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T&L Instructional Plan Template

(Updated 4/17/15)
(edTPA Aligned)

Overview
The information included in this document is to support faculty in teaching about and supporting students with
the T&L (and edTPA) Instructional Plan. While there are many variations of lesson plans, this format meets
departmental requirements and is aligned with the 2014 edTPA as well.

Background Information (When doing the actual edTPA, leave out identifiers)

Teacher Candidate: Deirdre Sanborn Date: 1/20/17


Cooperating Teacher: Kym Parise Grade: 5
School District: Mukilteo School: Fairmount Elementary
University Supervisor: Cathy Hayes
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: UDHR Articles poster making

Section 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment

a. Instructional Plan Purpose:


The purpose of this lesson is to deepen students understanding of what the Universal Declaration of Human
Rights is and what it means. Students will use paraphrasing skills to break down several articles into their own
words. They will also use art to help explain their new definition. The goal is for students to gain a better
understanding of the UDHR while working cooperatively in groups and building presentation skills.

This lesson falls in the middle of the UDHR unit. Before this lesson, students have broken down the
introduction to the UDHR into their own words and defined unfamiliar vocabulary. They have a good amount of
background knowledge about the time period, setting, and purpose of the UDHR. They also have worked to
connect the UDHR to the class read aloud, Esperanza Rising. In upcoming lessons, students will continue to
analyze the meaning and purpose of the UDHR through several more activity worksheets.

b. State/National Learning Standards:


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.2
Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the
text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.4
Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to
a grade 5 topic or subject area.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.4
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose,
and audience.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse
partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.4
Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and
relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.3
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

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c. Content Objectives and alignment to State Learning Standards:

1. SWBAT paraphrase UDHR Articles while including all main points of the text.

Aligned standard: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.2


Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the
text.

2. SWBAT determine the meaning of unfamiliar words using context clues and/or looking up definitions.

Aligned standard: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.4


Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to
a grade 5 topic or subject area.

3. SWBAT create poster using clear and coherent writing to paraphrase their article.

Aligned standard: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.4


Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose,
and audience.

4. SWBAT work collaboratively with classmates and contribute an equal amount of work.

Aligned standard: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and
teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own
clearly.

5. SWBAT present their groups poster while speaking clearly, making eye contact and taking turns.

Aligned standard: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.4


Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and
relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

Language Objectives:
1. SWBAT use English and its proper conventions when creating poster.
2. SWBAT use English and its proper conventions when giving oral presentation.

Aligned standard: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.3


Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

d. Previous Learning Experiences:


The students have spent the last week learning about the UDHR. They have a basic understanding of what it
is, why and when it was created, and how it is relevant to them today. They have worked to define unfamiliar
vocabulary which will help them paraphrase their article. The students have had a lot of practice working
cooperatively in groups. The students have, and will continue to, make connections between the UDHR and
their class read a-loud, Esperanza Rising. During this lesson, students will be encouraged to make connections
between the UDHR and their own, real life experiences.

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e. Planning for Student Learning Needs:
ELL Level 1:
For beginning level ELL students, they should help their team with the definition as much as they can, but are
highly encouraged to participate in drawing the pictures. Students are encouraged to use an ELL graduate to
translate or explain in their native language. Students will be given leeway when being graded for English
conventions during presentation.
ELL Level 2:
Advanced ELL students should require little accommodations to be successful. They should work with their
team to contribute as much as possible. If the written paraphrasing proves very difficult, they are highly
encouraged to participate in drawing the pictures. For the presentation, students will have more time to prepare
their portion and may write down a script if helpful.
Special Education Services:
This student will be placed in a group with students who are good supports. The teacher will closely monitor
this group to clarify directions and make sure the special ed student is participating and being included.

f. Assessment Strategies (Informal and formal)

Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies


SWBAT paraphrase UDHR Articles while Formative: Teacher will circulate the room during work
including all main points of the text. time to monitor group progress and make sure students
are on track. Students must get approval of rough draft
from teacher before starting poster.
Summative: Complete paraphrased article will be
evaluated from poster and presentation.
SWBAT determine the meaning of Formative: Teacher will circulate room to assess if
unfamiliar words using context clues students are able to come up with appropriate synonym
and/or looking up definitions. for unfamiliar words.
SWBAT create poster using clear and Summative: Students will present and turn in completed
coherent writing to paraphrase their article. posters for grading. Students will be assessed using
rubric for presentation and poster.
SWBAT work collaboratively with Formative: Teacher will circulate room to assess how
classmates and contribute an equal amount teams are working together.
of work.
SWBAT present their groups poster while Summative: Teacher will assess during presentation using
speaking clearly, making eye contact and rubric.
taking turns.
Language: SWBAT use English and its Summative: Teacher will assess final poster using rubric.
proper conventions when creating poster.

Language: SWBAT use English and its Summative: Teacher will assess each student during
proper conventions when giving oral presentations using rubric.
presentation.

g. Student Voice:
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Student-based evidence to be Description of how students
K-12 students will be able to: collected (things produced by will reflect on their learning.
students: journals, exit slips, self-
assessments, work samples,
projects, papers, etc.)
1. Explain student learning Journal Entry Students will begin the
targets and what is required to lesson by answering the
meet them (including why following questions: What
they are important to learn). are human rights? Why are
they important? These
questions will lead the
students into paraphrasing
the human rights stated in
the UDHR articles. Students
will have a better
understanding of the purpose
of this lesson.
2. Monitor their own learning Poster The rubric for require
progress toward the learning elements in the poster and
targets using the tools the presentation will be
provided (checklists, rubrics, shown to students before-
etc.). hand. Students will monitor
their progress as they
complete the poster. The
teacher will give students
time warnings to help pace
themselves.
3. Explain how to access Copy of UHDR and list of defined In a previous lesson,
resources and additional vocabulary. students received a handout
support when needed (and of the UDHR and they
how/why those resources will created a list of unfamiliar
help them). words and their
corresponding definitions.
Students should use these to
help them paraphrase their
articles.

h. Grouping of Students for Instruction:


Students will work collaboratively in groups for the entirety of this lesson. Students will work in their normal
table groups. Each table group has 3-4 students. The students have been specifically placed to optimize
collaboration and cooperation. One of the biggest factors for group placement is ability. There is a range of
abilities at each table in order to provide support for one another. Level 1 ELL students have been placed in a
group where there is a level 2 or graduated ELL student to provide language support. Students who do not work
well together, or have problems socially, have been separated. The same has also been done for students who are
too social and have a hard time staying on task.

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Section 2: Instruction and Engaging Students in Learning

a. Introduction: The teacher asks students to recall what they have already learned about the UDHR. The
teacher will have a quick class discussion about what rights and freedoms they have. After hearing
responses, the teacher will make connections between the rights of students and the rights given by the
UDHR.

b. Questions:
1. What are human rights? (Remembering)
2. What is the purpose of the UDHR? (Understanding)
3. How does the UDHR help us as students? As citizens? (Understanding)
4. How can we paraphrase the complicated words used in the document into our own, kid-friendly, words?
(Understanding)
5. What do the rights given in your article look like in action? What dont they look like? (Applying)

c. Learning Activities: Describe what the teacher will do and say and students will do during the lesson.
Write it as a procedural set of steps in the left column of table below. On the right, refer to a supporting
learning theory or principle driving that activity and/or your rationale for doing what you are doing.

Prompts for right hand columnsupporting theories/principles. In the right column, use references from
texts, research/peer reviewed journals, or other learning theories to support your choice of activities. You
might draw from your 301 and/or your methods courses here.
o Connections between students own lives, experiences, cultures, interests and the content.
o Active learning over passive learning (e.g. SCI Learning Experiences laddersimulation over
verbal)
o Theoretical support for learning activities (e.g. Culturally responsive strategy, or processing)
o Multiple means of representation for the K-12 students (UDL principle)
o Multiple means of engagement for the K-12 students (UDL principle)
o Multiple means of expression of learning by the K-12 students (UDL principle)
o Accommodations and modifications for students with diverse needs, including those with disabilities
(as stated in their IEPs)
o How the teacher candidate will assess the learning of the students (from table above)

(Add rows as needed)

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Learning Steps and Activities Supporting Theories/Principles
(Why are you doing what you are doing?)
1. Transitions from introductory discussion by Allows students to access prior knowledge,
having students respond to the following every student will have a different cultural
questions in their ELA journals. Give experience.
students 5 minutes to write independently Low-stakes writing activities allow students to
before coming back together. work at their own ability and language level.
What are human rights? Why are they
important? Theory: Schemes (Piaget)
2. Explain to students what is expected of Allows students to understand learning targets.
them during this lesson. Give them an
overview of what they will do and answer Theory: Scaffolding (Piaget)
questions. Show rubric for poster and
presentation so students can monitor their
own progress.
3. I do/you watch: (5 minutes) Teacher models learning and expectations for
Use article 26 as the teacher generated example. assignment.
Put article 26 under the document camera for all to
follow along. Read each section aloud. Theory: Observational learning (Bandura)
Demonstrate how to paraphrase each section into
simpler words. Make sure to note that you are
summarizing all parts of the article. Write new
paraphrased definition on poster paper.

4. I do/ You Help: (5 minutes) Using visual models allows for multiple means
Draw a t-chart on the bottom half of the poster for engagement.
paper. Label the sections as Looks like and
Does not look like. Ask students to help you Theory: Dual Coding (Paivio)
come up with ideas for what to draw. If students
struggle with this, help them out and explain what
you are drawing and why.
5. You do/ I Help: (30-45 minutes) Working in groups allows for collaboration
Give each group of students a piece of poster among students. Differentiating instruction
paper. Assign each group a different article. (2, 4, allows students of all levels to access material.
14,16, 23, 25). Assign more difficult articles to Drawing pictures allows for multiple means of
groups with higher ability levels and vice versa. expression.
Have students highlight their assigned article in
their packet. Have students produce a rough draft Theories:
of their paraphrase and get it approved by teacher Developmental stages, Scaffolding (Piaget)
before they begin their poster. Teacher should Importance of Language (Vygotsky)
circulate around the room and provide assistance Constructivism (Vygotsky, Piaget, Wertsch,
as needed. Give students time warnings to keep John-Steiner, Mahn)
them on track. Once students write their
paraphrased article, have them draw looks like
and does not look like pictures.
6. Presentations: (15-20 minutes) Students work collaboratively to present
Once all groups have finished their posters, take information orally. Giving an oral presentation
turns presenting them. Remind students what you gives ELL/struggling students another way to
are looking for during their presentation according demonstrate understanding.
to the rubric. Ask a group to volunteer to go first.
Allow students in the audience to ask several Theories:
questions to the presenters. Give all groups a round Importance of Language (Vygotsky)
of applause. Constructivism (Vygotsky, Piaget, Wertsch,
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John-Steiner, Mahn)
b. Closure: After presentations, ask students to revisit the questions what are human rights? Why are
they important? at their table groups. Have one person from each table share what they discussed.

c. Independent Practice: Students will make connections about rights given by the UDHR to the plot of
Esperanza Rising. At home, students are encouraged to have a conversation with their family about what
rights are especially important to their family and culture.

d. Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology:

Materials:
Student journals
Poster paper
Poster markers
Document Camera
Projector
UDHR handout
Copies of rubrics
Scratch paper

e. Acknowledgements:
Adapted from Engage New York curriculum

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UDHR Poster Rubric
Group members: ______________________________________________________________

Criteria 4 3 2 1
Paraphrase all Students Students Students Students did not
main points of successfully successfully paraphrased the paraphrase the
text paraphrased the paraphrased the article including text in their own
article including article including some main words, or
all main points most of the main points of the captured little to
of the text. The points of the text. The none of the main
paraphrase is text. The paraphrase could points. The
short and sweet, paraphrase is be better written, paraphrase is too
and carries a lot short and sweet, but still carries a long or too short.
of meaning. The and carries a lot lot of meaning. The students
students of meaning. The The students demonstrate
demonstrate students demonstrate little to no
mastery of demonstrate some knowledge knowledge of
difficult knowledge of of difficult difficult
vocabulary. difficult vocabulary. vocabulary.
vocabulary.
Used clear and Students used Students used Students used Students did not
coherent writing their best good okay use good
penmanship penmanship penmanship penmanship
when creating when creating when creating when creating
poster. The poster. The poster. The poster. The
writing is very writing is clear, writing is not writing is not
clear, concise concise and very clear or clear or concise,
and easily read. easily read. concise, and and is hardly
Work is clearly requires the readable.
above grade reader to re-read.
level.
Used proper Students made Students made Students made Students made a
English zero errors. little to no several errors. lot of errors.
conventions errors.

Total (add each category/by 3): ________________

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UDHR Presentation Rubric
Group members: ______________________________________________________________

Student Name Introduced Had equal Made eye Spoke loudly Overall grade:
themselves part of contact with and clearly 1 Below standard
presentation audience 2 Approaching standard
3 Meeting standard
4 Exceeding standard

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