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Deirdre Sanborn

Tch_Lrn 413
March 8, 2017
Language Objectives
Lesson: 5th grade Language Arts Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Lesson Goal: The purpose of this lesson is to deepen students
understanding of what the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is and
what it means. Students will use paraphrasing skills to break down several
articles into their own words. They will also use art to help explain their new
definition. The goal is for students to gain a better understanding of the
UDHR while working cooperatively in groups and building presentation skills.
Common Core Standard: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.2
Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are
supported by key details; summarize the text.
Content Objective: SWBAT paraphrase UDHR Articles while including all
main points of the text.
Social and Academic Language Demands:
Listening:

Students will need to be able to listen to and follow multi-step


directions.
Students will need to listen to their peers ideas when working
collaboratively.
Students will need to be able to comprehend their peers presentations
in order to gain a better understanding of the Universal Declaration of
Human Rights.
Speaking:
Students will need to be able to use academic language when
presenting their poster to the class.
Students will need to be able to use social language when working
collaboratively with peers in small groups.
Students will need to be able to ask clarifying questions to the teacher.
Reading:

Students will need to be able to comprehend their article from the


Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
Students will need to be able to define unfamiliar vocabulary words
using their word bank from a previous lesson.

Writing:

Students will need to be able to write their paraphrased article on their


poster.
Students will need to be able to reflect on their thinking through a
written journal entry.
One Social and One Academic Language Demand:
One academic language demand of this lesson requires students to
comprehend academic language written in the article, compute it, and then
write a paraphrased version of that academic language. This can be very
difficult for ELL students because not only do they have to read academic
language, they then have to write it. While this seems like a daunting task
for ELLs, they have participated in previous lessons that act as a scaffold to
this final project. Before this lesson, students have created word banks with
definitions of unfamiliar words. They have been exposed to the type of
academic language used in this document over several weeks. Hopefully,
this will help ELLs be able to accomplish this difficult academic language
demand. One social language demand of this activity is collaborating in small
groups with their peers. Most of this lesson will be done in groups, where
students are actively engaged with one another. While the students are
collaborating to come up with the academic language for their poster, they
are simultaneously using social language to convey messages to their peers.
In this lesson, I have strategically placed students in groups where ELLs are
working with students who can help them best. For low level ELLs, I have
placed them in a group with a fluent Spanish speaker. This gives these ELL
students an addition resource, and the ability to translate difficult language
into their native language.
One Language Objective:
Students will be able to interpret an article from the Universal Declaration of
Human Rights using word bank definitions.