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Causes and Effects of the Civil War

11 th grade

American History

Halle Harker

SED/HST 480

April 5, 2017

STAGE I GOALS

Unit Overview:

This unit is intended for a 10 th grade level course focusing on American History. The student’s look at different literature pieces in order to the students the important role the Civil War played in American History towards different groups . Students will be able to take information from primary and secondary source documents and form persuasive essays on different prompts. They will be looking at the political, social, and economic causes of Civil War. They will examine the differences in lifestyles from the North, South, and the West regions.

Enduring Understanding:

An argument that shows the Civil War could have been avoided…

“ The only way war on some scale might have been avoided in the spring of 1861 is for Lincoln and the Republicans to give up the very cause for which their party and their coalition across the North had rallied -- to cor don off and restrict the future of slavery in defense of free labor ideology and a more egalitarian society - and for Southern secessionists to give up their conviction that their slave society and their racial order were under desperate threat from that new Republican persuasion and simply wait for another four- year cycle of elections” (Blight, 2010).

An argument that shows the Civil War could not have been avoided…

Civil War Historian James McPherson said, “ Only if one side or the other had been willi ng to give up its principles could the war have been avoided. And neither side was willing”

(2015).

Essential Question:

How could the Civil War been avoided? OR do you even think it could have been?

Key Concepts:

Civil War - A war between two citizens of that same country

Slavery - the institution that supports the holding of human beings as property

Abolitionism - the movement to end African American and Indian slavery as well as racial discrimination/segregation

Popular Sov ereignty- the citizens are collectively the sovereign of the state and hold the ultimate authority over public officials and their policies

Confederate - 11 secessionist slave states breaking away from the United States

Union - Consisting of 23 s tates that w ere apart of the United States as well as the 5 border states who did not support slavery

Emancipation – the process of being set free from legal, social, or political restrictions

State Rights- the fight over political power between the federal government and individual states

Industrialism - a social or economic system built on manufacturing industries.

Additional people and events :

1850 Compromise

Emancipation Proclamation

Dred Scott decision

Kansas- Nebraska Act

Missouri Compromise

Frederick Douglass

John Brown

Presidential Election of 1860

Standards:

Arizona Standards for Social Studies:

PO. 1. Explain the economic, social, and political causes of the Civil War.

a. Economic and social differences between North, South, and West

b. Balance of power in t he Senate (e.g. Missouri and 1850 Compromises)

c. Extension of slavery into the territories (e.g. Dred Scott Decision, the Kansas Nebraska Act)

d. Role of abolitionists (e.g. Frederick Douglass and John Brown)

e. Debate over popular sovereignty and state rights

f. Presidential election of 1860

AZ Career & College Readiness Standards:

11-12.RH.1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

11-12.RH.3. Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

11-12.RH.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

11-12.RH.6. Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.

11-12.WHST.1 Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.

11-12.WHST.6. Use technology, including the I nternet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

11-12.WHST.9. Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Objectives: (add numbers as needed; should have 10- 12 total)

Students will be able to:

1. Identify important people and events that shaped the Civil War

2. Analyze the Emancipation Proclamation & Election of 1860

3. Compare and contrast the North, South, and West before the War

4. Analyze why the states seceded after Lincoln was elected

5. Analyze the economic, social, and political causes of the U.S. Civil War

6. Analyze different authors viewpoints on the same historical event by looking at biases, evidence, and othe r claims

7. Evaluate using specific content from the lessons whether they support or do not support events during the Civil War

8. Evaluate whether they believe if this Civil War could have been avoided or not

9. Analyze Civil War Propaganda Posters

10. Analyze popula r sovereignty and state rights

11. A nalyze photographs, diagrams, songs, political cartoons and letters to understand how they can be used as documents in historical research.

STAGE II ASSESSMENTS

Formative Assessments:

1. Day 1 Exit Ticket- Postcard Activity

After students get a short overview of key figures and events that played key roles in the cause of Civil War they will write a short exit ticket.

“Write a short postcard as a historical figure to another historical figure that was discussed in class describing in short detail a historical event we just went over”

Concepts covered: Civil War, Slavery

Concepts covered: Civil War, Slavery Objective Covered: Identify important people and events that shaped the Civil
Objective Covered: Identify important people and events that shaped the Civil War

Objective Covered: Identify important people and events that shaped the Civil War

2. Quick Write Bell Work Day 3 :

Please respond in your own words and not copying the definition straight from the textbook.

“What was the Emancipation Proclamation?”

Objective Covered #2 Analyze the Emancipation Proclamation & Election of 1860

3. Quick Class Discussion to Wrap Up Day 4:

On the white board there will be a spectrum as follows where the students will go to the side of the board in which they agree or disagree with. Both sides will have 5 minutes to gather their arguments and thoughts. Last minutes of class will be dedicated to the discussion of why or why not the students agree/disagree with the states.

Yes, I agree the states should have succeeded .

No, I do not agree with the states .

have succeeded . No, I do not agree with the states . Objective Covered: Analyze why

Objective Covered: Analyze why the states seceded after Lincoln was elected

4. Exit Ticket Day 5:

Before leaving write these down and turn them in out the door J

3- new things that you learned today

2- AH- HAH moments 1- Question you still have

Objective Covered: Analyze the economic, social, and political causes of the U.S. Civil War

5. Activating Prior Knowledge Quick Write Bell Work Day 6 Question:

Please respond using class notes from last Friday. Respond in complete sentences.

“What were the economic, social, and political causes of the Civil War?”

Objective Covered #5 Analyze the economic, social, and political causes of the U.S. Civil War

6. Achievement Test Description:

Day 8- Mid Week Check in Quiz

3 multiple- choice questions, one fill in the blank, and one short answer.

Question 1: Emancipation Proclamation Definition Question 2: Kansas - Nebraska Act and Dred Scott Decision Question 3: Significance of the Dred Scott Decision Question 4: Who surrendered to Robert E. Lee? Short Answer: Analyze the economic causes of the Civil War with respect to any TWO of the following in the United States: agriculture, labor, industrialism, and transportation.

Question 1 Example:

1. The Emancipation Proclamation:

A. Freed the slaves and abolished slavery in all the states of the Union and the Confederacy.

B. Freed slaves only in areas in rebellion against the United States but not in areas that remained loyal.

C. W as formulated by the Radical Republicans and issued by Lincoln despite his strong personal objections.

D. Convinced England and France to enter the war on behalf of the Union in order to win the crusade against slavery.

Objectives/Concepts Met:

1. Identify important people and events that shaped the Civil War

 

2. Analyze the Emancipation Proclamation & Election of 1860

 

3. Analyze the economic, social, and political causes of the U.S. Civil War

Concepts:

 

6

1. Emancipation

2. Industrialism

7. End of the Unit Achievement Test

20 Multiple Choice Questions- covering p olitical cartoons and maps, different battles,

as well as concepts discussed throughout the unit

10 Matching Questions- consisting of matching definitions as well as key figures

1 Essay Based Response- Identify and discussing a major source of conflict that led to the American Civil War. As well as the students own opinion if they believe the Civil War could hav e been avoided?

Example Question:

What was the significance of the Dred Scott decision?

a. Congress could not prohibit slavery in the Western territories.

b. Only Congress could prohibit slavery in any part of the United States.

c. The people of the territory could outlaw slavery by popular sovereignty.

d. The fugitive slave law was severely weakened.

Objective Covered & Concepts: ALL OF THEM!

Performance (A uthentic) Assessment Description:

Stage I concepts:

Slavery

Abolitionism

Unit objectives:

Compare and contrast the North, South, and West before the War

Analyze Civil War Propaganda Posters

Identify important people and events that shaped the Civil War

Evaluate using specific content from the lessons whether they support or do not support events during the Civil War

Description of the project:

G)

Your task is to create a propaganda poster with a one page justification paper

R)

You have been asked by a publishing company to be the artist of creating a propaganda

poster

A) Your audience will be whichever side and perspective you choose to do your poster

from. For instance, if you are an army general trying to recruit soldiers your audience will be to those soldiers. There are multiple different perspectives you can choose to do it from:

Northern State, Southern State, soldier, military l eader, and slaves, French, Germans.

S) Propaganda posters were a way for people to communicate during war times that

expressed how different individuals and groups fel t about something. You have been asked by the top newspaper publication company to create a piece of Civil War propaganda portraying your opinion or viewpoint on any situation. On top of the propaganda poster

you have been asked to justify your reasoning’s behind the historical content you have chosen.

P) You will create a propaganda poster in order to express your views or opinions in

regards to different situations before or during the Civil War as well as a short paragraph justifying your historical propaganda poster

S) Your work will be judged by the following rubric s:

Propaganda Poster Rubric

Propaganda Poster Rubric 9

Justification of Poster Paper Rubric

Justification of Poster Paper Rubric 10

STAGE III LEARNING ACTIVITIES

Unit Calendar:

Day

Topic(s)

Unit

Brief List ing of Activities

Assessments

Objective(s)

Day 1

Identifying

Objective #1

1. Introduction to the Civil War/ Class discussion

2. Vocabulary- List, Group, Label

Exit Ticket- Postcard Activity

Key Events

 

3. Lecture (8 Slides of key compromises and people)

Day 2

Emancipation

Objective #2

1. Analyze the emancipation proclamation document but through different lens of populations (Enslaved People, Free Blacks in the North, Abolitionists, Plantation Owner in the South, Union Sol dier, Confederate Soldier, Factory Workers in the North, Factory Owners )

Quick Write Bell Work - What do

Proclamation

& Election of

 

1860

you know about the emancipation proclamation?

Day 3

Compare &

Objective #3

1. Analyzing songs, photographs, and newspaper postings to compare/contras t the North and South before the War

Quick Write Bell Work - Activating Prior Knowledge

Contrast

Objective #11

North/South

before the

 

War

Homework - Why or why not do you believe the North and South were

2. Completing a Venn Diagram based off of the content and

similar or different before the war?

     

information from the texts

 

Day 4

State

Objective #4

1. Introduction

Agree or Disagree

Secession

2. Chart

Spectrum Exit

3. Mini - Lecture

Ticket +

4. Agree or Disagree Spectrum

Discussion

Day 5

Economic,

Objective #5

1. Quick Check in Quiz, Where are we? Are we all on track with the content?

2. Short lecture overview of causes

Quiz Day Check In Exit Ticket, 3, 2,1

Social,

Political

 

causes

3. Causes of the Civil War Graphic Organizer using information from Internet sources

Day 6

“Read Like a Historian” Analyzing Documents

Objective #6

1. Explain John Brown’s raid shocked and polarized the country:

Quick Write Bell Work

2. “Was John Brown a Misguided Fanatic?” Read documents

3. Work through guiding questions from documents

4. If time- Discussion questions

Day 7

Propaganda

Objective #9

1. Analyze propaganda from the Civil War.

Go over

Summative

(G.R.A.S.P.S)

2. Students with shoulder partner write 5 facts about the propaganda and why that matters

3. Begin Project

Propaganda

Poster

     

Brainstorming

 

Day 8

Popular

Review of

1. Lecture overview of what popular sovereignty is, what it meant under the

Nebraska

Kansas-

Bell Work , Exit Ticket

Sovereignty

Objectives: #1,

& State

#2, #3

 

Rights

Objective #10

Act

2. Quiz

Day 9

Given what you know about recent events would you choose to support or protest the Civil War?

Objective #7

1. Students will choose their sides

Bell Work

2. Once on their sides they will have 10 minutes

to gather their information that will support their debate

 

3. Group discussion/debat

e

with guiding

questions from

teacher

Day 10

After learning all this information in regards to the causes of the Civil War, could it have been avoided? Yes or no?

Objective #8

1. Quick Debate on

Summative

if

the Civil War

Achievement Test

could have been

avoided

2. Summative

Achievement

Test

Catalog of Lessons :

Day 1

Lesson title: Welcome to the Civil War!!!!

Unit objectives:

Identify important people and events that shaped the Civil War

Activities:

Introduce The Civil War- what are current issues that could divide the students in this class or school?

Separate the class into two sides. “Low- class and middle- class students all sit on this half of the classroom and high- class on the other side.”

Question them: “How does this situation make you feel?”

Disperse again: “Students who are labeled as the athletes on one side, and non- athletes on the other.”

Question again: “How does this situation make you feel?”

Class discussion questions: If I really made you guys do this how would you respond? Would you be a bystander? Or would you step up and try to change it?

How does this relate to the concept of the Civil War?

Vocabulary List, Group, Label- Teacher will give the concept (Civil War), Students will have 30 seconds with their shoulder partner to come up with as many words as possible that relate to the concept (competition,) tally who wins the most and have them state out loud, After the competition have the students group what they could recall about the Civil War with t heir shoulder partner. If they wrote down different things like Battle of Antietam, battle of Gettysburg, and Battle of bull run they may group these as the battles and so on.

Quick Lecture overview of the Civil War:

A Divided Nation

Comparing Northern and Southern Societies

A Divided Nation Comparing Northern and Southern Societies The North s population was three times that

The North s population was three times that of the South. Most other countries recognized the Union as the government in America. However, Britain and France had friendly relations with the Confederacy and considered aiding the South. The North also was more affluent.

aiding the South. The North also was more affluent. The South had about nine million people,

The South had about nine million people, including about three million slaves. The average Southerner was not as wealthy as the average person living in the North. About 90 percent of American industry and railroads were in the North. Reliance on slave labor discouraged the creation of new jobs in the South. This discouraged immigration, and most immigrants settled in the North.

CICERO © 2010

The Leaders

immigrants settled in the North. CICERO © 2010 The Leaders Abraham Lincoln was the sixteenth President
immigrants settled in the North. CICERO © 2010 The Leaders Abraham Lincoln was the sixteenth President

Abraham Lincoln was the sixteenth President of the United States. He opposed the expansion of slavery. A Republican, Lincoln led the Union during the Civil War. John Wilkes Booth assassinated Lincoln in Washington, D.C., on April 14, 1865.

assassinated Lincoln in Washington, D.C., on April 14, 1865. Jefferson Davis was President of the Confederate
assassinated Lincoln in Washington, D.C., on April 14, 1865. Jefferson Davis was President of the Confederate
assassinated Lincoln in Washington, D.C., on April 14, 1865. Jefferson Davis was President of the Confederate

Jefferson Davis was President of the Confederate States of America. During the Mexican War, he had been an officer in the United States Army. Davis also had served as the United States Secretary of War. When the South surrendered, he was charged with treason and prohibited from running for public office again.

CICERO © 2010

The Emancipation Proclamation

January 1, 1863

The Emancipation Proclamation January 1, 1863 President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. It was part

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. It was part of a two-part plan that guaranteed freedom to slaves in the Union and some Confederate states. The Confederate government claimed Lincoln could not issue laws over states in which he had no political control. The first plan, enacted on September 22, 1862, freed slaves in Confederate states that had not yet rejoined the Union. The second part took effect on January 1, 1863, applying to specific states, but not to the border states such as Maryland and West Virginia.

CICERO © 2010

Ø   Ø   Ø   Ø   The U.S. purchased Louisiana in 1803. Congress
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
The U.S. purchased Louisiana in 1803. Congress
had to decide if states being made from this
territory would be free or slave.
Missouri applied to become a slave state. Maine
wanted to come in as a free state. This would keep
the balance between slave and free in Congress.
To avoid future arguments, Henry Clay wrote a
compromise that said that any territory that
became a state would be slave or free depending
on where it was on the map.
Any territory below the 36x30 line on the map
would be a slave state, any territory above that line
would be a free state.
Compromise of 1850 Ø The annexation of Texas and the gaining of the Mexican Cession land
Compromise of 1850
Ø The annexation of Texas and the gaining of
the Mexican Cession land made the U.S. re-
examine the issue of slavery. They had to
decide if new states would be slave or free.
Ø When California asked to become a free
state in 1849 people began arguing. The
36x30 line cut right thru the middle of
California.
Kansas-Nebraska Act 1854 Ø  By the 1850s the area above Texas was ready to be
Kansas-Nebraska Act 1854
Ø  By the 1850s the area above Texas was ready to be recognized
as a territory in preparation to becoming a state.
Ø  It was North of the 36x30 line. The Compromise of 1850 had
stated that these territories could decide for themselves if they
were going to be free or slave.
Ø  In 1854 Congress passed a bill creating 2 territories=Kansas
and Nebraska. It was hoped by many that one would be free
and one would be slave. However, the decision was left up to
the people in those territories=Popular Sovereignty.
Ø  People from surrounding states flooded into these territories
to swing the vote the way they wanted it to go. Many people
were killed over the issue.
Dred Scott Decision 1857 Ø Dred Scott was an African American slave who belonged to an
Dred Scott Decision 1857
Ø Dred Scott was an African American slave who
belonged to an Army officer.
Ø He traveled with his owner and lived in 2 free states for
several years.
Ø At one point he even traveled alone through free
territories to join his master in the South.
Ø He never sued for his freedom while his master was
alive. However, shortly after the Army officer died, his
widow hired Scott out to someone else. At this point,
Scott tried to buy his freedom. He was denied.
Write in the section Presidential Election of 1860 Ø  1860-Republican Abraham Lincoln won the Presidency.
Write in the section Presidential Election of
1860
Ø  1860-Republican Abraham
Lincoln won the Presidency.
Ø  Republicans promised to:
Ø  End the spread of slavery
Ø  Impose tariffs to protect US
businesses
Ø  Give free land in the West
to settlers

Assessment : Day 1 Exit Ticket- Postcard Activity

After students get a short overview of key figures and events that played key roles in the cause of Civil War they will write a short exit ticket.

“Write a short postcard as a historical figure to another historical figure about a compromise or event that was discussed in class describing in short detail . ”

Day 3

Lesson Title: Compare and Contrast the North/South before the war

Unit Objectives:

Compare and contrast the North, South, and West before the War

A nalyze photographs, diagrams, songs and letters to understand how they can be used as documents in historical research.

Activities:

We will analyze different locations to give us a better understanding of what life was like before the C ivil War:

North- Factory South- Plantation New York City Richmond

Sources we will use:

Images and Songs related to the North and South contained in their “Life Before the Civil War” lesson.

http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson- plan/life - civil - war#sect - introduction

Images of New York City and Richmond before and at the beginning of the Civil War.

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/pmhtml/panhome.html

Images and Newspaper clippings from the plantation.

http://www.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/45chatham/45visual1.htm

- After analyzing these document s there will be a Venn diagram handout for the students to fill out using these sources

Assessments:

Quick Write Bell Work Activating Prior K nowledge from Yesterday’s lesson: Please respond in your own words and not copying the definition straight from the textbook.

“What was the Emancipation Proclamation?”

Formative Assessment:

Homework Assignment

Make sure to create a strong statement saying either it was more similar or different. Explain your answer by supporting it with information from our activity. You should have two reasons as well as 2 supporting evidences. 3 paragraphs minimum with an introduction as well as a conclusion

R espond to the following question:

Why or why not do you believe that life in the North or South were similar or different?

Day 4

Lesson Title: “State Seccession”

Unit Objectives: Analyze why the states seceded after Lincoln was elected

Activities:

Introduction:

Ask students their opinion on a certain issue that was discussed in our last staff meeting going on in the school that they have to keep very quiet. (Make them believe how serious it is)

A teacher t hey all know has proposed to the staff that she wants to secede from the school

Discuss what secession is

Tell students that the teacher stated that he/she does not agree with the school’s philosophy, curriculum, or rules and thus he/she wants to start a “school within a school” consisting of 28 students. Explain that if approved, the seceded classroom will be located in the main building of our school, but will not recognize itself as part of our school as it will not be following any of our school’s esta blished rules or guidelines for behavior, curriculum, etc. The school within our school will however use the main school’s resources such as the cafeteria, gym, and library.

Ask students what the benefits of seceding would be? Negative effects?

Finally, wrap up by paralleling this with the Civil War secession

Chart on Whiteboard:

Following scenarios I pointed out

Parallels to the Civil War

Teacher secedes from school

South secedes from United States

Teacher does not like philosophy of the school, its curriculum, rules, etc.

South did not like election of Lincoln or the threat of emancipation

Teacher still plans to remain in school’s building and utilize school resources

South plans to utilize f ederal government resources (i.e. Fort Sumter) and remain on the United State’s land

Teacher will assume lead role and create own curriculum, rules, expectations, etc. for classroom; will not recognize principal and school administration

South will op erate its own government, set its own laws, and elect its own president (Jefferson Davis); will not recognize Abraham Lincoln as president

If this class secedes, other classroom secessions may occur, completely splitting the school apart

If the Southern states secede, anarchy across the US may ensue

Worksheet: (Pasted in attachments)

Assessments:

Exit Ticket + Discussion On the white board there will be a spectrum as follows where the students will go to the side of the board in which they agree or disagree with. Both sides will have 5 minutes to gather their arguments and thoughts. Last minutes of class will be dedicated to the discussion of why or why not the students agree/disagree with the states. Please turn in your paper with your agree or disagree with one argument to why.

Yes, I agree the states should have succeeded.

Day 6

No, I do not agree with the states.

have succeeded. Day 6 No, I do not agree with the states. Lesson Title: “ Read

Lesson Title: “Read Like a Historian” Analyzing Documents

Unit Objectives:

Analyze different authors viewpoints on the same historical event by looking at biases, evidence, and other claims

Activities: “Was John Brown a Misguided Fanatic?”

1. Brief overview of John Brown’s raid that shocked the country

2. Read through as a class of John Brown’s timeline

3. Work through the guiding questions for documents A & B

4. Class discussion

(Guided Questions, Discussion questions, and Historical D ocuments are in the attachments) Assessments:

Activating Prior Knowledge Quick Write Bell Work Day 6 Questio n:

Please respond using class notes from last Friday. Respond in complete sentences. “What were the economic, social, and political causes of the Civil War?”

Day 9

Lesson Title: “Support or Protest”

Unit Objectives:

Evaluate using specific content from the lessons whether they support or do not support events during the Civil War

Activities:

Whatever side the students choose to be on is whatever side they will split into. There will be two sides in the classroom, and no one can choose to be “in the middle.” The groups will have ten minutes to plan their debates with whatever information they can compile in which they think can bring their side a “victory.”

1. Why do you feel it is necessary to fight the war?

2. Why do you feel it is necessary to oppose the war?

Assessments:

Bell Work: TODAY, we are going back in time. You have the chance to either support the Civil War or be a protestor. Tell me which side you are choosing while adding 3 reasons why you have chosen this side.

CITATIONS (APA Format)

Vocabulary Source:

Todorov, K. R. (n.d.). Glossary of Social Studies Terms and Vocabulary . Retrieved February 13,

2017, from

http://www.ectorcountyisd.org/cms/lib011/TX01000975/centricity/Domain/14/glossary%

20of%20soc%20st%20terms%20and%20voc.pdf

Day 3 Lecture Slides Source:

C. (2010). The American Civil War. Retrieved March 19, 2017, from

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0ahUKE

wiWg77k8-

PSAhVU72MKHXNJAjMQFggaMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dockhs.org%2Ffile

s%2FWorksheets%2FBush%2FU.S.%2520History%2520II%2FCicero%2520Summary

%2520of%2520TheCivilWar.ppt&usg=AFQjCNEsFiY7lk6mypgRjIxdZfl4EUpUaA&sig

2=OxCIrp_3I0jplSeXAEDnrg&bvm=bv.149760088%2Cd.cGc

Compromises and Events that Led to the Civil War. (n.d.). Retrieved March 19, 2017, from

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0ahUKE

wjEzYyR9ePSAhUS-

GMKHR8oDEQQFggaMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thhs.qc.edu%2Fourpages%2

Fauto%2F2015%2F3%2F1%2F50290074%2FCompromises%2520and%2520Events%25

20that%2520Led%2520to%2520the%2520Civil%2520Power%2520Point.ppt&usg=AFQ

jCNFfHa-

SAlJmWphAJ5Sk2aicWaYoyw&sig2=UCqYOkKbmNq4AfL0GKDoOw&bvm=bv.149

760088%2Cd.cGc

Day 3 Activity Source:

Nemeroff, A. (n.d.). Teaching an American History Project. Retrieved March 19, 2017, from

http://tah.eastconn.org/tah/1112AN1_LessonPlanLifeNorthSouthCivilWar.pdf

Day 4 Lesson plan and Worksheet

Education, N. C. (n.d.). To Secede or Not to Secede: Events Leading to the Civil War.

Retrieved March 24, 2017, from

http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/04/seccession.pdf

Day 6 Reading Like a Historian

S tanford . (n.d.). John Brown Lesson Plan . Retrieved March 21, 2017, from

http://sheg.stanford.edu/upload/V3LessonPlans/John%20Brown%20Lesson%20P

lan_0.pdf

ATTACHMENTS (Required if you reference attachments in the unit )

Day 3 In Class Activity Student Handout:

ATTACHMENTS (Required if you reference attachments in the unit ) Day 3 In Class Activity Student

Day 6 Class Activity:

John Brown Timeline

1800

John Brown born in Connecticut.

1833

John Brown married his second wife, who took care of his five children and later bore

him thirteen of her own. Finances got harder as he attempted to provide for his large

family.

1837 November 7: John Brown vowed to end slavery when he learned that an abolitionist

newspaperman was killed.

1842

John Brown went bankrupt. Lost almost everything.

1854

Kansas- Nebraska Act of 1854: Voters will decide if Nebraska Territory will be slave

or free.

1855 John Brown followed his sons to Kansas as Free- Soilers.

1856 May 24: Brown went to nearby Pottawatomie Creek and directed his men in the

murder of five proslavery settlers.

1859 October 16: John Brown attacked the armory at Harpers Ferry with 21 men (16

white, 5 black). Within 36 hours, they were almost all captured or killed. Two of John Brown’s sons were killed. November 2: A Virginia jury found John Brown guilty of murder, treason, and inciting a slave insurrection. December 2: John Brown was hanged.

1860

November: Abraham Lincoln elected President.

1861

April 12: The South seceded, and the Civil War began.

1865

The Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution abolished slavery.

Document A: John Brown's Speech (Modified)

I have, may it p lease the court, a few words to say. In the first place, I deny everything but

what I have all along admitted -- the design on my part to free the slaves. That was all I intended. I never did intend murder, or treason, or the destruction of property, or to excite or incite slaves to rebellion, or to make insurrection.

I have another objection: had I so interfered in behalf of the rich, the powerful, the

intelligent, the so- called great, or in behalf of any of their friends

right; and every man in this court would have deemed it an act worthy of reward rather

than punishment.

it would have been all

I believe that to have done what I have done-- on behalf of God’s despised poor was not

wrong, but right. Now, if it is deemed necessary that I should forfeit my life to further the end of justice, and mingle my blood further with the blood of my children and with the blood of millions in this slave country whose rights are disregarded by wicked, cruel, and unjust acts -- I say: so let it be done!

Source: Thi s was John Brown's last speech. November 2, 1859.

Thi s was John Brown's last speech. November 2, 1859. Document B: Last Meeting Between Frederick

Document B: Last Meeting Between Frederick Douglass and John Brown (Modified)

About three weeks before the raid on Harper's Ferry, John Brown wrote to me, informing me that before going forward he wanted to see me

We sat down and talked over his plan to take over Harper’s Ferry. I at once opposed the measure with all the arguments at my command. To me such a measure would be fatal to

the work of the helping slaves escape [Underground Railroad]. It would be an attack upon

the Federal government, and would turn the whole country against us.

Captain John Brown did not at all object to upsetting the nation; it seemed to him that

something shocking was just what the nation needed. He thought that the capture of

Harper's Ferry would serve as notice to the slaves that their friends had come, and as a

trumpet to rally them.

Of course I was no match for him, but I told him, and these were my words, that all his

arguments, and all his descriptions of the place, convinced me t hat he was going into a

perfect steel - trap, and that once in he would never get out alive.

Source: In this passage, Frederick Douglass describes his last meeting with John Brown, about three weeks before the raid on Harper’s Ferry. Douglass published this account in 1881 in The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass.

account in 1881 in The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass. Document C: Letter to John

Document C: Letter to John Brown in Prison (Modified)

Massachusetts, Oct 26th, 1859 Dear Capt. Brown,

You do not know me, but I have supported your struggles in Kansas, when that Territory

became the battle- ground between slavery and freedom.

Believing in peace, I cannot sympathize with the method you chose to advance the cause of

freedom. But I honor your generous intentions, I admire your courage, moral and physical,

I respect you for your humanity, I sympathize with your cruel loss, your sufferings and your

wrongs. In brief, I love you and bless you.

Thousands of hearts are throbbing with sympathy as warm as mine. I think of you night

and day, bleeding in prison, surrounded by hostile f aces, sustained only by trust in God, and

your own strong heart. I long to nurse you, to speak to you sisterly words of sympathy and

consolation. May God sustain you, and carry you through whatsoever may be in store for

you!

Yours with heartfelt respect, sympathy, and affection. L. Maria Child.

Source: The letter below was written to John Brown while he was in prison, awaiting trial.

Guiding Questions Name

Document A:

1. John Brown delivered this speech on the last day of his trial, after hearing the jury

pronounce him ‘guilty.’ He knew he would be sentenced to die. Given that context, what

does this speech say about him as a person?

2. Based on this document, do you think John Brown was a “misguided fanatic”? Why or

why not?

Document B:

1. What are two reasons why Douglass opposed John Brown’s plan to raid Harper’s Ferry?

2. Douglass’s account is written in 1881, twenty- two years after the raid. Do you trust his

account? Why or why not?

3. Based on this document, do you think John Brown was a “misguided fanatic”? Why or

why not?

Day 4 State Secession Worksheet:

(

Name:

To Secede or Not to Secede

After the Louisiana Purchase (1803), both the North & South wanted the acquired western land to benefit their sectional interests.

Northern Goals

Southern Goals

Why do you think Congress made compromises throughout the 1800s to try to appease both the North and the South?

Compromises made to appease the North & the South

Northwest Ordinance, 1787:

Missouri Compromise, 1820:

Compromise of 1850:

Kansas-Nebraska Act, 1854:

NC Civic Education Consortium Visit our Database of K-12 Resources at http://database.civics.unc.edu/

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