-pole Model: 9L50DF
Protection: IP55 Motor speed: 1,800 rpm No. of engines: 2

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Motor speed: 3,578 rpm Starting time: 5.0 seconds (maximum) Type: Four-stroke, in-line, dual fuel, turbocharged
Shaft speed: 11,200 rpm Current: 61A (full load) Maximum power: 29,126kW at 90.6 rpm
Rated motor power: 900kW, 6,600V, 60Hz 373A (starting)
Starting Method Direct on Line Propeller type: Fixed pitch
Low Duty Compressors No. of blades: 5
Manufacturer: Cryostar Ballast Pumps Diameter: 8,600mm
No. of sets: 2 Manufacturer: Shin Shin Hamworthy Machinery Co. Ltd.
Model:
Type:

Rated motor power:


CM2 200
Centrifugal, two-stage, dual speed with variable
diffusor vanes
650/325kW, 6,600V, 60Hz ft No. of sets:
Type:
Model:
3
Vertical, centrifugal with self-priming of No.3
CAD 450-12 V48 ASN (Nos.1 and 2 pumps)
Pitch (mean):
Direction of rotation:

Steering Gear
7,215.23mm
Right-handed
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CAD 450-12 V48 ASN w/PG (No.3 pump) Manufacturer: Yoowon-Mitsubishi Industries Ltd
Motor speed: 3,578 rpm Capacity: 3,000m3/h at 30m (about 3 bar) Model: YDFT-400-4-(45)
Shaft speed: 29,775 rpm
Torque: 3,432kNm at 35
Motors Main pump model: 3V-FH2B-MK x 4
Inert Gas Generator Manufacturer: Hyundai Motor: 55kW
Manufacturer Aalborg - Smit Gas Systems B.V. No. of sets: 3 Torque motor type: PV008
Model: Gln15000-0.25BUFD
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Type: TEFC, IC411
Type: Inert gas and dry-air Model: HLE5 352-66V Bow Thruster
No. of sets: 1 Maximum power output: 375kW Manufacturer: Brunvoll AS
Inert gas delivery rate: 15,000Nm3/h Speed: 1190 rpm Model: FU-100-LTC-2750
Dry air delivery rate: 15,000Nm3/h Starting Method: DOL (Direct-on-line) Type: Electro-hydraulic
Delivery pressure: 25kPag
No. of sets: 1
Ballast Stripping Eductors Input: 2,000kW at 1,180 rpm
Manufacturer: Teamtec Propeller speed: 256 rpm

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.1.2 - Page 2 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Auxiliary Boiler Emergency Generator


Manufacturer: Kangrim Industries Co. Ltd Manufacturer: Stamford
No. of sets: 1 No. of sets: 1
Model: MB0406BS11 Model: PM734C1
Type: Vertical oil-fired water tube Type: Single bearing, brushless, self-excited, 4-pole
Evaporation: 15,000kg/h Speed: 1800 rpm

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Steam condition: 1.0MPa Voltage: 450V
Exhaust Gas Economisers Output: 1,150kW, 1,844A, 1,437.5kVA, 0.8pf
Enclosure: IP23
Manufacturer: Kangrim Industries Co. Ltd

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Heating element: 220-260V, 210-325W
No. of sets: 2
Bearing type: Ball bearing, greased for life
Type: Water tube forced circulation type
Excitation: PMG
Exhaust gas flow: 78,480kg/h at 297C
Evaporation: 1,500kg/h
Safety valve setting: 1.6MPa
Main Generators DG1 and DG4
Manufacturer: Alstom

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No. of sets: 2
Model: B225T14
Type: Two bearing, brushless, self-excited, 14-pole
Speed: 514 rpm, 60Hz
Voltage 6,600V, 3-phase
Output: 902A, 10,312.5kVA, 0.8pf
Enclosure: IP 44
Heating element:
Bearing type:
Excitation:
230V, 3 x 915W

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Flange mounted, self-aligning, insulated sleeve
Inboard exciter and outboard shaft mounted
permanent magnet generator (PMG)
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Main Generators DG2 and DG3
Manufacturer: Alstom
No. of sets: 2
Model: B225X14
Type: Two bearing, brushless excitation, 14-pole
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Speed: 514 rpm, 60Hz
Voltage 6,600V, 3-phase
Output: 1,203A, 13,750kVA, 0.8pf
Enclosure: IP 44
Heating element: 230V, 3 x 915W
Bearing type: Flange mounted, self-aligning, insulated sleeve
Excitation: Inboard exciter and outboard shaft mounted
permanent magnet generator (PMG)

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.1.2 - Page 3 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

1.1.3 General Arrangement

Illustration 1.1.3a General Arrangement

Elevation

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13 12 11 9
10
17

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4
2

15
8 7 6 5 Cargo Tank
3 1
16
14

Cross-Section
Upper Deck

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Key

1 - Fore Peak Tank (Void)


2 - Chain Locker
3 - Bow Thruster Room
4 - Bosuns Store
5 - No.1 Cargo Tank
14 13
6 - No.2 Cargo Tank
7 - No.3 Cargo Tank
8 - No.4 Cargo Tank
9 - Manifold Area
10 - Deck House

Tank Top ft 11
12
13
14
15
16
17
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Cargo Compressor Room
Motor Room
Accommodation
Engine Room
Steering Gear Room
Aft Peak Tank
Lifeboat
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18 - Pipe Duct
19 - Store Space
20 - Rope Store

19

15 14 18 3 4
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20

Principal Particulars
Length OA - 288.43m Freeboard - A Type Main Diesel Generator Engine - Wartsila
Lenght BP - 275.00m Class - LR, +100AI Liquefied Gas Tanker, ShipRight (FDA Plus), Wartsila 12V50DF (V-Type): 11,400kW x 514 rpm; Two (2) Sets
Breadth (Mld) - 44.20m CM, *IWS, LI, EP, +LMC, UMS, ICC, CCS, NAV1 Wartsila 9L50DF (L-Type): 8,550kW x 514 rpm; Two (2) Sets
Depth (Mld) - 26.00m with Descriptive notes (Pt. HT., BWMP(S), Sea(Hss-4)
Draft (Mld) (Design) - 11.47m SERS, SCM, MCM, MPMS)
Draft (Mld) (Scantg/Summer) - 12.20m Propulsion Power - Maximum Propulsion Power: 29,126kW x 90.6 rpm

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.1.3 - Page 1 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 1.1.3b Cargo Machinery Room Layout

Cooler for NBU Level


Mist Separator Auxiliary Level
Alarm Alarm
Control Panel Bilge Lubricating

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Oil Pump
Gearbox
1st Stage LO Cooler
Engine GCU
After-Cooler After-Cooler No.2 LD Bilge
Control Panel Control Panel Compressor
Escape

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Drain
Pot Hatch 2nd Stage Emergency
Auxiliary Escape
NBO Mist Lubricating Hatch
Separator Oil Pump
Gearbox
1st Stage LO Cooler
No.2 LD
Control No.1 LD
No.2 BOG Panel
No.2 BOG Compressor
Heater
Heater
Control Panel
2nd Stage
Motor Room
Auxiliary
Lubricating

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No.1 BOG
No.1 BOG Oil Pump
Heater No.1 LD
Heater Standby
Control Panel Control LO Cooler
Panel Gearbox No.2 Glycol
Water Heater

No.2 HD Main
LNG Compressor No.1 Glycol
Vaporiser Water Heater
FBO Liquid Control Panel
Auxiliary
Separator

ftForcing
Vaporiser
Compressor Room
Gearbox
Lubricating
Oil Pump
LO Cooler
No.2 Glycol
Water Pump

No.1 Glycol
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LNG
Vaporiser Control Panel Water Pump
No.1 HD
Compressor
Ladder to Glycol Header
Forcing Glycol/Water Tank Situated On Top
Vaporiser Mix Tank of Air-Lock Door
From Fresh
(0.2m)
Water Filling
To Header
Bilge Pump Tank
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Recess
Bilge Level
Drains Reserve Oil No.6 Solenoid Gas Vent Alarm Air-Lock Door
Glycol
Cooler Tank Valve Box Drain Tank Storage Tank
(1.0m3) for Cargo (1.34m3) (4.5m)
Bilge

Compressor Room Motor Room

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.1.3 - Page 2 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 1.1.4a Tank Location Plan

Elevation

10 9

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24
18
27

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19 12 13 14
4 3 2 1 22 Cargo Tank
15 16 25 26
20
8 7 6 5 23
11
17
21

Cross-Section

Key
Upper Deck
1 - No.1 Cargo Tank
2 - No.2 Cargo Tank

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3 - No.3 Cargo Tank
4 - No.4 Cargo Tank
5 - No.1 Water Ballast Tank (Port and Starboard)
6 - No.2 Water Ballast Tank (Port and Starboard)
7 - No.3 Water Ballast Tank (Port and Starboard)
11 28
8 - No.4 Water Ballast Tank (Port and Starboard)
9 - Cargo Compressor Room
10 - Motor Room
11 - Engine Room
12 - Fresh Water Tank (Port and Starboard)
13 - Generator Engine Lubricating Oil Settling Tank
(Port and Starboard)

Tank Top ft 14 -

15 -
16 -
17 -

18 -
Generator Engine Lubricating Oil Storage Tank
(Port and Starboard)
Marine Diesel Oil Settling Tank (Port and Starboard)
Marine Diesel Oil Storage Tank (Port and Starboard)
Water Ballast Tank in Engine Room
(Port and Starboard)
Aft Marine Diesel Oil Bunker Tank
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17 8 7 6 (Port and Starboard)
5
37 18 38 19 - Steering Gear Room
20 - Aft Peak Tank
23 21 - Cooling Water Tank
30 22 - Forward Marine Diesel Oil Bunker Tank
(Port and Starboard)
35 23 - Forward Water Ballast Tank (Port and Starboard)
19 32 33 34 36 4 29 3 2 1 24 - Bosuns Store
24
22
25 - Bow Thruster Room
26 - Fore Peak Tank (Void)
31 27 - Chain Locker
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23
28 - Accommodation
39 29 - Pipe Duct
30 - Store Space
18
8 7 6 5 31 - Rope Store
17 32 - Dirty Grey Water Holding Tank (Centre)
33 - Bilge Holding Tank (Centre)
Principal Particulars
34 - Oily Bilge Tank (Centre)
Length OA - 288.43m Freeboard - A Type Main Diesel Generator Engine - Wartsila
35 - Cooling Fresh Water Drain Tank (Centre)
Lenght BP - 275.00m Class - LR, +100AI Liquefied Gas Tanker, ShipRight (FDA Plus), Wartsila 12V50DF (V-Type): 11,400kW x 514 rpm; Two (2) Sets
36 - Marine Diesel Oil Overflow Tank (Centre)
Breadth (Mld) - 44.20m CM, *IWS, LI, EP, +LMC, UMS, ICC, CCS, NAV1 Wartsila 9L50DF (L-Type): 8,550kW x 514 rpm; Two (2) Sets
37 - Inert Gas Generator Gas Oil Service Tank (Port)
Depth (Mld) - 26.00m with Descriptive notes (Pt. HT., BWMP(S), Sea(Hss-4)
38 - High Sea Chest
Draft (Mld) (Design) - 11.47m SERS, SCM, MCM, MPMS)
39 - Low Sea Chest
Draft (Mld) (Scantg/Summer) - 12.20m Propulsion Power - Maximum Propulsion Power : 29,126kW x 90.6 rpm

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.1.4 - Page 1 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

1.1.4 Tanks And Capacity Plan

Cargo Tanks Diesel Oil Tanks (SG 0.900)


Capacity Centre of Gravity COMPARTMENT Frame Capacities Centre of Gravity
Frame 100% full 98.5% at -163C LCG from VCG above No. Volume Volume Weight LCG from VCG above
COMPARTMENT No. at 20C Midship B.L. 100% Full 95% Full 95% Full Midship BL
SG = 0.47 SG = 0.50

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m3 Tonnes Tonnes Metres Metres m3 m3 Tonnes Metres Metres
No.1 Cargo Tank 115-126 25,952.9 12,014.9 12,781.8 79.70 17.80 Aft MDO Bunker Tank (P) 52-67 431.2 409.6 368.7 -88.54 19.22
No.2 Cargo Tank 99-114 44,878.7 20,776.6 22,102.8 36.43 16.66 Aft MDO Bunker Tank (S) 45-67 534.5 507.9 457.0 -90.50 19.88
No.3 Cargo Tank 83-98 44,885.0 20,779.5 22,105.9 -13.46 16.66 Forward MDO Bunker Tank (P) 127-151 2,491.1 2,366.5 2,129.9 107.53 12.91

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No.4 Cargo Tank 68-82 39,329.1 18,207.4 19,369.6 -60.47 16.66 Forward MDO Bunker Tank (S) 127-151 2,460.2 2,337.2 2,103.5 107.62 12.91
Total 155,045.7 71,778.4 76,360.1 - - MDO Settling Tank (P) 45-51 144.2 137.0 123.3 -99.10 15.37
MDO Settling Tank (S) 45-51 144.2 137.0 123.3 -99.10 15.37
MDO Service Tank (P) 51-59 200.2 190.2 171.2 -93.44 15.19
MDO Service Tank (S) 51-59 200.2 190.2 171.2 -93.44 15.19
Water Ballast Tanks (SG 1.025) Total 6,605.8 6,275.5 5,648.1 - -
Capacities Centre of Gravity
Frame 100% Full 99% Full LCG from VCG above

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COMPARTMENT No. Midship BL Inert Gas Generator Gas Oil Tank (SG 0.900)
m3 m3 Tonnes Metres Metres COMPARTMENT Frame Capacities Centre of Gravity
Forward Water Ballast Tank (Port) 127-151 2,113.9 2,092.8 2,145.1 108.07 11.89 No. Volume Volume Weight LCG from VCG above
Forward Water Ballast Tank (S) 127-151 2,113.9 2,092.8 2,145.1 108.07 11.89 100% Full 95% Full 95% Full Midship BL
No.1 Water Ballast Tank (Port) 114-127 6,451.1 6,386.6 6,546.3 76.53 10.74 m3 m3 Tonnes Metres Metres
No.1 Water Ballast Tank (Starboard) 114-127 6,451.1 6,386.6 6,546.3 76.53 10.74 IGGGO Service Tank (P) 45-52 103.3 98.1 88.3 -98.70 23.18
No.2 Water Ballast Tank (P) 98-114 6,673.7 6,607.0 6,772.1 34.77 8.81 Total 103.3 98.1 88.3 - -
No.2 Water Ballast Tank (S)
No.3 Water Ballast Tank (P)
No.3 Water Ballast Tank (S)
No.4 Water Ballast Tank (Port)
98-114
82-98
82-98
67-82
6,673.7
6,789.3
6,789.3
5,652.8
6,607.0
6,721.4
6,721.4
5,596.3 ft6,772.1
6,889.4
6,889.4
5,736.2
34.77
-14.83
-14.83
-61.13
8.81
8.69
8.69
9.12 COMPARTMENT Frame
Marine Diesel Oil Overflow Tank
Capacities
(SG 0.900)
Centre of Gravity
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No. Volume Volume Weight LCG from VCG above
No.4 Water Ballast Tank (Starboard) 67-82 5,652.8 5,596.3 5,736.2 -61.13 9.12
100% Full 95% Full 95% Full Midship BL
Engine Room Water Ballast Tank (P) 45-67 1,132.7 1,121.4 1,149.4 -92.09 14.54
m3 m 3 Tonnes Metres Metres
Engine Room Water Ballast Tank (S) 45-67 1,147.4 1,135.9 1,164.3 -92.05 14.41
MDO Overflow Tank (C) 57-61 41.6 39.5 35.6 -90.30 1.76
Aft Peak Tank (Centre) -6.1-17 1,483.0 1,468.2 1,504.9 -131.13 13.25
Total 41.6 39.5 35.6 - -
Total 59,124.7 58,533.7 59,997.0 - -
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.1.4 - Page 2 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Lubricating Oil Tanks (SG 0.900)


COMPARTMENT Frame Capacities Centre of Gravity
No. Volume Volume Weight LCG from VCG above
100% Full 95% Full 95% Full Midship BL
m3 m3 Tonnes Metres Metres
No.1 G/E LO Sump Tank (P) 25-40 32.8 31.2 28.0 -111.50 9.30

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No.2 G/E LO Sump Tank (P) 25-39 34.4 32.7 29.4 -111.90 9.30
No.3 G/E LO Sump Tank (S) 25-39 34.4 32.7 29.4 -11.90 9.30
No.4 G/E LO Sump Tank (S) 25-40 32.8 31.2 28.0 -111.50 9.30

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G/E LO Storage Tank (P) 37-43 76.9 73.1 65.8 -105.50 17.64
G/E LO Storage Tank (S) 37-43 76.9 73.1 65.8 -105.50 17.64
G/E LO Settling Tank (P) 32-37 64.1 60.9 54.8 -109.90 17.64
G/E LO Settling Tank (S) 32-37 64.1 60.9 54.8 -109.90 17.64
Total 416.4 395.8 356.0 - -

Fresh Water Tanks (SG 1.000)

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COMPARTMENT Frame Capacities Centre of Gravity
No. Volume 100% Weight 100% LCG from VCG above
Full Full Midship BL
m3 Tonnes Metres Metres
Fresh Water Tank (Port) 21-31 181.0 181.0 -116.51 17.75
Fresh Water Tank (Starboard) 21-31 181.0 181.0 -116.51 17.75
Total 362.0 362.0 - -

COMPARTMENT Frame
No. Volume
Other Tanks
Capacities
Volume ft
Weight
(SG 1.000)
Centre of Gravity
LCG from VCG above
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100% Full 98% Full 98% Full Midship BL
m3 m3 Tonnes Metres Metres
Cooling FW Drain Tank (C) 55-57 20.8 20.4 20.4 -92.70 1.76
Oily Bilge Tank (C) 51-55 41.6 40.8 40.8 -95.10 1.76
Bilge Holding Tank (C) 44-51 72.8 71.3 71.3 -99.50 1.76
Dirty Grey Water Holding Tank (C) 39-44 52.0 51.0 51.0 -104.30 1.76
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CW Tank (C) 8.6-17 89.8 88.0 88.0 -125.77 4.93
Sludge Tank (S) 37-51 33.9 33.2 33.2 -102.30 9.25
Total 310.9 304.7 304.7 - -

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.1.4 - Page 3 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

1.2 Rules and Regulations Gas Carriers Built Between 1976 and 1986 (the GC Code) Liquefied gas is changed from the codes definition of a product having
a vapour pressure of 2.8 bar abs at 37.8C to the proposed definition of a
The regulations covering gas carriers built after 1976 but before 1st July 1986
product having a vapour pressure of 1.76 bar abs at 37.8C. This is a change
Introduction is the Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied
in the definition from a Reid vapour pressure of 40 psi abs. to 25 psi abs. The
Gases in Bulk known as the Gas Carrier Code or GC Code and adopted under
change in the Reid vapour pressure includes the certain other substances
Since the introduction of liquefied gas carriers into the shipping field, it was assembly resolution A328 (IX).
referred to in para. 1.2 of the Code, but does not include any product in IMOs
recognised that there was a need for an international code for the carriage of Chemical Code except ethylene, which is presently listed in the Code and the

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liquefied gases in bulk. Since 1975 the MSC has approved four sets of amendments to the GC Code,
Chemical Code. The change in the Reid vapour pressure was proposed by the
the latest in June 1993.
U.S. delegation to the IMO but the change was not adopted, although there was
At the beginning of the 1970s, the Marine Safety Committee (MSC) of the apparently no objection to it. The change, however, does not affect the list of
International Maritime Organisation (IMO), known then as the International Gas Carriers Built Before 1977 (the Existing Ship Code) regulated cargoes.

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Consultative Maritime Organisation (ICMO), started work on a gas carrier
The regulations covering gas carriers built before 1977 are contained in the
code with the participation of the major country delegations representing gas Chapter 4 of the Code includes a provision for the evaluation of the insulation
Code for Existing Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk first advertised
carrier owners, the International Association of Classification Societies, the and hull steel assuming, for the purpose of design calculations, that the cargo
under assembly resolution A 329 (IX). Its content is similar to the GC Code,
United States Coast Guard and several other international associations. tanks are at the design temperature and the ambient outside air and sea design
though less extensive.
temperatures as follows:
The result of this work was the Code for the Construction and Equipment of
The existing ship code was completed in 1976 and remains as an IMO
Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk introduced under assembly resolution
recommendation for all gas carriers in this fleet of ships. General Worldwide
A328 (IX) in November 1975.
The IGC Code requires that a certificate (International Certificate of Fitness Still air: +5C (41F)
This was the first code developed by the IMO having direct applicability to

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for the Carriage of Liquefied Gases in Bulk) must be issued to all new gas
gas carriers. Sea water: 0C (32F)
carriers. The certificate should comply to a pro-forma, as set out in Model
Form attached as an appendix to the code and should be available on board
The intention was to provide a standard for the safe bulk carriage of liquefied Chapter 4 also provides that each administration may set higher or lower ambient
all new gas carriers.
gases (and certain other substances) by sea by prescribing design and design temperatures. This document proposed the following temperatures:
constructional features of ships and their equipment, so as to minimise risks to
The basic philosophy behind the code is summarised in the International Code
ships, their crew and the environment. Any Waters in the World, Except Alaskan Waters
for the Construction and Equipment of ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk
which is readily available on board in the ships library.
The GC code has been adopted by most countries interested by the transport Air (at 5 knots): -18C (0F)

of SOLAS.

The USCG have added some extra requirements to the GC Code for ships
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of liquefied gases by sea, as well as all classification societies, and is now part
Preamble
Most of the provisions in the IMO code are covered by the Classification
Societys rules and regulations, however, attention must be drawn to the fact
Still sea water:

Alaskan Waters
0C (32F)
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trading in the USAs waters. that it contains requirements that are not within the scope of classification as
Air (at 5 knots): -29C (20F)
defined in the societys rules, for example, chapter II Ship Survival Capability,
The applicability of the code is as follows: chapter XIV Personnel Protection and chapter XVII Operating Requirements. Still sea water: - 2C (28F)
Gas Carriers Built After June 1986 (the IGC Code) However, where the societies are authorised to issue the International The proposed regulations specify enhanced grades of steel for crack arresting
The code which applies to new gas carriers (built after June 1986) is the Certificate of Fitness, these requirements, together with any amendments or purposes in the deck stringer, sheer strake and bilge strake. The minimum
International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships carrying interpretations adopted by the appropriate national authority, will be applied acceptable grade for the deck stringer and the sheer strake is Grade E or an
Liquefied Gases in Bulk known as the IGC Code.
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where applicable. equivalent steel that is specially approved by the Commandant (G-MMT). The
minimum acceptable grades for the bilge strake are Grade D, or Grade E or an
At a meeting of the MSC in 1983 approving the second set of amendments to Since the IMO recommendations defer some matters to the discretion of each equivalent steel that is specially approved by the Commandant (G-MMT).
SOLAS, the requirements of the IGC Code become mandatory with almost administration, and in other matters are not specific enough for Coast Guard
immediate effect. regulatory purpose, several major changes have been introduced from the The Code allows pressure and temperature control of cargoes by venting cargo
code in the proposed Coast Guard rules. These changes are discussed in the vapours to the atmosphere when the vessel is at sea and in port if accepted by
following paragraphs. the receiving administration. It is proposed to prohibit normal venting of cargo
into the atmosphere in many ports.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.2 - Page 1 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

The Code requires the cargo system to be designed to withstand the full vapour 1991, 1992 and 1994 and 1998. GMDSS amendments including q) OCIMF Standardisation of Manifold for Refrigerated Liquefied
pressure of the cargo under conditions of the upper ambient design temperature, International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Gas Carriers (LNG).
or have other means to maintain the cargo tank pressure below the maximum Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC-code) (herein called
allowable relief valve setting (MARVS) of the tank. These regulations propose SOLAS). r) OCIMF Guidelines and Recommendations for the Safe Mooring
that when the cargo carried is a liquefied gas, the cargo tank pressure must be of Large Ships at Piers and Sea Islands (except special
maintained below the design vapour pressure indefinitely, the pressure on the d) International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from conditions of the intended terminal).
LNG tank would be maintained below the design pressure for a period of not Ships, 1973 (Annex I, IV &V), as modified by the Protocol

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less than 21 days. Cargo tank pressure may be maintained below the design 1978 relating thereto (herein called MARPOL 73/78) and s) OCIMF Ship to Ship Transfer Guide (Liquefied Gases) 1995.
pressure by several methods including refrigeration systems, burning boil-off amendment 1987, 1989, 1991 and 1992.
in waste heat or catalytic furnaces, using boil-off as fuel, or a combination of t) SIGTTO Recommendations for Emergency Shut Down Systems
these methods. Using the boil-off as a fuel for propulsion is limited to a vessel e) Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing 1997.

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carrying LNG. Collisions at Sea, 1972 with Amendments of 1981, 1987 and
1989 as amended by resolution A493(XII) and A494(XII). u) SIGTTO Recommendations for the Installation of Cargo
The proposed regulations also include the following: Strainers.
f) International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of
1. Transfer requirements for vinyl chloride. Ships, 1969, as amended by IMO Resolution A493(XII) and v) IMO Resolution A708(17) Navigation Bridge Visibility and
A494(XII). Function.
2. Loading requirements for methyl acetylene propadiene mixture.
g) International Telecommunication convention, 1973 with annex w) International Electro-technical Commission (IEC).
3. Additional operating requirements. and revisions 1974, 1982 and 1983/87.

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x) IMO Publication No.978 Performance Standards for Navigational
4. Requirements for inspection or re-inspection of US flag vessels at intervals h) IMO Resolution A343(IX) Recommendation on method of Equipment (1988 edition).
that are the same as for vessels inspected under Sub-chapter D. Inspection measuring noise levels at listening posts.
for certification would be required every 2 years and re-inspection would be y) ISO 8309-1991 Refrigeration Light Hydrocarbon Fluids.
required between the 10th and 14th month following the issue of a Certificate i) IMO Resolution A468(XII) Code on Noise Levels Onboard Measurement of liquid levels in tanks containing liquefied gases
of Inspection. Ships. electric capacitance gauges.

5. Requirements for the initial and periodic inspections and tests of the cargo j) USGG for foreign flag vessels operating in the navigable waters z) IMO Resolution A601(15) Provision and display of manoeuvring
containment system, cargo and process piping, and hull heating and cold of the United States except Alaskan waters (CFR Title 33- information on board ships.
spots.

The proposed Coast Guard regulations and the Classification Societys rules
have cross-references showing the corresponding IMO code numbers to allow ft Navigation and Navigable Waters, Part 155, 156, 159 and 164
and CFR Title 46-Shipping, Part 154) and Public Law 95-474,
1978 Port and Tanker Safety Act 1979.
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identification of the required paragraph. k) ISO draft proposal No.6954 Guidelines for Overall Evaluation
of Vibration in Merchant Ships, 1984.
The latest version of the following regulations and recommendations l) ILO convention concerning crew accommodation on board
incorporating all subsequent additions and amendments currently in force, or ships, No.92 and 133.
agreed between the owner and the builder, but awaiting ratification, enactment
or implementation at the time of signing of the contract shall be applied. m) ILO Guide to Safety and Health in Dock Work, 1977 and
1979.
D
a) Maritime Rules and Regulations of Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia,
Oman, Australia, Japan and Qatar for entry into those ports. n) SOLAS 1994 Chapter V, Emergency Towing Arrangements for
Tankers.
b) International Convention on Loadlines, 1966, amendments
1971,1975, 1979 and 1983 and Protocol of 1988 as amended by o) ICS guide to helicopter / ship operations.
Resolution A513(XIII) / A514(XIII).
p) OCIMF Recommendations on Equipment for the Towing of
c) International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 with Disabled Tankers, September 1981.
Protocol of 1978 and Amendments of 1981, 1983, 1989, 1990,

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.2 - Page 2 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

GTT III TANK LAYOUT

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ft
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.3.1 - Page 1 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

1.3 Cargo System Technology Illustration 1.3.1a Cargo Tank Lining Reinforcement

1.3.1 Cargo Containment System Principle

The Cargo Containment System consists of four double insulated cargo tanks
encased within the inner hull and situated in-line from forward to aft. The Side Passageway
containment system serves two purposes:

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To contain LNG cargo at cryogenic temperature (-160C)
Trunk Void
To insulate the cargo from the hull structure

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Cofferdam
The spaces between the inner hull and outer hull are used for ballast and will
also protect the tanks in the event of an emergency situation, such as collision
or grounding. The ballast spaces around the cargo tanks are divided into two
double bottom wing tanks, port and starboard for each cargo tank. The double
bottom tanks extend to the upper deck level.

The cargo tanks are separated from other compartments, and from each other,
by five transverse cofferdams which are all dry compartments. The LNG to Primary Barrier
be transported is stored in the four cargo tanks numbered 1 to 4, from fore to (304L SS 1.2mm Thick)

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aft. All cargo tanks have an octagonal transverse section matching with the
supporting inner hull.

Between the two transverse bulkheads, each tank is composed of a prism


placed in a direction parallel to the keel plate. Secondary Barrier
(Triplex Scab 0.7mm Thick)
The boundaries of the tanks are as follows:
One flat bottom, parallel to the keel plate raised along the ships
plating by two inclined plates, one on each side.
Two vertical walls each extended at their upper parts by an
inclined plate, in order to limit the liquid free surface effect
when the tanks are full. ft
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One flat top parallel to the trunk bottom.

The materials used for the hull structure are designed to withstand varying
degrees of low temperature. At temperatures below their specified limits, these
steels will crystallise and embrittle. The materials used for the containment
Key Primary Insulation (IBS)
system are required to reduce the heat transfer from the hull structure to
minimise the boil-off gas from the cargo, as well as to protect the hull structure Ballast
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from the effects of cryogenic temperature. The inner hull is lined with the GTT
Void Secondary Insulation (IS)
Mark III integrated tank system, consisting of a thin and flexible membrane,
called the primary barrier, which bears against a supporting insulation structure Cofferdam Ballast Tank
embodying a secondary barrier and further secondary insulation bolted
and glued to the inner hull. This construction ensures that the entire cargo Pipe Duct
hydrostatic load is transmitted through the membrane and insulation to the Pipe Duct
steel plating of the inner hull structure and thereby to the hull plating of the
vessel.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.3.1 - Page 2 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 1.3.2a Membrane Cargo Containment (GTT Mark III)

Plywood

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Plywood
Corner

ft
Stainless Steel

Plywood
Flat Joint
Primary Barrier
304 SS 1.2mm Thick
Secondary Barrier
(Triplex, 0.7mm Thick) Plywood
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PUF Packing

Glass Wool

R-PU Foam 100mm


D
R-PU Foam
170mm

12.5mm

Mastic
Cylindrical Plug Level Wedge

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.3.2 - Page 1 of 5
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

1.3.2 GTT Mark III Cargo Containment Secondary Barrier any reason, the effect may be a lowering of the inner hull steel temperature, ie,
a cold spot and an increase in boil-off from the affected tank. Increased boil-off
is of no direct consequence to the safety of the vessel, as any excess gas may
Membrane or Primary Barrier Material: Composite material made out of a 70 microns aluminium
be burnt as BOG, and as a last resort vented to atmosphere via the forward riser
foil bonded in between two glass cloth layers (overall
at No. 1 tank. The inner hull steel temperature must, however, be maintained
The membrane is an assembly of corrugated sheets 1.2mm thick, made of thickness # 0.7mm)
within acceptable limits to prevent possible brittle fracture.
AISI304L stainless steel. The sheets, lap-welded together, have two sets of

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orthogonal corrugations of ogival shape, where the nominal pitch is equal to The insulation and secondary barrier assembly is composed of the following
Thermocouples are distributed over the surface of the inner hull, but unless a
340mm by 340mm. The corrugations cross each other by means of geometrical elements, as shown in illustrations:
cold spot occurs immediately adjacent to a sensor, these can only serve as a
surfaces which are termed knots. general indication of steel temperature. To date, the only sure way of detecting
Level wedges, fixed to the inner hull and forming a rectangular pattern, serve
cold spots is by frequent visual inspection of the ballast spaces on the loaded
as a support for the insulation panels bonded to them. The plywood panels

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So that the elongation of the sheets in the two directions of the corrugations voyage.
will be the same for the same applied load, it is necessary to give different of the insulation barrier are secured to the inner hull by studs The level
dimensions to the corrugations of the two sets. Consequently there is one set wedge thickness are individually calculated to take into account any slight
The grade of steel required for the inner hull of the vessel is governed by the
of large corrugations, parallel to each other, and one set of small corrugations, irregularities in the inner hull surface.
minimum temperature this steel will reach at minimum ambient temperature,
also parallel to each other but at right-angles to the first set. Each sheet is assuming the primary barrier, the stainless steel membrane, has failed, so that
formed on an automatic folding machine using special tools. Insulating sandwich panels, composed of an outer plywood face, onto which
the LNG is in contact with the secondary barrier.
is bonded the membrane sheets and two layers of insulating foam, form the
On each of the tank walls, the corrugations present a pattern of squares, with actual interbarrier and insulation space barrier. Between the IBS and IS foam
In addition to failure of the membrane, local cold spots can occur due to failure
each set of corrugations being parallel to one of the axes of the vessel. layers there is a triplex membrane (scab) bonded onto the IS foam and forms
of the insulation.
the impervious barrier to the nitrogen circulation, known as the secondary

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Along the edges of the tank the joining of the corrugations on two adjacent barrier.
While the inner hull steel quality has been chosen to withstand the minimum
walls takes place by means of angle pieces, each one formed by folding temperature likely to occur in service, prolonged operation at steel temperatures
corrugation into a specially designed knot. The insulating sandwich panels are assembled by bonding with polyurethane or
below 0C will cause ice build-up on the plating, which in turn will cause a
epoxy glue. Insulation continuity between the panels is assured by glass wool
further lowering of steel temperature due to the insulating effect of the ice. To
The sheets are fixed to the supporting insulation along half their perimeter by (flat joint) which is sandwiched between PVC films. Tightness and continuity
avoid this, glycol heating coils are fitted in each cofferdam space, of sufficient
welding them onto small stainless steel strips solidly fixed in the insulation of the secondary barrier is achieved by means of a bonded scab-splice made of
capacity to maintain the inner hull steel temperature at 5C under the worst
structure. This anchoring has three purposes; it takes up the unbalanced forces prefabricated ridged polyurethane foam with reinforcing glass fibres.
conditions.
set up by non-uniform or transient temperature conditions, it supports the
weight of the sheets on the vertical walls and roof of the tank, and it allows a
small vacuum in the tank. The half perimeter is overlapped by, and lap-welded
to, the adjacent sheet, the overlap being 30mm. Along the edges and corners of
ft
the tank, the sheets are anchored to rigid stainless steel corner pieces, and the
For the corners of the tank, the sandwich panels are cut and assembled to form
dihedral and trihedral corners, the joints between the panels of these corners
being formed of precompressed expanded PVC.

The insulation dimensions have been determined to ensure that:


If a cold spot is detected either by the inner hull temperature measurement
system, or by visual inspection, the extent and location of the ice formation
should be recorded. Small local cold spots are not critical, and provided a
close watch and record are kept as a check against further deterioration and
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corners in turn are secured onto the insulation by hardwood keys. spreading of the ice formation, no immediate action is required. If the cold spot
The heat flow into the tank is limited to such an extent that the is extensive, or tending to spread rapidly, flooding of the ballast space should be
The welding process is Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) without filler metal. evaporation, or boil-off rate, is less than 0.15% per day. carried out. The thermal capacity of the water, plus the improved heat transfer
The inner hull steel does not attain a temperature below its from outside, should maintain the steel temperature at, or near, the ambient sea
Insulating Foam minimum design value, even in the case of failure of the primary water temperature. In the unlikely event that this remedy is insufficient and it
barrier. is considered unsafe to delay discharge of cargo until arrival at the discharge
Material: Load bearing fibreglass reinforced polyurethane
port, the final recourse will be to jettison the cargo via a portable nozzle fitted
foam (RPUF) Any deflections resulting from applied strains and stresses are
D
to one of the midships liquid manifolds, using a single main cargo pump.
Density: Approximately 120kg/m3 (10% fibreglass) acceptable by the primary barrier.
Close cell content: 95%
Thickness: 170mm below the secondary barrier In addition to these requirements, the insulation acts as a barrier to prevent any
contact between ballast water and the primary barrier, in the event of leakage
100mm above the secondary barrier
through the inner hull.

The insulation system is designed to maintain the boil-off losses from the
cargo at an acceptable level and to protect the inner hull steel from the effect of
excessively low temperature. If the insulation efficiency should deteriorate for

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.3.2 - Page 2 of 5
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 1.3.2b Interbarrier Space (IBS) Insulation Space (IS) Flat Panel Junction

Fitting Components
For Flat Panel

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Cylindrical Plug

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Top Bridge Pad

Nut HM 10
Cylindrical Plug

C
Washer LL 10 Stud

Secondary Barrier Flat Panel


Mastic Strip Level Wedge (Triplex Scab)
Secondary Barrier

Inner Hull

Anchoring Strip

ft
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D

Flat Joint

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.3.2 - Page 3 of 5
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 1.3.2c IBS IS Section of Longitudinal Corner

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Flat Panel

Mastic

C
PUF Packing

Stainless Steel
Corner Flat Panel

Flat Joint Primary Barrier Knot


Temperature 304 SS 1.2mm Thick
Sensor Pocket Teflon Block
Flat Panel

Plywood
ft Plywood
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R-PU Foam 100mm

R-PU Foam 170mm

Glass Wool
D
12.5mm
Sensor
Secondary Barrier
Level Wedge Mastic (Triplex, 0.7mm Thick)
Cylindrical Plug

Flat Panel

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.3.2 - Page 4 of 5
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 1.3.2d Hull Steel Grades

12

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29
28 11
38
22

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Item Temperature th 15 15th 20 20th 25
37
21
C mm mm mm
1 0 / A B
33 10
2 0 / A /
3 0 / A /

27 9 4 0 / D /
36 5 to 8 0 / A /
20
9 and 10 0 E / /

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32
11 and 12 0 A A /
13 -7 / B D
Ambient conditions for determining material grade of the hull structures are 14 -7 / BZ DZ
based on the worldwide service except Alaskan water as follows: 35 26 15 to 17 -7 / B /
- Air temperature (at 5 knots) : -18 degrees C 19
8 18 -14 E E /
- Sea water temperature : 0 degrees C
19 -24 E E /
- LNG supposed on secondary barrier
20 -27 E E /

The hull structure complies with requirements from Class Society, IGC- code

Statement of Compliance issued).

ft
requirements and USCG regulation for worldwide use except Alaska (46 CFR 154,
31

25 7
21 and 22
23
24
25
-29
-4
-3
-12
E
A
A
D
E
B
B
D
B
B
/

/
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26 -20 D / /
18 34
27 -23 E / /
6 28 -25 E / /
29 -25 E / /
30 30 -7 EZ / /
17
31 -16 D / /
32 -22 EZ / /
D
16
33 -24 E / /
5
15 34 -14 E / /
13 14 24
35 -24 E / /
36 -27 E / /
37 and 38 -29 E / /
23
4

1 2 3

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.3.2 - Page 5 of 5
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 1.4a Hazardous Area and Gas Dangerous Zone Plan

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re Cross-Section
he
Vent s Sp
diu
Elevation Vent Mast Vent Mast Vent Mast Mast Ra
m
25

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Cargo
Compressor
Room

Cargo Cargo Gear


Compressor Cargo Tank
Locker
Room

C
Key

Area Within This Boundary Is


Considered a Gas Dangerous Zone

1.5m Radius
Area Within This Boundary Is

ft 3m Radius

10m Radius
Considered a Gas Dangerous Zone
Area Within This Boundary Is
Considered a Gas Dangerous Zone

Air Intakes and Openings To Gas-Safe


Spaces Are Not Allowed Within This Boundary Is
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25m Radius
Air Intakes and Openings To Gas-Safe
Upper Deck
Spaces Are Not Allowed Within This Boundary Is
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Cargo Gear
Locker
Cargo Compressor
Room

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.4 - Page 1 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 1: British Emerald Date: September 2008

1.4 Hazardous Areas and Gas Dangerous


Zones

Introduction

Under the IMO Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying

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Gases in Bulk, the following are regarded as hazardous areas.

Gas dangerous spaces or zones, are zones on the open deck within 3.0m of
any cargo tank outlet, gas or vapour outlet, cargo pipe flange, cargo valve and

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entrances and ventilation openings to the cargo compressor house.

They also include the open deck over the cargo area and 3m forward and aft of
the cargo area on the open deck up to a height of 2.4m above the weather deck,
and a zone within 2.4m of the outer space of the cargo containment system
where such spaces are exposed to the weather.

The entire cargo piping system and cargo tanks are also considered gas
dangerous.

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In addition to the above zones, the code defines other gas dangerous spaces.

The area around the air swept trunking, in which the gas fuel line to the engine
room is situated, is not considered a gas dangerous zone under the above
code.

All electrical equipment used in these zones, whether a fixed installation or


portable, is certified safe type equipment. This includes intrinsically safe
electrical equipment, flame-proof type equipment and pressurised enclosure
type equipment. Exceptions to this requirement apply when the zones have
been certified gas free, eg, during refit.
ft
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 1.4 - Page 2 of 2
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Section 2: Properties of LNG

2.1 Properties of LNG

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2.1.1 Physical Properties and Composition of LNG

Illustrations

2.1.1a Properties of LNG and Methane

2.1.1b Variation of Boiling Point of Methane with Pressure

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2.1.1c Relative Density of Methane and Air

2.2 Characteristics of LNG

2.2.1 Flammability of Methane, Oxygen and Nitrogen Mixtures

ft
2.2.2 Supplementary Characteristics

Illustrations
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2.2.1a Flammability of Methane, Oxygen and Nitrogen Mixtures

2.2.2a Structural Steel Ductile to Brittle Transition Curve

2.3 Health Hazards


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Illustrations
2.3a Methane Safety Card

2.3b Nitrogen Safety Card


Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 2: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 2.1.1a Properties of LNG and Methane


Physical Properties of LNG Properties of Methane

Methane CH4 Ethane C2H4 Propane C3H8 Butane C4H10 Pentane C5H12 Nitrogen N2 Boiling point at 1 bar absolute -161.5 0C

Molecular Weight 16.042 30.068 44.094 58.120 72.150 28.016 Liquid density at boiling point 426.0 kg/m3

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Boiling Point at 1 bar absolute (C) -161.5 -88.6 -42.5 -5 36.1 -196 Vapour SG at 150C and 1 bar absolute 0.554

Liquid Density at Boiling Point (kg/m3) 426 544.1 580.7 601.8 610.2 0.8086 Gas volume /liquid volume ratio at -161.50C at 1 bar absolute 619

Vapour SG at 15C and 1 bar absolute 0.554 1.046 1.540 2.07 2.49 0.97 Flammable limits in air by volume 5.3 to 14%

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Gas Volume/Liquid Ratio at
619 413 311 311 205 649
Boiling Point and 1 bar absolute Auto-ignition temperature 595 0C
Non-
Flammable Limits in AIr by Volume (%) 5.3 to 14 3 to 12.5 2.1 to 9.5 2 to 9.5 3 to 12.4
flammable Higher Specific Energy (Gross Heating Value) at 150C 5550 kJ/kg

Auto-ignition Temperature (C) 595 510 468 365/500


Critical temperature -82.5 0C
Gross Heating Normal: 55559 51916 50367 49530 49069
Value at 15C (kJ/kg) Iso: 49404 48944 Critical pressure 43 bar a

Vaporisation Heat at Boiling Point (kJ/kg) 510.4 489.9 426.2 385.2 357.5 199.3

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Composition of Typical LNG

Methane CH4 Ethane C2H4 Propane C3H8 Butane C4H10 Nitrogen N2 C5+ Density (kg/m3)

Arzew 87.4 8.6 2.4 0.05 0.35 0.02 466

Bintulu 91.23 4.3 2.95 1.4 0.12 0 457

Bonny

Das Is
90.4

84.83
5.2

13.39
2.8

1.34

ft
1.5

0.28
0.07

0.17
0.02

0
453

465
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Badak 91.09 5.51 2.48 0.88 0.03 0 N/A

Arun 89.33 7.14 2.22 1.17 0.08 0.01 N/A

Kenai 99.8 0.1 0 0.1 0.1 0 421

Lumut 89.4 6.3 2.8 1.3 0.05 0.05 463


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Marsa el Brega 70 15 10 3.5 0.9 0.6 531

Point Fortin 96.2 3.26 0.42 0.07 0.008 0.01 433

Ras Laffan 90.1 6.47 2.27 0.6 0.25 0.03 457

Skikda 91.5 5.64 1.5 0.5 0.85 0.01 451

Withnell Bay 89.02 7.33 2.56 1.03 0.06 0 460

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 2.1.1 - Page 1 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 2: British Emerald Date: September 2008

2.1 Properties of LNG The auto-ignition temperature of methane, ie, the lowest temperature to which
the gas needs to be heated to cause self-sustained combustion without ignition
2.1.1 Physical Properties and Composition of by a spark or flame, is 595C.
LNG

Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons which, when liquefied, form a


clear colourless and odourless liquid; this LNG is usually transported and

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stored at a temperature very close to its boiling point at atmospheric pressure
(approximately 160C).

The actual composition of LNG will vary depending on its source and on the

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liquefaction process, but the main constituent will always be methane; other
constituents will be small percentages of heavier hydrocarbons, eg, ethane,
propane, butane, pentane, and possibly a small percentage of nitrogen. A typical
composition of LNG and the physical properties of the major constituent gases
are given in Table 2.1.1a.

For most engineering calculations (eg, piping pressure losses) it can be assumed
that the physical properties of pure methane represent those of LNG. However,
for custody transfer purposes when accurate calculation of the heating value

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and density is required, the specific properties based on actual component
analysis must be used.

During a normal sea voyage, heat is transferred to the LNG cargo through
the cargo tank insulation, causing part of the cargo to vaporise, ie, boil-off.
The composition of the LNG is changed by this boil-off because the lighter
components, having lower boiling points at atmospheric pressure, vaporise first.
Therefore, the discharged LNG has a lower percentage content of nitrogen and
methane than the LNG as loaded, and a slightly higher percentage of ethane,
propane and butane, due to methane and nitrogen boiling-off in preference to
the heavier gases.

The flammability range of methane in air (21% oxygen) is approximately 5.3 ft


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to 14% (by volume). To reduce this range the oxygen content is reduced to 2%,
using inert gas from the inert gas generators, prior to loading after dry dock.
In theory, an explosion cannot occur if the O2 content of the mixture is below
13% regardless of the percentage of methane, but for practical safety reasons,
purging is continued until the O2 content is below 2%. This safety aspect is
explained in detail later in this section.
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The boil-off vapour from LNG is lighter than air at vapour temperatures above
-110C or higher depending on LNG composition, therefore when vapour is
vented to atmosphere, the vapour will tend to rise above the vent outlet and will
be rapidly dispersed. When cold vapour is mixed with ambient air the vapour-
air mixture will appear as a readily visible white cloud due to the condensation
of the moisture in the air. It is normally safe to assume that the flammable range
of vapour-air mixture does not extend significantly beyond the perimeter of the
white cloud.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 2.1.1 - Page 2 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 2: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 2.1.1b Variation of Boiling Point of Methane with Pressure

TEMPERATURE (OC)

-165 -160 -155 -150 -145 -140 -135 -130 -125 -120 -115 -110 -105 -100 -95 -90 -85 -80 -75 -70 -65 -60 -55 -50 -40 -30 -20 -10 0 25 50 75 100
60

50

y
40

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30

20

Propane
2mol % Ethane

C
10
9
8
7
Methane Ethylene Ethane Propylene Propane bar
6

5
Butadrene N. Butane
1.3
4

ft 3
ata
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2

1
D
0.9
0.8
0.7

0.6
-165 -160 -155 -150 -145 -140 -135 -130 -125 -120 -115 -110 -105 -100 -95 -90 -85 -80 -75 -70 -65 -60 -55 -50 -40 -30 -20 -10 0 25 50 75 100

TEMPERATURE (OC)

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 2.1.1 - Page 3 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 2: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Variation of Boiling Point of Methane with Pressure Illustration 2.1.1c Relative Density of Methane and Air
See illustration 2.1.1b, which shows the vapour pressure diagram of liquid
cargoes.
+20
The boiling point of methane increases with pressure and this variation is
shown in the diagram for pure methane over the normal range of pressures on 0
board the vessel. The presence of the heavier components in LNG increases the

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Lighter than air
boiling point of the cargo for a given pressure. - 20

The relationship between boiling point and pressure of LNG will approximately - 40
follow a line parallel to that shown for 100% methane.

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Methane Vapour - 60
Temperature
C - 80

-100

-120
Heavier than air
-140

C
-160

1.5 1.4 1.3 1.2 1.1 1.0 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5

Density of Methane Vapour

ft Ratio =
Density of Air

(Density of air assumed to be 1.27kg/m3 at 15C)


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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 2.1.1 - Page 4 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 2: British Emerald Date: September 2008

2.2 Characteristics of LNG Using the Diagram It should be noted that some portable instruments for measuring methane
content are based on oxidising the sample over a heated platinum wire and
Assume that point Y on the oxygen-nitrogen axis is joined by a straight line
2.2.1 Flammability of Methane, Oxygen and measuring the increased temperature from this combustion. This type of
to point Z on the methane-nitrogen axis. If an oxygen-nitrogen mixture of
Nitrogen Mixtures analyser will not work with methane-nitrogen mixtures that do not contain
composition Y is mixed with a methane-nitrogen mixture of composition Z,
oxygen. For this reason, special portable instruments of the infrared type have
the composition of the resulting mixture will, at all times, be represented by
The ship must be operated in such a way that a flammable mixture of methane been developed and are supplied to the ship for this purpose.
point X, which will move from Y to Z as increasing quantities of mixture Z
and air is avoided at all times. The relationship between the gas/air composition are added.

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and flammability for all possible mixtures of methane, air and nitrogen is
shown on the diagram opposite. Note: In this example point X, representing changing composition, passes
through the flammable zone EDF, that is, when the methane content of the
The vertical axis A-B represents oxygen-nitrogen mixtures with no methane

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mixture is between 5.5% at point M, and 9.0% at point N.
present, ranging from 0% oxygen (100% nitrogen) at point A, to 21% oxygen
(79% nitrogen) at point B. The latter point represents the composition of Applying this to the process of inerting a cargo tank prior to cooldown, assume
atmospheric air. that the tank is initially full of air at point B. Nitrogen is added until the oxygen
content is reduced to 13% at point G. The addition of methane will cause the Illustration 2.2.1a Flammability of Methane, Oxygen and Nitrogen Mixtures
The horizontal axis A-C represents methane-nitrogen mixtures with no oxygen mixture composition to change along the line GDC which, it will be noted,
present, ranging from 0% methane (100% nitrogen) at point A, to 100% does not pass through the flammable zone, but is tangential to it at point D. If Area EDFE
B
methane (0% nitrogen) at point C. the oxygen content is reduced further, before the addition of methane, to any 21 flammable
E CAUTION
point between 0% and 13%, that is, between points A and G, the change in 20
This diagram assumes complete mixing
Any single point on the diagram within the triangle ABC represents a mixture composition with the addition of methane will not pass through the flammable 19

C
which, in practice, may not occur.
of all three components, methane, oxygen and nitrogen, each present in specific zone. 18
F

proportion of the total volume. The proportions of the three components 17


represented by a single point can be read off the diagram. Theoretically, therefore, it is only necessary to add nitrogen to air when inerting 16
Y

M
until the oxygen content is reduced to 13%. However, the oxygen content is 15
Mixtures of air and methane
For example, at point D: reduced to 2% during inerting because, in practice, complete mixing of air and N
14 cannot be produced above
G X line BEFC
Methane: 6.0% (read on axis A-C) nitrogen may not occur. 13
D
12
Oxygen: 12.2% (read on axis A-B)
When a tank full of methane gas is to be inerted with nitrogen prior to aeration, 11
Nitrogen: 81.8% (remainder)

The diagram consists of three major sectors:

1. The Flammable Zone Area EDF. Any mixture whose composition ft a similar procedure is followed. Assume that nitrogen is added to the tank
containing methane at point C until the methane content is reduced to about
14% at point H. As air is added, the mixture composition will change along line
HDB, which, as before, is tangential at D to the flammable zone, but does not
pass through it. For the same reasons as when inerting from a tank containing
%

O
x
y
g
e
10
9
8
7
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n 6
is represented by a point which lies within this area is air, when inerting a tank full of methane it is necessary to go well below the 5
flammable. theoretical figure to a methane content of 5% because complete mixing of Area HDFC
4
methane and nitrogen may not occur in practice. Capable of forming flammable
3 mixtures with air, but containing
2. Area HDFC. Any mixture whose composition is represented too much methane to explode
2
by a point which lies within this area is capable of forming a The procedures for avoiding flammable mixtures in cargo tanks and piping are
1
flammable mixture when mixed with air, but contains too much summarised as follows:
Z C
methane to ignite. A0 10 H 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
D
1. Tanks and piping containing air are to be inerted with nitrogen as Methane %
3. Area ABEDH. Any mixture whose composition is represented inert gas from the N2 generator before admitting methane until all Area ABEDH
Not capable of forming
by a point which lies within this area is not capable of forming sampling points indicate 5% or less oxygen content. flammable mixture with air
a flammable mixture when mixed with air.
2. Tanks and piping containing methane are to be inerted with
nitrogen as inert gas from the N2 generator before admitting air
until all sampling points indicate 5% methane.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 2.2.1 - Page 1 of 1
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 2: British Emerald Date: September 2008

2.2.2 Supplementary Characteristics 2. The major danger from an LNG vapour cloud occurs when
it is ignited. The heat from such a fire is a major problem. A
deflagrating (simple burning) is probably fatal to those within
LNG Spilled on Water
the cloud and outside buildings but is not a major threat to those
1. Boiling of LNG is rapid, due to the large temperature difference beyond the cloud, though there will be burns from thermal
between the product and water. radiation.

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2. LNG continuously spreads over an indefinitely large area,
Reactivity
and it results in a magnification of its rate of evaporation until
vaporisation is complete. Methane is an asphyxiant in high concentrations because it dilutes the amount
of oxygen in the air below that necessary to maintain life. Due to its inactivity,

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3. No coherent ice layer forms on the water. methane is not a significant air pollutant and, due to its insolubility, inactivity,
and volatility, it is not considered a water pollutant.
4. Under particular circumstances, with a methane concentration
below 40%, flameless explosions are possible when the LNG Cryogenic Temperatures
strikes the water. It results from an interfacial phenomenon in
which LNG becomes locally superheated at a maximum limit Contact with LNG or with materials chilled to its temperature of about -160C
until a rapid boiling occurs. However, commercial LNG is far will damage living tissue.
richer in methane than 40% and would require lengthy storage
before ageing to that concentration. Most metals lose their ductility at these temperatures; LNG may cause the
brittle fracture of many materials. In case of LNG spillage on the ships

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5. The flammable cloud of LNG and air may extend for large deck, the high thermal stresses generated from the restricted possibilities of
distances downward (only methane when warmer than -100C contraction of the plating will result in the fracture of the steel.
is lighter than air) because of the absence of topographic
features which normally promote turbulent mixing. Behaviour of LNG in the Cargo Tanks

6. When Agitated By Water When loaded in the cargo tanks, the pressure of the vapour phase is maintained
For example, if a flange drip tray becomes filled with LNG as substantially constant, slightly above atmospheric pressure.
a result of a leaking flange, under no circumstances should a
water jet be directed into the drip tray. Such action will cause
a severe eruption and a rapid expansion/boiling of the LNG
within the tray, resulting in LNG and ice particles being blasted
outwards. The LNG should be allowed to boil-off naturally or ft
The external heat passing through the tank insulation generates convection
currents within the bulk cargo, causing heated LNG to rise to the surface and
is then boiled-off.

The heat necessary for vaporisation comes from the LNG. As long as the
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the drip tray warmed with water spray on the sides or base.
vapour is continuously removed by maintaining the pressure as substantially
constant, the LNG remains at its boiling temperature.
Vapour Clouds
1. If there is no immediate ignition of an LNG spill, a vapour cloud If the vapour pressure is reduced by removing more vapour than is generated, the
may form. The vapour cloud is long, thin, cigar-shaped and, under LNG temperature will decrease. In order to make up the equilibrium pressure
certain meteorological conditions, may travel a considerable corresponding to its temperature, the vaporisation of LNG is accelerated,
distance before its concentration falls below the lower flammable resulting in an increased heat transfer from LNG to vapour.
D
limit. This concentration is important, for the cloud could ignite
and burn, with the flame travelling back towards the originating LNG is a mixture of several components with different physical properties,
pool. The cold vapour has a higher density than air and thus, particularly the vaporisation rates; the more volatile fraction of the cargo
at least initially, hugs the surface. Weather conditions largely vaporises at a greater rate than the less volatile fraction. The vapour generated
determine the cloud dilution rate, with a thermal inversion greatly by the boiling of the cargo contains a higher concentration of the more volatile
lengthening the distance travelled before the cloud becomes non- fraction than the LNG.
flammable.
The properties of the LNG, ie, the boiling point and density have a tendency to
increase during the voyage.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 2.2.2 - Page 1 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 2: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Properties of Nitrogen and Inert Gas Hazards


Nitrogen
WARNING
Nitrogen is used on board for the pressurisation of the cargo tank wedge
Due to the absence or to the very low content of oxygen, nitrogen is an
and insulation spaces, the purging of cargo pipelines and heaters, boiler gas
asphyxiant.
lines and Whessoe gauges, and for the sealing of the LNG compressors. It is
produced by the nitrogen generators whose principle is based on hollow fibre

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In a liquid state, its low temperature will damage living tissue and any spillage
membranes to separate air into nitrogen and oxygen.
of liquid nitrogen on the ships deck will result in metal failure (as for LNG).

Physical Properties of Nitrogen


Inert Gas

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Nitrogen is the most common gas in nature since it represents 79% in volume
Inert gas is used to reduce the oxygen content in the cargo system, tanks,
of the atmospheric air.
piping, void spaces and compressors. This is in order to prevent an air/CH4
mixture prior to aeration post warm-up, before refit or repairs and prior to the
At room temperature, nitrogen is a colourless and odourless gas. Its density is
gassing-up operation post refit before cooling down.
near that of air, 1.25kg/m3 under the standard conditions.
Inert gas is produced on board using an inert gas generator supplied by Smit
When liquefied, the temperature is -196C under atmospheric pressure, density
Gas System, which produces inert gas at 15,000Nm3/h with a -45C dew point
of 810kg/m3 and a vaporisation heat of 199kJ/kg.
burning low sulphur content gas oil. This plant can also produce dry-air at
15,000Nm3/h and -45C dew point (see Section 4.9 for more details).

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Properties of Nitrogen
The inert gas composition is as follows:
Molecular weight: 28.016
Nitrogen: 85% by volume
Boiling point at 1 bar absolute: 196C
Carbon dioxide: 14% by volume
Liquid SG at boiling point: 0.8086
Oxygen: <0.5% by volume
Vapour SG at 15C and 1 bar absolute: 0.97
Carbon monoxide: 100 ppm by volume
Gas volume/liquid volume ratio at 196C: 649


Flammable limits:
Dew point of 100% pure N2:
None
Below 80C
ft


Nitrogen oxides (NOx):
Sulphur oxides (SOx):
Dew point:
100 ppm by volume
10 ppm by volume
< -45C
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Chemical Properties Soot: Complete absence

Nitrogen is considered as an inert gas; it is non-flammable and without The inert gas is 5% denser than air: 1.3kg/m3 at 70mb and 30C. (Air weighs
chemical affinity. However, at high temperatures, it can be combined with other 1.25kg/m3 at 70mb and 30C.)
gases and metals.
WARNING
Due to its low oxygen content, inert gas is an asphyxiant.
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 2.2.2 - Page 2 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 2: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Avoidance of Cold Shock to Metal In the event of a major leakage or spillage, the cargo operations must be
stopped immediately, the general alarm sounded and the emergency deck water
Structural steels suffer brittle fracture at low temperatures. Such failures can be spray system put into operation.
catastrophic because, in a brittle steel, little energy is required to propagate a
fracture once it has been initiated. Conversely, in a tough material, the energy
necessary to propagate a crack will be insufficient to sustain it when it runs into
sufficiently tough material.

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Plain carbon structural steels have a brittle to ductile behaviour transition
which occurs generally in the range -50C to +30C. This, unfortunately, Illustration 2.2.2a Structural Steel Ductile to Brittle Transition Curve
precludes their use as LNG materials (carriage temperature -162C). The effect

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is usually monitored by measuring the energy absorbed in breaking a notched
bar and a transition curve, as shown in illustration 2.2.2a, is typical for plain
carbon steels.

For this reason, materials which do not show such sharp transition from ductile
to brittle fracture as the temperature is lowered, have found obvious application
Brittle Fracture transition Ductile
for use in cryogenic situations in general and particularly in liquid methane fracture range (mixed fracture fracture
carriers, for example, invar (36% nickel-iron alloy), austenitic stainless steel, appearance)
9% nickel steel and some aluminium alloys such as 5083 alloy. All of these

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materials behave in a ductile manner at -162C, so that the chance of an
unstable brittle fracture propagating, even if the materials were overloaded, is
negligible.

In order to avoid brittle fracture occurring, measures must be taken to ensure For a typical mild steel:
Notched
that LNG and liquid nitrogen do not come into contact with the steel structure bar test
T1 might be -30;
T2 might be +15.
of the vessel. In addition, various equipment is provided to deal with any energy
Although this depends
absorbed
leakages which may occur. on composition, heat
treatment etc. the curve

The manifold areas are equipped with a stainless steel drip tray, which collects
any spillage and drains it overboard. The ship, in way of the manifolds, is
provided with a water curtain from the deck and down the ships side with water
supplied from the fire and wash deck main. The deck fire main must always ft can shift to left or right.
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be available and the manifold water curtain in operation when undertaking any
cargo operation. Additionally, fire hoses must be laid out to each liquid dome
to deal with any small leakages which may develop at valves and flanges.
Permanent drip trays are fitted underneath the items most likely to cause
problems and portable drip trays are available for any other requirements.

During any type of cargo transfer, and particularly whilst loading and
T1 T2
D
discharging, constant patrolling on deck must be conducted to ensure that no
leakages go undetected.

In the event of a spillage or leakage, water spray should be directed at the


spillage to disperse and evaporate the liquid and to protect the steelwork. The
leak must be stopped, suspending cargo operations if necessary.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 2.2.2 - Page 3 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 2: British Emerald Date: September 2008

2.3 HEALTH HAZARDS


FIRE AND EXPLOSION DATA
Illustration 2.3a Methane Safety Card
Flash Point -175C approx. Explosive Hazards
Auto-Ignition Temperature -175C approx. Vapour can form a flammable mixture with air which, if ignited,
METHANE/LNG SYNONYMS may release explosive force causing structural damage.
Flammable Limits -5-16% by volume.
Appearance: Colourless Carburetted Hydrogen
THE MAIN HAZARD Firedamp
Colour: Very faint, nearly

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Hydrogen Bicarbide
odourless FLAMMABLE. Liquefied Natural Gas
UN Number: 1972/1971 LNG CHEMICAL DATA
Marsh-Gas
MFAG table: 620
Methyl-Hydride Formula - CH4. Chemical Family - Hydrocarbon.
MTH

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EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
STOP GAS SUPPLY. Do not extinguish flame until gas or liquid supply has been shut off, to avoid
Fire possibility of explosive re-ignition. Extinguish with dry powder, halon or carbon dioxide. REACTIVITY DATA
Cool tanks and surrounding areas with water.
Water, Fresh or Salt - No dangerous reaction; Other Liquids or Gases
Liquid DO NOT DELAY. Flood eye gently with clean fresh water. Force eye open if necessary. Do not rub may freeze to form ice or hydrates. No dangerous reaction; may freeze to form ice or hydrates.
in Eye the affected area. Continue washing for at least 15 minutes. Obtain medical advice as soon as possible.
Air - No reaction.

DO NOT DELAY. Remove contaminated clothing. Flood affected area with water. Handle patient gently.
Liquid
Do not rub affected area. Immerse frost-bitten area in warm water until thawed. Obtain medical advice or
on Skin

C
assistance as soon as possible.

REMOVE VICTIM TO FRESH AIR. Remove contaminated clothing. If breathing has stopped or is weak
PHYSICAL DATA
Vapour or irregular, give mouth to mouth/nose resuscitation or oxygen as necessary. Obtain medical advice or
Inhaled assistance as soon as possible.
Boiling Point at Coefficient of Cubic Expansion Enthalpy (KJ/Kg)
Atmospheric Pressure -161C. 0.0026 per C -165C. Liquid 29.3 at -165C 285.5 at -100C.
STOP THE FLOW. Avoid contact with liquid or vapour. Extinguish sources of ignition. Flood with large
Vapour 545.1 at -165 588.3 at -100C
Spillage amounts of water to disperse spill, and to prevent brittle fracture. Inform port authorities or coastguard Vapour Pressure Bar (A)
Freezing Point -182C.
of spill. Relative Vapour Density Latent Heat of Vaporisation
See graph in Figure A1.2.
0.55. (KJ/Kg)
Specific Gravity See graph in Figure A1.2.
Molecular Weight
See graph in Figure A1.2.

HEALTH DATA
ON EYES.Tissue damage due to frost-bite.
ft
TVL 1000 ppm ODOUR THRESHOLD 200 ppm
16.04kg/Kmole. Electrostatic Generation
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Effect of ON SKIN. Tissue damage due to frost-bite. CONDITIONS OF CARRIAGE
Liquid BY SKIN ABSORPTION. Not absorbed through skin.
BY INGESTION. Not pertinent. No hazard in normal industrial use. Normal Carriage Condition Control of Vapour within Vapour Detection
Fully refrigerated. Cargo Tank Flammable.
ON EYES. No hazard in normal industrial use. May be tissue damage due to frost-bite. Fully inerted with zero oxygen
Ship Type 2G Gauging Closed or Indirect.
content.
ON SKIN. No hazard in normal industrial use. May be tissue damage due to frost-bite.
Effect of Independent Tank Required No.
WHEN INHALED
Vapour Acute Effect. Vapour has narcotic effect. Because of very rapid evaporation rate,there is possibility
of total air replacement and danger of asphyxiation.
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Chronic Effect. No chronic effect known.

Personal Protection MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION


Protective clothing covering all parts of the body, gloves, boats, goggles or face shield,
all insulated against cold temperature attack.
Unsuitable Mild Steel Suitable Stainless steel, aluminium, copper, 9% or 36% nickel steel.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 2.3 - Page 1 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 2: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 2.3b Nitrogen Safety Card


FIRE AND EXPLOSION DATA
Flash Point - Non-flammable. Explosive Hazards
Auto-Ignition Temperature - Non-flammable. None.
NITROGEN SYNONYMS
Appearance: Colourless LN2 Flammable Limits - Non-flammable.
THE MAIN HAZARD Liquid Nitrogen
Odour: Odourless

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NXX
FROST-BITE
UN Number: 1977
MFAG Table: 620 CHEMICAL DATA
Formula - N2. Chemical Family - Noble gas.

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EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

Fire NOT FLAMMABLE. Cool nitrogen tanks with water spray in the event of fire near to them.
REACTIVITY DATA
Liquid DO NOT DELAY. Flood eye gently with clean fresh water. Force eye open if necessary. Do not rub
in Eye the affected area. Continue washing for at least 15 minutes. Obtain medical advice as soon as possible. Water, Fresh or Salt - No reaction; Other Liquids or Gases
nitrogen does not dissolve in water. No reaction.

DO NOT DELAY. Remove contaminated clothing. Flood affected area with water. Handle patient gently. Air - No reaction.
Liquid
Do not rub affected area. Immerse frost-bitten area in warm water until thawed. Obtain medical advice or
on Skin assistance as soon as possible.

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REMOVE VICTIM TO FRESH AIR. Remove contaminated clothing. If breathing has stopped or is weak
Vapour or irregular, give mouth to mouth/nose resuscitation or oxygen as necessary. Obtain medical advice or PHYSICAL DATA
Inhaled assistance as soon as possible.
Boiling Point at Freezing Point -210C. Enthalpy (KJ/Kg)
STOP THE FLOW. Avoid contact with liquid or vapour. Extinguish sources of ignition. Flood with large Atmospheric Pressure -196C. Liquid 30.7 at -196C 145.3 at -150C.
Spillage amounts of water to disperse spill, and to prevent brittle fracture. Inform port authorities or coastguard Relative Vapour Density Vapour 229.0 at -196 588.3 at - 150C
of spill. Vapour Pressure Bar (A) 0.97.
Latent Heat of Vaporisation
1.96 at -190C 9.87 at -170. Molecular Weight (KJ/Kg)
Specific Gravity 28.01kg/Kmole. 198.9 at -196C 72.4 at -160C.
0.807 at -196C.

HEALTH DATA
ON EYES.Tissue damage due to frost-bite.
ft TVL Simple Asphyxiant Non Toxic
ODOUR THRESHOLD Odourless
Coefficient of Cubic Expansion
0.005 per at C -198C.
Electrostatic Generation
None
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Effect of ON SKIN. Tissue damage due to frost-bite.
Liquid BY SKIN ABSORPTION. Nil.
CONDITIONS OF CARRIAGE
BY INGESTION. Not pertinent.
Normal Carriage Condition Control of Vapour within Vapour Detection
Fully refrigerated. Cargo Tank None required. Oxygen meter needed
ON EYES. Cold vapour could cause damage. prevent asphyxiation.
No.
ON SKIN. Cold vapour could cause damage. Ship Type 3G
Gauging Closed or Indirect.
WHEN INHALED
Effect of Independent Tank Required No.
Acute Effect. Asphyxiation. Headaches, dizziness,
Vapour unconsciousness or even death could result.
D
Chronic Effect.
Nil

Personal Protection MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION


Safety glasses or face shield, insulated gloves and boots. Long sleeves worn outside boots to
shed spilled liquid. Self-contained breathing apparatus where insufficient air is present.
Unsuitable Mild Steel Suitable Stainless steel, copper, aluminium.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 2.3 - Page 2 of 2
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Section 3: Integrated Automation System (IAS)

3.1 Cargo Control Room Arrangement

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Illustrations

3.1a Cargo Control Room Arrangement

3.1b Cargo Control Room Console

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ft
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Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.1a Cargo Control Room Layout

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2 2 2
3 4 5 6
1 1
7

7 Key

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1. Release Cabinet Powder Monitors
18
2. Window

3. Cargo Tank Layout Plan

Cargo Control Room Console 4. Inclinometer

5. White Board
1 2
12 3
11
4
10

6. Capacity Plan
9 5
8 6
7

C
8
7. Bookshelf

8. Drawer Units and Cupboards

9. Photocopier

10. Wolf Lamps

9 11. UHF Radio Charger

17

ft 10
12.

13.

14.

15.
Cupboard

Water Fountain

Network Computer

Desk
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16. Laserjet Printer
11
17. 5kg CO2 Fire Extinguisher

18. Sounding Board

16
12 14 15 14 12
13
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.1 - Page 1 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

3.1 Cargo Control Room Arrangement Buzzer Stop


Emergency Stop Pushbuttons
Introduction Flicker Stop
Test Switch
The cargo control room (CCR) is situated in the centre of deck level C on the
forward side of the accommodation block and has a forward facing view over Public Telephone

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the cargo tanks. Here all the necessary equipment and controls are located to PABX Telephone
permit the centralised supervision of the cargo operations during the loading
and discharging of a cargo. Sound Powered Telephone
Auto Telephone

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The main control console is shown in illustration 3.1b and contains a number
of workstations which are used for the operation of the cargo machinery and No.1 LCD for Custody Transfer System
associated equipment through the IAS. The workstations are complete with Workstation No.4 LCD Monitor
keyboard, trackball and colour flat screen monitors.
Keyboard and Mouse for Custody Transfer System
The console also contains the following equipment: Keyboard for Workstation No.4
MLM PC LCD Monitor, Keyboard and Mouse Workstation No.5 LCD Monitor
Loading Computer, Keyboard and Mouse Workstation No.6 LCD Monitor

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Omicron Level Alarm Panel Keyboard for Workstation No.5
Independent Ballast Tank High Level Alarm System Keyboard for Workstation No.6
Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure/Current Gauges Workstation No.7 LCD Monitor
Water Ballast Discharge Pressure Gauges No.2 LCD for Custody Transfer System
Tank Spray Pump Ammeters Keyboard for Workstation No.7
No.3 VHF Telephone Keyboard and Mouse for Custody Transfer System
No.2 UHF Remote Controller
Public Address Controller
General Emergency Alarm
ft Auto Telephone
CTS Report Printer
Alarm Printer
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Fire Alarm Loading Printer
CCTV Control Panel Hard Copy Printer
Sound Powered Telephone Alarm Event Printer
Hotline Telephone Data Log Printer
Wind Direction Indicator
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Trim Indicator
List Indicator
Float Type Cargo Tank Level Indicating Panel
Wind Speed Indicator
ESD Selectors
ESDS Alarm Lamps
ESD Pneumatic Set Point Panel

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.1 - Page 2 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.1b Cargo Control Room Console

No.1 No.2 No.3 No.4


Port Centre Console Centre Console Centre Console Centre Console Starboard
Corner Corner

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Console Console

9 10 11 12 17 18 19 33 34 35 36
8
38 39 50 51 54 55 58 59

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4 20 21 22 23
37 Starboard Console
13 14 15 16
1 2
12

Port Console
3

24
11

3
116

41
4
10
9 5
8 6
7

27 28 40 42 63
25 5 5
OM
IC
RO
N
26 FIRE

29 44 45
43 52 53 56 57 60 61
2 64

1 30 31 66
7 32 46 47 48 49 62 65

67

C
6
5

68

Key
1
2
3
-
-
-
MLM PC LCD Monitor
Loading Computer
Omicron Level Alarm Panel
ft
18
19
20
-
-
-
No.2 Water Ballast Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.3 Water Ballast Discharge Pressure Gauge
1C Tank Spray Pump Ammeter
35
36
37
-
-
-
List Indicator
Float Type Cargo Tank Level Indicating Panel
Wind Speed Indicator
52
53
54
-
-
-
Keyboard and Mouse for Custody Transfer System
Keyboard for Workstation No.4
Workstation No.5 LCD Monitor
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4 - Ships Clock 21 - 2C Tank Spray Pump Ammeter 38 - ESD Selectors 55 - Workstation No.6 LCD Monitor
5 - Dimmer 22 - 3C Tank Spray Pump Ammeter 39 - ESDS Alarm Lamps 56 - Keyboard for Workstation No.5
6 - MLM PC LCD Keyboard 23 - 4C Tank Spray Pump Ammeter 40 - Indicator Lamps 57 - Keyboard for Workstation No.6
7 - Loading Computer Keyboard and Mouse 24 - No.3 VHF Telephone 41 - ESD Pneumatic Set Point Panel 58 - Workstation No.7 LCD Monitor
8 - Independent Ballast Tank High Level Alarm System 25 - No.2 UHF Remote Controller 42 - Buzzer Stop 59 - No.2 LCD for Custody Transfer System
9 - 1C Tank - No.1 Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure/Current Gauges 26 - Public Address Controller 43 - Emergency Stop Pushbuttons 60 - Keyboard for Workstation No.7
10 - 2C Tank - No.1 Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure/Current Gauges 27 - Handset for No.3 VHF Telephone 44 - Flicker Stop 61 - Keyboard and Mouse for Custody Transfer System
11 - 3C Tank - No.1 Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure/Current Gauges 28 - General Emergency Alarm 45 - Test Switch 62 - Auto Telephone
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12 - 4C Tank - No.1 Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure/Current Gauges 29 - Fire Alarm 46 - Public Telephone 63 - CTS Report Printer
13 - 1C Tank - No.2 Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure/Current Gauges 30 - CCTV Control Panel 47 - PABX Telephone 64 - Alarm Printer
14 - 2C Tank - No.2 Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure/Current Gauges 31 - Sound Powered Telephone 48 - Sound Powered Telephone 65 - Loading Printer
15 - 3C Tank - No.2 Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure/Current Gauges 32 - Hotline Telephone 49 - Auto Telephone 66 - Hard Copy Printer
16 - 4C Tank - No.2 Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure/Current Gauges 33 - Wind Direction Indicator 50 - No.1 LCD for Custody Transfer System 67 - Alarm Event Printer
17 - No.1 Water Ballast Discharge Pressure Gauge 34 - Trim Indicator 51 - Workstation No.4 LCD Monitor 68 - Data Log Printer

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.1 - Page 3 of 3
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3.2 Integrated Automation System (IAS)

3.2.1 IAS Overview

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3.2.2 IAS Control Station Operation

3.2.3 Extension Alarm System

Illustrations

3.2.1a IAS Architecture

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3.2.1b Cargo Mimic Index Screen Shot

3.2.2a Cargo Plant Overview Screen Shot

3.2.2b Cargo Control Room IAS Annunciator Keyboard

3.2.2c Fuel Gas Network Overview Screen Shot

3.2.2d Filter Alarm and Trend Screen Shot


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3.2.3a Extension Alarm Panel

3.2.3b Watch Call Screen Shot


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Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.2.1a IAS Architecture


Wheelhouse
WS08 AVC WS09 AVC Integrated WP17
AMC FS01 AVC Fieldstation
Shipboard Navigation Watcall
Time from GPS Workstation Workstation Management VDR
Fire and (Interface Controller No.1)
or Master Clock Gas 1 System Panel
System
Navigation Deck

Accommodations
Officers Mess Junior Engineer 4th Engineer 3rd Engineer Chief Engineer 2nd Engineer Cargo Engineer ETO

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Duty Mess Officers Lounge Library Lounge Gymnasium Central Office Cadet (D) Chief Officers Room Captains Cabin
Room Room Room Room State Room Room Room Room
WP16 WP15 WP14 WP13 WP12 WP11 WP10 WP09 WP08 WP07 WP06 WP05 WP04 WP03 WP02 WP01
Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel Watchcall Panel

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D Deck
Cargo Control Room WS04 AVC WS05 AVC WS06 AVC WS07 AVC WS11 Programming CTS CC02 CC03 FS01 AVC Fieldstation NS02
NS01 PR05 PR06 UPS 2 (Interface Controller No.1)
PR01 Alarm and Workstation Workstation Workstation Workstation Workstation Interface FS16 AVC Controller AVC Controller Network
Network Hard Copy Data Log
Events Printer AVC (PMS A) (GMS A) Switch Box
Switch Box Printer (Screen Print) Printer Field
Station AMC AMC AMC
Fire and Emergency
Loading AMC Gas 2 Shutdown
Computer System

C Deck
B Deck
A Deck

C
Cargo I/O Cabinet Room-Port Cargo I/O Cabinet Room-Starboard NS04
NS03
FS09 FS10 FS11 FS12 FS13 FS14 Network
Network FS15 IS IS IS
AVC AVC GCU 2 AVC AVC AVC AVC Switch Box
Switch Box AVC
Field Field Field Field Field Field Field
IS IS IS
Station Float Station Station Station Station Station Station
Level Emergency Level
GCU 1 AMC Gauging AMC AMC AMC AMC AMC AMC
Shutdown Gauging
Interface System 2 Interface

Upper Deck
Engine Control Room
PR04 Alarm and
Events Printer
WS01 AVC WS02 AVC
Workstation Workstation

ft
WS03 AVC WS10 AVC
Workstation Workstation
PR02
Hard Copy
Printer (Screen Print)
UPS 1
PR03
Data Log
Printer
CC01 AVC
Controller (PMS A)

AMC
CC04 AVC
Controller (GMS B)

AMC
FS17
AVC
Field
Station
AMC
Hot Redundant
Field Station

AMC AMC
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2nd Deck
Main FS04 FS08 Performace
FS03 FS07 FS06 FS05
NS05 Switchboard AVC AVC
Monitoring
AVC N2 AVC System AVC AVC
Network Room GEN A Field Field
Field Field Field Field NS05
Switch Box Alarms and Alarms and
Station Station Station Station Station Station Network
Monitoring Monitoring
NS07 Diesel Gen 1 Diesel Gen 3 Switch Box
AMC IGG AMC AMC AMC N2 AMC Diesel Gen 4 AMC
Network Diesel Gen 2
GEN B NS07
Switch Box
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Network
Switch Box
3rd Deck

Propulsion Room Motor I/O Propulsion Converters Motor I/O


Switch Converter I/O Switch Converter I/O
AMC
Control I/O Starboard Control I/O
Port Thruster PEC Switch PEC Starboard
Control Port Thruster
Switch Control

4th Deck

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.1 - Page 1 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

3.2 Integrated Automation System (Ias) For watchkeeping purposes, the duty officers cabins are fitted with IAS monitor System Operator IDs
screens. Senior officers and gas engineer cabins are fitted with IAS monitoring
screens and computer workstations. Login User ID Privilege
3.2.1 IAS Overview
Machinery Operator 1
IAS Equipment Cargo Operator 1
System Main Components
Manufacturer: Alstom/Converteam Wheelhouse Operator 2
Senior Operator 2

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Model: Integrated Automation System B The IAS is manufactured by Alstom/Converteam, and has an open architecture
that is fault tolerant. The system incorporates a redundant bus control network Supervisor 3
that interconnects various stations such as control processors, application ALSTOM 3
Introduction processors and application workstations. The redundant bus is used to provide
high speed, redundant communications between each of the stations. The main

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The workstations are installed in the locations listed and include the following
The IAS system is a machinery monitoring and control system which covers all the components of the IAS system are as follows. equipment:
important plant on board the vessel, such as propulsion, power generation, boilers,
auxiliary machinery and cargo/ballast systems, fire systems monitoring etc.
Workstations Engine Control Room
The basic functions include: The workstations are the main interface between the operator and the processes
Each workstation includes a colour monitor, control computer,
under the operators control. The system consists of 10 workstations, with 2
Process and system monitoring an operator keyboard with buttons and trackball
configured as alarm servers, these being the ECR and the CCR. The remaining
Event logging and monitoring 8 workstations are alarm clients. One workstation, WS01 is configured as the alarm server

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Control functions (motor control, valve control and PIDs) Three workstations, WS02, WS03, WS10 are configured as
Note: Alarm servers are responsible for control of the alarm system, and alarm clients
The main applications to which these functions are applied are: work in an on-line/standby arrangement with only one being on-line at any
one time. Alarm clients must be connected to an alarm server, through which One alarm and event printer PR04
Power management all displayed alarm information is received and control commands are sent. One hard copy printer for screen prints PR02
Propulsion plant
One data logger printer PR03
There are 4 levels of login privilege at each workstation, and only an operator
Cargo and ballast control
who has logged-in and has taken control at his workstation can control plant or
Watch call system acknowledge alarms. Each workstation must be individually logged-in for an Cargo Control Room
Fire and gas alarm monitoring

The system architecture is as shown in illustration 3.2.1a above, and is made


up of two distinct parts, one of which provides the operator with display and ft operator to have control.

Login Privileges
Each workstation includes a colour monitor, control computer,
an operator keyboard with buttons and trackball
One workstation, WS04 is configured as the alarm server
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operating facilities, and one that is used for the processing of the collected Login Level User Privilege
Three workstations, WS05, WS06, WS07 are configured as
information. 0 Monitor Without login only monitoring of the system alarm clients
permitted.
1 Control Normal login gives control access, which allows One alarm and event printer PR01
Main Components
control actions for most plant devices. One hard copy printer for screen prints PR05
The IAS system is made up of workstations connected by a dual bus to the 2 Supervisor This privilege gives access to key operations One data logger printer PR06
network switch boxes, and the process field stations. The process field stations such as alarm editing, time zone adjustment,
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contain the input/output cards to and from the equipment controlled and/or and the ability to grab control of a control group
irrespective of location. Wheelhouse
monitored.
3 Marine This privilege is only for use by manufacturers
Each workstation includes a colour monitor, control computer,
service engineer during commissioning or fault
Workstations an operator keyboard with buttons and trackball
finding on board.
The workstations are the main interface between the operator and the processes Two workstations, WS08, WS09, are configured as alarm
under the operators control. Each workstation includes a colour monitor, clients
control computer, an operator keyboard with buttons and trackball. These are
installed in the engine control room, cargo control room and the wheelhouse.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.1 - Page 2 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.2.1b Cargo Mimic Index Screen Shot

11:10:36 20/03/07 Cargo Main Menu avc7


Version
20 Mar 2007 11:10:04:072 AVC 4 Ethernet Network A (Port) Communications Failed RESET HMI: Duplex
20 Mar 2007 11:10:04.072 AVC 7 Ethernet Network A (Port) Communications Failed RESET

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PMS: Duplex
20 Mar 2007 11:09:15.756 FS15 Rail 1 Communications Failed RESET
Ack: 611 Unack: 1,046 Ack: 387 Inhib: 6,118 ? I/O Ack Alarm Ack Banner Alarm Mute Mimic Call GMS: Duplex TKS: Duplex

Cargo Fuel Gas Auxiliary Systems

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Cargo Plant Glycol Water Fuel Gas NBO Mist
101 109 102 129 134 CTS Communication
Overview Heating Management Overview Separator

LNG Vaporiser LD Compressor


103 Cargo Tank 1 110 Vent Mast 122 130 121 ESD
Control Aft Coolers

104 Cargo Tank 2 117 Cargo Tank 123 FBO Liquid 131 Gas Heaters
Temperature Separator HD

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Cargo Loading Gas Combustion HD Compressor 1
105 Cargo Tank 3 136 124 Forcing Vaporiser 132 118
Tank 1 and 2 Unit Monitoring

Cargo Loading LD Compressor 1 Fuel Gas 119 HD Compressor


106 Cargo Tank 4 137 125 133
Tank 3 and 4 Monitoring Network Control

Cargo Unloading LD Compressor 1 HD Compressor 2


107 Cargo Manifold 138 126 140 NBO Calculator 120
Tank 1 and 2 Control Monitoring

108

299
Cofferdam Heating
System

Individual Pump
Start/Stop Sequences
139

300
ft Cargo Unloading
Tank 3 and 4

Cargo Unloading
Sequence Master
127

128
LD Compressor 2
Monitoring

LD Compressor 2
Control
141

142
Fuel Gas & BOG
Management

Gas Line Purging


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Nitrogen System LD Compressor Gassing Up
280 287
Sequences Sequences

111 Nitrogen 114 Nitrogen Barrier


Pressurising System Pressuring Tank 2 290 Purge Sequences

Nitrogen Barrier Nitrogen Barrier


112 115
Pressuring System Pressuring Tank 3
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Nitrogen Barrier Nitrogen Barrier
113 116
Pressuring Tank 1 Pressuring Tank 4

Memorise System Prop. Cargo Machinery PMS Emerg. ECR Attended Control ADMIN
Trends Alarms Health Control Control Control Control Call Transfer
Recall Menu Menu Menu Menu Menu CCR Attended Logout

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.1 - Page 3 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

The annunciator keyboard consists of an array of red, green and yellow The process stations are interface and processing units in the locations listed The Operator Interface
pushbuttons and an audible annunciator. Each button is labelled and allows below. They are related to particular pieces of equipment, or plant, and provide
The graphic displays are shown on the monitor of the IAS workstations, and
access to the system mimic labelled on the button. the interface between the IAS and the actual plant or equipment. Process
further details on these have been provided in Section 3.2.2 that follows.
stations also contain the operating software for the associated equipment.
Note: Workstation WS11 located in the cargo control room is the one that
can be used to modify the system software, but this must only be performed The IAS on board is called a distributed processing system, because the System Peripheral Equipment
by an authorised person. process control functions are defined locally in the process stations and not
Printers

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in the operator stations. The operator stations function independently, so they
can be located at the ship control centres. This also means that each station is Certain workstations are connected directly to a dedicated printer for printing
Fieldbus Modules capable of controlling any process, provided it has control of the appropriate out alarms and events, and may be interfaced to one or more network printers
The fieldbus modules (FBMs) are fitted in IAS cubicles and provide the command group and the user is logged-on with the correct access code. for event and report printing.

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necessary conversion of all of the digital and analogue input and output (I/O)
signals to allow the corresponding signal values to be communicated to the Each station computer has a hard disk containing the software files for the A workstation may also have the facility to print to the network colour printer,
control processor. fitted equipment. Process values to be displayed at the operator stations are providing colour screen dumps.
generated in the process stations and transferred to each station as required.
A wide range of FBMs have been fitted to perform the different types of signal Wheelhouse: FS01 - voyage data recorder, integrated navigation Monitoring and Control
conversion and to interface the control processor with the engine room sensors system and fire and gas alarms.
and actuators. The location of the FBMs and their external interfaces are as Monitoring and control is performed by software modules. The basic modules
follows: Electrical equipment room on C deck level: FS02 - fire and are:
gas alarms and emergency shutdown system. FS16 - custody Buttons

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transfer system, time for master clock and loading computer.
Communication Network Analogue measurement modules
Port cargo switchboard room on upper deck level: FS09 -
The workstations communicate to the redundant bus network. No.1 gas combustion unit. FS10 - float level. FS15 - starboard Digital measurement modules
ethernet. Pulse measurement modules
Power Supply Starboard cargo switchboard room on upper deck level: FS11 Motor/pump control modules
- No.2 gas combustion unit and emergency shutdown system.
FS12 - level gauging. FS13 - starboard ethernet. FS14 - Valve control modules
The IAS system is supplied from two independent uninterruptible power
supplies (UPSs). UPS1 in the ECR, and UPS2 is located in Cargo Control starboard ethernet. PID controller modules
Room. Each UPS has batteries fitted that supply two hours of back-up in the
event of power failure, and each is provided with protected output terminals.
The UPSs have two electrical supplies, one from the main switchboard and a
second supply from the emergency switchboard. The details of these supplies
ft Engine control room on 2nd deck level: FS17 - port ethernet.
FS18 and 19 redundant spares.
Port main switchboard on 3rd deck level: FS03 - alarms and
monitoring of No.1 and No.2 diesel generators. FS04 - Inert gas
All display views are made up from a set of standard modules. The symbols
on the screen are the symbols associated with these modules, valves, motors,
measurements etc.
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are as detailed in the electrical Section 2.2 of the Machinery Operating
Manual. generator and nitrogen generator A. FS07 - starboard ethernet.
Symbols
Starboard main switchboard on 3rd deck level: FS05 - alarms
The supply to the fieldbus module enclosures is 230V, 60Hz from the UPS units and monitoring of No.3 and No.4 diesel generators. FS06 - The symbols indicate the operational mode, and status of the represented
and each fieldbus cubicle is fitted with two power supply modules that run in nitrogen generator A and and performance monitoring system. equipment (motor/pump etc) by means of tag mark characters, and changes in
parallel with each other in case one supply develops a fault and fails. This FS08 - starboard ethernet. colour and appearance. Illustration 3.2.1b shows the common module symbols
ensures the supply to the modules is safeguarded and remains uninterrupted. used within the system.
The supply to each of the modules is from one UPS unit.
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Alarm Servers
The power supply to the operator workstations in the control rooms is split into
An alarm server is a specific computer on the network which runs the operator
two sections, with each section being supplied from separate UPS units. In the
station software. It also contains the historical database, storing an historical
event that one UPS fails, the power supply to both sections will be provided by
(time/date) series of process (samples). These series are used to produce trends
the one remaining UPS.
and reports at the operator and alarm server stations. There are two alarm
servers fitted, one in the ECR (WS01), and one in the CCR (WS04).

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.1 - Page 4 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.2.2a Cargo Plant Overview Screen Shot

Cargo Overview avc7


Version
20 Mar 2007 11:12:44:178 Generator 3 Power Cross Fail HMI: Duplex
20 Mar 2007 11:12:15.465 AVC 4 Ethernet Network A (Port) Communications Failed

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PMS: Duplex
20 Mar 2007 11:12:15.465 AVC 5 Ethernet Network A (Port) Communications Failed
Ack: 607 Unack: 1,059 Ack: 387 Inhib: 6,118 ? I/O Ack Alarm Ack Banner Alarm Mute Mimic Call GMS: Duplex TKS: Duplex

395.9 kPa Vapour Return Port


CL-041 CL-031 CL-001 CL-021 CL-011

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7.3 C 124.31 kPa
650.4 kPa CG-550
FG Overview
40 C 511.4 C
CG-526 HD1 UnLoading
7497 kg/hr Inhibited 21.627 t/hr
CG-519 CG-532
Unloading Loading
Htr 1
Sequence On
Fuel Gas 798.5 kPa
Line After HD2 LD
Cooler Inhibited Pre- 579.8 C
697.6 kPa CG-518 CG-512 CG-533
Cooler
-7.7 C CG-526 0 kPa
CG-511

C
CG-569 530.3 C
CG-527 LD1 -271.4 C
CG-521 CG-570 Running CG-534 Forcing
Vap
Htr 2 CL-042 CL-032 CL-002 CL-022 CL-012 Stbd

GCU Line CG-501 LNG


After LD2 Vap
9.55 kPa 125.89 kPa
CG-712
CG-613 Cooler Inhibited
CG-520 CG-513 CG-535 577.5 C 601.5 C
62 C CG-601 15.194 t/hr

Engines & GCU

523.5 C

ft Vapour Main CG-504


CS-601
530.1 C

631.5 C
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CG-404 CG-304 CG-204 CG-104
Tank 4 Tank 3 Tank 2 Tank 1 CG-702
HH HH HH HH
CL-406 CS-401 CL-306 CS-301 CL-206 CS-201 CL-106 CS-101
H H H H

123.93 kPa
575.8 C
CL-407 CL-408 CL-409 CS-402 CS-404 CL-307 CL-308 CL-309 CS-302 CS-304 CL-207 CL-208 CL-209 CS-202 CS-204 CL-107 CL-108 CL-109 CS-102 CS-104 81.44 t/hr
R R R R R R R R R R R R
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Port Stbd Spray Port Stbd Spray Port Stbd Spray Port Stbd Spray
Vent Mast SP
Fault Fault Fault L Fault Fault Fault L Stopped Inhibited Inhibited L Fault Fault Fault L L M
0 kPa 0 kPa 0 kPa LL 0 kPa 0 kPa 0 kPa LL 0 kPa 0 kPa 0 kPa LL 0 kPa 0 kPa 0 kPa LL
0 %

Memorise System Prop. Cargo Machinery PMS Emerg. ECR Attended Control ADMIN
Trends Alarms Health Control Control Control Control Call Transfer
Recall Menu Menu Menu Menu Menu CCR Attended Logout

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.2 - Page 1 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

3.2.2 IAS Control Station Operation 3=Marine - This level of access is reserved for the use of Each mimic displays all of the essential parameters and the safety information
the manufacturers service engineers, and can be used to alter related to the operation of that system and where applicable it is possible to
process values inside the system during commissioning or fault enter a sub-mimic which will display more detailed information on the system.
The Operator Interface
finding. The pipelines are shown in varying thicknesses, with the heavy lines showing
the main lines and the narrower lines the smaller secondary pipelines.
The graphic displays are shown on the monitor of the workstations. These
displays show all or part of a system or process using standard symbols to Screen Displays and Alarm Treatment
represent the actual plant, equipment, valves, motors etc. Events such as alarms The graphic components used in the mimics are as follows:

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Modes of Operation
and messages are also shown on the displays. - This symbol displays a manual system valve. If the valve
When operating any equipment through the IAS the normal method of control has been fitted with limit switches it will be coloured green
The operator panel is used to interact with the display and control the process. is the REMOTE mode, so when switched to this it will not be indicated as such when open and white when closed. If there are no limit switches
This is achieved by the use of the trackball and buttons to point and click on on the screen. The indication has been left off for clarity on the screen, but if an the valve will be coloured grey. If the valve has a critical alarm

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symbols and menus. item has been switched to something other than the remote mode it will show the symbol will have a red blinking square around it, which
one of the following: when acknowledged will go to a steady state red light. If the
Displays and Views Unavailable - This will be shown as a capital letter U on the alarm is non-critical the flashing square will be yellow in colour,
screen. and when acknowledged will go to a steady state yellow.
The system is made up of the following types of views:
Manual mode - This will be shown as a capital letter M on the
Process screen.
- This displays a regulating valve which is proportional,
Event Interlocked - This will be shown as a capital letter I on the will show the percentage the valve is open (XX%) on the control
Trends screen. window. The control window allows the valve to fully close,

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fully open or go to a fixed position. The valve will be coloured
The Display and Control of System Processes Annunciator Keyboard Operation green when open and white when closed. If the valve is opening
or closing, it will be flashing green when either opening or
The number of views in a system depends upon the equipment under system The annunciator keyboard is a shown in illustration 3.2.2b and provides a closing until the movement has stopped.
control. The operator can select views with varying levels of detail. When a short-cut method of accessing system screen mimics. The keyboard eleven F
view is selected showing an overall process, there may not be enough room keys will provide access to the relevant screen from where the system details
to display all the details on a single view. To account for this, the system will can be seen or access to a systems sub-menus provided.
- This displays a hydraulic remote controlled valve which
therefore have a number of views, accessed from the main view, that show
The keyboard is also used in the conventional way to changing the parameters will be coloured green when open and white when closed.
these details.

Access Level
There are four levels of access provided in the IAS system and the operator ft of the control valves.

Screen Mimics
When the valve is moving the valve symbol will be flashing
green when either opening or closing until the movement has
stopped.
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can log on at a workstation by means of a password for each level. These are There are two other alternative methods of accessing the system screen mimics.
detailed as follows: The first one is to use the trackball and to left click over the MACHINERY - This symbol displays a non-return valve which will have
1, MACHINERY 2, COMMON or CARGO coloured screen buttons on the the white part coloured grey when open.
0=Monitor - Without login, only monitoring of the system
opening screen shot as shown in illustration 3.2.2a. This will take the operator
is permitted. At this level of access, all of the system mimics
to a sub-menu where clicking with the trackball will take the operator into - This displays an ejector and will be coloured grey.
can be displayed but the operator will have no control over the
that system. The second method is to use the toolbar located at the very top of
information or parameters displayed.
the opening screen shot and to click on to the MACHINERY, COMMON or
1=Control - Normal login gives control access, which allow CARGO symbols. From here a number of flyouts will appear and by clicking Mimic Colour Guide
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control actions for most plant devices. The operator level of onto one of them and then following the file path will provide the operator with
access is the one used for the day-to-day operations of the on The different piping systems on board are each colour-coded on
the mimic or screen shot required.
board systems and can be accessed from the ECR and CCR. the mimic screens, and categorised as main or secondary systems.
The colours utilised are as follows and the differentiation
2=Supervisor - Supervisor privilege gives accesss to key Screen Mimic Symbols between the main and secondary lines is made by the thickness
operations such as alarm editing, time-zone adjustments, and of the line:
The design of the mimic screens for the various systems are such that wherever
the ability to grab control of a control group irrespective of
possible, the starboard side of the vessel is shown at the bottom of the screen
location. This level is used to modify the parameters preset
and the port side on the top. Similarly, the forward end of the vessel is shown
in the IAS such as alarm threshold values, and time delays on
on the right-hand side of the screen and the aft end on the left.
shutdowns and alarms.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.2 - Page 2 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.2.2b Cargo Control Room IAS Annunciator Keyboard

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Esc F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8 F9 F10 F11

! $ % ^ & * ( ) _ + Print Screen


Pause
Screen Lock
` 3 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 - =

C
} } Insert Home Page
Tab Q W E R T Y U I O P [ ] Up

Page
Caps : @ ~ Del End
Lock A S D F G H J K L ; #
Down

| < > ? Caps


Shift
\ Z X C V B N M , . / Lock

Ctrl Alt Space Alt Ctrl

ft
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D

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.2 - Page 3 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Note that the mimic background colour is light grey. Alarms will be displayed in the alarms display until they are acknowledged and By selecting the appropriate pushbutton FILTER on the alarms
reset, ie, returned to normal. page, a window is presented to the operator to enable filters to
Condition Colour be applied for browsing.
Running/Energised/Open Green Events are not shown on the current alarm list.
The operator may filter on Priority, Status, Group, Mimic
Changing Status Flashing Green
No., Time Date, or by using a test search in the Contains
Not Running or Not Energised White Note: Operators are always alerted to alarms when they occur. This is field. The window lists all the relevant facilities, and allows the
Fault Alarm/Closed Red achieved by use of a dedicated alarms banner present in the header, which user to select the filters he wishes to apply.

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Warning Alarm Amber is visible at the top of the mimic displays, irrespective of the system that is
being displayed. The header also displays the total number of active alarms, Options are provided on the filter window which control the
Bad Data Blue order of alarms, resulting in the list being presented in either
total number of unacknowledged alarms, and total number of inhibited
alarms. ascending or descending order, sorted by date/time or priority.

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Mimic Colour Palette The Period start and end date/time can be typed in.

Note that the mimic background colour is light grey. Alarm States The user can also enter a test string, and choose whether to filter
for all alarms containing that text string in their description, or
System Colour Main Secondary 1) Alarm Selection/Scroll to filter for all alarms which do not contain that text string in
Ballast Black their description.
The scroll bar to the right of the alarm list supports navigation
Bilge, fire and wash deck system Black through the list of alarms. The alarm screen will display FILTERED at the top of the
Sea water Green alarm list display if a filter has been applied.
The scroll bar indicates the position of the current page relative
Fresh water Medium Blue to the full list.

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Lubricating oil systems Orange Current Alarms Display
A highlight box is used to indicate the selected alarm
Marine diesel oil and gas oil Brown The current alarms display (alarms page) is viewed as a full screen after
Starting air Dark violet clicking on the corresponding function key in the bottom banner. For current
2) Alarm Acknowledgement and Status alarms the presentation order is chronological, either latest first or latest last.
Service and control air Dark violet
Domestic fresh water system Light blue Alarm acknowledgement is performed by:
Each alarm message within this display has the following format:
Feed water system Light blue
Using the ACK ALARM button which will acknowledge the
Exhaust gas Grey System Alarm Number (SAN) - which is a unique identity for
selected alarm, or
Nitrogen system
Inert gas
Waste water system
LNG vapour
Yellow
Grey
Black
Yellow ft Using the ACK PAGE button which will acknowledge
current displayed alarm page, or
Using the ACK RESET button which will acknowledge all
each alarm in the system. This has 7 characters.
Date in DD/MMMM/YYYY format. This has 10 characters.
Time in hh:mm:ss:uuu format. This has 12 characters.
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RESET alarms in the system, or Alarm group. This has 22 characters.
LNG liquid Light blue
On the banner, ACK ALARM acknowledges the alarm Main alarm description. This has 80 characters.
LNG spray liquid Cyan
selected in the banner, and ACK BANNER acknowledges Alarm State, eg, ACTIVE, RESET, ACKLGE, NORMAL. This
all 3 alarms displayed in the banner. has 6 characters.
Alarm Treatment Note: An operator must be logged-in, and have the control baton for a control
group before any alarm from that control group may be acknowledged. Note: NORMAL is only displayed on logged alarms page and on alarms
The IAS gives two levels of alarm that are categorised by priority. VITAL and
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print-out, not on current alarms page.
NON - VITAL. The text on each line, other than the state column, has a colour
scheme based on priority, ie, white on red for VITAL alarms, and black on 3) Filtering
amber for NON - VITAL alarms. Alarm Configuration
To reduce the amount of information the operator has to The system allows an operator with appropriate access rights to reconfigure
The state column has a blinking text if the alarm needs to be acknowledged, and browse through in order to get an overview of the process, a each alarm. Alarm parameters may be viewed and changed via an alarm
its colour depends on the alarm state, ie, white on red for active alarms, black comprehensive filtering facility is available. configuration window that is accessed from any alarm display, or from a mimic
on yellow for acknowledged alarms, and black on green for reset alarms. showing the variable that is alarmed. The following alarm parameters may be
changed on-line:

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.2 - Page 4 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.2.2c Fuel Gas Network Overview Screen Shot

11:27:14 20/03/07 Fuel Gas Management Overview avc7


Version
20 Mar 2007 11:26:15.465 AVC 4 Ethernet Network A (Port) Communications Failed HMI: Duplex
20 Mar 2007 11:26:15.465 AVC 5 Ethernet Network A (Port) Communications Failed

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PMS: Duplex
20 Mar 2007 11:16:16.465 AVC 7 Ethernet Network A (Port) Communications Failed
Ack: 607 Unack: 1,029 Ack: 387 Inhib: 6,118 ? I/O Ack Alarm Ack Banner Alarm Mute Mimic Call GMS: Duplex TKS: Duplex

798.8 kPa -101.1 C 645.1 kPa 5340 kg/hr


Vaporiser in FG Ctrl FG Ctrl Ref
8.9 C 33.17 kPa

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-148.3 C LDC in NBO Control NBO Ctrl Ref 0 kg/hr
LDC 1 80.6 C
CG-534 CG-567 Heater 1
LDC in FG Ctrl
Forcing Vaporiser
Running 395.9 kPa Vapour Main 802.7 kPa
CG-565
29.1 C 62 C 995.3 kPa
14.7 C 40 C 7.3 C CG-526
CG-530

5715 kg/hr 21.5 C G/E


CG-569
CS-507 7497 kg/hr 3&4
CS-512
FBO CG-531
Mist CG-613 CG-617
CS-501 Sep CG-509 CG-510 CG-511 CG-512
CG-571
CS-511 CG-566 Heater 2
84.3 C CG-616 G/E

C
514.1 kPa 1&2
LNG Vaporiser -134.7 C CG-620
16.5 C CG-572
0 %
LDC 2 697.6 kPa CG-527
GCU
CG-535 CG-568 Stopped
-7.7 C
NBO Inhibited CG-513 CG-615 Comp Start Mode
Mist
Sep 802.9 kPa Normal Mode
-271.4 C CG-619
11.7 C Standby
HH Level Absolute Pressure Gauge Pressure CG-570
Standby Eco
CG-528 111.25 kPa 15 kPa Freeflow

CS-601
Liquid
Main CG-404 ftSpray Main

CG-304 CG-204
Vapour Main

22.4 %

CG-104 CG-703
CG-712
CG-618 CG-614

Voyage Mode
987.3 kPa
GCU

957.6 kPa
60.7 C
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CL-601
Tank 4 Tank 3 Tank 2 Tank 1
Ballast
Stopped Engine 1
Spray Disch Press. Spray Disch Press. Spray Disch Press. Spray Disch Press. CG-001 Laden
0 kPa 0 kPa 0 kPa 0 kPa Load Sharing Engine 2
BOG Disposal
0 % Vent Load Sharing Engine 3
CPP CPS SP CPP CPS SP CPP CPS SP CPP CPS SP
CG-702 None Load Sharing Engine 4
GCU
Volume 7074 m3 Volume 8328 m3 Volume 1027 m3 Volume 9081 m3 GMS Control Active
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Liquid -143.3 C Liquid 109.4 C Liquid 193.5 C Liquid 136.3 C CG-002
IS 2.125 kPa IS 2.125 kPa IS 2.125 kPa IS 4 kPa Vent Mast SV Total LNG Consumption kg/hr
IBS 1.593 kPa IBS 1.593 kPa IBS 1.593 kPa IBS 2.999 kPa 15 kPa

Memorise System Prop. Cargo Machinery PMS Emerg. ECR Attended Control ADMIN
Trends Alarms Health Control Control Control Control Call Transfer
Recall Menu Menu Menu Menu Menu CCR Attended Logout

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.2 - Page 5 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Alarm group - attach any alarm to a group. A maximum of 16 The chart is capable of operating in either real-time or in historical mode. Auxiliary Equipment Control
alarm groups may be defined, which contain all the configured
Single Speed Equipment
alarms. Trending will log all signals received from the controller and signals will be
stored for 24 hours Single speed auxiliary equipment that can be viewed through the system mimics
Alarm thresholds - each analogue signal can generate up to
can be switched between START, STOP and STANDBY modes of operation
4 alarms (High/High; High; Low; Low/Low) which can be
via the IAS workstation. The equipment can only be switched between these
switched on/off. Each of the 4 alarms has their trigger threshold. Trend Drawings
modes if the local starter or control panel has been turned to the REMOTE
This makes easy the configuration of warning and shutdown

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Chart position. If the local switch has been turned to the LOCAL position, control
alarms.
of the equipment via the IAS will not be possible and the UNAVAILABLE
Hysteresis offset - the amount by which a signal must fall below The chart is configured for trend logged data, and is time-based condition will be indicated on the screen.
the threshold before the alarm will reset. rather than event based. The recorder defaults to 10 minutes

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worth of data displayed, but the operator may zoom in or out to
Alarm delay - a delay time in seconds can be added to any alarm Note: Switching over the mode of operation of the equipment from local to
show more or less data.
to delay its activation. This facility is most useful to prevent remote or from remote back to local does not change the running or stopped
nuisance alarms from level switches etc. Signal List status of that equipment. It should also be noted that by switching the
Below the chart itself is an area where details of the signals equipment to LOCAL control at the switchboard control panel will override
Alarm priority - alarms may be allocated a Priority.
selected for trending are displayed. Each signal is listed in the the IAS and transfer control immediately to the local position.
Alarm description - message text up to a maximum of 80
same colour used for its trace.
characters. If switched to REMOTE, the machine will be started and stopped by the IAS
To select a new signal to a pen, the tag button can be clicked to in accordance with the associated control loops which can, if applicable,
Signal blocking (on/off), and its block expiry delay - an alarm
bring up a signal selection window. include an automatic restart after an electrical blackout. If the equipment fails
generated from a single signal can be blocked for a time period

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(block expiry delay). Once the block expiry delay has timed-out Time Selection to start or stop within a set period of time after receiving a signal, an alarm
the alarm is enabled again. will be generated and displayed on the screen to notify the duty engineer of
A button below the chart shows the current mode: historical, the situation.
or real-time. When clicked, this button switches to the opposite
Alarm Suppression/Blocking mode. The IAS mimic will also display information on the total running hours of
This feature can be performed in 2 ways: In real time, the chart shows the last 10 minutes data updated the equipment, the running/standby status and if the machine has any active
live as new values are logged. interlocks.
1) Manually In historical mode, the operator can select the time frame being
By using the alarm configuration window the operator, with the appropriate
access rights, is given on-line facility to:
Suppress alarms from being detected as long as the alarm is
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viewed using the zoom and pan controls, or by typing in the
required end time of the trend.
The buttons with the magnifying glass icons, double or half the
time frame, zooming in or out from the chart.
The restart of the equipment after a blackout is only available if it was running
in REMOTE mode before the blackout. If after a preset time delay the duty
equipment has not restarted, the IAS releases the standby machine (where
applicable) to start.
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switched to the off state.
Saved Pen Selections Dual Speed Equipment
Block signals from generating alarm(s) for a period of time.
To avoid having to set up the pen selections anew every time Dual speed auxiliary equipment that can be viewed through the system
a particular set is required, the Pens Load/Save button gives mimics can be switched between START/STOP and STANDBY modes of
2) Automatic
access to a facility to store and retrieve pen selections to/from a operation and START LOW SPEED/START HIGH SPEED/STOP via the
The vessels alarm system caters for alarms that require automatic blocking global cache. IAS workstation. The equipment can only be switched between these modes,
based on a particular machinery state. however, if the local starter or control panel has been toggled to the REMOTE
From this pop-up, current pen set-ups may be saved by entering
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a template name and clicking Save, or a pre-saved template position. If the local switch has been toggled to the LOCAL position, control of
Trending may be loaded by clicking on its name, then clicking load. the equipment and its speed via the IAS will not be possible. If this is the case,
the UNAVAILABLE condition will be indicated on the screen.
Any signal available in the monitoring system, either Analogue or Digital is
continuously logged, and may be called up on the trending pages. The system
provides the facility to:
Select either of 2 chart recorder pages each displaying up to 8
trends at any one time.
Save / Load up to 20 charts of 8 pens set up data at any time.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.2 - Page 6 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.2.2d Filter Alarm and Trend Screen Shot

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06:29:55 07/06/08 Current Alarms avc10 06:29:55 07/06/08 Trend avc10
Version Version
02 Jun 2008 03:54:57.558 Echo Sounder Abnormal ACKLGE HMI: Duplex 02 Jun 2008 03:54:57.558 Echo Sounder Abnormal ACKLGE HMI: Duplex

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25 May 2008 05:37:34.398 Cargo Tank High Level Alarm System Failure ACKLGE 25 May 2008 05:37:34.398 Cargo Tank High Level Alarm System Failure ACKLGE
PMS: Duplex PMS: Duplex
23 May 2008 05:29:20.900 No.1 HD Compressor Common Trip Alarm ACKLGE 23 May 2008 05:29:20.900 No.1 HD Compressor Common Trip Alarm ACKLGE
Act: 17 Unack: 0 Ack: 17 Inhib:6,111 ? I/O Ack Alarm Ack Alarm Ack Banner Alarm Mute Mimic Call GMS: Duplex TKS: Duplex Act: 17 Unack: 0 Ack: 17 Inhib:6,111 ? I/O Ack Alarm Ack Alarm Ack Banner Alarm Mute Mimic Call GMS: Duplex TKS: Duplex

SAN Date/Time Group Description State 2 35

31751 02 Jun 2008 03:54:57.558 Navigation Systems Echo Sounder Abnormal ACKLGE
1.8
Fire Alarms 30
Priority Group Mimic Numbers
Undefined Power Generation 1.6
EVENT URGENT Alarms not on a Mimic
NON-VITAL OTHER Power Distribution Propulsion Common Alarms on Mimic Nos 25
VITAL 1.4
Steering Gear System Cooling Water Systems 0
States Lube Oil Diesel Oil 20
0 1.2
NORMAL ACKLGE

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Boiler Systems Air Systems 0
RESET ACTIVE
N2 Generator System Inert Gas Generator 0 1 15
Ballast System Misc Vessel Systems 0
Bilge Control Engine Room Gas 0.8
10
Time/Date
Cargo Area Bilge Levels Cargo Instrumentation
AFTER 0.6
Cargo Storage Cargo Handling
07 Jun 2008 05:28:05 5
Fuel Gas Management Engine Room Bilge Levels
0.4
BEFORE
Cargo / Accom Gas Glycol Water System
07 Jun 2008 06:28:05 0
Fire Pump Navigation Systems 0.2
Port Propulsion Starboard Propulsion
ESDS Ship
Fire Detection System

Description
Contains Does Not Contain
ft
ESDS Shore
Internal AVC System
0
07 Jun 06:19:55

Load/Save

Visible Axis1
07 Jun 06:20:55

Tag
Select Pen 1
Select Pen 2
07 Jun 06:21:55

Duration: 0
07 Jun 06:22:55

h 0 m 04 Jun 2008
07 Jun 06:23:55

23:34:34

Signal Description
AMC1:ActPowMes :Valve Activ Power propulsion
SD:MesN :Value Speed measurement
07 Jun 06:24:55

GO MODE:
07 Jun 06:25:55

REAL TIME
07 Jun 06:26:55

HISTORIC

Axis1
35
95
07 Jun 06:27:55 07 Jun 06:28:55

Cursor: 04/06/08 23:20:30

Min
-5
-70
Value at Cursor
21.40
81.68
Unit
MW
Rpm
-5
07 Jun 06:29:55

Axis2
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Select Pen 3 SD:WhILever :Speed Reference Wheelhouse Lever 95 -70 80.41 rpm
Select Pen 4 AMC1:PLSFctC2 :Torque limitation value PLS function CS 150 0 100.00 Undef
Reset Filter Apply Close
Select Pen 5 SD:RghSea :On status Rough sea mode 2 0 1.00 Undef
Select Pen 6 PD:RghSea :On status Rough sea mode 2 0 0.00 Undef
Select Pen 7 Main 6.6KV Port SWBD (MS1) Bus Section Frequency 65 55 59.98 Hz
Current Logged Potential Print Print Mimic Clear Ack Ack 2 0f 17
Edit ? I/O Search Filter
Alarms Alarms Alarms Page All Call Filter Alarm Page Select Pen 8 SD:FreqLim :Motor limitation by frequency Flt 0 0 0.00 Undef

Memorise System Prop. Cargo Machinery PMS 2nd Engineer MACHINE Memorise System Prop. Cargo Machinery PMS 2nd Engineer MACHINE
Emerg. Control Emerg. Control
Trends Alarms Health Control Control Control Control Trends Alarms Health Control Control Control Control
Call Transfer Call Transfer
Recall Menu Menu Menu Menu Menu Cargo Engineer Logout Recall Menu Menu Menu Menu Menu Cargo Engineer Logout
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.2 - Page 7 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Note: Switching over the mode of operation of dual speed equipment from
local to remote or from remote back to local does not change the running
or stopped status or the speed of that equipment. Changing the mode of
operation from low to high speed or vice versa can also be achieved by
giving the appropriate order to the equipment without having to stop it
first. Switching the equipment to LOCAL control at the local control panel
overrides the IAS and transfers control immediately to the local position.

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If switched to REMOTE, the machine will be started at the required speed and
stopped by the IAS in accordance with the associated control loops which can,
if applicable, include an automatic restart after an electrical blackout. If the

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equipment fails to start or stop within a set period of time or fails to change
speed when requested, an alarm will be generated and displayed on the screen
to notify the duty engineer of the situation.

In addition to the duty/standby indication being displayed, the IAS mimic will
also provide information on the total running hours of the equipment at the
two speed ratings, the running/standby status of the equipment and if it has
any active interlocks.

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Single and Double-Acting Valves
Single or double-acting valves can be selected for AUTOMATIC or MANUAL
operation via an IAS workstation. If switched to automatic, the valve position
is controlled by the system control loop, but if switched to manual the operator
can provide open/close instructions through the mimic. On signal failure the
valve will either stay at its final position or fully open/close as indicated by the
direction arrow on the stem of the valve symbol.

If a valve fails to respond to a signal from the IAS within a set period of time,
an alarm will be generated and displayed on the screen to notify the duty
engineer of the situation. An alarm will also be generated if the valve position
alters, so registering a discrepancy if it has not been given a signal to move. ft
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The IAS mimic also provides information on the automatic/manual status of
the valve and also the safety closing status of the valve.
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.2 - Page 8 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.2.3a Extension Alarm Panel

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C
ALARM ENGINEER ALARM DEADMAN UNATTENDED ON DUTY

Power Generation Cargo Storage

Power Distribution Cargo Handling

Propulsion Fuel Gas System


ACK/
MENU F1 F2
ENTER

ftVessel Machinery

Fire Detection

AVC System
Cargo Misc

Fire & Gas System

ESD System
CALL LIGHT DIMMER SILENCE
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.3 - Page 1 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

3.2.3 Extension Alarm System Officers mess: This panel has an on indication and provides
an alarm lamp and buzzer, local alarm acknowledge and test
functions for the lamps and the buzzer.
Introduction
Officers lounge: This panel has an on indication and provides
In addition to the operator and engineering workstations, the IAS has the an alarm lamp and buzzer, local alarm acknowledge and test
facility for advising duty engineers of the occurrence of new alarms through functions for the lamps and the buzzer.
an extension alarm system, so making it possible to operate the vessel with an

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unmanned machinery space (UMS). The advising of the duty engineers takes Central office: This panel has an on indication and provides
place through the alarm panels which are located in the engineers cabins and an alarm lamp and buzzer, local alarm acknowledge and test
in the public rooms. The alarms are sorted depending on whether they are functions for the lamps and the buzzer.
cargo or engine room related, and sent to the extension alarm panel as defined Gymnasium: This panel has an on indication and provides

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in the IAS. At the appearance of a new alarm the IAS will provide selective, an alarm lamp and buzzer, local alarm acknowledge and test
automatic call (duty call) in the accommodation area. Selective means that it functions for the lamps and the buzzer.
is possible to select one engineer as the duty engineer, but that this engineer
Library lounge: This panel has an on indication and provides
officer can still move freely around the ships accommodation area while being
an alarm lamp and buzzer, local alarm acknowledge and test
on call.
functions for the lamps and the buzzer.
When a duty engineer is selected, the accommodation alarm panels in the In addition to the above, access to the extension alarm system can be gained
public rooms also give an alert when the alarms occur. In response to a duty via the IAS screen mimic in the ECR, the CCR and in the wheelhouse. The
call the duty engineer must perform the same actions as for a normal alarm functions in each of these locations is as follows:

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announcement, first silence the horn/buzzer and then acknowledge the alarm at
the watch station. The final alarm acknowledgement must always be performed Engine control room: From the IAS mimic it is possible to
from the operator workstation in the ECR or in the CCR. select the duty engineer(s), to transfer operations to UMS duty
and to display the alarm groups. A buzzer for transfer indication
The duty selection itself must also be acknowledged, but this is simply done from is also provided.
the cabin of the engineer on duty. If an alarm call has been acknowledged from Cargo control room: From the IAS mimic in the CCR it is
the cabin of the duty engineer, the horns and buzzers in the accommodation and possible to view the duty engineer(s) and to display the 12 alarm
in the wheelhouse will be silenced, but the alarms must still be acknowledged groups. A buzzer for alarm indication is also provided.
from the watch station.

The horn/buzzer can be stopped locally in the public rooms, but this will not
be interpreted as an acknowledgement of the duty call.
ft Wheelhouse: From the IAS mimic in the wheelhouse it is
possible to view the duty engineer(s), to transfer to/from UMS
duty and to display the alarm groups. A buzzer for alarm
indication and an alarm acknowledgement have also been
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The location and make-up of each of the extension alarm panels is as follows: provided.

Chief Engineers cabin: This panel indicates the on duty In the case that an extension alarm is not acknowledged by the duty engineer
engineer, and provides indication of 12 system alarm groups, within a 3 minute timescale, an ENGINEERS CALL will be automatically
and has an alarm buzzer, local alarm acknowledge, and test generated and go through to all of the extension alarm panels in the
functions for the lamps and the buzzer. accommodation.
2 Senior officers cabins: These panels indicate the on duty
engineer, and provides indication of 12 system alarm groups,
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and has an alarm buzzer, local alarm acknowledge, and test
functions for the lamps and the buzzer.
7 officers cabins: These panels have an on duty indication
and have a transfer responsibility button, an alarm buzzer, an
alarm acknowledge and a visual alarm indication.
Duty mess: This panel indicates the on duty indication and
has a transfer responsibility button, an alarm buzzer, an alarm
acknowledge and a visual alarm indication.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.3 - Page 2 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.2.3b Watch Call Screen Shot

06:29:55 07/06/08 161 Watchcall avc10


Version
02 Jun 2008 03:54:57.558 Echo Sounder Abnormal ACKLGE HMI: Duplex
25 May 2008 05:37:34.398 Cargo Tank High Level Alarm System Failure ACKLGE

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PMS: Duplex
23 May 2008 05:29:20.900 No.1 HD Compressor Common Trip Alarm ACKLGE
Act: 17 Unack: 0 Ack: 17 Inhib:6,111 ? I/O Ack Alarm Ack Alarm Ack Banner Alarm Mute Mimic Call GMS: Duplex TKS: Duplex

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Status Status Panal Alarm Groups

Mode: Unattended Mode: Unattended Machinery Alarms


Vital Nonvital
Duty: 2nd Engineer Duty: Chief Officer
Power Generation
ECR Duty Engineer CCR Duty Engineer
Power Distribution

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Attended Attended

Bridge to Acknowledge Bridge to Acknowledge Propulsion

ETO Stateroom Chief Officers Room


Vessel Machinery
2nd Engineer Stateroom Cargo Engineer Room
Fire Detection
Chief Engineer Stateroom Chief Engineer Stateroom

3rd ENgineer Stateroom Cadet (D) Room AVC System


4th Engineer Stateroom

Junior ENgineer Room

Cadet (D) Room

ft Emergency Call

Harbour Mode
Cargo Alarms

Vital Nonvital

Cargo Storage
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Test Cargo Alarm
Cargo Handling
Test MAchinery Alarm

Fuel Gas System

Cargo Misc

Fire Detection
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ESD System

Memorise System Prop. Cargo Machinery PMS 2nd Engineer MACHINE


Emerg. Control
Trends Alarms Health Control Control Control Control
Call Transfer
Recall Menu Menu Menu Menu Menu Cargo Engineer Logout

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.3 - Page 3 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Selection of Duty Engineer for Unattended Condition (UMS) This alarm automatically goes through to all of the extension panels, and
operates whether the engine room is manned or not. The alarm buzzer cannot
When the ECR or CCR is to be operated in the UMS condition, and engineer be silenced at any panel. Silencing of the alarm will only be possible from the
with the correct privilege must select unattended mode at the alarm server ECR or CCR workstation, and can be done by acknowledging all currently
workstation. This is done by selecting one of the duty engineers from the watch unacknowledged fire alarms.
call mimic, or from the bottom banner. As a result of this action, a command
is sent to the watch call controller, which is used to action the following WARNING

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sequence: Any Watch Call Alarm Group containing a fire alarm CANNOT be
a) Display the Duty Engineer status in the ECR or CCR in all blocked.
watch call panels, and flash the Unattended LED.

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b) Sound buzzer and display the text Wheelhouse To Acknowledge
on wheelhouse panel only.

c) Whilst waiting for ACK/ENTER to be pushed on the


wheelhouse panel, the bottom banner on the workstation will
display Bridge to Ack.

d) When ACK/ENTER is received from the wheelhouse panel,

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then this cancels the buzzer and removes the text Bridge to Ack
on the wheelhouse panel. On the workstation, the bottom banner
will change from Wheelhouse to Acknowledge to the identity
of the duty engineer. The watch call mimic shows the identity
of the duty engineer. If Manned Operation is selected on the
watch call mimic before the wheelhouse has acknowledged,
then selection of unattended mode is aborted.

e) ECR or CCR status will display Unattended and Duty

f)
Engineer Information.

The UNATTENDED LED in the watch call panel will be


turned on. ft
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g) The Alarms Printer records the event that the duty engineer has
changed.

Note: Only one engineer at a time can be selected as duty engineer.

If Harbour Mode is selected, then unattended mode can be entered without


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acknowledgement from the wheelhouse. All watch call panels will display
Harbour Mode.

The same procedure is to be used when changing from one engineer to another,
with the exception that the ECR status field will display the new duty engineer
instead of the previous one.

In the event of the engine room fire alarm system being activated, a different
buzzer tone to that used on the other alarms will be heard.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.2.3 - Page 4 of 4
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3.3 Custody Transfer System (CTS)

3.3.1 Saab Radar Primary System (Radar Gauges and Custody Transfer System)

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3.3.2 Float Level Gauge

3.3.3 Omicron EHL and HHL Independent Level Alarms

3.3.4 Trim and List Indicator

3.3.5 Loading Computer

Illustrations

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3.3.1a Saab Tank Level Monitor Display

3.3.1b Saab Radar System

3.3.1c IAS Custody Transfer Screen Shot

3.3.1d Custody Transfer Data


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3.3.1e Certificate of Loading

3.3.2a Whessoe Gauge System


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3.3.2b Whessoe Float Level Gauge

3.3.3a High Level and Overfill Alarm System

3.3.4a Trim and List Indicators

3.3.5a Loading Computer


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3.3.5b Loading Computer (Cargo Screen)

3.3.5c Loading Computer (Load Summary)

3.3.5d Loading Computer (Bending Moments)


Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.3.1a Saab Tank Level Monitor Display

DATE
Saab TankRadar TM

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Help Close All

Window Cargo Overview CT 1 CT 2 CT 3 CT 4 System Overview

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Tr i m F - 0 . 7 5 m B y S t e r n
L i s t S 1 . 0 0 < > To S t b d

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Cargo Level Cargo Level Cargo Level Cargo Level
Alarm Block Alarm Block Alarm Block Alarm Block

Grade Grade Grade Grade


LNG LNG LNG LNG

ft CT 4 CT 3 CT 2 CT 1
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Cargo Level 1.573 m 1.938 m 0.207 m 0.478 m
Va p o r P r e s s u r e 1151 m b a r 1151 m b a r 1150 m b a r 1151 m b a r Avg 1151 m b a r
Va p o r Te m p -87.72 C - 11 7 . 7 1 C -79.34 C -74.14 C Avg -89.73 C
L i q u i d Te m p -159.42 C -159.30 C -159.20 C -159.30 C Avg -159.31C
L i q u i d Vo l u m e 2002.540 m3 2890.815 m3 207.331 m3 159 300 m3 Sum: 3 4 5 6 . 7 5 4 m 3
Vo l u m e R a t e -312.0 m3/h -520.3 m3/h -19.2 m3/h -747.6 m3/h Sum: -399.8 m3/h
D

Alarm

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.1 - Page 1 of 9
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

3.3 Custody Transfer system (CTS) workstation. The data from the spare terminal can only be accessed from the As all the operations are normally done on the workstation, the back-up
workstation. The vapour pressure sensor is situated inside the gauge housing. display is only needed when servicing the system or if there is a failure on the
3.3.1 Saab Radar Primary System (Radar Gauges workstation.
and Custody Transfer System) Workstation
Note: No alarm handling on measured values (except for the extreme IG
The workstation is used by the operator for monitoring the tank liquid levels pressure alarm) is done in the level unit. All such alarm handling is done in
Saab Tank Level Measurement System (ullage), liquid and vapour average temperatures, cargo volumes at average the workstation.

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temperatures and all the other data that is handled by the Saab Tank Radar.
Manufacturer: Emerson Saab Rosemount Marine The workstation takes care of the alarm handling of the measured values and
Type: Saab Tank Radar the transfer of all requested data to the IAS. Temperature and pressure within the tanks for use in the CTS calculations
is obtained from the Saab temperature and pressure monitoring system as
System No. G1128

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The workstation is operated with a trackball and keyboard to activate various described in Section 5.1.
functions.
General Description of the Saab Tank Radar System Failure of the CTS Equipment
The display works under the QNX Windows environment. Different windows
can be opened up and displayed simultaneously. The windows can be moved on If the CTS equipment should fail during custody transfer, the levels would have
The radar transmitters on the top of the tank emit microwaves, directed by an the screen by pointing at the top, on the title bar, of the window and dragging
antenna, towards the surface of the tank contents. The antenna picks up the to be measured using the Whessoe float gauges. The volume calculations and
them to a new position. corrections have to be made by hand, using the hard copy of the tank gauge
echo from the surface. The difference in frequency between the transmitted and
reflected signal is directly proportional to the measured distance, ie, ullage. tables.
The overview window is the main window to work from, as it shows the layout
of the tanks of the vessel. If the overview window is not displayed select the

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The Saab Tank Radar system, which is the main part of the cargo tank control The float gauges must be kept blocked at their top stored position when at sea,
EXIT ALL button or the OVERVIEW button. Select a tank area on the mimic with their respective isolating valves in the closed position.
system, is made up of the following units: figure to open the tank data window, which displays the basic information on
Level unit one tank. When loading or discharging, the tank data windows of all the active In port, during cargo operations, the floats should be manually lowered to the
tanks can be opened and placed beside each other. liquid level. The float will automatically rise and lower with the liquid level.
Transmitters
Workstation To display the channel menu select a value (for example an ullage value). After the cargo operations have been completed the floats should be returned
Select one of the items on the menu or touch outside the menu to close it. The to their raised stored position before the vessel leaves port.
Level Unit tank set-up window shows more information on one tank than the tank data

The level unit contains terminals for the intrinsically safe connection of the

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transmitters. It contains the electronics used for processing the signals from the
transmitters for calculating the tank parameters, average cargo temperature and
for communicating with the workstation.
window.

Back-up CPU
In this case a Cargo Record Report Sheet is manually completed using the
gauging tables. These contain the correction figures for trim, list, and thermal
value (level gauge) of each individual tank in order to give the corrected level
and volume in each cargo tank.
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If the CPU in the Saab workstation in the CCR should fail, the standby CPU
can be activated by the manual switch next to the two CPUs located below the
The system automatically measures the ullage more frequently on cargo tanks Alarms
monitor.
that are either being loaded or discharged.
High high level alarm 98% volume
High level alarm 97% volume
Gauges Back-up Display on the Saab Level Unit
Low level alarm 370mm
The gauges measure the distance to the product surface, using a frequency If the workstation and the standby CPU should fail, level indication can be Low low level alarm 200mm.
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modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar signal, and have an electronic box obtained from the level unit located in the electrical equipment room on C
that generates and processes the radar signal. deck.

The gauges used for LNG incorporates a cone antenna as an adaptor for a full The back-up display is located in the calculation unit in the top part of the
length stainless steel pipe in the tank. level unit cabinet. The back-up display serves only as a back-up for the
workstation. The display can show each tank with its tank name and relevant
Additional equipment for each tank, such as temperature sensors and a vapour tank values. The display can also show other information such as the mode of
pressure sensor are connected to a wire terminal inside the gauge housing. the Processor Memory Board (LCM), communication parameters and versions
The spare temperature sensors are connected via field bus terminals to the of the software.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.1 - Page 2 of 9
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.3.1b SAAB Radar System


Omicron Cabinet Alarm
Panet Mounted in Cabinet
HIGH LEVEL AND OVERFILL ALARM SYSTEM

98.5% TANK NO. 1

98.5% TANK NO. 2


99.0% TANK NO. 1

99.0% TANK NO. 2 4 Relay Output, 99.0% Override Indication Sensor/Communication OK


4 Relay Output, 99.0% Level Alarm Activation of ESD
98.5% TANK NO. 3 99.0% TANK NO. 3

98.5% TANK NO. 4 99.0% TANK NO. 4

LOOP FAILURE HIGH LEVEL LOOP FAILURE HIGH LEVEL

SYST./POWER FAIL. HIGH LEVEL

ALARM
SYST./POWER FAIL. HIGH LEVEL

ACCEPTED
4 Relay Output, 98.5% Override Indication Sensor/Communication Fail
LOOP FAILURE ACCEPTED

ACCEPT
ALARM
RESET
ALARM BUZZER
ALARM
HOLD
LAMP
TEST ON/OFF
4 Relay Output, 98.5% Level alarm Filing Valve Close
OMICRON

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TONSBERG - NORWAY

Cargo Tank No. 1 - 4

Standby Ships 24V DC


Radar Level Gauge
with Pressure Transmitter HH Level 230V AC
VHH Level 230V AC DOT Alarm Printer Laser CTS Printer

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UPS Printer Switch Printer Switch 230V

Verification
Pin
Level Unit UPS UPS

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UPS Networked WS UPS

UPS

I/O Box I/O Box

UPS UPS

ft Relay Output System Failure


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Master Clock Interface NMEA 0183
Field Bus Serial Interface to IAS

UPS A1 A2

2.0m Low Level Alarm


SIOX Cabinet

Array Attenuator
UPS A1 A2
D

}
4 Relay Output, 98% volume for high high level alarm
4 Relay Output, 97% volume for high level alarm
4 Relay Output, 2.0 metre for low level alarm To IAS
4 Relay Output, 0.5 metre for low low level alarm
Analog Inputs from Trim/List Sensor

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.1 - Page 3 of 9
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Operation Alarm Row The alarm limits are shown as lines beside the bar graph. The shorter lines
indicate the high and low limits, while the longer lines indicate the high high
Trackball At the bottom of the screen there is an alarm row. On the alarm row there is:
and low low limits. The values in the window that are underlined can be
a) Move the trackball (mouse) pointer to the area on the screen to An ALARM button for opening the alarm summary window changed.
be activated. An alarm text with the oldest accepted alarm, status, channel
name, current value and the past alarm limit Channel Data Window
b) At the area to be activated, click on with the left-hand button.

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An indication of how many more unaccepted alarms there are The Channel Data window looks similar to the tank data window. The channel
This registers a hit and activates the function where the cursor
was positioned. A red ACCEPT button for accepting the alarm displayed on the data window is used to obtain a quick overview of the data of a single channel.
alarm row A new channel can be selected directly from this window by pressing the
CHANNEL button.
c) If the trackball should fail, it is possible to move the cursor with A buzzer stop button for silencing the workstations alarm

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the arrow keys on the keyboard. buzzer, until there is a new alarm
Tank Set-Up Window
d) Press an arrow key once to move it just slightly, or keep it The Tank Set-Up window will give all the data on one tank. Alarm limits
pressed to move the cursor quickly. When there is an alarm, the alarm row is shown on top of the other windows
on the screen, if there is no alarm, only the ALARM button is shown on the and other data can be changed from this window. It is also possible to block
alarm row. individual channels from this window by pressing the check boxes at the right
e) To activate a function, once it has positioned the cursor end of the window. A check mark in a box indicates that the channel is blocked.
correctly, press the CONTROL key and the RETURN key at the Select a new tank by pressing the TANK button.
When the workstation is switched on, a mimic of the vessel is shown in an
same time, this corresponds to a hit by the trackball.
overview window.
It is possible to press a field in the Mode column to set a manual value to the

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The Base Window The overview window is made specifically for each ship. The information in channel. The value of delay is entered in seconds.
the overview window will change for different ships.
The base window is always at the background of the screen. The tank set-up window can contain more information than can fit sideways.
Each tank is shown with its tank name and sounding. In this case there is a scroll bar at the bottom of the window for scrolling the
At the top of the window there is row with the Tank Radar name, the date and window sideways.
time, the HELP button and a CLOSE ALL button. There can also be fixed areas on the overview window with information on, for
example, draught, sea water density, trim and list.
Channel Set-Up Window
By pressing the HELP button the help texts can be read about the various parts
By pressing a tank area, the tank data window for that tank is opened. If the Use the Channel Set-Up window to enter a manual value. Just press the CHECK
of the software.

Clear the screen by pressing the CLOSE ALL button. All the windows that are
open on the screen are closed down and the overview window is opened.
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sounding value is pressed, the channel menu is opened.

Tank Data Window


BOX for manual, and then press the VALUE and type the manual value. Some
channels do not allow manual entries and the word Manual is then dimmed. It
is also possible to disconnect a channel, by pressing the disconnect check
box so that a check mark shows.
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Below the top row there is the row of buttons, of which the first button is The Tank Data window is a small window displaying basic data of one tank for
always the WINDOW button. The other buttons can be as follows (depending each window. The ullage for a cargo tank is shown in a numeric form below the Alarm limits can be changed as well as blocking a channel.
on system configuration): bar graph. In the bar graph, the ullage is indicated by the empty space above the
coloured bar in the bar graph. Open the tank data window by pressing the area Select a new channel by pressing the CHANNEL button.
OVERVIEW of the tank in the overview window. The tank data window for that specific
CT1 tank will open. If the value of the ullage in the overview window is hit, the
channel menu will be displayed instead. Alarm Window
CT2 The Summary window contains four summaries; Sysfail, Warning Summary,
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CT3 A number of tank data windows can be opened (a maximum of 20 windows can Alarm Summary and the Event Log.
be displayed at one time) and placed wherever required on the screen. Touch
CT4 the title bar and move the track ball. Open the Summary window by pressing one of the two ALARM buttons, either
SYSTEM OVERVIEW at the lower left corner of the screen or at the row of buttons at the top part of
It is possible to switch to a new tank in a window by pressing the TANK button the screen.
These buttons are used to open the corresponding windows. However, both and selecting a new tank from the list.
the WINDOW button and the SETUP button are MENU buttons, which means Press the Summary button to display one of the following summaries:
they open up menus from which a selection can be made. An arrow pointing down beside the bar graph indicates that the tank is being
discharged, and conversely if the arrow points up the tank is being loaded. Sysfail to display any system failure

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.1 - Page 4 of 9
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.3.1c IAS Custody Transfer Screen Shot

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C
ft
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D

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.1 - Page 5 of 9
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Warning to display the Warning Summary Event Log Then press the SET UP button and select EDIT GROUP. The look of the
window changes slightly when it is in the edit mode.
Alarm to display the Alarm Summary The Event Log lists the latest 200 events for channels of the alarm classes
Event log to display a log of all events (up to the 200 latest Sysfail, Warning and Alarm. An event is recorded when a channel status goes
The column and row headings turn into buttons that are used for defining the
events in the system) into or out of alarm, block or disconnect.
contents of each row or column. To change a row, press the button containing
the heading of the row. A small menu, with the options EDIT, NEW and
On the right side of the window there are four buttons for scrolling the list. Group Window DELETE, is displayed.

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Use the intermediate buttons to scroll the list one page at a time, or use TOP or Use the Group window to group information, such as measured values, status,
BOTTOM buttons to go to the beginning or to the end of the list. When selecting EDIT or NEW, the Edit Member window is opened, see figure
alarm limits, into one or more tables. It could, for example, be the ullage values
below. If selecting NEW, first make the selection whether the new row will be
of a number of tanks with the same cargo or it could be a group with all the
When the ACCEPT PAGE button is pressed, all the channels seen on the screen placed before or after the active row.
at the moment are accepted. ballast tanks. It is possible to change a group or add new groups as follows:

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Press the MEMBER button to select another channel to be displayed on that
a) Press the GROUP button to display a list of the available row. The new channel is displayed on the Member row in the window. In the
Sysfail Window groups. Label input field the label can be changed so that it fits in the Group window.
The Sysfail window contains a list of any serious system failures within
the tank radar system. The following failures can be included in the Sysfail b) Select the group required. The columns are changed in a similar way. Instead of the Member window, the
window: Infopost window is opened. In addition to the functions described above, it is
c) Press the SET UP button to select one of the following modes: possible to define the width of the column.
Level unit communication failed
1. Edit Group mode to change the group
Level unit sysfail Use the LOG SET UP button to open the Group and Log Set-up window where

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2. Add Group mode to create a new group the period, start time or stop time of the groups log can be set up. It is also
Level unit power failure
3. Delete Group to delete a whole group possible to define whether the log should be printed or saved on a file. The
Level unit LI communication failed option of saving a file to a log is used only for service purposes.
Input/output box relay communication failed d) Press the BLOCK button to block all the channels in the
group that are possible to block. Unblock them by pressing Trend Window
Warning Summary Window UNBLOCK.
The Trend window is used to view the historical data of up to four channels in
The Warning Summary window lists all the failures that normally do not a window, with different colours for each channel.
e) Press the LOG button to start or stop a logging of the group. It is
seriously affect the tank radar system.

The following messages can be included in the Warning Summary window:


Level unit ground failure
Level unit memory failure ft also possible to order it to make a single logging of the group.

Adding a New Group


Add a new group by pressing the ADD GROUP ACTION under the SET UP
A number of trends can be configured and selected by pressing the TREND
button. The minimum sample rate is ten seconds. The latest 1,000 samples are
stored and can be displayed using the scroll bar.

Each channel is displayed with its actual value and with its maximum and
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button. The Group and Log Set-up window is displayed. Enter the name of the minimum settings for the diagram. The trends are shown in a window, these
Master communication failed
group. can be scrolled one page at a time using the intermediate left or right buttons,
Level datic communication failed or they can be scrolled to the end of the trend using the outermost left and right
SIOX communication failed Select whether the group will be based on tanks or on channels. Normally it is buttons. The window shows 180 samples at a time.
best to have groups that are based on tanks. There will be one row for each tank.
Level unit restarted The columns can contain data such as ullage value, status, and unit for each There is a time ruler for viewing historical data. Use the buttons described
tank. The logging of the group can be set up directly, but these parameters can above to move to the trend area that is required, then switch the ruler on by
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See the service manual for more information on how to find the failures and also be defined at a later time, see instructions next on how to edit a group. pressing the RULER button. When the ruler is on the values of the channels
how to fix them. corresponding to the time where the ruler is placed, the values are displayed
under the heading Ruler Value. The time and date, corresponding to the
Editing a Group
Alarm Summary Window position of the ruler, are shown above the grey window containing the trend
Note: Do not edit a group with a log started. Stop it first, edit it and save the lines. The ruler can be moved one sample at a time using the left and right
The Alarm Summary window displays all the channels that are in alarm at the
changes, then start it again. single arrow buttons, or five samples at a time using the left and right double
moment. They are displayed with their status, value, the limit that caused the
arrow buttons. To move quickly to another part of the Trend, switch the ruler
channel to go into alarm and the unit with which the channel is presented. The
To edit a group, first select the group from the list under the GROUP button. off and use the buttons to move one whole window at a time, or to go to one
alarm summary can contain an unlimited number of rows. The alarms for each
end of the trend.
tank are grouped together in the summary.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.1 - Page 6 of 9
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.3.1d Custody Transfer Data

Saab TankRadar G
3 CUSTODY TRANSFER DATA

Before Loading
Saab TankRadar G
3 CUSTODY TRANSFER DATA

After Loading
SHIP NAME THIS SHIP SHIP NAME THIS SHIP

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DATE (DD/MM/YYYY) 05-05-2008 DATE (DD/MM/YYYY) 06-05-2008
LOCAL TIME (HH:MM) 10:55 LOCAL TIME (HH:MM) 12:20
PORT NAME DAMIETTA PORT NAME DAMIETTA
BERTH SEGAS BERTH SEGAS
VOYAGE 0805E VOYAGE 0805E
CARGO NO. 08003/2008-019 CARGO NO. 08003/2008-019
CHIEF OFFICER A.N.OTHER CHIEF OFFICER A.N.OTHER

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TRIM (METERS) 0.00 (M) Even Keel TRIM (METERS) 0.00 (M) Even Keel
LIST (DEGREES) 0.00 (M) Upright LIST (DEGREES) 0.07 (M) to Port
SHIP AVG VAPOR TEMP 31.08 DEG C SHIP AVG VAPOR TEMP -134.45 DEG C
SHIP AVG LIQUID TEMP -------- DEG C SHIP AVG LIQUID TEMP -159.77 DEG C
SHIP AVG VAPOR PRESS 1,153 mbar(a) SHIP AVG VAPOR PRESS 1,142 mbar(a)

TANK 4 TANK 3 TANK 2 TANK 1 TANK 4 TANK 3 TANK 2 TANK 1


LEVEL MEASUREMENT (m) No.1 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 LEVEL MEASUREMENT (m) No.1 26.902 26.869 26.887 27.020
No.2 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 No.2 26.904 26.870 26.887 27.018
No.3 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 No.3 26.901 26.870 26.888 27.021
No.4 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 No.4 26.900 26.870 26.889 27.021
No.5 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 No.5 26.902 26.871 26.889 27.020

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AVERAGE LEVEL(m) 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 AVERAGE LEVEL(m) 26.902 26.870 26.888 27.020

TRIM CORRECTION (m) 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 TRIM CORRECTION (m) 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
LIST CORRECTION (m) 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 LIST CORRECTION (m) -0.001 -0.001 -0.001 -0.001
CORRECTED LEVEL (m) 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 CORRECTED LEVEL (m) 26.901 26.869 26.887 27.019

TEMPERATURE (DEG C) TEMPERATURE (DEG C)


99.5% 19.30 V -4.03 V 19.34 V 19.93 V 99.5% -142.31 V -132.74 V -132.03 V -130.73 V
75% 19.29 V -4.84 V 19.31 V 19.92 V 75% -159.81 L -159.82 L -159.76 L -159.81 L
50% 19.23 V -5.52 V 19.24 V 19.87 V 50% -159.80 L -159.77 L -159.79 L -159.79 L
25% 19.14 V -5.60 V 19.12 V 19.83 V 25% -159.80 L -159.84 L -159.84 L -159.79 L

TANK AVG VAPOR TEMP (DEG C)


TANK AVG LIQUID TEMP (DEG C)

TANK VAPOR PRESS (mbar(a)


0% 19.11

19.21
--------

1,154
V -9.39

-5.88

ft
--------

1,153
V 18.93

19.19
--------

1,153
V 19.59

19.83
--------

1,153
V

TANK AVG VAPOR TEMP (DEG C)


TANK AVG LIQUID TEMP (DEG C)

TANK VAPOR PRESS (mbar(a)


0% -159.74 L

-142.31
-159.79

1,142
-159.59 L

-132.74
-159.76

1,141
-159.59 L

-132.03
-159.75

1,141
-159.74 L

-130.73
-159.78

1,142
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TANK VOLUME (M3) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 TANK VOLUME (M3) 38,766.354 44,215.946 44,206.934 25,475.076
VOLUME SUMMED (M3) 0.0 (A) VOLUME SUMMED (M3) 152,764.310 (B)

Company Name Company Name

SHIP'S MASTER SHIP'S MASTER


D
BUYER(S) BUYER(S)

SELLER(S) SELLER(S)

SURVEYOR SURVEYOR

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.1 - Page 7 of 9
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

When the ruler is on, it is possible to press a point on a trend and the Ruler Custody Transfer System Quantity Value Displays During Loading
moves to this point. Then the position of the ruler can be adjusted more exactly The values displayed in the following fields will show the corrected liquid
with the single arrow left and right buttons. The CTS process image can be accessed via the drop-down menu by selecting volume according to the following rules:
WINDOW, then CTS DATA. The display has the following main purposes:
Quantity on board on arrival.
Edit, Add or Delete a Trend To display the measured values relating to the CTS
Quantity on board on departure.
To change a trend, add a new one or delete one, press the SET UP button to To enable the operator to generate reports at the start and end of

y
open a menu with these choices. When selecting Add Trend or Edit Trend, the cargo loading Quantity loaded.
Edit Trend window opens up. Before loading, all the values are frozen at the quantity present
To enable the operator to generate reports at the start and end of
cargo discharging in the tanks after the previous unloading operation.
Another way to open the Edit Trend window is by pressing one of the numbered
During loading, the quantity on board on arrival value is frozen

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channel buttons or anywhere on a channel row. To enable the operator to enter values manually
at the quantity present in the tank when the BEFORE LOADING
Change the name of the trend by typing the new name in the input field. button was pressed. The quantity loaded value is dynamically
Change the sample period by entering the time between each sampling in
CTS Operation updated to show how much has been loaded at all times. The
hours, minutes and seconds. The minimum sample rate is ten seconds. quantity on board on departure value is frozen at 0.0.
The CTS reporting operation is manual. The operator uses the buttons in the
After loading, the quantity on board on arrival value remains
CTS display image to print CTS reports at the following 4 different stages:
It is also possible to activate or deactivate the trend by pressing the ACTIVE frozen. The quantity on board on departure value is frozen at
box. A check mark indicates that the trend is active and is storing samples. the quantity present in the tanks when the AFTER LOADING
Before Loading:
button was pressed.
The state and content of the cargo tanks immediately before the
Select up to four channels that are included in the trend by pressing the

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loading operation is started.
numbered buttons at the bottom of the window. The total gross number of cubic metres of cargo in the tanks before and after
loading or discharging is calculated using the corrected level. The corrected
After Loading:
When pressing one of these buttons the Edit Channel window opens up. level is the measured level +/- the trim and list corrections.
The state and content of the cargo tanks immediately after
loading. This includes the difference in volume from before
Editing a Channel in a Trend loading. Quantity Value Displays During Unloading
By pressing one of the numbered buttons for the channels in either the Trend The values displayed in the following fields will be set according to the
window or in the Edit Trend window, the Edit Channel window is opened. Before Unloading:
following rules:

In this window it is possible to select the channel for that trend line and also
specify the maximum and minimum range for the trend graph. As a guidance,
the maximum and minimum of that range for the channel are printed in the
window. Select the colour by pressing the box with the correct colour.
ft The state and content of the cargo tanks immediately before the
unloading operation is started.

After Unloading:
The state and content of the cargo tanks immediately after the
Quantity on board on arrival.
Quantity on board on departure.
Quantity unloaded.
ra
unloading operation is completed. This includes the difference Before unloading, all the values are frozen at the quantity
in volume from before unloading. present in the tanks after the previous loading operation.
Note: Maximum and minimum ranges can be changed without losing the
historical data of the trend. When any channel is added or deleted, the During unloading, the quantity on board on arrival value is
Certificate of Loading is accessed when After Loading/Discharging is selected.
historical data for the other channels in that trend window is lost. To avoid frozen at the quantity present in the tank when the BEFORE
The reports generated from the display will be sent to file on disk so that all
losing historical data, make a new trend with the new channel or channels UNLOADING button was pressed. The quantity unloaded value
CTS reports will be available if required at a later stage. They will also be sent
included or deleted. The original trend will still contain the historical data. is dynamically updated to show how much has been unloaded at
to the printer for a hard copy upon request.
all times. The quantity on board on departure value is frozen at
D
Changing the Sampling Period of a Trend 0.0.
The initial report (before loading and after unloading) will be printed manually
from the Report System operation dialogue. Before printing, the operator will After unloading, the quantity on board on arrival value remains
Note: All historical data of the trend will be lost when the sampling period be prompted for the name of: The Port and the Chief Officer. At the loading frozen. The quantity on board on departure value is frozen at the
is changed. To avoid this, make a new trend with the new sampling period. port the voyage number will also be requested and then automatically included quantity present in the tanks when the AFTER UNLOADING
Press the SET UP button in the Trend window and press EDIT TREND on for all reports relevant to that cargo. button was pressed.
the menu. Enter a new sampling period in the Edit Trend window. Select OK
to start the trend with the new sampling period.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.1 - Page 8 of 9
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

CTS Reports Illustration 3.3.1e Certificate of Loading

CTS reports will be generated:


Before Loading After Loading Saab TankRadar G
3 CERTIFICATE OF LOADING
Before Unloading After Unloading SHIP NAME
PORT NAME
THIS SHIP
DAMIETTA
BERTH SEGAS

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VOYAGE NO. 0805E
The report will be generated and printed on paper when the operator activates CARGONO. 08003
one of the four buttons and one copy will be saved to disk. If more paper CHIEF OFFICER A.N.OTHER

copies of the report are required they can be printed using the standard report BEFORE LOADING
mechanism (window/CTS report). The historic report function can be used to DATE (DD/MM/YYYY) 05-05-2008

op
LOCAL TIME (HH:MM) 10:55
view previous cargoes. TRIM (METERS) 0.00 (M) Even Keel
LIST (DEGREES) 0.00 (M) Upright
SHIP AVG VAPOR TEMP 13.08 DEG. C
Overview values are highlighted in yellow. The status of the modules (from SHIP AVG LIQUID TEMP -------- DEG. C
which all the values are read) will be checked and each value with a status SHIP AVG VAPOR PRESS 1,153 mbar(a)

other than OK will be marked with a hash mark (#). TANK 4 TANK 3 TANK 2 TANK 1
AVG LEVEL MEASUREMENT (M) 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010
TRIM CORRECTION (M) 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Failure of the CTS Equipment LIST CORRECTION (M) 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
CORRECTED LEVEL (M) 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010
TANK AVG VAPOR TEMP (DEG C) 19.21 -5.88 19.19 19.83
If the CTS equipment should fail in one tank during custody transfer, the levels ------- ------- ------- -------

C
TANK AVG LIQUID TEMP (DEG C)
for that tank would have to be measured using the Whessoe float gauge. The TANK VAPOR PRESS (mbarA) 1,154 1,153 1,153 1,153
TANK VOLUME (M3) 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
volume calculations and corrections have to be made by hand, using the hard SHIP TOTAL VOLUME (M3) 0.000 (A)
copy of the tank gauge tables. AFTER LOADING
DATE (DD/MM/YYYY) 06-05-2008
LOCAL TIME (HH:MM) 12:20
The float gauges must be kept blocked at their top stored position when at TRIM (METERS) 0.00 (M) Even Keel
sea. LIST (DEGREES) 0.07 to Port
SHIP AVG VAPOR TEMP -134.45 DEG. C
SHIP AVG LIQUID TEMP -159.77 DEG. C
In port, during cargo operations, the floats should be manually lowered to the SHIP AVG VAPOR PRESS 1,142 mbar(a)

After the cargo operations have been completed the floats should be returned
to their raised stored position before the vessel leaves port.
ft
liquid level. The float will automatically rise and lower with the liquid level.
AVG LEVEL MEASUREMENT (M)
TRIM CORRECTION (M)
LIST CORRECTION (M)
CORRECTED LEVEL (M)
TANK AVG VAPOR TEMP (DEG C)
TANK 4
26.902
0.000
-0.001
26.901
TANK 3
26.870
0.000
-0.001
26.869
TANK 2
26.888
0.000
-0.001
26.887
TANK 1
27.020
0.000
-0.001
27.019
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-142.31 -132.74 -132.03 -130.73
TANK AVG LIQUID TEMP (DEG C) -159.79 -159.76 -159.75 -157.78
In this case a Cargo Record Report Sheet is manually completed using the TANK VAPOR PRESS (mbarA) 1,142 1,141 1,141 1,142
gauging tables. These contain the correction figures for trim, list, and thermal TANK VOLUME (M3) 38,766.354 44,215.946 44,206.934 25,575.076
value (level gauge) of each individual tank in order to give the corrected level SHIP TOTAL VOLUME (M3) 152,764.310 (B)

and volume in each cargo tank. VOLUME LOADED (M3) 152,764.310 (B-A)

Company Name

SHIP'S MASTER
D
BUYER(S)

SELLER(S)

SURVEYOR

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.1 - Page 9 of 9
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.3.2a Whessoe Gauge System

1084 Receiver

Hazardous Area

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1084 Receiver
WHESSOE
Transmitter Fig. 2047MT Transmitter Fig. 2047MT VAREC
(Tank 1) (Tank 2)

MAIN MENU

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Control Room

OPERATION
CONFIGURATION
PRINTER
Output to Ships IAS / Host Computer
HELP
3304 Gauge 3304 Gauge
IAS
MAINTENANCE

C
Transmitter Fig. 2047MT Transmitter Fig. 2047MT
(Tank 4) (Tank 3)

ft Key

This is the enter or validate key and is used to confirm a selection, command an action or to
validate data.
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Move cursor right key. In user mode this is used to continue to the next screen. In configuration
3304 Gauge 3304 Gauge mode it is used to continue to the next tank.

Move cursor left key. In user mode this is used to return to the previous screen. In configuration
mode it is used to return to the previous tank.
Junction
Box
Move cursor down key. This is used to select a line or to scroll through available choices.
In user mode it is used to continue to the next tank.
D
Move cursor up key. This is used to select a line or to scroll through available choices.
In user mode it is used to return to the previous tank.
110/220V AC 50Hz

Exit without validating key. This is used to quit a menu or to return to a higher level.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.2 - Page 1 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

3.3.2 float level gauge The accurately perforated tape transmits float movement to a sprocket wheel, A float lock-up arrangement provides removal of the level gauge float from the
which in turn drives a counter mechanism providing local digital read-out, tank when in the stored position. It also provides a gauge datum reference and
Manufacturer: Whessoe visible through a window in the counter housing. a means of locking the float in the storage position.
Type: Figure 3304
The shrinkage of the float invar tape in LNG vapour at -140C is about 1mm
Quantity: 4 (1 per tank)
when the tank is full and about 8mm when the tank is empty. The stillwell is Operation: Gauging
Accuracy: 7.5mm installed 120mm above the tank bottom and the minimum level which can be
a) Open the gauge isolating valve fully (it is normally left open),

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Repeatability: 4.0mm read from the gauge is 120mm.
then put the crank handle in the STORED position, ie, with the
Operating range: 0 to 44 metres handle towards the gauge cover.
Ambient temperature to -200C CAUTION
22.5 angle to the vertical (maximum) To reduce the risk of tape failure and wear on the gauging mechanism, b) Put the spring-loaded automatic float lock-up and the datum

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the floats should be fully stowed when the ship is at sea. Care should plunger up to release the float and allow it to descend at a
Transmitter type: 2047MT
be taken when stowing the float as excessive tension may cause tape controlled rate to the liquid level.
breakage.
Introduction To Return the Gauge to the Stored Position
The float descends under control to the liquid surface. The rate of descent is an
Each of the four cargo tanks is provided with an approved secondary level automatic function made possible by the inclusion of a viscous damper within a) Put the crank to the CRANKING position, ie, with the handle
measurement system via a Whessoe gauge as shown in illustration 3.3.2a. This the gauge head. The tank sounding may then be taken by observation of the facing outwards.
secondary system provides an alternative means of cargo level measurement local mechanical read-outs to provide level indication. The Whessoe gauges
in the event of the failure of the primary radar gauges system. During cargo should be checked against the Custody Transfer System (CTS) during each Note: The cranking handle is designed to drive in one direction only and is

C
loading or discharge operations, it is normal to lower the float to the product alternate loading. spring-loaded by a cam arrangement so that it is not in motion during normal
level and allow the float to follow the changing liquid level during these gauging.
operations. At the completion of the operation, and before the vessel departs 12" Float Well
the terminal, the float has to be stored in the gauge head to prevent the gauge b) Carefully raise the float by turning the crank slowly in a
The float well comprises a 12" (305mm) nominal bore float well tube installed
spring, float and tape being damaged by the rapid level changes that would counter-clockwise direction, as indicated by the arrow on the
vertically within the cargo pump tower. The upper end of the float well
occur when the vessel is at sea. main cover inspection plate. Watch the read-out counter, which
penetrates the top of the tank dome where it terminates in a flange.
will indicate when the float nears the top. When resistance is felt
The Whessoe Figure 3304 Marine Liquid level gauge has been designed and by the float touching the cushion spring, continue cranking until
The lower end extends to within 120mm of the bottom of the tank in the warm
developed specifically for low temperature liquefied gas carriers to measure
accurately and continuously liquid levels in marine cargo tanks during loading
and discharging. The float in each gauge should be lowered to the liquid level
after the ship is securely moored at the LNG terminal. The levels obtained from
the floats and from the Saab radar gauges should be recorded in the Cargo Log ft condition, where it is closed by a perforated plate. The lower end of the float
well is provided with a bolted inspection cover. To avoid level errors caused
by the till well effect, there is a 25mm diameter hole spaced every 300mm
below the sliding connection.
c)
the plunger is seated and the automatic float lock-up and datum
plunger spring fully inward, securing the float.

Check that the counter reads exactly the same before and after
use, then put the crank handle in its STORAGE position.
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at the start and completion of each cargo loading or unloading operation. Any
deviation over 10mm should be investigated during the voyage. Isolating Valve and Float Inspection Chamber CAUTION
A 300mm gate valve, bolted to the top of the float well, allows the gauge head Do not attempt to turn the crank clockwise or to interfere with the free
Each gauge is fitted with a 2047MT type transmitter connected to a 1084 to be isolated for maintenance. A stainless steel inspection chamber is mounted fall of the float. To do so will severely damage the tape or the tensator
mini receiver located in the CCR. The receiver functions as a mini tank above the isolating valve to provide access to the float and for the connection spring.
gauging system and the data is displayed on an LCD panel on the front of the of special float recovery tools in the event of tape breakage. The isolating vale
instrument. Command entry is by means of a splash-proof membrane keypad. is normally closed when the gauges are stowed.
D
The Whessoe gauge panel is interfaced with the IAS workstation and the tank Maintenance
levels are displayed on the IAS tank screen. The levels displayed on the LCD
Level Gauge Assembly The gauge head is sealed with locking wire and lead seals by a Sworn Measurer,
and IAS have not been corrected for tape shrinkage.
The level gauge assembly comprises the gauge head and float assembly. The therefore it is important to avoid damaging these seals. In the event of the seals
The Whessoe gauge is float actuated and employs a tensator spring as a counter- float is clamped to an accurately perforated tape manufactured from stainless being broken, the companys head office should be informed immediately so
balancing mechanism which maintains a constant tape tension at the float. This steel, a viscous damper to control the rate of descent of the float to the cargo that arrangements can be made for the attendance of a Sworn Measurer to
ensures that the float maintains the same level of immersion irrespective of the level, a crank for raising the float to the storage position, and a mechanical check and re-seal the gauges.
amount and weight of the tape paid-out. read-out which is observed through the counter window, plus a transmitter for
continuous read-out on the IAS during loading and discharging operations. The float must be raised and secured whenever the vessel is at sea.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.2 - Page 2 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

An inspection housing is provided between the gauge head and the closure Illustration 3.3.2b Whessoe Float Level Gauge
valve on each unit. The closure valve is used to cut-off vapour flow to the Read-Out Window Transmitter
inspection housing. The inspection housing is provided with a pipe connection
for inerting the space with nitrogen before inspection or renewal of the tape or
float. The nitrogen is supplied from the nitrogen purge valve available at each
tank dome area and is introduced by means of a flexible hose from an outlet
valve to the Whessoe unit.

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Loss of Float
Handle To Raise
The Float
In the event of a float becoming detached, Whessoe supply a magnetic retrieval

op
device that will attach to the metal plates on the top or bottom of the float so
that it can be recovered without the need for gas freeing.

To retrieve a detached float, first ensure the tape and plunger are stored in the
gauge housing, then fully close the gate valve.
Cushion Spring
Open the inspection hatch and attach the magnetic retrieval device. Close the
inspection hatch.

C
Open the gate valve and lower the retriever to the liquid level to pick up
the float. Raise and store the float, close the gate valve, open the inspection
chamber hatch and remove the float. Disconnect the retrieval device.

If the float has simply become detached and the tape remains in good condition, Cylindrical Float Inspection Hatch
simply re-attach the float to the tape and check the store position setting. If the
readings are accurate there will be no need to remove the main gauge cover.

If the tape has been damaged or cut, it will be necessary to rectify the tape and
hence rectify the gauge readings. In order to rectify the readings it is necessary
to remove the main cover to adjust the gauge read-out and gain access to the
tape.
ft
ra
Removal of the main cover will mean the custody seal will be broken. The
300mm Closure Valve
custody seal is there to prevent removal of the main cover and adjustment to
the gauge after accuracy tests have been carried out with the surveyor.

On completion of repairs and readjustment it is good practice to have a surveyor


re-verify the gauge readings and reseal the main cover. This will ensure no
problems are encountered by surveyors at future loading or discharge ports.
D

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.2 - Page 3 of 3
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.3.3a High Level and Overfill Alarm System

230V AC Supply HIGH LEVEL AND OVERFILL ALARM SYSTEM


Float Switch Arrangement High Level System
98.5% TANK NO. 1 99.0% TANK NO. 1
Protective Cap
98.5% TANK NO. 2 99.0% TANK NO. 2

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230V AC Supply
Overfill System 98.5% TANK NO. 3 99.0% TANK NO. 3

Test Lift Button 98.5% TANK NO. 4 99.0% TANK NO. 4

LOOP FAILURE HIGH LEVEL LOOP FAILURE HIGH LEVEL

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SYST./POWER FAIL. HIGH LEVEL SYST./POWER FAIL. HIGH LEVEL

Connection ALARM ACCEPTED


Box
LOOP FAILURE ACCEPTED

ACCEPT RESET ALARM LAMP


Cargo Tank Dome Shell ALARM ALARM BUZZER HOLD TEST ON/OFF

OMICRON

C
TONSBERG - NORWAY

99% 99% 99% 99%


OVERRIDE OVERRIDE OVERRIDE OVERRIDE
CT1. CT2. CT3. CT4.

Float Guide AT
SEA

High High 98.5% 98.5% 98.5% 98.5%


OVERRIDE OVERRIDE OVERRIDE OVERRIDE
Low Density Float CT1. CT2. CT3. CT4.

Sensor Switch

ft Intrinsically Safe Inputs


SAFE AREA
ra
Level Sensor Level Sensor Level Sensor Level Sensor
High Tank No.4 Tank No.3 Tank No.2 Tank No.1 HAZARDOUS AREA
D

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.3 - Page 1 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

3.3.3 Omicron EHL and HHL Independent High Level Operation Override
Alarms Independent Alarm and Shutdown Override
When a cargo tank float moves upwards and activates the alarm, the buzzer on
Manufacturer: Omicron the CTS workstation will start. The corresponding alarm will also be raised via During the loaded voyages it will be necessary to override the High Level
Type: HHL - 8903A the IAS system. alarms and shutdowns, during the ballast voyage the Low Level alarm override
is engaged to prevent the sloshing LNG liquid from constantly activating the
Pressing the SILENCE ALARM pushbutton on the IAS control panel will alarms.
The vessels cargo tank high level alarm system is fitted to comply with the

y
cause the common alarms to stop.
IMO, DNV and USCG etc, societies requirements. To comply with these The following alarms can be overridden from the CTS workstation on the CCC.
requirements the Very High Level alarm, activated by the Saab radar and the To override these levels, depress the ESDS button on top of the Saab monitor
The common alarm unit is configured to raise alarms for either the 98.5%
Extreme High Level alarms are completely separate. and select all of these alarms and shutdowns to be overridden. Confirmation
HIGH HIGH LEVEL or 99.% EXTREME HIGH LEVEL alarm.

op
will be given by the check mark appearing in the small square in the Figure
Both the High High Level (HHL) and Extreme High Level (EHL) level below and by red indicating lamps being displayed in the centre of the cargo
When the level in the tank reaches the 97% alarm limit the filling valve for that
switches are of the float-type and can be tested independently from the top of Tank and ESDS mimics on the IAS.
tank should be throttled-in to 25% or less.
the tank.
Independent EHL alarm and ESD activation
In addition to the normal alarm function the system also has an Alarm Hold
All the inputs from the level switches are connected directly to the input side Saab CTS VHL alarm and fill valve close
function.
of the ESD control panel, then by relay to the ESD override (99% level), the
common alarm system and the IAS cargo system. Independent HHL alarm
The Alarm Hold operates in the following manner:
The 98.5% capacity float will activate the HHL alarm and will close the tank CAUTION

C
If prior to loading the Alarm Hold button is already activated, it must be
filling valve. The 99% capacity EHL alarm will activate the ESD system,
released and then reactivated; this is done to clear any previous alarms. None of the High and Low Level alarms and overrides should be in the
which closes the manifold valves.
override mode during loading and unloading operations of the cargo
When the Alarm Hold is activated, the first alarm from each tank and level tanks.
The level switch has two floats with built-in permanent magnets in each float.
will activate the buzzer on the control panel in the CCR, also the appropriate
As the float moves upwards, a reed switch inside the housing is deactivated
LED will flash.
and an alarm is raised. When the float moves downward, the reed switch is
closed again.
If one of the level switches, that is already in alarm condition, should be
deactivated and then reactivated because of the movement of the cargo surface,
and one is in parallel with the switch contacts. This enables the detection of
broken or shorted alarm circuits. If necessary it is possible to replace a faulty
sensor without taking the cargo tank out of service, see the manufacturers
information instructions for full details. ft
Two resistors are connected to the reed switch inside the sensor. One is in series
the alarm will not sound again due to the alarm hold function.

When the alarm hold button is deactivated, all alarms and alarm LED will
return to the normal working condition according to signal inputs from the
ra
level switches in the tank.

Testing Tank 4 Tank 3 Tank 2 Tank 1


Each level switch is equipped with a mechanical testing device. The testing 100.0% Liquid height mm 27.940 27.952 27.952 27.923
device is located under a protective screw cap on top of the level switchs 99% Liquid height - mm 27.095 27.095 27.095 27.178
junction box. By lifting the testing device slowly, the HIGH HIGH LEVEL Extreme High Level
alarm (98.5%) for that particular tank will be raised. Lifting the device further
98.5% Liquid height mm 26.882 26.882 26.882 27.004
D
up will cause the EXTREME HIGH LEVEL alarm (99%) to be raised.
98.0% Liquid height - mm 26.673 26.673 26.673 26.833
When testing is complete, the test device should be pressed back down and the High High Level
protective screw cap replaced. 97.0% Liquid height mm 26.265 26.265 26.265 26.497

Note: The EHL and HHL alarms are to be tested prior to each cargo loading Note: The Omicron floats for the EHL and HHL are located 1.8 metres
and discharge operation. forward of the Saab Radar and Whessoe Float Level Gauges in the liquid
dome. Therefore, if the ship is not on an even keel during the topping-up of
the tanks the EHL and HHL alarms will not activate at the correct levels.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.3 - Page 2 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.3.4a Trim and List Indicators


Analog Indicator
for Wheelhouse and CCR
Sensor (Inclinometer)
Inclinometer Cuircuit Unit Installed in the Motor
Box Installed in Electrical Room
Equipment Room

y
op
Wheelhouse

Electrical Equipment Room


Motor Room

C
Forward List Indicator Trim Indicator
AC220V

Port Starboard
Power Supply % %

+ - + -

Aft

INCLINOMETER
Inclination
Detector in
Electric Motor Room

ft
ra
Cargo Control Room
List Indicator Trim Indicator
D
% %

+ - + -
Hazardous Area
Custody Transfer System
For List

For Trim
Key

Electrical Signal
Safety Area

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.4 - Page 1 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

3.3.4 trim and List indicator Electronic Circuit Unit


The voltage signal transmitted from the linear transformer is amplified by
Manufacturer: Utsuki Keiki Co. Ltd a high impedance amplifier to minimise the voltage loss suffered in the
conductor. The amplified output is used to give an analogue output signal.
Detector:
Direction: 2 Indicator Panel

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Type: CSM-2DD The indicator panel is formed by two circular gauges. The trim gauge has a
Measuring: 0~2, 0~5 range of +/- 2 with an minimum scale reading of 0.1. The list gauge has a
Measure for: Trim and List range of +/- 5 with a minimum scale reading of 0.2.
Accuracy: 0.3% FS

op
Response time: 0.5 sec Set-up Procedure

Circuit Unit Box: The detector should be installed at a time when the heel and trim are at a
minimum such as dry dock. The place of installation should be free from
Type No: CB-2S
vibration, secure from impacts and horizontal.
Type: Wall mount
Power: Ac 220V 1 60Hz Once the detector is mounted the adjusting bolts can be moved to set the scale
Dissipation: 40VA reading on each instrument to the correct figure.

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Output: TRIM
Before the indicator panel is switched on check that each of the gauges reads
Aft Fore zero. When the power is switched on allow readings to settle, then adjust the
4mA ~ 12mA ~ 20ma readings by turning the adjusting bolts/nuts to the actual trim or list.
-3V ~ 0V ~ +3V
LIST
Port Stbd
4mA ~ 12mA ~ 20ma

Introduction
-3V ~ 0V ~ +3V

ft
ra
The trim and list indicator system consists of the following parts:

Inclination Detector
Essentially the detector is a core suspended by a leaf spring to form a pendulum.
As the core moves to maintain the vertical its position changes according to the
degree of inclination caused by either trim or list. This movement of the core is
D
transferred into an electrical signal by the linear transformer (LVDT).

The detector is filled with silicon oil to give protection against impact and
vibration.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.4 - Page 2 of 2
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.3.5a Loading Computer

Active Loading Condition CURRENTCONDITION [2008-07-27-07:21]

File Mode Task Cargo&Ballast Results Tools View Loads Help 03:59:00 DRAFT ERROR: ERROR WH Ack. Log. ONline

94 m

y
Mode

Monitoring

Planning

op
Task

Bunkers

Cargo&Ballast

Stores

Emergency

C
Show Cargo tanks Show Ballast tanks Show totals

Column Selection: Standard M3 Bbls

WBT4P
WBT4S
WBTERP
WBTERS ft Tank
WBT4P
WBT4S
WBTERP
WBTERS
Load id
BW
BW
BW
BW
Capacity
[m3]
5652.8
5652.8
1132.7
1147.4
FILL
[%]
96.4
97.4
96.0
96.1
Sound
[m]
25.25
25.24
22.58
22.50
Radar
[m]
8.49
8.49
1.30
1.32
Volume
[m3]
5449.87
5508.32
1087.89
1102.51
Target/TOV
[m3]
5428.7
5422.2
1091.0
1101.9
Dens
[t/m3]
1.0250
1.0250
1.0250
1.0250
Weight
[t]
5586.1
5646.0
1115.1
1130.1
Frsm
[tm]
509
593
32
32
RATE
[m3/h]
0 -
0 -
0 -
0 -
READY Onli

ON
ON
ON
ON
ra
WBTAP WBTAP BW 1483.0 944.4 5.37 0.59 1400.34 1404.7 1.0250 1435.4 37635 0 - ON
59084.9 97.2 57221.62 56653.9 58652.2 40574 0

Floating position according to Mode Online Aft 9.04 m Mid 10.42 m Fwd 9.74 m Trim F 1.20 m Heel S 0.57

Dens 1.025 t/m3 n/a Heel S 0.14 deg GMo 9.66 m DW 63411 t Strength Limit Sea
10.72 At perp. Mean 10.20 9.68 Trim A 1.05 m GMcor -1.85 m UnkDWT -0.6 % BMmax 68% at fr. 73
Below keel
D
Defl. 0 m GM 7.59 m Disp 95342 t SFmax 68% at fr. 45
Prop. immersion 123 % n/a

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.5 - Page 1 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

3.3.5 loading computer Monitoring and Planning Modes When the user changes from one mode to the other, the current loading
condition is stored temporarily. Depending on the mode in use, the loading
The program has two main running modes. The user can utilise both modes condition is saved either with the name Monitoring or Planning respectively.
Introduction simultaneously. The two modes are in fact two different loading conditions.
In this way, the ongoing cargo operation can be kept active and connected to When the program is started again, the loading condition last in use will be
Manufacturer: NAPA Oy Ltd read, and if an old load condition is opened, then default mode monitoring is
the on-line monitoring mode, while the next voyage is being planned in the
Type: Onboard-NAPA for LNG 2006.1 planning mode. on.

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The ships loading computer is situated in the cargo control room incorporated Hydrostatic Information
Planning
in the cargo console.
The fields at the bottom of all the primary menus contain the hydrostatic
Open a default loading condition, or rename an existing loading

op
The Onboard-NAPA is an advanced computer programme for the calculation information of the active loading condition. Every time the loading condition
condition. is changed the hydrostatic values are immediately updated. The following
of the ship loading, damage stability, analysis and the ship performance
prediction. All of the calculations are based on a real 3D geometric model of Choose the grades to be loaded. information is available:
the vessel created by the Naval Architectural Package (NAPA) and conforms Enter cargo quantities in tanks. Mean Draft, Draft Forward, Draft Aft, calculated extreme
to the requirements of IMO Res.A749 and MARPOL 73/78. draughts located at the draught marks.
Adjust with ballast if required.
Trim is the difference of the draughts at the perpendiculars.
There is an on-line link between the NAPA program and the tank measuring Estimate the bunkers on departure/arrival.
system (TMS) which consists of two distinct parts. The hardware interface and Heel is the heeling angle in degrees.
Check the stores weights.
the software interface that is used to convert the protocol to obtain data from GMcorr is the total effect of free surface in the active loading

C
the Foxboro tank measuring system; the hardware interface is defined by the Check the stability and stresses. condition.
TMS manufacturer, while the software part of the interface which includes the Check the direct damage results.
on-line reading program, is a separate background programme taking care of GM is the metacentric heights.
the communication with the TMS. The data is sent from the TMS to the on-line Modify if required. MBmax, SFmax are the maximum hogging and sagging
reading program which then converts it and sends it to the Onboard-NAPA. Save the condition. bending moment and shear force relative to the SEA condition.
Where these forces exceed 100% they are displayed in red.
The computer also has an ullage input from the TMS for the cargo, ballast and
Monitoring Dens is the current specific gravity of the sea water, which can
the fuel oil tanks that enables the computer to be used in on-line mode during
be manually changed by typing a new value.
loading or discharging.

Starting the Programme

a) Power-up the PC, monitor and printer.


ft Open the planned departure condition.
Choose the monitor tool.
Target values are the departure values for the loading
condition.
Defl is the deflection of the hull obtained from the draft survey.
A positive sign indicated hogging and a negative sign indicates
sagging.
ra
Choose the book-folder Standard Features anchor Monitor File Menu
b) The message Press Ctrl-Alt-Delete to log on appears. Tool >Areas to be viewed.
Book-folder Standard Features anchor Monitoring Areas The purpose of the file menu is to display all the loading conditions saved
c) Press the keys Ctrl, Alt and Delete simultaneously. on the hard disk. In the file menu it is possible to change the active loading
>Customise the areas.
condition or save the current condition. Loading conditions can also be deleted
d) Enter the correct user name and password as requested. Without saving the view it is only available until the loading using this menu.
condition is changed. Saving the view is done by writing the
D
Once the login has been successful the operating system is loaded and can be name of the profile in the editable drop-down box, and pressing
accessed by double-clicking the Onboard-NAPA icon on the desktop. the save button next to it. Use of Onboard-NAPA When Loading New Cargo
The user can set the anchor Tanker Target Settings book- a) Start the programme, the last loading condition is displayed.
folder Standard Features personal alarm margin from the
tools>settings>cargo table>target. b) Select File. From the drop-down menu select an old condition
Connect the Onboard-NAPA to On-line. by selecting on-line/ suitable as a base for the new one.
off-line.
c) Use the OPEN command to make it active.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.5 - Page 2 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.3.5b Load Computer (Cargo Screen)

Active Loading Condition CURRENTCONDITION [2008-07-27-07:21]

File Mode Task Cargo&Ballast Results Tools View Loads Help 03:59:00 DRAFT ERROR: ERROR WH Ack. Log. ONline

94 m

y
Mode

Monitoring

Planning

op
Task

Bunkers

Cargo&Ballast

Stores

Emergency

C
Show Cargo tanks Show Ballast tanks Show totals

Column Selection: Online M3 Bbls Selected tank group: All Cargo

COT1
COT2
COT3
COT4 ft LNG
LNG
LNG
LNG
Trade Name
Capacity
[m3]
25952.9
44878.7
44885.0
39329.1
FILL
[%]
1.3
0.5
6.5
5.3
RS
[m]
0.487
0.173
1.955
1.599
TOV
[m3]
349.00
242.00
2933.00
2079.00
Target/TOV
[m3]
471.0
478.0
3794.0
2350.0
Dens
[t/m3]
0.4300
0.4300
0.4300
0.4300
Weight
[t]
150.1
104.1
1261.2
894.0
RATE
[m3/h]
-239 ON
1376 ON
466 ON
1227 ON
ONLINE
Frsm
[tm]
12392

66953
55087
0
ra
155045.7 5.5 5603.00 7093.0 2409.3 2830 134433

Floating position according to Mode Online Aft 9.15 m Mid 10.28 m Fwd 9.79 m Trim F 1.20 m Heel P 0.33

Dens 1.025 t/m3 n/a Heel S 0.02 deg GMo 9.49 m DW 63242 t Strength Limit Sea
10.70 At perp. Mean 10.18 9.66 Trim A 1.03 m GMcor -1.85 m UnkDWT -0.6 % BMmax 68% at fr. 73
Below keel
D
Defl. 0 m GM 7.63 m Disp 95143 t SFmax 68% at fr. 45
Prop. immersion 123 % n/a

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.5 - Page 3 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

d) From the drop-down menu select SAVE AS, a dialogue box will Voyage Order Remove port.
appear. Type in the new conditions name, then click SAVE and
With this menu the operator can plan how different cargo parcels are loaded Add port.
save it.
and unloaded during one voyage. Each line of the table is the voyage of one
The table is automatically saved by the command OK.
cargo parcel from the load port (Lport) to the discharge port (Dport). The line
e) Start loading. Use the SAVE command at no more than ten
can be edited with the fields displayed at the top of the window. Ports are
minute intervals in order that the minimum amount of input is Load Tool
selected from drop-down menus. When the grade is selected, the information
lost should there be a problem.
GradeDB is shown on the list. The operator must enter the cargo quantity in the

y
Once the operator has entered all cargo parcels in Voyage Order, loading is then
amount box. In the margin box the operator selects % deviation allowable. planned using this module. With the menu area on the right of the screen the
Test conditions at intervals of not more than one month are used to check that
the program is still operating correctly. The results on screen should be checked operator selects the actions to be carried out in one port.
against Test Conditions supplied as hard copy from the manufacturers. These Information Copied from Grade Database Port: Operator enters port for cargo operation.

op
checks must be recorded and kept for any statutory, port state or oil company When a grade is selected from the drop-down list the following information is Load: Operator selects parcel to load or discharge.
inspections the vessel may undergo. copied. All information can be edited on a voyage by voyage basis.
Action: Operator selects Load or Discharge.
Table: (ASTM)
User Settings Menu Amount: Quantity of cargo involved.
Reference density
In this menu the user can modify several settings of the program. Margin%: Margin of discrepancy allowed.
Reference temperature
Unit: Bbls/tonnes, etc.
The settings are: Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE)
Min: Selects minimum amount.
Float-tab. The vessels draught, deadweight and displacement Loading temperature

C
can be expressed here in different modes. The user can also set Max: Selects maximum amount.
Actual Litre/weight or Volume Correction Factor (VCF)
an alarm for overly high GM.
Print. A default printer can be selected from a drop-down menu. Reset Parcel
Information to be Completed for Each Grade
SAVE FILES TO defines the path where the files are stored. If the reset parcel function is selected, the whole parcel is removed from the
On-line. Default status can be on or off-line. Voyage number tanks and, for instance, can be relocated.
Files. The user can select where to store files. Loading port (can be chosen from drop-down list)
The table to the left shows all of the tanks, one by one, that have been selected
Alarms. Allows the alarms to be activated or deactivated. Discharging port (can be chosen from drop-down list) from the graphical area to be used for a particular parcel. When the background
Cargo Table. Allows the operator to select a source for readings,
eg, radar gauges. A target value, eg, ullage. And a target
difference between actual and selected readings before an alarm
is activated. It also allows the operator to select which columns ft Colour (a different colour can be selected for each grade)
Cargo number (some companies use this to identify the cargo)
Parcel
of the TOTAL box turns green, the amount of the parcel is within the selected
margins. The Info column shows the operator how much, in percent, the actual
amount differs from the nominal amount. When the operator is satisfied with
the tanks to be used, he selects APPLY to confirm this.
ra
are displayed. There is also a facility to select between weights Amount of cargo to load The table to the right is an ACTION LIST that shows a summary of all the
in air or vacuum.
Unit in which cargo is to be measured (chosen from drop-down parcels and how much will actually be loaded. A green dot in front of a parcel
Cargo History. The operator can select the Vessels Experience list) indicates that the amount is within the margins selected. No dot appears if the
Factor, (VEF) in either SHIP/SHORE or SHORE/SHIP mode. operator accepts an amount outside these margins.
There is also an adjustable cut-off setting, above which Margin ( allowable discrepancy range)
percentage cargoes are excluded from the VEF calculation. The use of the OPTIONS menu defines how tanks will be filled:
Port Database
D
Load Tool. Offers the operator the choice of overriding the Equally: The parcel is loaded into selected tanks at an equal
cargo presently in the selected tank or re-planning the whole In this table the operator can store information on ports the vessel may visit. filling percentage.
cargo. It also allows the operator to select a running total, and a The following commands are used:
Priority: Cargo parcels are loaded to the tanks in the order they
facility to choose the units this is displayed in.
Name (abbreviated port name, eg, ROT). were selected. All tanks will be filled to the maximum filling
level, but the last tank may remain slack.
Description (actual port name, eg, ROTTERDAM).
Priority WT: As for priority, but the last pair of wing tanks
Max. Draft (depth in fairway) /Not used for calculations.
selected will have the same filling percentage.
Density (dock water density) /Not used for calculations.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.5 - Page 4 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.3.5c Load Computer (Load Summary)

Active Loading Condition CURRENTCONDITION [2008-07-27-07:21]

File Mode Task Cargo&Ballast Results Tools View Loads Help 03:59:00 DRAFT ERROR: ERROR WH Ack. Log. ONline

94 m

y
Mode

Monitoring

Planning

op
Task

Bunkers

Cargo&Ballast

Stores
Load Summary
Emergency

LNG : 2435.9 ton


BALLAST WATER : 58620 ton
Diesel Oil : 2034.2 ton
D.O Overflow : 20.8 ton

C
Gas Oil : 72.8 ton
Lubricating Oil : 327.5 ton
Fresh Water : 289.0 ton

Liquids total : 63800.6 ton

UNKNOWN_DWT : -544.2 ton


DEADWEIGHTCONST : 240.0 ton

Mass Load Tot. : -304.2 ton

Unknown Deadweight : -544.2 ton


Show Cargo tanks Show Ballast tanks Show totals
Deadweight. 63496.3 ton
Column Selection: Standard M3 Bbls

WBT4P
WBT4S
WBTERP
WBTERS ft Tank
WBT4P
WBT4S
WBTERP
WBTERS
Load id
BW
BW
BW
BW
Capacity
[m3]
5652.8
5652.8
1132.7
1147.4
FILL
[%]
96.4
97.4
96.0
96.1
Sound
[m]
25.25
25.24
22.58
22.50
Radar

8.49
8.49
1.30
1.32
Volume
[m]Close [m3]
5449.87
5508.32
1087.89
1102.51
Target/TOV
[m3]
5428.7
5422.2
1091.0
1101.9
Dens
[t/m3]
1.0250
1.0250
1.0250
1.0250
Weight
[t]
5586.1
5646.0
1115.1
1130.1
Frsm
[tm]
509
593
32
32
RATE
[m3/h]
0 -
0 -
0 -
0 -
READY Onli

ON
ON
ON
ON
ra
WBTAP WBTAP BW 1483.0 944.4 5.37 0.59 1400.34 1404.7 1.0250 1435.4 37635 0 - ON
59084.9 97.2 57221.62 56653.9 58652.2 40574 0

Floating position according to Mode Online Aft 9.04 m Mid 10.42 m Fwd 9.74 m Trim F 1.20 m Heel S 0.57

Dens 1.025 t/m3 n/a Heel S 0.14 deg GMo 9.66 m DW 63411 t Strength Limit Sea
10.72 At perp. Mean 10.20 9.68 Trim A 1.05 m GMcor -1.85 m UnkDWT -0.6 % BMmax 68% at fr. 73
Below keel
D
Defl. 0 m GM 7.59 m Disp 95342 t SFmax 68% at fr. 45
Prop. immersion 123 % n/a

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.5 - Page 5 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Free: All tanks can be filled freely with any filling percentage at Balance Tool Stores
all. The items in the stores, on the left side of the stores tables, are items that can be
Balance With: Allows the operator on the Graphic area to select
edited, ie, modified, added and deleted freely. The weight, centre of gravity and
the tanks that may be used to achieve balance. The options are:
Profiles Selected Tanks (Default), or different tank groups.
extension or length of a mass component are modified in the LOAD STORES
section using the EDIT WEIGHT tool as follows:
Profiles can include many different customised tool layouts, these can be Target: Is used to select the final floating position. Up to three
selected from the drop-down menu. Profiles can be saved or deleted by Click on NEW WEIGHT
targets can be selected.

y
entering or deleting from the profiles field. Click on ADD WEIGHT
Print Operations: Prints the contents of the OPERATIONS
Floating Position Mode allows the operator to choose between: window. Select LOAD STORES>ADD WEIGHT
On-line: Draught readings are read remotely, and trim and heel

op
are calculated from these readings. Amount of Liquid to Use A name for the new component is entered, along with its weight, location and
dimensions.
Calc: Draughts, trim and heel are calculated by Onboard-Napa Free: Do not restrict the amount of liquid transferred, added or
based on the current load condition. removed. Location of a new mass component can also be given graphically with the
User: Allows manual entry of draughts, heel and trim. Keep Unchanged: Do not alter Displacement. LOCATE option. After selecting the LOCATE option the operator may point
the location on any of the geographical windows.
Minimum: For the selected tanks or purpose, achieve balance
Show Rates For: The drop-down menu allows the operator to choose which with the minimum amount of transfer.
tanks are in the upper rates window. The options are: All tanks, Ballast, Bunker Fixed Stores
or Cargo and Ballast. Maximum: Find balance with the maximum number of

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selections. This option is used when cargo will be used to The items in the fixed stores, tables are locked for many changes, however,
achieve balance. mass and/or centre of gravity of these components can be changed indirectly
Sort By Time: This facility allows the operator to select tanks in order of their with the MODIFY FIXED STORES option.
completion time instead of alphabetically. User Defined: The user to define the total change in
displacement. Typical stores that change, but are located in a known area can be modified
There are two windows for loading/discharging rates. In the upper window the using the EDIT WEIGHT tool. These stores could include for example, hotel
Equal to: Defines the exact change in displacement.
rates (m3/h), remaining time and completion time are displayed. In the lower stores, provisions, etc. The centre of gravity of such stores is fixed but the
window the same information is displayed for parcels. The completion times Less Than: Defines the maximum change.
weight can be changed.
are calculated with the formula: (Target volume minus current volume) divided
More Than: Defines the minimum change in Displacement.
by the current rate. At present only m3/h calculations are available.

The operator can set filling alarms for reaching target values (eg, ullage,
metric tonnes, bbls or m3). They are adjusted in TOOLS>SETTINGS>CARGO
TABLE>TARGET. The options are unit and value. When the difference ft Limits to Take into Account

Bending Moments: Both limit, either the sea or harbour


ra
between the target value and current value is less than the chosen limit, the condition, or some other restriction given by the operator in the
label of the tank/parcel starts blinking red/grey. The alarm can be turned off by BALANCE window.
clicking the label below the bar. Shear Force: Both limit, either the sea or harbour condition, or
some other restriction given by the operator in the BALANCE
Balance Mode window.

Balance allows the operator to balance the ship (heel, trim, draught, either one,
Load Stores Menu
D
or all of these at the same time) to certain given values. When the options have
been entered, the operator selects PREVIEW. The program then calculates This function is used for updating, adding, deleting and modifying mass load
the result and displays it on OPERATIONS and RESULT windows. On the components, also called stores.
RESULT window the user sees the current floating position and the floating
position after balancing. If the operator is satisfied with the result, APPLY is Onboard-NAPA has two main sets of stores:
selected and the tanks are modified, as shown on the OPERATIONS window.
Stores
The contents of this window can be printed by selecting PRINT
OPERATIONS. Fixed stores

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.5 - Page 6 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 3.3.5d Loading Computer (Bending Moments)

Active Loading Condition CURRENTCONDITION [2008-07-27-07:21]

File Mode Task Cargo&Ballast Results Tools View Loads Help 03:59:00 DRAFT ERROR: ERROR WH Ack. Log. ONline

94 m

y
Mode

Monitoring

Planning

op
Task
Load Summary

Bunkers GZ-Curve Bending Shear Weight Strength Sequence

Cargo&Ballast
SHEAR min SF max SF
Stores

(t)
Emergency 5000

0
50 100 150

C
frame

5000

Position Frame

Show Cargo tanks Show BallastMin.


tanks
ShearShow totals
Force -4499 t 197.5 m 114

Column Selection: Standard Max. Shear Force 3877 t 28 m 35 M3 Bbls

WBT4P
WBT4S
WBTERP
WBTERS ft Tank
WBT4P
WBT4S
WBTERP
WBTERS
BW
BW
BW
BW
Load id
Max. Relative
CapacityShearFILL
[m3]
Sagging Moment
5652.8
Hogging Moment
5652.8
1132.7
Force Sound
[%]

Max. Ref. Sagging Moment


1147.4
[m]
96.4
97.4
96.0
96.1
25.25
25.24
22.58
22.50
Radar
[m]
68 t Volume

-6301 tm
8.49
265584
8.49 tm
1.30
19 %
1.32
36 m
Target/TOV
[m3] .250.1 m[m3]
5449.87
45Dens

144

5508.32117.9 m
1087.89
252.9 m
1102.51
[t/m3]
5428.7
5422.2
1.0250
89 1.0250
1091.0 147 1.0250
1101.9 1.0250
Weight
[t]
5586.1
5646.0
1115.1
1130.1
Frsm
[tm]
509
593
32
32
RATE
[m3/h]
0 -
0 -
0 -
0 -
READY Onli

ON
ON
ON
ON
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Max. Ref. Hogging 67 % 71.9 m 73
WBTAP WBTAP BW 1483.0 Moment
944.4 5.37 0.59 1400.34 1404.7 1.0250 1435.4 37635 0 - ON
59084.9 97.2 57221.62 56653.9 58652.2 40574 0

Close

Floating position according to Mode Online Aft 9.04 m Mid 10.42 m Fwd 9.74 m Trim F 1.20 m Heel S 0.57

Dens 1.025 t/m3 n/a Heel S 0.14 deg GMo 9.66 m DW 63411 t Strength Limit Sea
10.72 At perp. Mean 10.20 9.68 Trim A 1.05 m GMcor -1.85 m UnkDWT -0.6 % BMmax 68% at fr. 73
Below keel
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Defl. 0 m GM 7.59 m Disp 95342 t SFmax 68% at fr. 45
Prop. immersion 123 % n/a

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.5 - Page 7 of 8
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 3: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Draught Survey Menu Tanker Emergency Task/Direct Damage Strength and Stability Information

The Draught Survey determines the difference between the Displacement This command is for calculating all possible MARPOL-damage combinations, This is accessed by clicking on the results box on the left-hand side of the main
calculated using the known draughts and Displacement calculated using the and makes a summary list of all those damages. If all damages are acceptable, screen.
loading data input by the operator. The difference is called the Unknown SUMMARY of RESULTS shows a green tab. If any damage is not fulfilling
Deadweight, ie, Unknown_DWT. the criteria then a red tag appears. DAMAGED COMPARTMENTS shows Under the GZ-CURVE tab the operator can see the ships stability as a curve,
which spaces and compartments are damaged in SELECTED DAMAGE, that or as a text. The red curve is for GZ, and the green is for the area under the

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To ensure the most accurate result, the draught survey should be performed is highlighted on the list. GZ-curve. The light blue line is for GMo.
while the vessel is in harbour or in calm water, not under way.
The text area shows the basic SOLAS criteria in the required column The
Functions
attained column has all the attained values of the respective criteria. The green
Draught Survey Procedure

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CALCULATE: Calculates all MARPOL damage. bars show how good each particular criterion is in comparison to the required
Main window: Tools->Draught Survey or value. If the attained value is less than required, the green bar disappears and
PRINT: Prints list of all damage. the attained field turns red.
Click on Draught Survey or
SELECT CASES: Shows list of damage.
F9 function key on the keyboard Under the BENDING tab, bending moments along the hull length are shown.
SUMMARY: Shows a short summary, in table format: Dominant
Red curves show minimum allowed moment (sagging), and maximum allowed
Update the tank contents in LOAD TANKS manually, or using criteria, required GM, status OK or not met.
moment (hogging). The light blue curve shows the actual moment along the
the on-line link to the system.
DETAILED RESULTS: Shows flotation, attained stability, and hull.
Update stores. distance to the nearest opening that can lead to progressive

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flooding. The text area shows the maximum and minimum shear forces, and the
Reset the previous draught observations by clicking on CLEAR
maximum hogging and sagging moments, as well as their locations. The
OBSERVED. CRITERIA: Shows all criteria and attained values.
maximum relative shear force and relative moments show how much the real
Reset the current UNKNOWN DEADWEIGHT in the loading OPENINGS: Shows the five closest openings that can lead to moment/force differs from those allowed. Because the allowed forces/moments
condition by clicking on RESET. progressive flooding, their location and reserves in distance and vary along the hull, the maximum forces/moments are not necessarily on the
heeling. same location as the maximum relative force/moment.
Enter the current draught data by clicking on UPD from the on-
line button, or by manually entering the observed draughts in GZ-VALUES: Shows the GZ curve in a table format for every
their respective boxes. damage case. Shear forces along the hull are shown under the SHEAR tab. Red curves show
the minimum and maximum shear force allowed. The light blue curve shows
Check that the value of the new UNKNOWN DEADWEIGHT
is reasonable.
Load the UNKNOWN DEADWEIGHT to the current loading
condition by clicking on LOAD NEW. The result can be seen in ft the actual shear force along the hull.

The distributions of weight and displacement are shown under the WEIGHT
tab. The red curve shows the displacement distribution and the light blue curve
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the FIXED STORES table in the LOAD STORES task. shows the weight distribution.
Close the dialogue by clicking on CLOSE. The STRENGTH tab shows all the strength results (bending, shear and weight)
in tabular format. The user can examine the strength values of any X-Location
in the hull by typing the location in metres or as a frame number in the fields
on the top left corner.
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 3.3.5 - Page 8 of 8
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Section 4: Cargo and Ballast Systems

4.1 Cargo Manifold

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4.1.1 Cargo Manifold System

4.1.2 Cargo Strainers

Illustrations

4.1.1a Cargo Manifold (Port Side)

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4.1.1b Drain and Inlet Manifold Pipes and Loading Arms

4.1.2a Cargo Strainer

ft
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Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 4: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 4.1.1a Cargo Manifold (Port Side)

Ships Side

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3150mm

AFT FORWARD

14" 16" 16" 16" 16" 16" 14"

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350mm

Hydraulic Hydraulic
ESD Valves ESD Valves

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Manual Valve Hydraulic Manual Valve
ESD Valve

Manual Double- Manual Double-


Shut Valves Shut Valves

350mm
Manual Valve

ft
500mm 500mm
Manual Valve

600mm
Manual Valve

500mm 500mm
Manual Valve

350mm
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80mm

80mm

Diesel Oil LNG Vapour LNG Spray Line Diesel Oil


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LBP/2
(FR.95+930)

2255mm

2000mm 3000mm 3000mm 3000mm 3000mm 2000mm

Centre of Manifold
(FR.95-1325)

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 4.1 - Page 1 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 4: British Emerald Date: September 2008

4.1 CARGO MANIFOLD The cargo manifold is used for the loading and discharging of the liquid LNG
and the transfer of LNG vapour to and from the shore terminal during cargo
4.1.1 cargo Manifold system operations.

The principal particulars are as follows: The cargo manifold system is situated in the area between No.2 liquid dome
and No.3 vapour dome, and comprises two 650/500mm branch liquid headers
extending out to the port and starboard from the main fore and aft liquid header

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Manifolds towards the ship sides. Each liquid branch header reduces down and splits to
provide two 400mm liquid connections, two forward and two aft of the vapour
Spacing between liquid line and vapour line: 3000mm
manifold, to which the portable reducer/spool connection piece, with the bi-
Distance between ship manifold QCDC spool 3150mm directional strainers in position, are connected and ultimately the cargo arms.
piece and ship side:

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Distance between middle of manifold flange 1342mm The 600mm vapour branch header extends from the fore and aft main
and top of working platform: vapour header towards each ship side, it also reduces to provide a single
400mm connection with a portable reducer/spool connection piece, port and
Conical Strainers starboard.

16" x /#60/#10 mesh 8 sets Each liquid manifold has a manual double shut-off valve and an automatic
V shaped, portable dual flow type Stowed in box on manifold deck ESD valve, the manual shut-off valve is located on the inboard side of the
Maximum flow rate: 3,600m3/h for each ships side automatic valve. Each vapour manifold connection only has the automatic ESD

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valve. The automatic valves (ESD valve) are connected to the ESD system on
Maximum flow speed: 1.000m/s board, and in the event of an ESD situation occurring can be closed either from
the ship or shore.
Reducers/Spool Piece
Cargo Manifold and Spray Header Connection
Cargo liquid JPI 150PSI. Short type, 8 pieces 16"/16"
fitted to manifold On each liquid manifold are connections into the spray header, these
connections, together with the respective bypass/cooldown valves, can be used
JPI 150PSI 6 pieces 16"/12"
by the operator to cool down or drain the main liquid header and shore arms.

Cargo vapour
Concentric type
JPI 150PSI
Concentric type, without
bolt hole for panigaglia
2 pieces 16"/12"

JPI 150PSI. Short type, 2 pieces 16"/16"


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Each liquid manifold is provided with two pressure relief valves, located
inboard and outboard of the ESD valve, which in the event of a pressure build-
up between the manual shut-off valve and the ESD valve or the ESD valve and
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the blank flange, would drain back to No.2 or No.3 cargo tank liquid dome.
fitted to manifold
JPI 150PSI 2 pieces 16"/12" At the top of each liquid manifold is a pressure gauge connection and sample
Concentric type vent with a quick connection for nitrogen purge, there is also a drain cock on
JPI 150PSI 2 pieces 16"/8" the bottom of the cooldown/bypass line outboard of the ESD valve.
Concentric type, without
bolt hole for panigaglia On the vapour manifold there is no manual shut-off valve, only the automatic
ESD valve with a small 25mm bypass line and valve for purging purposes.
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Reducer for STS (Cargo JPI 150PSI 3 pieces 16"/10"
liquid) Concentric type There is also a pressure gauge connection, drain cock and sample vent with a
quick connection.
Nozzle for cargo jettison 16" flange, to extend not less than 3 metres
outboard of ships side.
Each manifold is also provided with a small davit for use during the
Nitrogen supply at LNG Adapter piece. JPI 150PSI 1 piece connection or disconnection of the spools and reducers and for inspection of
liquid manifold 16" x ANSI 150PSI 3" the strainers.

Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 4.1 - Page 2 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 4: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 4.1.1b Drain and Inlet Manifold Pipes and Loading Arms
Manifold Plan View Nitrogen Pressure

Manifold Manual Crossover Line

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Double-Shut Valve Cooling Valve

Conical Strainer

Safety Valve

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Safety Valve

Manifold and Crossover


Line Cooling Valve

Cargo Liquid Main Line


Hydraulic Hydraulic
ESD Valve ESD Valve

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Spray Main Line

Trunk Deck Liquid Dome Height


Manifold Manifold Manual Manifold Manual
Safety Valve
ESD Valve Cooldown Valve Cooldown Valve
Sampling and
Purge Unit
Presentation Flange
and Conical Strainer

Reducer/Spool Piece
and Blank Flange

Drain Valve

Manifold Deck Manifold Cooling Valve ft Spray Header to Cargo Tank Spray Header to Cargo Tank
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Pressure Gauge Line

Manifold Manual Manifold Manual


Double-Shut Valve Double-Shut Valve
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 4.1 - Page 3 of 4
Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 4: British Emerald Date: September 2008

4.1.2 Cargo Strainers Illustration 4.1.2a Cargo Strainer

Before arriving at the LNG terminal ensure that the bi-directional strainer fitted
in each of the four liquid manifolds is clean and securely bolted in place by the
QCDC spool pieces, to ensure no debris is allowed to enter the cargo tanks or
be discharged to the receiving terminal during the cargo loading or discharge.
Outer Strainer

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Support
The strainer is constructed and designed for bi-directional flow so that it can be
be left in place after inspection without having to be turned round 180 degrees.
It comprises of two conical type strainers, a 60 mesh for loading and 10 mesh
for discharging, mounted within an outer stainless steel body. The mesh is

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measured as the number of openings per square inch. The actual pressure drop Screen Mesh
(2 Layers)
when pumping LNG at the normal rate of 3600m3/h is 0.07 bar. The pressure
drop for a flow rate of 4,320m3/h is 0.11 bar and 0.41 bar for 8,640m3/h. The Inner Strainer
Support
length of the strainer unit is 1,100mm and the size is 16.
Section A-A
After the flow rates are stabilised, the deck watch should periodically notify (Typical For Both
Inner and Outer Cones)
the CCR of the pressure on each of the four liquid manifold gauges and the
pressure on the liquid crossover gauges.

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Outer Strainer
Support
Screen

A
End Support

ft Stay
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Flange
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Issue: Final Draft - September 2008 IMO No. 9333591 Section 4.1 - Page 4 of 4
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4.2 Cargo Piping System

4.2.1 Cargo Piping

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4.2.2 Cargo Pipe Insulation

Illustrations

4.2.1a Cargo Piping System

4.2.1b No.2 Cargo Tank Arrangement

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4.2.1c Spiral Wound Gasket

ft
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Document Title: Cargo Operating Manual Revision: Final Draft
Document Section 4: British Emerald Date: September 2008

Illustration 4.2.1a Cargo Piping System


Key
CL CL CL CL
LO 041 031 CG CG 021 011
CG526 CG519 CG510 CG509 LNG Liquid Gas Line
CG 001 007
No.1 Warm-
571 up / Boil-off CG547 CG546 FBO Mist
No.1 LNG Vapour Spray Line
CG CG CG Heater Separator CS CL CL CS
CG CG
613 619 614 531 572 CG561 LD CG534 Inert Gas C Cargo Pump 011 043 033 009 CS CL CL CS
CG LO
CG565 Compressors 003 023 013 001
CG518 CG512 567 CS

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LC LO Locked Open S Spray Pump
CG549 CG548 514 CG
CG569
CG511 CS CG566 No.2 618
CG615 CG527 CG521 LO
523 CG508 LC Locked Closed Spray Cooler
CG CG562 CG535 LO
No.2 Warm- CG568
620 NBO Mist
up / Boil-off Separator
CG CG CG Heater CG528