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FALL 2017 COURSE SCHEDULE

ACADEMIC CALENDAR
CLASSES BEGIN: 8:35 AM WEDNESDAY AUGUST 30
LABOR DAY (NO CLASSES) MONDAY SEPTEMBER 04

FALL BREAK (NO CLASSES) SATURDAY - TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 10

CLASSES RESUME: 8:35 AM WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 11

REGISTRATION FOR SPRING 2017 BEGINS MONDAY NOVEMBER 06


THANKSGIVING BREAK (NO CLASSES)
WEDNESDAY SUNDAY NOVEMBER 22 - 26
*BREAK STARTS AT NOON ON WEDNESDAY*
CLASSES RESUME: 8:35 AM MONDAY NOVEMBER 27

ACCOMPANYING JURIES SATURDAY DECEMBER 9

READING WEEKEND SATURDAY SUNDAY DECEMBER 9 - 10

LAST DAY OF CLASSES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 13

READING DAY THURSDAY DECEMBER 14

FINAL EXAMS BEGIN FRIDAY DECEMBER 15

FINAL EXAM ENDS SUNDAY DECEMBER 17

REFUNDS & LATE FEES


GRADUATE/PART-TIME STUDENTS: LAST DAY FOR 100% COURSE
SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 03
REFUND
GRADUATE/PART-TIME STUDENTS: LAST DAY FOR 90% COURSE
SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 10
REFUND
LAST DAY FOR STUDENTS TO REGISTER W/O $250 LATE FEE SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 10
GRADUATE/PART-TIME STUDENTS: LAST DAY FOR 50% COURSE
SUNDAY OCTOBER 01
REFUND
GRADUATE/PART-TIME STUDENTS: LAST DAY FOR 25% COURSE
SUNDAY OCTOBER 22
REFUND (NO REFUNDS AFTER TODAY)
ACADEMIC CHANGES
LAST DAY TO SUBMIT AN INDEPENDENT STUDY FORM FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 08

LAST DAY TO CHANGE FROM CREDIT TO AUDIT WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 27

LAST DAY TO DROP W/O NOTATION ON TRANSCRIPT WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 27

LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW CLASSES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 15

Access academic policy and schedule information at:


www.esm.rochester.edu
Schedule published March 2017
Eastman School of Music
Office of the Registrar

26 GIBBS STREET ROCHESTER, NY 14604 PHONE (585) 274-1220 FAX (585) 232-8601 WEBSITE: WWW.ESM.ROCHESTER.EDU EMAIL: REGISTRAR@ESM.ROCHESTER.EDU
Accompanying
58246 6ACY 100 STUDIO ACCOMPANYING 1.0 TBA RTBA Beaudette S
58258 6ACY 100G STUDIO ACCOMPANYING: GRAD TBA RTBA Beaudette S
58260 6ACY 201 ACCOMPANYING CLASS 2.0 T 1235 1425 ESM HHH Garver B B
58318 6ACY 201 ACCOMPANYING CLASS 2.0 W 1235 1425 ESM HHH Garver B B
81515 6ACY 201 ACCOMPANYING CLASS 2.0 R 1335 1525 ESM HHH Garver B B
58271 6ACY 405 OPERA COACHING 1.0 R 1335 1525 ESM 334 Hess B A
58285 6ACY 415 ENGLISH LYRIC DICTION 1.0 MW 0935 1025 ANNEX 710 Garver B A
ENGLISH LYRIC DICTION will be offered 08/30/17 - 10/23/17.
58292 6ACY 418 ITALIAN LYRIC DICTION 1.0 MW 0935 1025 ANNEX 710 Staff U A
ITALIAN LYRIC DICTION will be offered 10/25/17 - 12/13/17.
58305 6ACY 596 DMA DISSERTATION PROJECT TBA ESM 440 Barr J

Arts Leadership Curriculum


The Catherine Filene Shouse Arts Leadership Program Curriculum offers 7-week, half-semester courses and whole-semester courses on a variety of career-related topics relevant to professional
musicians and music educators. ALP courses are open to all current graduate students and undergraduate seniors, juniors and sophomores. Students participating in the Undergraduate and Graduate
Certificate Programs have preference in registering for these courses. Freshmen can register for these courses only with the permission of their advisor and the Assistant Director of the Arts
Leadership Program. All graduate students can take ALP courses for free by registering at the ALC 400 level. Graduate students in certain instances may also wish or be required to register for other
than the ALC 400 level and pay regular tuition charges. For additional information on this policy and further details on whether or not a course may be used to fulfill certificate, diploma, or degree
requirements, please visit the ALP website at www.esm.rochester.edu/iml/alp/gradpolicy.php
ARTS LEADERSHIP PROGRAM ONLINE COURSES
ALPs online courses are asynchronous, meaning that students do not attend class at a specific time of day. However, students must participate in online class activities and complete assignments
within the weekly framework and deadlines of the course. Interaction with your instructor and peers is an essential part of these courses and is through discussion forums, class activities, assignments
and video presentations hosted in Blackboard. The online courses for this semester include the following: Career Skills for the 21st Century, Entrepreneurial Thinking & Keys to Healthy Music I
Fall 2017 Course Timeline:
Full semester: Wednesday, August 30 Wednesday, December 13

Early Fall: Wed Classes: 8/30 - 10/18 Thurs & Fri Classes: 8/31-10/13
Last day to drop without notation on record: Wed, Thurs & Fri Classes: 9/8
Last Day to withdraw from classes: Wed, Thurs & Fri Classes: 10/6

Late Fall: Wed Classes: 10/25 - 12/13 Thurs & Fri Classes: 10/19 - 12/8
Last day to drop without notation on record: Wed, Thurs & Fri Classes: 11/3
Last Day to withdraw from classes: Wed, Thurs & Fri Classes: 12/1

58391 6ALC 211 CREATIVITY/YOUR MUSIC CAREER 1.0 T 1135 1225 MC 320 Danyew S C
58442 6ALC 411 CREATIVITY/YOUR MUSIC CAREER 1.0 T 1135 1225 MC 320 Danyew S
CREATIVITY AND YOUR MUSIC CAREER (formerly EXCELLENCE, INNOVATION & UNIQUENESS: DEVELOPING YOUR CREATIVE LIFE IN MUSIC)
Full Semester
Enrollment Limit: 15
Explore ways to infuse creativity, innovation and originality into your work. In this class, you will develop your own personal artist mission statement and chart out an action plan
for your career. Discover your distinct skills, talents, and intereststhings that set you apart as a musician and artistand learn how to combine those into a rewarding,
creative career. During the semester, youll have an opportunity to kickstart your creative career by designing and launching a collaborative project that creates value
(monetary or otherwise).
Stephen Danyew is a composer, saxophonist, teacher, and arts administrator based in Rochester, NY. Danyew writes commissions for a variety of genres and currently
serves as Managing Editor for the Paul R. Judy Center web pages. He holds a B.M. in Composition from the University of Miami and an M.M. in Composition and a Certificate
in Arts Leadership from the Eastman School of Music. Danyew's experiences crafting his own creative career include starting a non-profit professional chamber ensemble in
Miami, FL; co-founding a summer music series and workshop in rural Massachusetts; and self-publishing his own compositions.
58363 6ALC 211 DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY & VIDEO 1.0 T 1600 1800 EC 103 Zhang X C
58557 6ALC 411 DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY & VIDEO 1.0 T 1600 1800 EC 103 Zhang X
DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY & VIDEO (formerly ESSENTIAL TECHNOLOGY FOR MUSICIANS)
Half Semester: Early Fall 9/5-10/24
Enrollment Limit: 15
Technological advancements in the last century have revolutionized the way people make, market, and listen to music. In this ever-changing world, it is important for musicians
to understand emerging trends and have the skills to fully represent themselves online. This course will introduce basic digital media applications and discuss how to
incorporate them into careers in music. Focus will be placed on video production, learning how to communicate through video, and navigating online platforms. During this
course, you will produce multiple videos for your portfolio.
Xuan Zhang is an Eastman graduate and video artist who specializes in cross-disciplinary collaborations with contemporary composers, ensembles, and musicians. Her digital
media work is a composite of classical training and candid experimentation which focuses specifically on the correlation between music, color, and imagery.
58372 6ALC 211 GIFT AND GRANT SEEKING 1.0 R 1700 1900 ESM M9 Powell M C
58468 6ALC 411 GIFT AND GRANT SEEKING 1.0 R 1700 1900 ESM M9 Powell M
GIFT AND GRANT SEEKING IN THE NON-PROFIT ARTS WORLD: A PRIMER FOR FUNDRAISING IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Half Semester: Early Fall 8/3110/12
Enrollment Limit: 15
This course will offer an introduction to the gift, earned, and grant income seeking process for non-profit arts organizations, as well as introduce the mechanisms by which a
successful arts organization maintains its mission, scope, and most importantly, its funding. We will examine the various avenues of non-profit support, how to cultivate them,
when and how to engage an organization's mission to enhance donor relationships, and how to strategically highlight your organization's value. The course will include a
grantmaker's forum, in which you will learn about the mechanics and procedures of the funding side of these relationships, as well as an opportunity to evaluate the proposals
we create during the class.
Mark Powell has served as the Managing Artistic Director of the Hobby Center for the Performing Arts' Uniquely Houston Series and is the Founding Music Director of ARCO,
the American Radio Chamber Orchestra. A Ford Foundation conducting prize winner, he has also authored development and public engagement materials for organizations as
diverse as the Grand Teton Music Festival and the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft. He has served on the juries of the Metropolitan Opera Quizkids program, the
Young Texas Artists Competition and currently serves the Rochester area as principal of Powell and Associates, a non-profit consultation consortium.
58389 6ALC 211 INTRO TO RECORDING: BEGINNER 1.0 W 0835 1025 ESM 120 Wattie R C

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
58450 6ALC 411 INTRO TO RECORDING: BEGINNER 1.0 W 0835 1025 ESM 120 Wattie R
INTRODUCTION TO RECORDING: A BEGINNERS GUIDE
Half Semester: Late Fall 10/25-12/13
Enrollment Limit: 15
Most successful audio engineers are also musicians. They speak the same language of music. But even if your career path is not towards audio engineering, you will benefit
from understanding the recording process. In this course, we will focus on mobile audio recorders and computer audio software. This class covers sound wave properties,
acoustics, microphone technique, critical listening, and post-production. Students will operate recording equipment, edit and process audio, and produce recordings. We will
also learn basic video capture, editing and sync. Guest lecturers will speak on topics including broadcast audio, mastering engineering, and the professional recording process.
Rich Wattie is a professional audio engineer and musician. He holds degrees in Recording Arts & Sciences and Percussion Performance from the Peabody Conservatory of
Music. He is a contributing member of the Audio Engineering Society. He enjoys sharing his insight of the recording experience with students through classes and by
supporting live events & recording sessions.
58354 6ALC 211 ARTS MEDIA & PROMOTION 1.0 R 1600 1800 MC 320 Blum A C
58544 6ALC 411 ARTS MEDIA & PROMOTION 1.0 R 1600 1800 MC 320 Blum A
ARTS, MEDIA AND PROMOTION: PERFECTING & PITCHING YOUR MESSAGE
Half-semester: Late Fall 10/19-12/7
Enrollment Limit: 15
Whether your performing career calling leads you to a string quartet, a jazz trio, the opera stage, a major orchestra or a still-to-be-determined musical entity, you'll need to
know how to inform potential audiences about you and your performances. In this course, you'll explore the fundamentals of identity, promotion, and public and media relations
as they relate to a performing musician. Learn how to write an effective and newsworthy press release, construct a bio, assemble a press kit, create a promotional plan, work
with a photographer and understand the "ins-and-outs" of the print, electronic and social media. Guests will include members of the local media in a roundtable discussion.
Although professional photographs are not mandatory for this course, they are highly recommended. Contacts for local professional photographers will be shared.
Amy Blum, a creative and experienced public relations and media professional, worked as the national publicist for the Eastman School, and is former director of public
relations at the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. In that role, she was responsible for helping to craft and "pitch" the RPO's "message" to the media, whether for concerts,
events, recordings or other newsworthy activities. She also wrote and was the project manager for the RPO's award-winning annual report. A graduate of SUNY Buffalo with a
bachelor's degree in music, Amy has had her own music publicity business for more than 20 years, representing chamber ensembles, record labels, music festivals,
orchestras, singers, and composers.
58347 6ALC 212 CAREER SKILLS FOR THE 21ST C 2.0 R 1900 2100 MC 320 Doser J C
58336 6ALC 412 CAREER SKILLS FOR THE 21ST C 2.0 R 1900 2100 MC 320 Doser J C
CAREER SKILLS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY (Arts Leadership Certificate CORE Course)
CLASSROOM VERSION (In person)
6ALC 212 CRN: 58347 6ALC 412 CRN: 58336
ONLINE VERSION
6ALC 212 CRN: 58533 6ALC 412 CRN: 58473
Full Semester
Enrollment Limit: 20
It's never too early to start thinking about your career, but how do you get started on your career path? In this course, we will focus on the nuts and bolts of getting a job, and
on developing skills needed for creating your own career. This class will help identify today's job market, and assist with fundamental job skills, such as networking and
interviewing. Students will craft rsums, cover letters, bios, and press releases, and use the Internet as a career development tool. We will also explore career goals and
business strategies for the future. Guest lecturers will speak on topics including freelancing, financial management, and entrepreneurship.
Jim Doser is an educator, administrator, musician and entrepreneur, and the Director of Eastmans Institute for Music Leadership. He served as Music Administrator in the
Penfield Central Schools, taught at all levels of public school and at Eastman as Director of the Eastman New Jazz Ensemble and various undergraduate and graduate
classes. For nearly twenty years he was co-owner of Tritone Music, Inc., a company specializing in jazz instruction for adults. Mr. Doser holds degrees in Music Education,
Jazz and Contemporary Media and the Performers Certificate from Eastman, and is recipient of the Smithsonian Award in Education for his work on the Smithsonians
traveling exhibit The Jazz Age in Paris.
84140 6ALC 212 ENTREPRENEURIAL THINKING 2.0 TBA RTBA Doser J C
84152 6ALC 412 ENTREPRENEURIAL THINKING 2.0 TBA RTBA Doser J
ENTREPRENEURIAL THINKING (Arts Leadership Certificate CORE Course)
ONLINE VERSION (Face to face version will be taught in the spring semester)
Full Semester
Enrollment Limit: 20
An entrepreneurial person is one who transforms an idea into an enterprise that creates value. Musicians have been entrepreneurial thinkers throughout history, and continue
to be so. Entrepreneurial Thinking helps students to recognize the entrepreneurial potential they posses, appreciate the role of entrepreneurship within society and in their own
professional lives, and understand and implement the processes and skills of entrepreneurship. Students envision, develop, and present a Capstone Project in this course,
titled 'The Big Idea'. This is a project, initiative, product, business, or other entrepreneurial idea chosen by the student. Essential concepts covered in this class include idea
generation, assessing potential value and feasibility, market analysis, writing for business, developing marketing strategies, budgeting, types of business structures, funding,
contracts, legal issues, and best practices for effective presentations. This course may also serve as a resource for students wishing to submit applications to the IML Grant
and Mentorship Program, Eastman/ArtistShare Program, and Paul R. Judy Grant Program. (Cross-listed as JCM261 /84169)
Jim Doser is an educator, administrator, musician and entrepreneur, and the Director of Eastmans Institute for Music Leadership. He served as Music Administrator in the
Penfield Central Schools, taught at all levels of public school and at Eastman as Director of the Eastman New Jazz Ensemble and various undergraduate and graduate
classes. For nearly twenty years he was co-owner of Tritone Music, Inc., a company specializing in jazz instruction for adults. Mr. Doser holds degrees in Music Education,
Jazz and Contemporary Media and the Performers Certificate from Eastman, and is recipient of the Smithsonian Award in Education for his work on the Smithsonians
traveling exhibit The Jazz Age in Paris.
58484 6ALC 422 PREPARE FUTURE MUSIC FACULTY 2.0 T 1235 1425 ESM M9 Silvey P
PREPARING FUTURE MUSIC FACULTY
Full Semester
Enrollment Limit: 15
All musicians participate in various forms of music teaching and learning. For those graduate students who desire to teach in a college or community music school, even on a
part-time basis, this course will prepare you to teach effectively. During the course, you will begin to develop a teaching portfolio that will complement your performance
portfolio. You will also explore ways to organize music content for learning, assess your students prior musical knowledge and experience, communicate expectations to your
students, and speak knowledgeably about teaching with colleagues and administrators. RESTRICTED TO GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY. Graduate students wishing to take
this course for degree elective credit will need to pay for the course and should sign up for MUE 504 / CRN: 67920. Core course for Certificate in College/Community
Teaching.
Dr. Philip Silvey is Assistant Professor of Music Education at the Eastman School of Music. Prior to this, he taught at Baldwin-Wallace Conservatory, the University of
Maryland, and Hope College. He holds degrees from Houghton College, the Pennsylvania State University, and the University of Illinois. He was selected as a Lilly Teaching
Fellow at the University of Maryland.
58407 6ALC 231 A SINGER'S GUIDE 1.0 M 1335 1425 ESM 320 Cowdrick K C
Carr S

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
58496 6ALC 431 A SINGER'S GUIDE 1.0 M 1335 1425 ESM 320 Cowdrick K
Carr S
A SINGERS GUIDE TO THE PROFESSIONAL JOURNEY (formerly Voice Audition Synergism: Maximizing your winning potential!)
Full Semester
Enrollment Limit: 15
This 14 week, one hour course explores the many facets that help singers negotiate the beginning of their professional life. This
includes financial management, website construction, Young Artist and summer institute program information, and preparing your audition package (graduate school, concert,
oratorio and all forms of lyric theater). Classes include creating a completed package resume and head shots, application information- in addition to audition practice and
helping you nurture your musical and performing strengths. This class is open to all seniors and graduate students. Consent of the instructors and primary studio teacher are
required.
Kathryn Cowdrick, mezzo soprano, was trained as a voice and speech pathologist and began her career when awarded an Adler Fellowship with the San Francisco Opera.
She went on to appear with many international companies in the Rossini mezzo repertoire and now is a respected character actress for regional companies here in the US. Her
appearances this season include LE NOZZE DI FIGARO for Ft. Worth Opera, MADAMA BUTTERFLY for the Sugar Creek Festival and CENDRILLON for Kentucky Opera.
Stephen Carr's recent work as a stage director, performer, and educator has taken him across the United States, Europe, and Asia, with companies including Palm Beach
Opera, Washington National Opera, Center City Opera of Philadelphia, Opera North, and Ohio Light Opera. He has appeared in New York, touring, and regional productions of
RAGTIME, CABARET (London), JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR (European Tour), and THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL. He has served on the faculties of the Interlochen Arts
Institute, Senzoku Gakuen Conservatory in Tokyo, and the Eastman School of Music.
58579 6ALC 232 WIN AN ORCHESTRAL AUDITION 2.0 W 1235 1425 ESM 514 Mc Cormick G C
58500 6ALC 432 WIN AN ORCHESTRAL AUDITION 2.0 W 1235 1425 ESM 514 Mc Cormick G
HOW TO WIN AN ORCHESTRAL AUDITION (Arts Leadership Certificate CORE Course)
Full Semester
Enrollment Limit: 15
In this class we will learn how to develop both the internal and external skills to achieve optimal audition performance; Internal: a state of presence, allowing thought and action
to be calm, integrated, and accurate. External: the practical tools toward a clear and balanced preparation of instrument, materials, body, and logistical needs. Guest speakers
will include professionals in the areas of Eurythmics, Stress management, Health and Wellness, as well as resume and cover letter preparation. Live mock auditions will be
experienced as well.
Gaelen McCormick has been a member of the RPO bass section since 1995, and frequently performs with other ensembles around the country. She has been on the audition
committee for numerous RPO string openings, and has been the reviewer for NYO, NYO-2, and NRO festival auditions. Which is to say, she's "been there, done that" and
wants to help you succeed at winning auditions.
84586 6ALC 252 KEYS TO HEALTHY MUSIC I 2.0 TBA RTBA Callan-Harris S C
84590 6ALC 452 KEYS TO HEALTHY MUSIC I 2.0 TBA RTBA Callan-Harris S
KEYS TO HEALTHY MUSIC I - ONLINE
Full-semester
Enrollment Limit: 25
Keys to Healthy Music is now being offered as two separate courses. The fall course is online, provides the context for experiential aspects, and is a PREREQUISITE for the
spring course. The spring course will continue to be offered as a traditional classroom course.
This fall course introduces music students to relevant Anatomy and Physiology and Performing Arts Medicine resources. Students will assess their own posture and
ergonomics, as well as lifestyle considerations that put them at risk for a performance- related injury. Students will explore performance anxiety and ways of transforming it into
performance enhancement through healthy practice habits. Students will develop a vocabulary and basic comprehension skills of health and wellness strategies for musicians.
Students will learn to interpret how elements of performing arts medicine affect their music making directly, and develop a personal health regiment that will allow them to
synthesize new practice habits for lifelong music making.
Susanne Callan-Harris, M.S., P.T. is the chief Physical Therapist for University Health Services and specializes in Performing Arts Medicine.
58421 6ALC 280 ARTS LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP 1.0 TBA RTBA Scatterday L A
58525 6ALC 480 ARTS LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP 1.0 TBA RTBA Scatterday L A
ARTS LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP
Full Semester
Enrollment Limit: No limit
Open to Arts Leadership Program (ALP) certificate candidates only, the Catherine Filene Shouse Arts Leadership Program internship places ALP certificate candidates in
internships designed to expose them to extra-musical tools and information that can only be learned in practical, real world settings. Benefits to the student include the
cultivation of self-management skills and an awareness of the current climate for the arts in America. In addition to helping prepare our students to function in the real world,
the internship program also contributes to the Eastman Schools focus on the community by supplying local, national and international arts organizations with high quality
interns. Limited to 2 credits maximum towards certificate requirement.

Chamber Music
62955 6CHB 181 INTRO WOODWIND QUINTET SEM 1.0 TBA ESM 331 Harrow A P
63318 6CHB 181 INTRO STRING QUARTET SEM 1.0 T 1235 1325 ESM 209 Ying J P
62961 6CHB 277 BAROQUE CHAMBER MUSIC 1.0 R 1835 2025 ESM 404 Thielmann C
62976 6CHB 281 CHAMBER MUSIC I: BRASS 1.0 TR 1535 1725 ANNEX 709 Prosser D
62987 6CHB 281 CHAMBER MUSIC I: DUO PIANO 1.0 M 1235 1425 ESM 442 Freer E A
62993 6CHB 281 CHAMBER MUSIC I: GUITAR 1.0 WR 1730 2000 ESM 442 Goluses N
63002 6CHB 281 CHAMBER MUSIC I: HARP 1.0 TBA ESM 204 Bride K
63017 6CHB 281 CHAMBER MUSIC I: INTENSIVE 1.0 R 1535 1725 ESM 305 Ying J A
63026 6CHB 281 CHAMBER MUSIC I: ORG/HARPSI 1.0 TBA ESM 425 Bellotti E
63034 6CHB 281 CHAMBER MUSIC I: PIANO 1.0 TR 1535 1725 ESM 332 Ying J
63043 6CHB 281 CHAMBER MUSIC I: SAXOPHONE 1.0 TBA EEW 311 Lin C
63051 6CHB 281 CHAMBER MUSIC I: STRINGS 1.0 TR 1535 1725 ESM 332 Ying J
63065 6CHB 281 CHAMBER MUSIC I: TRUMPET 1.0 TR 1535 1725 ANNEX 709 Prosser D
63305 6CHB 281 CHAMBER MUSIC I: WOODWINDS 1.0 TBA ESM 331 Harrow A
63292 6CHB 401 INSTRUMENTAL SONATA & DUO RE 2.0 W 1035 1225 ESM HHH Barr J A
63078 6CHB 480 CHAMBER MUSIC I: BAROQUE R 1835 2025 ESM 404 Thielmann C A
63080 6CHB 480 CHAMBER MUSIC I: BRASS TR 1535 1725 ANNEX 709 Prosser D A

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
63099 6CHB 480 CHAMBER MUSIC I: DUO PIANO M 1235 1425 ESM 442 Freer E A
63103 6CHB 480 CHAMBER MUSIC I:GRAD SEMINAR R 1535 1725 ESM 442 Freer E A
63112 6CHB 480 CHAMBER MUSIC I: GUITAR WR 1730 2000 ESM 442 Goluses N A
63129 6CHB 480 CHAMBER MUSIC I: HARP TBA ESM 204 Bride K A
63130 6CHB 480 CHAMBER MUSIC I: ORG/HARPSI TBA ESM 425 Bellotti E A
63214 6CHB 480 CHAMBER MUSIC I:PIANO/STRING TBA ESM 332 Ying J A
63223 6CHB 480 CHAMBER MUSIC I: SAXOPHONE TBA EEW 311 Lin C A
63237 6CHB 480 CHAMBER MUSIC I: TRUMPET TR 1535 1725 ANNEX 709 Prosser D A
63285 6CHB 480 CHAMBER MUSIC I: WOODWINDS TBA ESM 331 Harrow A A
63148 6CHB 481 CHAMBER MUSIC I: BRASS 1.0 TR 1535 1725 ANNEX 709 Prosser D
63156 6CHB 481 CHAMBER MUSIC I: DUO PIANO 1.0 M 1235 1425 ESM 442 Freer E A
63167 6CHB 481 CHAMBER MUSIC I:GRAD SEMINAR 1.0 R 1535 1725 ESM 442 Freer E
63175 6CHB 481 CHAMBER MUSIC I: GUITAR 1.0 WR 1730 2000 ESM 442 Goluses N
63181 6CHB 481 CHAMBER MUSIC I: HARP 1.0 TBA ESM 204 Bride K
63194 6CHB 481 CHAMBER MUSIC I: ORG/HARPSI 1.0 TBA ESM 425 Bellotti E
63209 6CHB 481 CHAMBER MUSIC I: PIANO 1.0 TR 1535 1725 ESM 332 Ying J
63246 6CHB 481 CHAMBER MUSIC I: SAXOPHONE 1.0 TBA EEW 311 Lin C
63258 6CHB 481 CHAMBER MUSIC I: STRINGS 1.0 TR 1535 1725 ESM 332 Ying J
63260 6CHB 481 CHAMBER MUSIC I: TRUMPET 1.0 TR 1535 1725 ANNEX 709 Prosser D
63271 6CHB 481 CHAMBER MUSIC I: WOODWINDS 1.0 TBA ESM 331 Harrow A A

Composition
63706 6CMP 101 FIRST YEAR MAJOR I 3.0 TBA ESM 434 Staff U 3
63439 6CMP 103 SECOND YEAR MAJOR I 3.0 TBA ESM 434 Staff U 3
63442 6CMP 201 THIRD YEAR MAJOR I 3.0 TBA ESM 434 Staff U 3
63450 6CMP 203 FOURTH YEAR MAJOR I 3.0 TBA ESM 434 Staff U 3
63693 6CMP 221 COMP FOR NON-MAJORS I 2.0 M 0835 1025 ET 603 Staff U E
84116 6CMP 221 COMPOSITION FOR NON-MAJORS I 2.0 W 0835 1025 ET 603 Staff U E
63473 6CMP 223 COMP FOR NON-MAJORS III 2.0 TBA ESM 434 Staff U E
63496 6CMP 225 INTRO TO COMPUTER MUSIC I 3.0 R 1335 1525 ESM 514 Schneller O A
63500 6CMP 240 COMPUTER ENGRAVING/CALLIGRAP 2.0 W 1035 1125 ESM 514 Staff U
F 1135 1225 EC 103
63511 6CMP 244 CHORAL ARRANGING 2.0 F 0835 1025 MSH 221 Mcclure G
63525 6CMP 251 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRATION 2.0 T 1535 1725 ANNEX 710 Liptak D A
63687 6CMP 291 COMPOSITION SYMPOSIUM 1.0 R 1535 1700 ESM 209 Staff U
63533 6CMP 293 COMPOSITION SYMPOSIUM 1.0 R 1535 1700 ESM 209 Staff U
63544 6CMP 295 COMPOSITION SYMPOSIUM 1.0 R 1535 1700 ESM 209 Staff U
63557 6CMP 297 COMPOSITION SYMPOSIUM 1.0 R 1535 1700 ESM 209 Staff U
63676 6CMP 401 ADVANCED COMPOSITION I 3.0 TBA ESM 434 Staff U 3
63566 6CMP 421 ADVANCED COMPUTER MUSIC I 3.0 T 1335 1525 ESM 514 Schneller O A
63579 6CMP 440 COMPUTER ENGRAVING/CALLIGRAP 2.0 W 1035 1125 ESM 514 Staff U
F 1135 1225 EC 103
63582 6CMP 491 COMPOSITION SYMPOSIUM 1.0 R 1535 1700 ESM 209 Staff U
63661 6CMP 493 COMPOSITION SYMPOSIUM 1.0 R 1535 1700 ESM 209 Staff U
63598 6CMP 495 MA THESIS TBA ESM 434 Staff U
63604 6CMP 496 MM THESIS TBA ESM 434 Staff U
63610 6CMP 501 ADVANCED COMPOSITION III 3.0 TBA ESM 434 Staff U 3
63628 6CMP 595 PHD DISSERTATION PROJECT TBA ESM 434 Staff U

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
63632 6CMP 596 DMA DISSERTATION PROJECT TBA ESM 434 Staff U

Conducting
63719 6CND 211 BASIC CONDUCTING I 2.0 T 1235 1325 EEW 415 Scatterday M
63722 6CND 211 BASIC CONDUCTING I LAB TBA RTBA Scatterday M
63735 6CND 213 INTERMED CONDUCTING I: INSTR 2.0 T 1335 1525 ESM 209 Lubman B A
63741 6CND 215 ADVANCED CONDUCTING I: INSTR 2.0 T 1535 1725 ESM 209 Lubman B A
63753 6CND 223 ADV CONDUCTING I: CHORAL 2.0 T 1335 1525 ANNEX 902 Weinert W
81584 6CND 231 CHORAL LITERATURE I 2.0 R 0935 1125 NSL 308 Weinert W
63890 6CND 411 BASIC CONDUCTING I 2.0 T 1235 1325 EEW 415 Scatterday M
63901 6CND 411 BASIC CONDUCTING I LAB TBA RTBA Scatterday M
63916 6CND 413 INTERMED CONDUCTING I: INSTR 2.0 T 1335 1525 ESM 209 Lubman B A
64037 6CND 415 ADVANCED CONDUCTING I: INSTR 2.0 T 1535 1725 ESM 209 Lubman B A
64023 6CND 423 ADV CONDUCTING I: CHORAL 2.0 T 1335 1525 ANNEX 902 Weinert W
81596 6CND 431 GRAD CHORAL LITERATURE I 2.0 R 0935 1125 NSL 308 Weinert W
63764 6CND 441 COLLOQUY IN CONDUCTING 0.5 TBA OSL 104 Varon N
64014 6CND 443 COLLOQUY IN CONDUCTING 0.5 TBA OSL 104 Varon N
63808 6CND 461 REHEARSAL TECHNIQUES I 2.0 T 1535 1725 ESM 120 Varon N 3
WF 1135 1300 OSL 101
63813 6CND 481 ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING 3.0 TBA RTBA Lubman B 3
64009 6CND 481 ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING 3.0 T 1535 1725 ESM 120 Varon N 3
WF 1135 1300 OSL 101
63940 6CND 483 ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING 3.0 TBA RTBA Lubman B
63995 6CND 483 ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING 3.0 T 1535 1725 ESM 120 Varon N 3
WF 1135 1300 OSL 101
63824 6CND 523 ADV CONDUCTING I: CHORAL 2.0 T 1335 1525 ANNEX 902 Weinert W
63831 6CND 541 DMA CHORAL CONDUCTING I 4.0 TBA ANNEX 606 Weinert W
63845 6CND 541 DMA ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING I 4.0 TBA RTBA Lubman B
63983 6CND 541 DMA ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING I 4.0 TBA OSL 104 Varon N
64046 6CND 541 DMA WIND CONDUCTING I 4.0 TBA EEW 312 Scatterday M
63859 6CND 542 DMA CHORAL CONDUCTING II 4.0 TBA ANNEX 606 Weinert W
63862 6CND 542 DMA ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING II 4.0 TBA RTBA Lubman B
63974 6CND 542 DMA ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING II 4.0 TBA OSL 104 Varon N
81602 6CND 542 DMA WIND CONDUCTING II 4.0 TBA EEW 312 Scatterday M
63877 6CND 543 DMA CHORAL CONDUCTING III 4.0 TBA ANNEX 606 Weinert W
63952 6CND 543 DMA ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTNG III 4.0 TBA RTBA Lubman B
63969 6CND 543 DMA ORCHESTRAL CONDUCT III 4.0 TBA OSL 104 Varon N
81617 6CND 543 DMA WIND CONDUCTING III 4.0 TBA EEW 312 Scatterday M
63770 6CND 544 DMA CHORAL CONDUCTING IV 4.0 TBA ANNEX 606 Weinert W
63788 6CND 544 DMA ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING IV 4.0 TBA RTBA Lubman B
63886 6CND 544 DMA ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING IV 4.0 TBA OSL 104 Varon N
81626 6CND 544 DMA WIND CONDUCTING IV 4.0 TBA EEW 312 Scatterday M
63797 6CND 596 DMA DISSERTATION PROJECT TBA EEW 312 Scatterday M

Eastman Immersion
64106 6EI 090 MUSIC LITERATURE I TBA RTBA Staff U A
64119 6EI 092 MUSIC THEORY I TBA RTBA Staff U A

Eastman Initiatives Curriculum


64122 6EIC 090 STUDENT SUCCESS STRATEGIES TBA RTBA Hain J A

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
84349 6EIC 100 CROSS-CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING 1.0 TBA RTBA Semenow B A
Cross-Cultural Understanding: Students will study community and cultural norms in the U.S. and compare cultures through readings, reflection, and interactive activities. The
course will emphasize practices that will lead to academic and social success at the Eastman School of Music. Designed for international students, this class will be taken
during first semester of study.
64141 6EIC 101 EASTMAN COLLOQUIUM 1.0 T 1035 1125 EEW HATCH Hain J P
64153 6EIC 251 SENIOR PROJECT BM/MUA 3.0 TBA ESM 210 Vandemark J D

Ensemble
64217 6ENS 100 LARGE INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE 2.0 MWF 1335 1525 RTBA Scatterday M K
64226 6ENS 120 CHORALE 2.0 MWF 1335 1445 ESM 120 Weinert W
64781 6ENS 120A REP SINGERS 1.0 MW 1535 1635 ESM 120 Weinert W
64234 6ENS 120B ERC 1.0 T 1930 2145 RLUTH CHRC Weinert W
64775 6ENS 120C WOMEN'S CHORUS 1.0 R 1830 2030 LATT 201 Silvey P
64243 6ENS 200 ADV INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE 2.0 MWF 1535 1725 RTBA Scatterday M B
64251 6ENS 207 COLLEGIUM MUSICUM I 1.0 M 1835 2025 ESM 404 Odette P
64265 6ENS 215 WEST AFRICAN DRUMMING ADV 1.0 W 1900 2030 STRNG LOWE Bangoura K A
64756 6ENS 215 WEST AFRICAN DRUMMING BEG 1.0 W 2030 2200 STRNG LOWE Bangoura K
64767 6ENS 215 GAMELAN ENSEMBLE 1.0 S 1500 1730 ET 12 Staff U
64278 6ENS 216 INTRODUCTORY MBIRA ENSEMBLE 1.0 M 1830 2000 ET 12 West G
64280 6ENS 217 ADVANCED MBIRA ENSEMBLE 1.0 U 1330 1500 ET 12 Kyker J A
64299 6ENS 242 TROMBONE CHOIR 1.0 R 1535 1725 ANNEX 902 Zalkind L
64300 6ENS 243 TUBA MIRUM 1.0 W 2100 2300 ESM 120 Harry D
64311 6ENS 244 BRASS GUILD 1.0 R 1735 1925 ANNEX 902 Thompson J
64325 6ENS 245 HORN CHOIR 1.0 T 1735 1925 ESM 120 Kurau W
64333 6ENS 246 EASTMAN SAXOPHONE PROJECT 1.0 T 1430 1630 EEW 415 Lin C A
R 1335 1525 ANNEX 902
64344 6ENS 251 ORCHESTRAL REP: CELLO 2.0 R 1335 1525 ESM 404 Kemp K
64357 6ENS 251 ORCHESTRAL REP: CELLO 2.0 TBA RTBA Kim A
64366 6ENS 251 ORCHESTRAL REP: LOW BRASS 2.0 T 1535 1725 ANNEX 902 Zalkind L A
64379 6ENS 251 ORCHESTRAL REP: VIOLA 2.0 T 1700 1900 ESM 514 Matson M
64621 6ENS 251 ORCHESTRAL REP: VIOLA 2.0 R 1700 1900 ESM 209 Matson M
64639 6ENS 251 ORCHESTRAL REP: VIOLIN 2.0 T 1535 1725 ESM 404 Athayde J
64730 6ENS 251 ORCHESTRAL REP: VIOLIN 2.0 W 1335 1525 ESM 320 Athayde J
64748 6ENS 251 ORCHESTRAL REP: VIOLIN 2.0 F 1335 1525 ESM 320 Athayde J
64382 6ENS 260 PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 1.0 M 1900 2100 EEW 415 Burritt M
64398 6ENS 260 PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 1.0 T 1900 2100 EEW 415 Burritt M
64729 6ENS 260 PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 1.0 F 0935 1125 EEW 415 Burritt M
64404 6ENS 400 GRAD ENSEMBLE:LOWER ROTATION 1.0 MWF 1335 1525 RTBA Scatterday M A
64712 6ENS 400 GRAD ENSEMBLE:UPPER ROTATION 1.0 MWF 1535 1725 RTBA Scatterday M
64410 6ENS 400J GRAD JAZZ ENSMBLE: SEC I 1.0 TR 1235 1425 ESM 120 Dobbins W
64428 6ENS 400J GRAD NEW JAZZ ENSMBLE:SEC II 1.0 TR 1235 1425 MSH 1 Rivello D
64703 6ENS 400J GRAD JAZZ LAB BAND: SEC III 1.0 MW 1830 2030 ESM 120 Thompson R
64432 6ENS 401 GRAD COLLEGIUM MUSICUM I M 1835 2025 ESM 404 Odette P A
64684 6ENS 401 GRADUATE GAMELAN ENSEMBLE S 1500 1730 ET 12 Staff U A
64696 6ENS 401 GRADUATE ENSEMBLE MWF 1535 1725 RTBA Scatterday M A
64794 6ENS 401 GRAD BRASS GUILD R 1735 1925 ANNEX 902 Thompson J A
64449 6ENS 401J GRAD JAZZ ENSMBLE: SEC I TR 1235 1425 ESM 120 Dobbins W A
64455 6ENS 401J GRAD NEW JAZZ ENSMBLE:SEC II TR 1235 1425 MSH 1 Rivello D A
64673 6ENS 401J GRAD JAZZ LAB BAND: SECT III MW 1830 2030 ESM 120 Thompson R A

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
64615 6ENS 407 GRAD COLLEGIUM MUSICUM I 1.0 M 1835 2025 ESM 404 Odette P
64461 6ENS 415 GAMELAN ENSEMBLE 1.0 S 1500 1730 ET 12 Staff U
64476 6ENS 416 INTRODUCTORY MBIRA ENSEMBLE 1.0 M 1830 2000 ET 12 West G
64487 6ENS 417 ADVANCED MBIRA ENSEMBLE 1.0 U 1330 1500 ET 12 Kyker J A
64493 6ENS 420 GRADUATE CHORALE 2.0 MWF 1335 1445 ESM 120 Weinert W
64505 6ENS 420A GRADUATE REP SINGERS 1.0 MW 1535 1635 ESM 120 Weinert W
64668 6ENS 420B GRADUATE ERC 1.0 T 1930 2145 RLUTH CHRC Weinert W
64518 6ENS 420C GRADUATE WOMEN'S CHORUS 1.0 R 1845 2045 LATT 201 Silvey P
64520 6ENS 421 GRADUATE CHORALE MWF 1335 1445 ESM 120 Weinert W 4
64536 6ENS 421A GRADUATE REP SINGERS MW 1535 1635 ESM 120 Weinert W 4
64547 6ENS 421B GRADUATE ERC T 1930 2145 RLUTH CHRC Weinert W 4
64554 6ENS 421C GRADUATE WOMEN'S CHORUS R 1845 2045 LATT 201 Silvey P 4
81762 6ENS 442 GRAD TROMBONE CHOIR 1.0 R 1535 1725 ANNEX 902 Zalkind L
64642 6ENS 446 GRAD ESM SAXOPHONE PROJECT 1.0 T 1430 1630 EEW 415 Lin C A
R 1335 1525 ANNEX 902
64563 6ENS 451 GRAD ORCHESTRAL REP: CELLO 2.0 F 1235 1425 ANNEX 707 Kemp K
64572 6ENS 451 GRAD ORCHESTRL REP:LOW BRASS 2.0 T 1535 1725 ANNEX 902 Zalkind L A
64589 6ENS 451 GRAD ORCHESTRAL REP: VIOLA 2.0 F 0935 1125 ANNEX 710 Matson M
64650 6ENS 451 GRAD ORCHESTRAL REP: VIOLIN 2.0 TBA RTBA Athayde J
64607 6ENS 460 GRAD PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 1.0 TBA EEW 415 Burritt M
64591 6ENS 470 CONDUCTING ENSEMBLE T 1535 1725 ESM 120 Zager K

Ethnomusicology
65127 6ETH 495 MA THESIS TBA RTBA Staff U

Humanities Department
Art History
83701 6AH 213 HISTORY OF WESTERN ART 3.0 TR 1000 1115 ET 603 Durkin L
History of Western Art: The visual arts - across an ever-widening variety of media - testify to the universal human urge to create and communicate in shared pictorial
languages. This fast-paced course introduces the basics of art appreciation and examines the dynamic development of art in Europe and the US from its roots in the
Renaissance to the present. As we explore the changes in visual art, we will cross-reference the broader cultural context of different styles by considering contemporary
history, literature and music.
English
64164 6ENG 115 ENGLISH DICTION:FRESHMEN/VCE 1.0 MW 1145 1230 OSL 204 Garver B
83752 6ENG 242 LYRIC POETRY 3.0 MWF 1135 1225 ET 412 Baldo J
Lyric Poetry: A study of the major forms of lyric poetry, exploring poems from several historical periods (Renaissance, neo-classical, romantic, modern, and postmodern) and
paying particular attention to modern and contemporary reinterpretations of traditional forms like the haiku, renga, ode, elegy, sonnet, ballad, sestina, pantoum, and villanelle.
From time to time, we will remind ourselves of lyric poetrys historical associations with music, and I will encourage students to explore musical settings of the poetry we read.
83716 6ENG 262 FILMS OF ALFRED HITCHCOCK 3.0 MWF 1235 1325 ET 412 Baldo J
W 1800 2130 ET 412
Films of Alfred Hitchcock: The films of Alfred Hitchcock are among those that can hold our fascination after many viewings. Dan Auiler, author of a book on the making of
Vertigo, has written, As Ive experienced with Shakespeare, Hitchcocks work reflects something of the viewer so that the film appears to change when watched from a
different age. Whether youve seen virtually all of Hitchcock films before or whether youve only heard of the famous director, I hope the films we watch and discuss this
semester will hold your interest for a lifetime and prompt a sustained interest in film history. We will view and study fourteen of Hitchcocks films in the context of the life and
times of their director. We will consider his early work in Germany and England before moving on to his long career in Hollywood and his attempts to interpret his newly
adopted country cinematically.
64197 6ENG 281 VERSATILE MUSICIAN 3.0 TR 1000 1115 ET 412 Uselmann S A
The Versatile Musician: Professional Writing and Speaking Musicians in the 21st century must be familiar with a wide variety of rhetorical skills, whether they are performers,
scholars, composers, teachers, or ambassadors to the broader community. This course explores the culture of professionalism in the United States, and how different contexts
influence professional and academic discussions of music, with a particular emphasis on the resources offered in and around Eastman. Speaking and writing assignments will
focus on rhetorical skills involved in academic work, collaboration, concerts, lectures, and other events in the community. The course is useful for advanced non-native
speakers of English. Students interested in developing professional skills in an intercultural environment will also find this course useful. Instructor permission required.
English As A Second Language
64816 6ESL 103 ESL FOR ACADEMIC STUDIES I 3.0 TR 1335 1450 MC 1 Uselmann S A
64801 6ESL 103G ESL FOR ACADEMIC STUDIES I 3.0 TR 1335 1450 MC 1 Uselmann S A

French
65284 6FR 101 ELEMENTARY FRENCH 4.0 MW 1035 1125 ESM 209 Scheie T 4
F 1035 1210 ESM 209
65296 6FR 101G GRAD ELEM FRENCH REVIEW 1.0 MW 1035 1125 ESM 209 Scheie T A
F 1035 1210 ESM 209

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
65349 6FR 101 ELEMENTARY FRENCH 4.0 MW 1035 1125 ANNEX 707 Couderc V 4
F 1035 1210 ANNEX 707
65304 6FR 101G GRAD ELEM FRENCH REVIEW 1.0 MW 1035 1125 ANNEX 707 Couderc V A
F 1035 1210 ANNEX 707
65310 6FR 115 FRENCH DICTION 1.0 MW 1135 1225 ESM 209 Hess B
65328 6FR 201 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 3.0 MWF 1235 1325 ESM 209 Couderc V
65332 6FR 201G GRAD INTERMED FRENCH 1.0 MWF 1235 1325 ESM 209 Couderc V
83738 6FR 209 FRENCH FOR READING KNOWLEDGE 3.0 M 1730 2000 ET 412 Scheie T
83740 6FR 209G GRAD FRENCH READING KNOWLEDGE 1.0 M 1730 2000 ET 412 Scheie T A
French for Reading Knowledge: Intensive study of French for reading knowledge and research purposes. Readings include academic writing on musical and non-musical
topics. Focus on grammar and structure. Appropriate for students with no previous knowledge of the language. Fulfills PhD language requirement for some fields. Open to
undergraduates. Taught in English. Not recommended for students seeking to develop speaking and writing skills in French.
Film Studies
65355 6FS 231 INTRO TO ITALIAN CINEMA 3.0 TR 1335 1450 ET 412 Staff U
Introduction to Italian Cinema (in English) The course designed to provide an overview of the reception of the Italian and European Renaissance in Italian cinema from the
1970s to the present day. The course is chronologically organized and moves from the late Middle Ages to the late Renaissance. We will examine, among others, films by Pier
Paolo Pasolini, Roberto Rossellini, Roberto Benigni and Massimo Troisi, Ermanno Olmi, Matteo Garrone. The course will address some crucial issues in European history: the
role of women in Renaissance culture; war and religion; magic and science. Films will be in Italian with English subtitles. All readings and class discussions will be in English.
No previous knowledge of Italian language/culture is necessary.
83727 6FS 262 FILMS OF ALFRED HITCHCOCK 3.0 MWF 1235 1325 ET 412 Baldo J
W 1800 2130 ET 412
Films of Alfred Hitchcock: The films of Alfred Hitchcock are among those that can hold our fascination after many viewings. Dan Auiler, author of a book on the making of
Vertigo, has written, As Ive experienced with Shakespeare, Hitchcocks work reflects something of the viewer so that the film appears to change when watched from a
different age. Whether youve seen virtually all of Hitchcock films before or whether youve only heard of the famous director, I hope the films we watch and discuss this
semester will hold your interest for a lifetime and prompt a sustained interest in film history. We will view and study fourteen of Hitchcocks films in the context of the life and
times of their director. We will consider his early work in Germany and England before moving on to his long career in Hollywood and his attempts to interpret his newly
adopted country cinematically.
Freshman Writing Seminar
65387 6FWS 121 MIGRATION AND THE MODERN CITY 3.0 MWF 0835 0925 ESM 209 Staff U
Migration and the Modern City: Within the past twenty yearsindeed, within the lifetime of every person in this classroomhumans have become a predominantly urban
species. That is to say, more of us, worldwide, live in cities than do not. While many of us (especially in the United States) were born in cities, or near enough to them, this has
not been the case elsewhere in the world. In Africa, in India and China, in Brazil, and many other parts of the world, the growth of cities has been aided by extensive migration
from well beyond the urban limits. As concepts, migration and the modern city are inseparableone cannot exist without the other. In this course, we will study that relationship
and in the process develop your writing and critical thinking skills in a way that prepares you to consider the experience of the individual migrant faced with urban society.
65409 6FWS 121 ARTISTIC CROSSOVER 3.0 MWF 0835 0925 ESM 320 Staff U
Artistic Crossover: Igor Stravinsky, Virginia Woolf, Joseph Cornell, Beyonc these artists excel(led) in their artistic medium, but also redefine(d) that medium. In this class,
we will read, listen to, and look closely at pieces that blend or transcend the conventional boundaries of the sister arts: visual art, music, and literature. What are the differences
between the arts? What happens when one form borrows from, or imitates, another? Can one medium more faithfully depict an aspect of the human experience than another?
In addressing these questions, we will learn to think critically, forge our own arguments, and marshal them in clear and cohesive prose.
65414 6FWS 121 THE POLITICS OF PERSONHOOD 3.0 MWF 0835 0925 ESM 404 Mackin G
The Politics of Personhood: In the contemporary political world, most of us would say that all persons deserve some basic level of respect. Once someone is included in the
category of personhood, s/he is granted moral, political, and legal protections. Many critics argue, however, that the category of personhood has been and continues to be
problematic. Historically and in the contemporary world, the argument goes, "personhood" is typically defined in different ways, and many persons are excluded from the moral,
political, and legal protections that supposedly attach to all. This course will draw upon political philosophy, literature, and the writings of political activists in order to examine
the ways in which conceptions of the person are created and contested. Readings will include canonical political philosophers (such as Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau), as well
as more recent theorists and activists and such as Frederick Douglass and Charles Mills.
65423 6FWS 121 HARLEM RENAISSANCE & BLACK 3.0 MWF 0835 0925 MC 1 Staff U
Prohibition, Prostitution, and Jazz: The Harlem Renaissance and Black Identity: What does it mean to be American? More specifically, what does it mean to be a black
American? In this FWS 121 course, we will begin to answer these questions through an examination of the Harlem Renaissance, a period of artistic and intellectual growth
within the African American community. Works studied will include selections of literature, music, and art from artists of the Harlem Renaissance era (1920s-1930s), including
Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larson, W.E.B. DuBois, and James Weldon Johnson. We will also survey contemporary African
American art forms in an attempt to understand how the Harlem Renaissance continues to influence African American culture. Special focus will be given to the following
topics: African American identity, migration, jazz, and the divergence within the black community that resulted from this movement.
65437 6FWS 121 ART AND POLITICS 3.0 MWF 0835 0925 MC 320 Pedersen J
Art and Politics: 2017 marks the centennial of womens right to vote in New York State, the American entry into World War I, and the Russian Revolution. This course will
explore the significance of these events through a combination of poetry, painting, fiction, film, opera, and other art forms. We will visit the Memorial Art Gallery, sample the
Rochester Fringe Festival, screen one or more films at the Dryden Theatre, and attend the premiere of Mrs. President at the Rochester Lyric Opera. Students will finish the
semester by completing individual independent projects on the connections between art and politics in the life, world, and work of the poet, painter, writer, director, composer,
or other creative individual of their choice.
65446 6FWS 121 FANTASTIC CITIES 3.0 MWF 0835 0925 OSL 204 Staff U
Fantastic Cities: A recurring trope in literature is the city within the city: the hidden, or lost, worlds that exist in tandem with the real world we live in. In this course students
will read three books on this themeNeil Gaimans Neverwhere, China Mivilles Kraken, and Ben Aaronovitchs Midnight Riot. For each text, we will explore both why and
how each uses the theme, with a particular focus on how the hidden worlds critique the modern world.
65458 6FWS 121 PORTRAITS OF THE ARTIST 3.0 MWF 0935 1025 ESM 209 Baldo J
Portraits of the Artist: Focusing on conflicting ways in which the arts and artists have been portrayed in literature, this course will encourage students to explore the relation of
their own artistic vocation to the culture at large. Readings include novels and short stories by authors such as E. T. A. Hoffmann, James Joyce, Frank Conroy, and James
Baldwin. Students will begin by sketching in prose their own portrait of an artist: that is, a profile of a musician (instrumentalist, singer, composer, or conductor) whom they will
interview, after reading skillfully written profiles from The New Yorker, The New York Times, and elsewhere.
65471 6FWS 121 ARTISTIC CROSSOVER 3.0 MWF 0935 1025 ESM 320 Staff U
Artistic Crossover: Igor Stravinsky, Virginia Woolf, Joseph Cornell, Beyonc these artists excel(led) in their artistic medium, but also redefine(d) that medium. In this class,
we will read, listen to, and look closely at pieces that blend or transcend the conventional boundaries of the sister arts: visual art, music, and literature. What are the differences
between the arts? What happens when one form borrows from, or imitates, another? Can one medium more faithfully depict an aspect of the human experience than another?
In addressing these questions, we will learn to think critically, forge our own arguments, and marshal them in clear and cohesive prose.

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
65485 6FWS 121 THE POLITICS OF PERSONHOOD 3.0 MWF 0935 1025 ESM 404 Mackin G
The Politics of Personhood: In the contemporary political world, most of us would say that all persons deserve some basic level of respect. Once someone is included in the
category of personhood, s/he is granted moral, political, and legal protections. Many critics argue, however, that the category of personhood has been and continues to be
problematic. Historically and in the contemporary world, the argument goes, "personhood" is typically defined in different ways, and many persons are excluded from the moral,
political, and legal protections that supposedly attach to all. This course will draw upon political philosophy, literature, and the writings of political activists in order to examine
the ways in which conceptions of the person are created and contested. Readings will include canonical political philosophers (such as Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau), as well
as more recent theorists and activists and such as Frederick Douglass and Charles Mills.
65492 6FWS 121 HARLEM RENAISSANCE & BLACK 3.0 MWF 0935 1025 MC 1 Staff U
Prohibition, Prostitution, and Jazz: The Harlem Renaissance and Black Identity: What does it mean to be American? More specifically, what does it mean to be a black
American? In this FWS 121 course, we will begin to answer these questions through an examination of the Harlem Renaissance, a period of artistic and intellectual growth
within the African American community. Works studied will include selections of literature, music, and art from artists of the Harlem Renaissance era (1920s-1930s), including
Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larson, W.E.B. DuBois, and James Weldon Johnson. We will also survey contemporary African
American art forms in an attempt to understand how the Harlem Renaissance continues to influence African American culture. Special focus will be given to the following
topics: African American identity, migration, jazz, and the divergence within the black community that resulted from this movement.
65508 6FWS 121 ART AND POLITICS 3.0 MWF 0935 1025 MC 320 Pedersen J
Art and Politics: 2017 marks the centennial of womens right to vote in New York State, the American entry into World War I, and the Russian Revolution. This course will
explore the significance of these events through a combination of poetry, painting, fiction, film, opera, and other art forms. We will visit the Memorial Art Gallery, sample the
Rochester Fringe Festival, screen one or more films at the Dryden Theatre, and attend the premiere of Mrs. President at the Rochester Lyric Opera. Students will finish the
semester by completing individual independent projects on the connections between art and politics in the life, world, and work of the poet, painter, writer, director, composer,
or other creative individual of their choice.
81651 6FWS 121 FANTASTIC CITIES 3.0 MWF 0935 1025 OSL 204 Staff U
Fantastic Cities: A recurring trope in literature is the city within the city: the hidden, or lost, worlds that exist in tandem with the real world we live in. In this course students
will read three books on this themeNeil Gaimans Neverwhere, China Mivilles Kraken, and Ben Aaronovitchs Midnight Riot. For each text, we will explore both why and
how each uses the theme, with a particular focus on how the hidden worlds critique the modern world.
German
65513 6GER 101 ELEMENTARY GERMAN 4.0 MWF 1035 1140 ESM 305 Staff U 4
65531 6GER 101G GRAD ELEMENTARY GERMAN REV 1.0 MWF 1035 1140 ESM 305 Staff U A
65524 6GER 101 ELEMENTARY GERMAN 4.0 MWF 1035 1140 ESM 404 Curren C 4
65545 6GER 101G GRAD ELEMENTARY GERMAN REV 1.0 MWF 1035 1140 ESM 305 Curren C A
65559 6GER 102 ELEMENTARY GERMAN 4.0 MWF 1200 1305 ESM 305 Staff U A
65562 6GER 102G GRAD ELEMENTARY GERMAN REV 1.0 MWF 1200 1305 ESM 305 Staff U A
65577 6GER 115 GERMAN DICTION 1.0 MWF 1150 1225 ESM 404 Curren C
65586 6GER 201 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 3.0 MWF 1235 1325 ESM 320 Staff U
65590 6GER 201G GRAD INTERMED GERMAN REVIEW 1.0 MWF 1235 1325 ESM 320 Staff U

History
65765 6HIS 281 HOLOCAUST:EVENT,HIST,MEMORY 3.0 MWF 1135 1225 MC 1 Staff U
Holocaust: Event, History, Memory: In the midst of the Second World War, under the auspices of the National Socialist regime in Germany, Germans along with their allies and
collaborators murdered roughly six million European Jews. This much is incontrovertible, but only in subsequent decades did this series of events become known as the
Holocaust. In this course we will cover not only the historical context and potential causes of the Holocaustfrom the long history of European anti-Jewish and antisemitic
violence to the specifics of National Socialist racial ideologyand the events themselvesthe persecution, ghettoization and eventually extermination of Jewish communities
across occupied Europebut also consider the long afterlife of this historical fact, including how the Holocaust has, in the past seven decades, become a critical episode in
both European and global history.
83803 6HIS 281 CULTURE AND CRISIS 3.0 MWF 1235 1325 MC 320 Pedersen J
Culture and Crisis: What do psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, novelist Virginia Woolf, and composer Dmitri Shostakovich all have in common? They all experienced the
combined crises of the First World War and the Russian Revolution, and they all responded by creating individual arguments and artworks that continue to speak to us today.
This course will focus on the complexities of their time as a way of thinking about the complexities of ours.
Humanities
83783 6HUM 281 HOLOCAUST:EVENT,HIST,MEMORY 3.0 MWF 1135 1225 MC 1 Staff U
Holocaust: Event, History, Memory: In the midst of the Second World War, under the auspices of the National Socialist regime in Germany, Germans along with their allies and
collaborators murdered roughly six million European Jews. This much is incontrovertible, but only in subsequent decades did this series of events become known as the
Holocaust. In this course we will cover not only the historical context and potential causes of the Holocaustfrom the long history of European anti-Jewish and antisemitic
violence to the specifics of National Socialist racial ideologyand the events themselvesthe persecution, ghettoization and eventually extermination of Jewish communities
across occupied Europebut also consider the long afterlife of this historical fact, including how the Holocaust has, in the past seven decades, become a critical episode in
both European and global history.
83812 6HUM 281 CULTURE AND CRISIS 3.0 MWF 1235 1325 MC 320 Pedersen J
Culture and Crisis: What do psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, novelist Virginia Woolf, and composer Dmitri Shostakovich all have in common? They all experienced the
combined crises of the First World War and the Russian Revolution, and they all responded by creating individual arguments and artworks that continue to speak to us today.
This course will focus on the complexities of their time as a way of thinking about the complexities of ours.
65929 6HUM 281 VERSATILE MUSICIAN 3.0 TR 1000 1115 ET 412 Uselmann S A
The Versatile Musician I: Professional Writing and Speaking Musicians in the 21st century must be familiar with a wide variety of rhetorical skills, whether they are performers,
scholars, composers, teachers, or ambassadors to the broader community. This course explores the culture of professionalism in the United States, and how different contexts
influence professional and academic discussions of music, with a particular emphasis on the resources offered in and around Eastman. Speaking and writing assignments will
focus on rhetorical skills involved in academic work, collaboration, concerts, lectures, and other events in the community. The course is useful for advanced non-native
speakers of English. Students interested in developing professional skills in an intercultural environment will also find this course useful. Instructor permission required.
65930 6HUM 283 CREATIVE CONVERGENCES 3.0 TR 1000 1115 ESM 320 Scheie T A
"Creative Convergences: The Arts in Conversation: This course provides students the opportunity to engage in independent research on a topic of their choice. Topics will
generally relate music to other art forms (theater, performance art, dance, film, digital media, etc.) or other disciplines (history, philosophy, anthropology, literature, language,
art history, etc.). Readings and discussion will focus on the convergence of music with other fields. Coursework includes a research dossier and a formal oral presentation.
Required for MUA majors. Open to all other students with permission of instructor.

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
Italian
65967 6IT 101 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I 4.0 MWF 1035 1140 OSL 204 Murano T 4
65981 6IT 101G GRAD ELEMENTARY ITALIAN REV 1.0 MWF 1035 1140 OSL 204 Murano T A
65975 6IT 101 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I 4.0 TR 1135 1315 ET 412 Staff U 4
65994 6IT 101G GRAD ELEMENTARY ITALIAN REV 1.0 TR 1135 1315 ET 412 Staff U A
83795 6IT 221 ITAL CONVERSATION/COMPOSITION 3.0 TR 1535 1650 ET 412 Staff U
Italian through Conversation & Composition: Advanced Italian course designed to improve students speaking and writing skills. The course aims at an intense review of Italian
grammar, syntax, and vocabulary through a full immersion journey in contemporary Italian culture in Italy and in the US. Students will develop their language and writing skills
while reading blogs, newspapers articles, novels, watching Italian TV shows and documentaries, travelling through the Italian peninsula and the US with journalist Beppe
Severgninis video journal and online material. Students should have completed two or more semesters of college level Italian courses.
66016 6IT 231 INTRO TO ITALIAN CINEMA 3.0 TR 1335 1450 ET 412 Staff U
Introduction to Italian Cinema (in English) The course designed to provide an overview of the reception of the Italian and European Renaissance in Italian cinema from the
1970s to the present day. The course is chronologically organized and moves from the late Middle Ages to the late Renaissance. We will examine, among others, films by Pier
Paolo Pasolini, Roberto Rossellini, Roberto Benigni and Massimo Troisi, Ermanno Olmi, Matteo Garrone. The course will address some crucial issues in European history: the
role of women in Renaissance culture; war and religion; magic and science. Films will be in Italian with English subtitles. All readings and class discussions will be in English.
No previous knowledge of Italian language/culture is necessary.
Philosophy
83774 6PHL 209 POWER, VIOLENCE & VIRTUE 3.0 MWF 1135 1225 ET 603 Mackin G
Power, Violence, and Virtue: Themes in early modern political thought: This course examines some of the core themes and concepts in early modern political thought, from
Machiavelli to Kant. Topics include the nature and origin of the state, the proper role of state violence, pluralism, the relationship between virtue and politics, and how one
should evaluate the legitimacy of a political order. Cross-listed as PSC 209.
Political Science
83769 6PSC 209 POWER, VIOLENCE & VIRTUE 3.0 MWF 1135 1225 ET 603 Mackin G
Power, Violence, and Virtue: Themes in early modern political thought: This course examines some of the core themes and concepts in early modern political thought, from
Machiavelli to Kant. Topics include the nature and origin of the state, the proper role of state violence, pluralism, the relationship between virtue and politics, and how one
should evaluate the legitimacy of a political order. Cross-listed as PHL 209.
Psychology
69528 6PSY 111 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 M 1730 2000 ESM 320 Tomczak T 3

Jazz Studies & Contemporary Media


66291 6JCM 119 BASIC JAZZ THEORY/AURAL SKIL 1.5 MWF 1035 1125 OSL 101 Staff U 3
66309 6JCM 151 JAZZ PERF WKSHP: NON JCM MAJ 1.0 T 1535 1725 ANNEX 624 Versace G
66314 6JCM 200 JAZZ ENSEMBLE: SECT I 1.0 TR 1235 1425 ESM 120 Dobbins W
66323 6JCM 200 NEW JAZZ ENSEMBLE: SECT II 1.0 TR 1235 1425 MSH 1 Rivello D
66337 6JCM 200 JAZZ LAB BAND: SECT III 1.0 MW 1830 2000 ESM 120 Thompson R
66346 6JCM 200 JAZZ WORKSHOP ENS: SECT IV 1.0 MW 1830 2000 ANNEX 902 Staff U
66855 6JCM 201 JAZZ THEORY/IMPROVISATION I 2.0 MW 0935 1025 ANNEX 624 Staff U
66358 6JCM 203 BASIC JAZZ BASS 1.0 R 0935 1025 ANNEX 624 Staff U
66360 6JCM 203 BASIC JAZZ BASS 1.0 R 1035 1125 ANNEX 624 Staff U
66371 6JCM 205 FUNCTIONAL JAZZ PIANO 1.0 M 1035 1125 ESM 443 Staff U 3
66849 6JCM 205 FUNCTIONAL JAZZ PIANO 1.0 F 1435 1525 ESM 443 Staff U 3
66385 6JCM 207 WOODWIND DOUBLING: FLUTE 1.0 TBA RTBA Harrow A 3
66392 6JCM 211 JAZZ COMPOSITION 3.0 TBA ANNEX 623 Dobbins W 3
66832 6JCM 213 JAZZ COMPOSITION 3.0 TBA ANNEX 623 Dobbins W 3
66828 6JCM 218 JAZZ PEDAGOGY 2.0 MW 1735 1825 ANNEX 624 Rivello D
66406 6JCM 223 JAZZ COMPOSITION/ARRANGE: I 2.0 TR 1535 1625 ANNEX 708 Dobbins W 3
66810 6JCM 225 JAZZ COMPOSITION/ARRANGE:III 2.0 TR 1635 1725 ANNEX 708 Dobbins W 3
66419 6JCM 230 JAZZ STYLE/LIT/ANALYSIS:BASS 1.0 M 1135 1225 ANNEX 624 Campbell J
66422 6JCM 230 JAZZ STYLE/LIT/ANLYSIS:PIANO 1.0 M 1135 1225 ANNEX 621 Versace G
66435 6JCM 230 JAZZ STYLE/LIT/ANALYSIS:DRUM 1.0 M 1135 1225 ANNEX 710 Thompson R
66441 6JCM 230 JAZZ STYLE/LIT/ANLYSIS:BRASS 1.0 M 1135 1225 OSL 101 Jenkins C
66796 6JCM 230 JAZZ STYLE/LIT/ANALYSIS:SAX 1.0 M 1135 1225 ESM 514 Staff U
66804 6JCM 230 JAZZ STYLE/LIT/ANALYIS: GTR 1.0 F 1135 1225 ANNEX 704 Sneider R
66453 6JCM 251 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:A 2.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 708 Versace G 3

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
66464 6JCM 251 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:B 2.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 624 Jenkins C 3
66470 6JCM 251 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:C 2.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 710 Campbell J 3
66488 6JCM 251 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:D 2.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 707 Terefenko D 3
66497 6JCM 251 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:E 2.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 708 Versace G 3
66784 6JCM 251 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:F 2.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 624 Jenkins C 3
66861 6JCM 251 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:G 2.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 710 Campbell J 3
66876 6JCM 251 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:H 2.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 707 Sneider R 3
84169 6JCM 261 ENTREPRENEURIAL THINKING 2.0 TBA RTBA Doser J
ENTREPRENEURIAL THINKING (Arts Leadership Certificate CORE Course)
ONLINE VERSION (Face to face version will be taught in the spring semester)
Full Semester
Enrollment Limit: 20
An entrepreneurial person is one who transforms an idea into an enterprise that creates value. Musicians have been entrepreneurial thinkers throughout history, and continue
to be so. Entrepreneurial Thinking helps students to recognize the entrepreneurial potential they posses, appreciate the role of entrepreneurship within society and in their own
professional lives, and understand and implement the processes and skills of entrepreneurship. Students envision, develop, and present a Capstone Project in this course,
titled 'The Big Idea'. This is a project, initiative, product, business, or other entrepreneurial idea chosen by the student. Essential concepts covered in this class include idea
generation, assessing potential value and feasibility, market analysis, writing for business, developing marketing strategies, budgeting, types of business structures, funding,
contracts, legal issues, and best practices for effective presentations. This course may also serve as a resource for students wishing to submit applications to the IML Grant
and Mentorship Program, Eastman/ArtistShare Program, and Paul R. Judy Grant Program.
66893 6JCM 291 JAZZ DEPARTMENT FORUM W 1135 1225 ESM 120 Campbell J
66503 6JCM 431 STUDIO ORCHESTRA ARRANGING 2.0 W 1535 1725 ANNEX 709 Dobbins W
66512 6JCM 451 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:A 1.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 708 Versace G 3
66529 6JCM 451 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:B 1.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 624 Jenkins C 3
66530 6JCM 451 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:C 1.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 710 Campbell J 3
66548 6JCM 451 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:D 1.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 707 Terefenko D 3
66556 6JCM 451 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:E 1.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 708 Versace G 3
66567 6JCM 451 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:F 1.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 624 Jenkins C 3
66575 6JCM 451 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:G 1.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 710 Campbell J 3
66887 6JCM 451 JAZZ PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP:H 1.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 707 Sneider R 3
66926 6JCM 456 MM MEDIA PROJECT TBA ANNEX 706 Rivello D
66773 6JCM 475 WRITING PROJ: CONTEMP MEDIA 3.0 TBA ESM 433 Rivello D A
66581 6JCM 483 ADV STUDIES: IMPROVISATION 4.0 TBA ESM 435 Sneider R A
66594 6JCM 483 ADV STUDIES: IMPROVISATION 4.0 TBA ESM 218 Jenkins C A
66608 6JCM 483 ADV STUDIES: IMPROVISATION 4.0 TBA EEW 314 Terefenko D A
66613 6JCM 483 ADV STUDIES: IMPROVISATION 4.0 TBA ESM 304 Campbell J A
66624 6JCM 483 ADV STUDIES: IMPROVISATION 4.0 TBA ANNEX 621 Versace G A
66631 6JCM 483 ADV STUDIES: IMPROVISATION 4.0 TBA ESM 433 Pillow C A
66917 6JCM 483 ADV STUDIES: IMPROVISATION 4.0 TBA ANNEX 623 Dobbins W A
66902 6JCM 485 MM WRITING PROJECTS: JAZZ 3.0 TBA ANNEX 623 Dobbins W A
66645 6JCM 487 ADV STUDIES:JAZZ COMPOSITION 4.0 TBA ANNEX 706 Rivello D A
66659 6JCM 487 ADV STUDIES:JAZZ COMPOSITION 4.0 TBA ANNEX 623 Dobbins W A
66662 6JCM 491 JAZZ DEPARTMENT FORUM W 1135 1225 ESM 120 Campbell J
66677 6JCM 501 JAZZ ENSEMBLE: SECT I TR 1235 1425 ESM 120 Dobbins W A
66686 6JCM 501 NEW JAZZ ENSEMBLE: SECT II TR 1235 1425 MSH 1 Rivello D A
66965 6JCM 501 JAZZ LAB BAND: SECT III MW 1830 2030 ESM 120 Thompson R A
66690 6JCM 524 THEORY/PRACTICE IMPROVISATIO 3.0 TR 0900 1015 ESM 514 Terefenko D A
66707 6JCM 551 DMA JAZZ PERFORM WORKSHOP:A 2.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 708 Versace G 3
66715 6JCM 551 DMA JAZZ PERFORM WORKSHOP:B 2.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 624 Jenkins C 3
66721 6JCM 551 DMA JAZZ PERFORM WORKSHOP:C 2.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 710 Campbell J 3
66739 6JCM 551 DMA JAZZ PERFORM WORKSHOP:D 2.0 MW 1335 1525 ANNEX 707 Terefenko D 3
66742 6JCM 551 DMA JAZZ PERFORM WORKSHOP:E 2.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 708 Versace G 3
66750 6JCM 551 DMA JAZZ PERFORM WORKSHOP:F 2.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 624 Jenkins C 3

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
66943 6JCM 551 DMA JAZZ PERFORM WORKSHOP:G 2.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 710 Campbell J 3
66951 6JCM 551 DMA JAZZ PERFORM WORKSHOP:H 2.0 MW 1535 1725 ANNEX 707 Sneider R 3
66934 6JCM 596 DMA DISSERTATION PROJECT TBA EEW 314 Terefenko D

Keyboard
66980 6KBD 111 PIANO SIGHT READING I 2.0 MW 1635 1725 ESM 443 Staff U 4
67113 6KBD 111 PIANO SIGHT READING I 2.0 MW 1735 1825 ESM 443 Staff U 4
81665 6KBD 201 SACRED MUSIC SKILLS I 2.0 TBA ESM 425 Kennedy S
67108 6KBD 205 ORGAN IMPROVISATION 1.0 TBA ESM 108 Bellotti E
66999 6KBD 212 PIANO LITERATURE II: 19TH C 3.0 WF 1035 1225 ESM 320 Staff U
67003 6KBD 250 JAZZ PIANO HARMONIZATION 2.0 MW 1235 1325 ESM 443 Caramia T
67012 6KBD 291 ORGAN DEPARTMENT COLLOQUIUM M 1900 2030 RTBA Higgs D
81678 6KBD 401 SACRED MUSIC SKILLS I 2.0 TBA ESM 425 Kennedy S
67029 6KBD 405 GRADUATE ORGAN IMPROVISATION 1.0 TBA ESM 108 Bellotti E
67094 6KBD 412 PIANO LITERATURE II: 19TH C 3.0 WF 1035 1225 ESM 320 Staff U
81680 6KBD 423 ORGAN REPERTOIRE III 2.0 T 1535 1725 NSL 308 Laube N
67081 6KBD 443 KEYBOARD CONTINUO REALIZATIO 1.0 T 1435 1525 ESM 424 Bellotti E
67030 6KBD 450 JAZZ PIANO HARMONIZATION 2.0 MW 1235 1325 ESM 443 Caramia T
67048 6KBD 491 ORGAN DEPARTMENT COLLOQUIUM M 1900 2030 RTBA Higgs D

Music History
67228 6MHS 119 MUSIC HISTORY REVIEW 1.5 MW 0835 0925 NSL 404 Staff U
67287 6MHS 119 MUSIC HISTORY REVIEW 1.5 MW 0935 1025 NSL 404 Staff U
81972 6MHS 121 OTHER PEOPLE,SOUNDS:800-1750 3.0 TR 0835 0950 ANNEX 902 Staff U
84035 6MHS 221 OTHER PEOPLE,SOUNDS:800-1750 3.0 TR 0835 0950 ANNEX 902 Staff U
Other People, Other Sounds: Music and Meaning, 800-1750: The people who made and consumed music in what we now call the medieval, Renaissance, and baroque
periods of Western music conceived of their worlds very differently than we do today, and indeed very differently from each other. To explore their music we must therefore
explore their cultures, philosophies, mental habits. In this course we will consider a series of such intersections of culture and music and ponder how each might inform our
understanding of both the technique and meaning of the relevant music. Our recurrent theme will be Music as Power, and we will touch on such ideas as the Music of the
Spheres, the Birth of Humanism, the Dominion of Rhetoric, the Aesthetics of Wonder, and the Ascendance of Rationalism. Over the course of the semester we will investigate
such genres as plainchant, organum, motet, mass, madrigal, opera, sonata, concerto, and more, along with their representative composers and performance practices.
81989 6MHS 121 OTHER PEOPLE,SOUNDS:800-1750 3.0 TR 1400 1515 ESM 305 Freitas R
84019 6MHS 221 OTHER PEOPLE,SOUNDS:800-1750 3.0 TR 1400 1515 ESM 305 Freitas R
Other People, Other Sounds: Music and Meaning, 800-1750: The people who made and consumed music in what we now call the medieval, Renaissance, and baroque
periods of Western music conceived of their worlds very differently than we do today, and indeed very differently from each other. To explore their music we must therefore
explore their cultures, philosophies, mental habits. In this course we will consider a series of such intersections of culture and music and ponder how each might inform our
understanding of both the technique and meaning of the relevant music. Our recurrent theme will be Music as Power, and we will touch on such ideas as the Music of the
Spheres, the Birth of Humanism, the Dominion of Rhetoric, the Aesthetics of Wonder, and the Ascendance of Rationalism. Over the course of the semester we will investigate
such genres as plainchant, organum, motet, mass, madrigal, opera, sonata, concerto, and more, along with their representative composers and performance practices.
67293 6MHS 122 MUSIC/PERFORMANCE: 1750-1880 3.0 TR 1000 1115 OSL 101 Staff U
84053 6MHS 222 MUSIC/PERFORMANCE: 1750-1880 3.0 TR 1000 1115 OSL 101 Staff U
Music in Performance, 1750-1880: How did the advent of Romanticism coincide with a broad shift in the meaning of musical performance? As nineteenth-century musicians
and audiences became ever more concerned with musical monuments, canons of masterpieces, and the score as a source of musical authority, earlier notions of ideal
musical performance underwent radical alteration. This course focuses on the changing venues and aesthetic aims of musical performance from the Enlightenment through
Romanticism, delving into new notions of expression and sentiment, the emergence of different performance contexts and venues (including non-Western spaces), the rise of
virtuosity and spectacle, and new performance practices. We will examine multiple genres (opera, symphony, string quartet and solo instrumental genres) and composers
(from Mozart through Wagner); readings will include contemporary reviews and criticism from the period as well as modern studies of the meanings and cultural uses of
performance.
67396 6MHS 122 MUSC/NATURE:MOZART TO WAGNER 3.0 TR 1235 1350 ESM 320 Watkins H
84041 6MHS 222 MUSC/NATURE:MOZART TO WAGNER 3.0 TR 1235 1350 ESM 320 Watkins H
Music and Nature from Mozart to Mahler: What did musicians and audiences consider to be natural in the Enlightenment and Romantic eras? How did what was musically
natural relate to the depiction of nature, meaning both human nature and the natural environment? This course traces how music illustrates the broader shift in thinking about
naturalness as a feature of human society to naturalness as Romantic attunement to the natural world. Spanning the period 1760-1900, the course explores music by Mozart,
Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Wagner, Liszt, and Mahler, along with essays by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Friedrich Schiller, E.T.A. Hoffmann, and Eduard Hanslick. In
addition to exploring transformations in musical form as composers grappled with new ways of construing naturalness in music, the course seeks to discover the origins of
modern attitudes toward the beauty and sublimity of nature, and how those attitudes relate to the changing mission of the arts.
81991 6MHS 123 MUSIC & TECHNOLOGY IN 20TH C 3.0 TR 0835 0950 OSL 101 Staff U
84070 6MHS 223 MUSIC & TECHNOLOGY IN 20TH C 3.0 TR 0835 0950 OSL 101 Staff U
Music and Technology in the Twentieth Century: How has modern technology shaped the composition, performance, and reception of music? And, in turn, how has music
influenced technology? In this course, we will evaluate the changing relationship between music and technology from the late Romantic era to the present day. Considering
broader political and cultural contexts, students will explore both popular and art music alongside important developments in instrument design, compositional techniques,
media, recording, and home and personal audio. Composers and groups studied will include Russolo, Schaffer, Stockhausen, Ligeti, Kraftwerk, Oliveros, Ono, Afrika
Bambaataa, and more. Assignments will consist of weekly reading and listening, small writing assignments and projects, and a midterm and final exam.

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
82008 6MHS 123 SCANDAL & CONTROVERSY 20TH C 3.0 TR 1000 1115 ANNEX 902 Mueller D
84064 6MHS 223 SCANDAL & CONTROVERSY 20TH C 3.0 TR 1000 1115 ANNEX 902 Mueller D
Scandal, Controversy, and Outrage in 20th Century Music: The twentieth century was one of the most tumultuous periods of music history as composers and performers
disrupted entrenched traditions, unsettled aesthetic boundaries, and called into question long-held assumptions about what music is and how it operates in the world. Many
listeners struggled to comprehend the new sounds being created on the stage and in the studio. As a result, it was also a time of scandal and outrage. This class traces the
history of twentieth-century European and American music through various musical controversies, beginning with the roots of modern music at the end of the nineteenth
century and through the creation of many new genres, including jazz, experimental electronic music, and minimalism. Through close analysis of sounds, scores, and the written
word, we will ask: What cultural, historical, and musical elements create musical controversy? What do musical scandals tell us about the stylistic developments of music? And
how can we understand our present musical cultures through this history? We will cover works by Strauss, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Ellington, Gershwin, Ornette Coleman,
Coltrane, Cage, Glass, Adams, Penderecki, Babbitt, Stockhausen, and Saariaho (among others).
67451 6MHS 281 HISTORY OF JAZZ 3.0 TR 1135 1225 ESM 209 Staff U
83944 6MHS 424 MUSIC IN THE CLASSIC PERIOD 3.0 R 1035 1225 ESM 404 Staff U
67315 6MHS 425 MUSIC IN THE 19TH CENTURY 3.0 T 1235 1425 ESM 404 Thym J
67321 6MHS 426 MUSIC SINCE 1900 3.0 T 1035 1225 ESM 404 Staff U
67339 6MHS 435 CONCERT REPERTOIRE 1.0 R 0855 1025 ESM 404 Szymanski G A
67434 6MHS 441 BAROQUE PERFORM PRACTICE I 2.0 T 0835 1025 ESM 404 Odette P
67342 6MHS 480 BIBLIOGRAPHY 2.0 TR 1135 1225 NSL 404 Farrington J
67426 6MHS 480 BIBLIOGRAPHY 2.0 TR 1235 1325 NSL 404 Szymanski G
67350 6MHS 590 RACE & GENDER 20TH C MUSIC 3.0 M 1035 1225 NSL 404 Mueller D A
Race and Gender in 20th Century Music: This class investigates the history of twentieth-century music through the lens of race and gender. Historians have long focused
on how technological innovations, military conflicts, geopolitical economics, and cultural movements helped create new musical traditions during one of the most turbulent
periods of music history. By engaging with recent musicological trends, this class seeks to account more evenly for people, cultures, traditions, and innovators traditionally left
in the margins. Topics will include: the appropriation of African American music in France and United States; narratives of masculinity and femininity in instrumental
performance; jazz in the Harlem Renaissance; race, gender, and class in La Nouvelle Vague (i.e., French New Wave film); field recordings and folk music; gender and music
technologies. Beyond the seminar room, we will also consider how these issues influence our own teaching and music making more broadly. Students will be expected to
engage with the readings and music in several ways, including informal weekly responses, analysis, class discussions, in-class presentations, and a final project of their
choosing.
67368 6MHS 590 EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE 20TH C 3.0 M 1335 1525 NSL 404 Jakelski L A
East-Central Europe in the Twentieth Century: From Witold Lutosawski to Arvo Prt, Sofia Gubaidulina to Gyrgy KurtgEast-Central Europe witnessed an extraordinary
flowering of compositional activity during the late twentieth century. This course offers a comparative study of music in Poland, Hungary, and Russia from the 1950s to the
present day. Our primary task is to gain a thorough understanding of a diverse body of repertoire, by composers both familiar and relatively unknown. We will also consider the
social and cultural contexts in which this music has been written, performed, and made meaningful. On the broadest level, we will explore questions of local, regional, and
international identity; changing patterns of institutional support; and the impact of socialism (and post-socialist transformations) on the arts. Assignments will include weekly
readings, listening, and score study; a brief in-class presentation; and a final paper/presentation.
67373 6MHS 590 THE SYMPHONY: 1800-1900 3.0 W 1035 1225 NSL 404 Thym J A
The Symphony, 1800-1900: Study of symphonic repertory in the nineteenth century, including related genres such as the concert overture and the symphonic poem.
Composers to be discussed include Beethoven (Eroica, Pastoral, Ninth), Schubert (Unfinished), Berlioz (Fantastique) Mendelssohn (Scottish), Schumann (Fourth), Liszt (Les
Prludes), Bruckner (Ninth), Brahms (First), Saint-Saens (Organ), Franck, Strauss (Heldenleben), and Mahler (Fourth). While the focus will be on a close study of standard
works, the discussion will also explore some of the by-roads of symphonic composition as well as aesthetic, sociological, and philosophical issues related to the repertory.
67384 6MHS 590 ACOUSTIC AFRICA 3.0 W 1535 1725 NSL 404 Kyker J A
Acoustic Africa: Through film clips, audio examples, readings, and hands-on performance clinics, students in this course will take a journey in sound across Sub-Saharan
Africa. We will explore the musical and social dimensions of a wide variety of genres and styles, ranging from pre-colonial instruments such as the mbira, kora, and balafon to
20th- and 21st-century urban popular music, such as the acoustic guitar music ubiquitous across the continent.
67402 6MHS 590 HANDEL'S ITALIAN VOCAL MUSIC 3.0 R 0935 1125 NSL 404 Freitas R A
Handels Italian Vocal Music: From his arrival in Italy in 1706 to his abandonment of opera ca. 1740, George Frideric Handels Italian vocal musicprimarily operas and
cantatasstood at the center of his musical efforts. Over the last thirty years or so, both performers and scholars have increasingly engaged them. In this seminar, we will
consider Handels operas and cantatas from multiple perspectives, highlighting especially their status as literary, musical, and cultural practices. We will also consider the
relevant performance techniques of the era. This approach should help both to comprehend how these works communicated to their original audiences and to suggest ways
they might continue to communicate today. A final research project, presented to the seminar, will be required.
67417 6MHS 590 TOSCANINI/AMER MUSICAL LIFE 3.0 R 1335 1525 NSL 404 Esse M A
Toscanini and American Musical Life: This course will explore how conductor Arturo Toscanini (1867-1957) came to embody Great Music for American audiences in the first
half of the twentieth century. We will explore his career and influence, thinking of Toscanini not simply as a great maestro but also as a cultural phenomenon. His meteoric
rise to popularity reflected the U.S.A.s sense of its own difference from European musical contexts, while the Toscanini cult helped to define modern concert life. As we read
both recent scholarship and original press reports and listen to historic recordings, we will think about how Toscaninis decisions as a musician and a cultural ambassador had
a lasting impact on todays musical world.

Music Teaching & Learning


MUE 222 & MUE 226: "A" Courses Meet: August 30, 2017 - October 20, 2017
"B" Courses Meet: October 23, 2017 - December 13, 2017
67465 6MUE 110 INTR MUSC TEACHNG/LEARNNG I 1.0 W 1135 1225 MSH 1 Azzara C
67478 6MUE 110 INTR MUSC TEACHNG/LEARNNG I 1.0 W 1235 1325 MSH 1 Azzara C
68154 6MUE 211 EARLY CHILDHOOD MUSIC EDUCAT 2.0 MW 1235 1325 MC 2 Fox D
83925 6MUE 213 SEC GENERAL MUSIC METHODS 2.0 MW 1035 1225 MC 2 Bucura E
67499 6MUE 215 HIGH SCHOOL CHORAL MUSIC 2.0 TR 0730 1030 ESM M8 Silvey P 3
68147 6MUE 216 MUSIC FOR SPECIAL LEARNERS 1.0 F 0835 0925 MC 2 Richards W
67501 6MUE 218 TEACHING GROUP STRINGS-LAB A T 1335 1425 ANNEX 707 Fetter J
67516 6MUE 218 TEACHING GROUP STRINGS-LAB B R 1335 1425 ANNEX 707 Fetter J

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
67527 6MUE 218 TEACHING GROUP STRINGS 2.0 R 1135 1325 OSL 101 Fetter J
67538 6MUE 221 CLARINET CLASS 1.0 T 1335 1425 OSL 204 Liperote K 3
68136 6MUE 221 CLARINET CLASS 1.0 T 1435 1525 OSL 204 Liperote K 3
67540 6MUE 222A WOODWIND CLASS: BASSOON A 0.5 TBA RTBA Liperote K 3
67552 6MUE 222A WOODWIND CLASS: FLUTE A 0.5 TBA RTBA Liperote K 3
67569 6MUE 222A WOODWIND CLASS: OBOE A 0.5 TBA RTBA Liperote K 3
68120 6MUE 222A WOODWIND CLASS: SAXOPHONE A 0.5 TBA RTBA Liperote K 3
67574 6MUE 222B WOODWIND CLASS: BASSOON B 0.5 TBA RTBA Liperote K 3
67583 6MUE 222B WOODWIND CLASS: FLUTE B 0.5 TBA RTBA Liperote K 3
68105 6MUE 222B WOODWIND CLASS: OBOE B 0.5 TBA RTBA Liperote K 3
68118 6MUE 222B WOODWIND CLASS: SAXOPHONE B 0.5 TBA RTBA Liperote K 3
67595 6MUE 225 TRUMPET CLASS 1.0 R 1335 1425 OSL 204 Snell A 3
68090 6MUE 225 TRUMPET CLASS 1.0 R 1435 1525 OSL 204 Snell A 3
67600 6MUE 226A BRASS CLASS: EUPHONIUM A 0.5 TBA RTBA Snell A 3
67611 6MUE 226A BRASS CLASS: HORN A 0.5 TBA RTBA Snell A 3
67625 6MUE 226A BRASS CLASS: TROMBONE A 0.5 TBA RTBA Snell A 3
68086 6MUE 226A BRASS CLASS: TUBA A 0.5 TBA RTBA Snell A 3
67633 6MUE 226B BRASS CLASS: EUPHONIUM B 0.5 TBA RTBA Snell A 3
67644 6MUE 226B BRASS CLASS: HORN B 0.5 TBA RTBA Snell A 3
67657 6MUE 226B BRASS CLASS: TROMBONE B 0.5 TBA RTBA Snell A 3
67666 6MUE 226B BRASS CLASS: TUBA B 0.5 TBA RTBA Snell A 3
67679 6MUE 231 STRINGS CLASS I 2.0 TR 1035 1125 ESM 514 Fetter J 3
67682 6MUE 235 HARP CLASS I 1.0 TBA RTBA Staff U 3
67698 6MUE 236 HARP CLASS II 1.0 TBA RTBA Staff U 3
67709 6MUE 241 VOICE CLASS I 1.0 R 1630 1730 ET 603 Silvey P 3
67714 6MUE 242 VOICE CLASS II 1.0 R 1730 1830 ET 603 Silvey P 3
67723 6MUE 255 PERCUSSION CLASS 1.0 T 1135 1225 ANNEX 902 Liperote K 3
67737 6MUE 255 PERCUSSION CLASS 1.0 R 1135 1225 ANNEX 902 Liperote K 3
67746 6MUE 261 CLASSROOM INSTRUMENTS 1.0 R 1035 1125 MC 2 Culp M
68077 6MUE 271 STU TCH: ELEM VOCAL/GENERAL 4.0 TBA ESM M1 Bucura E A
68062 6MUE 272 SENIOR PRACTICUM IN MUS EDU 1.0 T 1700 1800 ESM M9 Snell A A
67758 6MUE 273 STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR 1.0 TBA ESM M8 Silvey P A
67760 6MUE 273 STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR 1.0 TBA ESM M3 Fetter J A
68059 6MUE 273 STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR 1.0 T 1600 1700 ET 603 Snell A A
67771 6MUE 276 STU TCH: SEC VOCAL/GENERAL 4.0 M 1600 1730 ESM 320 Silvey P A
67785 6MUE 277 STU TCH: ELEM/STRINGS I 4.0 TBA ESM M3 Fetter J A
67792 6MUE 277 STU TCH: ELEM/WBP I 4.0 TBA ESM M6 Snell A A
67805 6MUE 278 STU TCH: SEC/WBP II 4.0 TBA ESM M6 Snell A A
68045 6MUE 278 STU TCH: SEC/STRINGS II 4.0 TBA ESM M3 Fetter J A
67818 6MUE 290 URBAN PRACTICUM STRING TEACH 1.0 R 1435 1645 ESM M9 Fetter J A
68031 6MUE 402 MEASUREMENT & EVALUATION 3.0 M 1600 1900 ESM M9 Snell A
67820 6MUE 411 EARLY CHILDHOOD MUSIC EDUCAT 2.0 MW 1235 1325 MC 2 Fox D
83933 6MUE 413 SEC GENERAL MUSIC METHODS 2.0 MW 1035 1225 MC 2 Bucura E
67836 6MUE 415 HIGH SCHOOL CHORAL MUSIC 2.0 TR 0730 1030 ESM M8 Silvey P 3
67847 6MUE 465 INSTR METHOD/TECH:WIND/PERCU 3.0 R 1600 1900 ANNEX 707 Liperote K
67854 6MUE 466 INSTRUMENTAL TECHNIQUE:STRIN 3.0 R 1135 1325 OSL 101 Fetter J
R 1335 1425 ESM M9
COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
67863 6MUE 471 TEACHING INTERN: STRINGS 2.0 TBA ESM M3 Fetter J A
67872 6MUE 471 TEACHING INTERN: GENERAL 2.0 TBA ESM M1 Bucura E A
67889 6MUE 471 TEACHING INTERN: WBP 2.0 TBA ESM M6 Snell A A
68013 6MUE 471 TEACHING INTERN: CHORAL 2.0 TBA ESM M8 Silvey P A
67891 6MUE 472 TCH INTERN FOR CERT: VOC/GEN 4.0 TBA ESM M8 Silvey P A
67906 6MUE 472 TCH INTERN FOR CERT: STRINGS 4.0 TBA ESM M3 Fetter J A
67919 6MUE 472 TCH INTERN FOR CERT: WBP 4.0 TBA ESM M6 Snell A A
68008 6MUE 473 MA PROJECT TBA ESM M5A Azzara C
67997 6MUE 495 MA THESIS TBA ESM M5A Azzara C
67922 6MUE 501 HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY SEMINAR 3.0 W 1600 1900 ESM M9 Bucura E
67935 6MUE 504 PREPARE FUTURE MUSIC FACULTY 2.0 T 1235 1425 ESM M9 Silvey P
67953 6MUE 591 RESEARCH FOR DMA STUDENTS TBA ESM M5A Azzara C
67964 6MUE 595 PHD DISSERTATION PROJECT TBA ESM M5A Azzara C
67988 6MUE 596 DMA DISSERTATION PROJECT TBA ESM M5A Azzara C

Musicology
68172 6MUY 590 INTRO TO MUSICOLOGY 3.0 T 1335 1625 NSL 404 Esse M A
68163 6MUY 501 INTRO TO MUSICOLOGY 4.0 T 1335 1625 NSL 404 Esse M 3
Introduction to Musicology: This course will provide an introduction to the scope, bibliography, and prominent methodologies of musicology. To that end, it will explore the
history and development of the discipline, focusing especially on the current trends and their background: provide a practical introduction to the diverse sources of information
in the field; and give experience employing solid research and writing strategies.

68189 6MUY 590 MUSIC & THE COLD WAR 3.0 W 1235 1525 NSL 404 Jakelski L A
68191 6MUY 591 MUSIC & THE COLD WAR 4.0 W 1235 1525 NSL 404 Jakelski L 3
Music and the Cold War: This course examines the compositional trends, aesthetic debates, and music institutions that were implicated in the Cold War, a conflict that was as
cultural as it was political. Beginning in the late 1940s, the United States and the Soviet Union strove to prove their supremacy in contests of cultural prowess; these struggles
impacted artistic policy and musical life in the two superpowers as well as the regions that lay within their competing spheres of influence. We will investigate musical life during
the Cold War from several distinct geopolitical vantage points. We will examine primary sources, read recent scholarship, and discuss music that either provoked significant
critical reactions or sheds light on the politicization of music in the mid-twentieth century. Our main task will be to think about how local concerns intersected with the Cold
Wars broader issues. We will also consider points of similarity among the places that we study, asking how music created ties that bound together seemingly disparate
geopolitical areas, as well as reinforcing the divisions that separated them. Seminar assignments will include weekly readings, listening, and score
study; occasional presentations to facilitate class discussion; and a final research paper/presentation.
68244 6MUY 590 TBA 3.0 F 0935 1225 NSL 404 Staff U 3
68233 6MUY 591 TBA 4.0 F 0935 1225 NSL 404 Staff U 3
68200 6MUY 593 DIRECTED STUDY I 4.0 TBA RTBA Watkins H 3
68225 6MUY 594 DIRECTED STUDY II 4.0 TBA RTBA Watkins H 3
68211 6MUY 595 PHD DISSERTATION PROJECT TBA RTBA Watkins H

Orchestral Studies
68399 6ORC 420 RPO PRACTICUM I 2.0 TBA RTBA Kemp K A
68403 6ORC 420Z RPO PRACTICUM I 2.0 TBA RTBA Kemp K A
68412 6ORC 421 RPO MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP I TBA RTBA Kemp K A

Pedagogy
69390 6PED 210 HARP PEDAGOGY I 1.0 TBA ESM 204 Bride K
69270 6PED 211 HARP PEDAGOGY II 1.0 TBA ESM 204 Bride K
69288 6PED 235 HISTORY OF PERCUSSION 2.0 W 1035 1225 NSL 308 Beck J
69297 6PED 261 PRACTICAL PIANO PEDAGOGY 2.0 W 1335 1525 ESM 404 Caramia T
69308 6PED 281 VOICE PEDAGOGY I 2.0 TR 1235 1325 ESM 305 Cowdrick K
69362 6PED 405 DESC/ANALY WRITING IN JCM 1.0 T 1435 1525 ANNEX 708 Dobbins W
69313 6PED 435 HISTORY OF PERCUSSION 2.0 W 1035 1225 NSL 308 Beck J
81699 6PED 461 PRACTICAL PIANO PEDAGOGY 2.0 W 1335 1525 ESM 404 Caramia T
69386 6PED 471 TEACHING CERTIFICATE INTERN 1.0 TBA ESM 109 Fox D A
69331 6PED 482 GRADUATE VOCAL PEDAGOGY II 2.0 MR 0935 1025 ESM HHH Retzlaff J

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
69377 6PED 505 DESC/ANALY WRITING IN JCM 1.0 T 1435 1525 ANNEX 708 Dobbins W

Performance
69491 6PRF 596 DMA DISSERTATION PROJECT TBA RTBA Staff U

Piano Class
68971 6PCL 101 PIANO CLASS: A 2.0 WF 1035 1125 ESM 443 Caramia T
68985 6PCL 101 PIANO CLASS: B 2.0 MW 1035 1125 MSH 414 Caramia T
68992 6PCL 101 PIANO CLASS: C 2.0 MW 1135 1225 ESM 443 Caramia T
69007 6PCL 101 PIANO CLASS: D 2.0 MW 1235 1325 MSH 414 Caramia T
69015 6PCL 101 PIANO CLASS: E 2.0 TR 0935 1025 ESM 443 Caramia T
69021 6PCL 101 PIANO CLASS: F 2.0 TR 1235 1325 ESM 443 Caramia T
69180 6PCL 101 PIANO CLASS: G 2.0 TR 1235 1325 MSH 414 Caramia T
69199 6PCL 101 PIANO CLASS: H 2.0 TR 1335 1425 ESM 443 Caramia T
69222 6PCL 101 PIANO CLASS: I 2.0 TR 1535 1625 ESM 443 Caramia T
81731 6PCL 101 PIANO CLASS: J 2.0 TR 1635 1725 MSH 414 Caramia T
69039 6PCL 102 PIANO CLASS: A 2.0 MW 1135 1225 MSH 414 Caramia T
69042 6PCL 102 PIANO CLASS: B 2.0 TR 1135 1225 MSH 414 Caramia T
69206 6PCL 102 PIANO CLASS: C 2.0 TR 1335 1425 MSH 414 Caramia T
69219 6PCL 102 PIANO CLASS: D 2.0 TR 1535 1625 MSH 414 Caramia T
69050 6PCL 103 PIANO CLASS: A 2.0 MW 0835 0925 ESM 443 Caramia T
69068 6PCL 103 PIANO CLASS: B 2.0 MW 0935 1025 ESM 443 Caramia T
69073 6PCL 103 PIANO CLASS: C 2.0 MW 1335 1425 ESM 443 Caramia T
69084 6PCL 103 PIANO CLASS: D 2.0 MW 1535 1625 ESM 443 Caramia T
69096 6PCL 103 PIANO CLASS: E 2.0 TR 0835 0925 ESM 443 Caramia T
69102 6PCL 103 PIANO CLASS: F 2.0 TR 1135 1225 ESM 443 Caramia T
69264 6PCL 103 PIANO CLASS: G 2.0 TR 1435 1525 ESM 443 Caramia T
69117 6PCL 104 PIANO CLASS: A 2.0 MW 0835 0925 MSH 414 Caramia T
69126 6PCL 104 PIANO CLASS: B 2.0 MW 0935 1025 MSH 414 Caramia T
69253 6PCL 104 PIANO CLASS: C 2.0 MW 1335 1435 MSH 414 Caramia T
81708 6PCL 104 PIANO CLASS: D 2.0 MW 1535 1625 MSH 414 Caramia T
81713 6PCL 104 PIANO CLASS: E 2.0 MW 1435 1525 MSH 414 Caramia T
81724 6PCL 104 PIANO CLASS: F 2.0 TR 1435 1525 MSH 414 Caramia T
69134 6PCL 105 PIANO CLASS: A 2.0 F 1035 1125 MSH 414 Caramia T
69143 6PCL 105 PIANO CLASS: B 2.0 F 1235 1325 ESM 443 Caramia T
69151 6PCL 106 PIANO CLASS: A 2.0 F 1135 1235 MSH 414 Caramia T
84513 6PCL 106 PIANO CLASS: B 2.0 F 1235 1325 MSH 414 Caramia T

Sacred Music
69646 6SMU 210 SCHOLA CANTORUM 1.0 U 2100 2300 CHRST CHRC Kennedy S A
69658 6SMU 410 SCHOLA CANTORIUM 1.0 U 2100 2300 CHRST CHRC Kennedy S A

Special Registrations
64838 6ESM 201 BACHELORS DEGREE RECITAL TBA RTBA Staff U
64840 6ESM 202 BACHELORS JCM DEGREE RECITAL TBA RTBA Staff U
64852 6ESM 275 MUE CERT WORKSHOPS TBA ESM M5A Azzara C
64869 6ESM 385 UNDERGRAD INACTIVE STATUS TBA ESM 111 Hain J J
64874 6ESM 399 UNGRAD CONT OF ENROLLMENT TBA ESM 111 Hain J J
64883 6ESM 401 MASTERS DEGREE RECITAL TBA RTBA Staff U

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
64895 6ESM 402 MASTERS JCM DEGREE RECITAL TBA RTBA Staff U
64908 6ESM 405 MM ACM REC WITH VOCALIST TBA RTBA Staff U
65116 6ESM 406 MM ACM REC WITH INSTRUMENTAL TBA RTBA Staff U
64913 6ESM 450 MM LISTENING EXAM TBA RTBA Staff U
65101 6ESM 455 MM ORAL EXAM TBA RTBA Staff U
64924 6ESM 460 COMPOSITION COMPREHEN REVIEW TBA ESM 434 Staff U
64931 6ESM 475 MUE CERT WORKSHOPS TBA ESM M5A Azzara C
64945 6ESM 501 FIRST DOCTORAL RECITAL TBA RTBA Staff U
65097 6ESM 502 SECOND DOCTORAL RECITAL TBA RTBA Staff U
64959 6ESM 503 DOCTORAL LECTURE RECITAL TBA RTBA Staff U
64962 6ESM 504 DMA PIANO COLLABOR RECITAL TBA RTBA Staff U
64977 6ESM 505 DMA ACM REC WITH VOCALIST TBA RTBA Staff U
64986 6ESM 506 DMA ACM REC WITH INSTRUMENTA TBA RTBA Staff U
64990 6ESM 507 DMA ACM THIRD RECITAL TBA RTBA Staff U
84332 6ESM 508 DMA CONDUCTING PERFORMANCE TBA RTBA Staff U
65019 6ESM 899 MUE MASTERS CONT GRAD ENROL: TBA ESM 102 Krayterman O J
65070 6ESM 950 DOCTORAL QUALIFY EXAM: FALL TBA ESM 102 Krayterman O A
65088 6ESM 985 GRADUATE INACTIVE STATUS TBA ESM 102 Krayterman O J
65022 6ESM 995 CONT GRADUATE ENROLLMENT: PT TBA ESM 102 Krayterman O J
65035 6ESM 999 CONT GRAD ENROLL/COURSES: FT TBA ESM 102 Krayterman O J
65041 6ESM 999 CONT GRADUATE ENROLLMENT: FT TBA ESM 102 Krayterman O J
65053 6ESM 999A CONT GRADUATE ENROLLMENT: FT TBA ESM 102 Krayterman O J
65064 6ESM 999B CONT GRADUATE ENROLLMENT: FT TBA ESM 102 Krayterman O J

String, Harp & Guitar Dept.


Guitar
65618 6GTC 201 HIST & LIT OF GUITAR 2.0 F 1535 1725 OSL 204 Goluses N 4
65620 6GTC 220 FRETBOARD HARMONY 2.0 T 1535 1725 OSL 204 Goluses N 4
65636 6GTC 401 SEM IN GUITAR STUDIES 2.0 F 1535 1725 OSL 204 Goluses N 4

Strings
69660 6STR 101 HARP TECHNIQUE I 1.0 TBA ESM 204 Bride K

Study Abroad
69532 6SAB 200 STUDY ABROAD 16.0 TBA ESM 111 Hain J J
69549 6SAB 400 STUDY ABROAD 12.0 TBA ESM 111 Hain J J

Theory
69829 6TH 101 MODEL COMP/TONAL ANALYSIS I 2.0 T 0835 0925 ESM HHH Monahan S
R 0835 0925 ANNEX 704
70144 6TH 101 MODEL COMP/TONAL ANALYSIS I 2.0 T 0935 1025 ESM HHH Monahan S
R 0935 1025 ANNEX 704
69979 6TH 161 AURAL MUSICIANSHIP I 2.0 MWF 0835 0925 ANNEX 704 Curlee J
70220 6TH 161 AURAL MUSICIANSHIP I 2.0 MWF 0935 1025 ANNEX 704 Curlee J
69830 6TH 101H MODEL COMP/TONAL ANA I: HON 2.0 MWF 0835 0925 ANNEX 710 Brown M
70218 6TH 161H AURAL MUSICIANSHIP I:HONORS 2.0 MW 1235 1325 ANNEX 707 Curlee J
69848 6TH 101I MODEL COMP/TONAL ANA I:INTEN 2.0 MTWR 0835 0925 MSH 221 Monahan S
69856 6TH 101I MODEL COMP/TONAL ANA I:INTEN 2.0 MTWR 0935 1025 MSH 221 Monahan S
69982 6TH 161I AURAL MUSICIANSHIP I:INTEN 2.0 TRF 1135 1225 MC 2 Curlee J
69998 6TH 161I AURAL MUSICIANSHIP I:INTEN 2.0 TRF 1235 1325 MC 2 Curlee J
70001 6TH 201 MODEL COMP/TONAL ANALYS III 2.5 MWF 0835 0935 ANNEX 902 Burns C

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
70205 6TH 201 MODEL COMP/TONAL ANALYS III 2.5 MWF 0935 1035 ANNEX 902 Burns C
69957 6TH 261 AURAL MUSICIANSHIP III 1.5 TR 1135 1225 ANNEX 709 Marvin W
70111 6TH 261 AURAL MUSICIANSHIP III 1.5 TR 1235 1325 ANNEX 709 Marvin W
70125 6TH 261 AURAL MUSICIANSHIP III 1.5 TR 1335 1425 ANNEX 709 Marvin W
70133 6TH 261 AURAL MUSICIANSHIP III 1.5 TR 1435 1525 ANNEX 709 Marvin W
70016 6TH 201H MODEL COMP/TONAL ANA III:HON 3.0 TR 0835 0950 ESM 320 Dunsby J
69966 6TH 261H AURAL MUSICIANSHIP III:HON 1.0 TR 1135 1225 ANNEX 710 Curlee J
70027 6TH 205 MODEL COMP/POST TONAL ANALYS 4.0 R 0835 0950 ESM 209 Bernstein Z
TWF 0835 0925 ET 410
70038 6TH 205 MODEL COMP/POST TONAL ANALYS 4.0 R 0835 0950 ESM 209 Bernstein Z
TWF 0835 0925 ET 412
70040 6TH 205 MODEL COMP/POST TONAL ANALYS 4.0 R 0835 0950 ESM 209 Bernstein Z
TWF 1135 1225 ET 404
70052 6TH 205 MODEL COMP/POST TONAL ANALYS 4.0 R 0835 0950 ESM 209 Bernstein Z
TWF 1235 1325 ET 404
70100 6TH 205 MODEL COMP/POST TONAL ANALYS 4.0 R 1000 1115 ESM 209 Bernstein Z
TWF 1035 1125 MSH 221
70179 6TH 205 MODEL COMP/POST TONAL ANALYS 4.0 R 1000 1115 ESM 209 Bernstein Z
TWF 1135 1225 MSH 221
70182 6TH 205 MODEL COMP/POST TONAL ANALYS 4.0 R 1000 1115 ESM 209 Bernstein Z
TWF 1235 1325 MSH 221
70198 6TH 205 MODEL COMP/POST TONAL ANALYS 4.0 R 1000 1115 ESM 209 Bernstein Z
TWF 1335 1425 MSH 221
69933 6TH 205J MODEL COMP/MODERN JAZZ 4.0 TR 1035 1150 ESM 305 Terefenko D
F 1335 1525 ESM 305
69867 6TH 117 THEORY/ANALY/MUSICIANSHP REV 1.5 MW 1035 1150 ANNEX 704 Hilewicz O
69875 6TH 117 THEORY/ANALY/MUSICIANSHP REV 1.5 MW 1200 1315 ANNEX 704 Hilewicz O
69881 6TH 117 THEORY/ANALY/MUSICIANSHP REV 1.5 TR 1035 1150 ANNEX 707 Hilewicz O
69894 6TH 117 THEORY/ANALY/MUSICIANSHP REV 1.5 TR 1200 1315 ANNEX 707 Hilewicz O
70157 6TH 251 COUNTERPOINT I 3.0 TR 1035 1150 ANNEX 704 Frank B
69944 6TH 260 MUSIC & THE MIND 3.0 TR 1230 1345 GAVET 202 Temperley D
Music & the Mind: Introduction to the discipline of music cognition. Topics include empirical methods, psycho-acoustic principles, influence of Gestalt psychology, music and
language, metric and tonal hierarchies, music and the brain, aspects of musical development, and research on musical memory, expectation, and emotion. (Course taught on
River Campus)
69900 6TH 281 MUSIC ANALYSIS:HOLLYWOOD 3.0 MWF 1235 1325 ANNEX 710 Covach J
Music Analysis: Hollywood Musicals This course is designed for upper-level undergraduate music majors and graduate students in music. We will analyze the music of
Hollywood movie musicals in detail, focusing on issues of form, harmony, lyrics, and character/story in the historical context of American popular music in the 20th century.
Songwriters studied will include Jerome Kern, Richard Rodgers, Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, Stephen Sondheim, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Alan Menken and
others. Prerequisites: MUR 211, TH 201, or the equivalent.
84559 6TH 281 MUSICAL INFORMANCE 3.0 T 1435 1725 ANNEX 707 Headlam D
Musical Informance: Musical informance is performance for the information age. In settings like "Music for All," students are now asked to present information to audiences as
well as to perform. Informance provides a framework to integrate the two modes of presentation, using technology and software for real-time display and music analysis to
derive context. The class is designed for chamber music groups and solo performers. Readings are drawn from the emerging performance analysis field as well as
performance practice and analysis and performance literature, including video from Leonard Bernstein and online materials from recent audience outreach initiatives by the
Chicago and San Francisco Symphonies. The goal is to create a convincing informance, which is essentially a video document, with a script, multi-media presentation,
analysis points, and performance.
83685 6TH 281 ADVANCED MUSICIANSHIP 3.0 TBA RTBA Curlee J
69911 6TH 295 SENIOR THESIS I 3.0 TBA ESM 502 Dunsby J
69925 6TH 400 SURVEY OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQ 3.0 MW 1200 1315 ESM 070 Headlam D
70166 6TH 400 SURVEY OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQ 3.0 TR 1335 1450 MC 2 Hilewicz O
70083 6TH 401 TOPICS IN TONAL LIT & ANALYS 3.0 MW 1200 1315 ANNEX 708 Klumpenhouwer H
70236 6TH 401 TOPICS IN TONAL LIT & ANALYS 3.0 TR 1200 1315 ANNEX 704 Frank B
70254 6TH 402 TOPICS IN 20TH C LIT & ANALY 3.0 MW 1035 1150 ANNEX 708 Klumpenhouwer H
70263 6TH 402 TOPICS IN 20TH C LIT & ANALY 3.0 TR 1335 1450 ANNEX 704 Bernstein Z
70358 6TH 421 PEDAGOGY OF THEORY 3.0 TR 1325 1450 ANNEX 710 Monahan S 3
70371 6TH 451 MODAL COUNTERPOINT 3.0 MW 1200 1315 ET 404 Brown M
70272 6TH 460 MUSIC & THE MIND 3.0 TR 1230 1345 GAVET 202 Temperley D
Music & the Mind: Introduction to the discipline of music cognition. Topics include empirical methods, psycho-acoustic principles, influence of Gestalt psychology, music and
language, metric and tonal hierarchies, music and the brain, aspects of musical development, and research on musical memory, expectation, and emotion. (Course taught on
River Campus)

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
70360 6TH 471 APPRENTICESHIP IN PEDAGOGY 1.0 TBA RTBA Burns C
70289 6TH 475 INTERMED KEYBOARD SKILLS 3.0 T 1035 1125 ANNEX 708 Rolf M A
70291 6TH 475 INTERMED KEYBOARD SKILLS LAB TBA RTBA Rolf M A
70309 6TH 481 MUSIC ANALYSIS:HOLLYWOOD 3.0 MWF 1235 1325 ANNEX 710 Covach J
Music Analysis: Hollywood Musicals This course is designed for upper-level undergraduate music majors and graduate students in music. We will analyze the music of
Hollywood movie musicals in detail, focusing on issues of form, harmony, lyrics, and character/story in the historical context of American popular music in the 20th century.
Songwriters studied will include Jerome Kern, Richard Rodgers, Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, Stephen Sondheim, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Alan Menken and
others. Prerequisites: MUR 211, TH 201, or the equivalent.
83671 6TH 481 MUSICAL INFORMANCE 3.0 T 1435 1725 ANNEX 707 Headlam D
Musical Informance: Musical informance is performance for the information age. In settings like "Music for All," students are now asked to present information to audiences as
well as to perform. Informance provides a framework to integrate the two modes of presentation, using technology and software for real-time display and music analysis to
derive context. The class is designed for chamber music groups and solo performers. Readings are drawn from the emerging performance analysis field as well as
performance practice and analysis and performance literature, including video from Leonard Bernstein and online materials from recent audience outreach initiatives by the
Chicago and San Francisco Symphonies. The goal is to create a convincing informance, which is essentially a video document, with a script, multi-media presentation,
analysis points, and performance.
83660 6TH 511 THEORY & ANALYSIS TONAL MUSIC 4.0 MW 1200 1315 ANNEX 709 Marvin W A
70406 6TH 521 PEDAGOGY OF THEORY 4.0 TR 1325 1450 ANNEX 710 Monahan S 3
83692 6TH 523 HISTORY MUSIC THEORY: PART I 4.0 W 1435 1725 OSL 204 Wason R
70314 6TH 581 MUSIC AND LANGUAGE 4.0 M 1435 1725 ESM 070 Marvin E A
Mcdonough J
Music and Language: This course will explore relationships between musical and linguistic structure. In addition to reading and evaluating early writings on the subject by
Bernstein and Lerdahl & Jackendoff, students will assess more recent work by Huron and Patel, and the linguists Hayes and Ladd on prosodic structure. We will also discuss
experimental work on prosodic structure in language and on music acquisition in infants. Co-taught by a music theorist and linguist, the course will review basic aspects of
phonology, intonational phonology, meter, and memory that are relevant to music. Each student will complete a piece of original research in the form of a term paper and class
presentation.
70419 6TH 591 THEORY COLLOQUIUM 1.0 F 1535 1725 ESM 305 Dunsby J
Marvin E
70346 6TH 595 PHD DISSERTATION PROJECT TBA RTBA Marvin E

Voice And Opera


68343 6OP 222 ACTING SEMINAR 1.0 T 1535 1725 OSL 101 Baker L A
68365 6OP 224 LYRIC THEATER WORKSHOP 1.0 T 1535 1725 ANNEX 804 Carr S A
68351 6OP 230 OPERA THEATER PRACTICUM 3.0 MWRF 1535 1825 ANNEX 804 Daigle S A
68302 6OP 401 SEM LYRIC THEATER STAGE DIRECT 1.0 M 1035 1225 ANNEX 804 Daigle S A
68380 6OP 402 SEM LYRIC THEATER STAGE DIRECT 2.0 M 1035 1225 ANNEX 804 Daigle S A
68317 6OP 410 OPERA PROD: STAGE MANAGEMENT 2.0 MWRF 1535 1825 ANNEX 804 Daigle S A
68378 6OP 414 FUNDAMENTALS SINGING ACTOR 1.0 T 1235 1425 ANNEX 804 Carr S A
68326 6OP 416 ADV OPERA SEM: PERF TECHNIQ 2.0 R 1235 1425 ANNEX 804 Daigle S A
68334 6OP 430 OPERA THEATER PRACTICUM 1.0 MWRF 1535 1825 ANNEX 804 Daigle S A

70530 6VCC 111 VOICE CLASS:RC NON-MUSIC MAJ 1.0 S 1430 1530 DEWEY 1305 Staff U
70556 6VCC 233 VOICE REPERTOIRE SENIOR 2.0 TR 1135 1225 ESM 320 Garver B
70548 6VCC 402 VOICE REPERTOIRE FOR PIANIST 2.0 TR 1035 1125 ESM HHH Miller R A
70529 6VCC 431 VOICE REPERTOIRE MASTERS 1.0 TR 1035 1125 ESM HHH Miller R A

Wellness Initiative
71460 6WLN 101 YOGA FOR MUSICIANS 1.0 WF 1745 1900 OSL 101 Metzendorf A
71471 6WLN 101Z YOGA FOR MUSICIANS 1.0 WF 1745 1900 OSL 101 Metzendorf A
Yoga for Musicians: Course will include alignment-based hatha yoga, meditation, mindfulness, and breathing practices to promote greater strength, flexibility, and relaxation.
Emphasis on cultivating mindful qualities and physical techniques to protect against injury & increase openness. Support will be given to help each student establish a home
yoga & meditation practice.

COURSE RESTRICTIONS
A - Perm of Instructor Required J - Perm of Dean Required 3 - Open to Majors Only
B - Not Open to Freshmen or Sophomores K - Open to Freshman & Sophmores 4 - W/Instructor Perm (except VCE)
C - Perm of instructor Required for Freshmen P - Open to Freshmen Only Z- Open to ESM Students Only
E - Not Open to Freshmen UPDATED
APPLIED MUSIC LESSONS (All teacher assignments must be pre-approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs.) FALL 2017
UNDERGRADUATE : 130 - 1/2 hr-2 cr 160 - 1 hr-4 cr GRADUATE : 430 - 1/2 hr-1.5 cr 460 - 1 hr-3 cr MM-DMA PRL: 430A - 1/2 hr-2 cr 460A - 1 hr-4 cr

ODETTE P 67159
STAFF U 67124 67131
Accompanying 6ACM
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A Violoncello 6VCL
BARR J 58209 58223 58237 COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
DOANE S 70980 71035
HARRIS A 71088 71064
Jazz (Various Instruments) 6JAZ
STAFF U 70943 70999
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
YING D 70965 71022
CAMPBELL BASS 66125 66182
JENKINS C TRUMPET 66289 66254 66220 Viola 6VLA
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
KELLOGG M TROMBONE 66100 66218
STAFF U 71101 71195 71140 71174
PILLOW C SAXOPHONE 66133 66236
TAYLOR G 71138 71169
SNEIDER R GUITAR 66052 66272 66144 66205
YING P 71127 71152
STAFF 1 U DRUMSET 66040 66263
STAFF 2 U GUITAR 66069 66157
Violin 6VLN
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
STAFF 3 U BASS 66074 66179
AGOSTINI F 71268 71332
STAFF 4 U PIANO 66083 66166
ATHAYDE J 71423 71349
THOMPSON DRUMSET 66095 66247
HUANG B 71250 71376
VERSACE G PIANO 66111 66198
JOLLES R 71414 71361
KOPELMAN 71273 71355
Harpsichord 6HPC KRYSA O 71437 71328
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A 71242 71387
SCOTT R
BELLOTTI E 65778 65780 65800
STAFF U 71215 71284
Organ 6ORG
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
BELLOTTI E 68448 68535 Voice 6VCE
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
HIGGS D 68456 68522
CIESINSKI K 70887 70796
LAUBE N 68467 68519
COWDRICK 70662 70832
STAFF U 68429 68475
GRIFFEY A 70893 70810
Piano 6PA
OPALACH J 70624 70804
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
68640 68755 RETZLAFF J 70645 70784
ANTONOVA
68896 68923 STAFF U 70567 70690
CARAMIA T
68868 68909 SWENSEN R 70659 70773
CHOW A
68873 WEBBER C 70876 70849
FREER E
HUMPHERY 68850 68776
KOBRIN A 68669 68787 Bassoon 6BSN
LENTI V 68884 68914 COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
SNYDER B 68638 68761 SAKAKEEN 58610 58649

STAFF U 68588 68695 STAFF U 58655 58628

TRUE N 68674 68749 Clarinet 6CL


COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
GRANT K 63389 63363
Double Bass 6DBL MANASSE J 63336 63407
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
STAFF U 63320 63354
STAFF U 64058 64085
VANDEMAR 64071 64092 Euphonium 6EUP
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
Guitar 6GTR KELLOGG M 65140 65169
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
STAFF U 65174 65183 65152
GOLUSES N 65689 65726
STAFF U 65663 65691
Flute 6FL
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
Harp 6HRP BOYD B 65239 65273
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
STAFF U 65207 65242
BRIDE K 65882 65903
STAFF U 65912 65898
Horn 6HRN
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
Lute 6LUT KURAU W 65811 65844
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
STAFF U 65879 65833
Oboe 6OB
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
BURGESS G

KILLMER R 68266 68282


STAFF U 68257 68298
Piccolo 6PIC
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
HARROW A 69447 69436
Percussion 6PRC
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
BURRITT M 69454 69463
STAFF U 69489 69472
Saxophone 6SAX
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
LIN C 69609 69587
STAFF U 69555 69561
Tuba 6TBA
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
HARRY D 69685 69701
STAFF U 69671 69692
Trombone 6TBN
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
KELLOGG M 69795 69769
STAFF U 69783 69740
ZALKIND L 69727 69738 69774

Trumpet 6TPT
COURSE 130 160 430 460 430A 460A
PROSSER D 70512 70488
STAFF U 70422 70497
THOMPSON 70453 70470
EASTMAM SCHOL OF MUSIC ACADEMIC CALENDAR
FALL 2017 SPRING 2021

Fall Semester FALL 2017 FALL 2018 FALL 2019 FALL 2020
Labor Day (no classes)
* Before Semester Begins
Classes Begin Wed, Aug 30, 2017 Wed, Aug 29, 2018 Wed, Aug 28, 2019 Thurs, Aug 27, 2020
Labor Day (no classes)
Mon, Sep 04, 2017 Mon, Sep 03, 2018 Mon, Sep 02, 2019 Mon, Sep 07, 2020
* After Semester Begins
Fall break begins Sat, Oct 07, 2017 Sat, Oct 13, 2018 Sat, Oct 12, 2019 Sat, Oct 10, 2020
Classes Resume Wed, Oct 11, 2017 Wed, Oct 17, 2018 Wed, Oct 16, 2019 Wed, Oct 14, 2020

Thanksgiving break
Wed, Nov 22, 2017 Wed, Nov 21, 2018 Wed, Nov 27, 2019 Wed, Nov 25, 2020
ESM & RC break starts at noon

Classes Resume Mon, Nov 27, 2017 Mon, Nov 26, 2018 Mon, Dec 02, 2019 Mon, Nov 30, 2020
Accompanying Juries Sat, Dec 09, 2017 Sat, Dec 08, 2018 Sat, Dec 07, 2019 Sat, Dec 05, 2020
Sat, Dec 09, 2017 Sat, Dec 08, 2018 Sat, Dec 07, 2019 Sat, Dec 05, 2020
Reading Weekend
Sun, Dec 10, 2017 Sun, Dec 09, 2018 Sun, Dec 08, 2019 Sun, Dec 06, 2020
Last Day of Classes Wed, Dec 13, 2017 Wed, Dec 12, 2018 Wed, Dec 11, 2019 Thu, Dec 10, 2020
Reading Day Thu, Dec 14, 2017 Thu, Dec 13, 2018 Thu, Dec 12, 2019 Fri, Dec 11, 2020
First day of final examinations Fri, Dec 15, 2017 Fri, Dec 14, 2018 Fri, Dec 13, 2019 Sat, Dec 12, 2020
Last day of final examinations Sun, Dec 17, 2017 Sun, Dec 16, 2018 Sun, Dec 15, 2019 Mon, Dec 14, 2020
70 (M13, T14, W15, 70 (M13, T14, W15, 70 (M13, T14, W15, 70 (M13, T14, W14,
Number of Class Days
R14, F14) R14, F14) R14, F14) R15, F14)
Number of Reading Days 3 3 3 3
Number of Exam Days 3 3 3 3
Spring Semester Spring 2018 Spring 2019 Spring 2020 Spring 2021
Martin Luther King Day (no classes)
Mon, Jan 15, 2018
* Before Semester Begins
Classes Begin Tue, Jan 16, 2018 Mon, Jan 14, 2019 Mon, Jan 13, 2020 Mon, Jan 11, 2021
Martin Luther King Day (no classes)
Mon, Jan 21, 2019 Mon, Jan 20, 2020 Mon, Jan 18, 2021
* After Semester Begins
Spring Break Begins Sat, Mar 10, 2018 Sat, Mar 09, 2019 Sat, Mar 07, 2020 Sat, Mar 06, 2021
Classes Resume Mon, Mar 19, 2018 Mon, Mar 18, 2019 Mon, Mar 16, 2020 Mon, Mar 15, 2021
Mon, Apr 23, 2018 Mon, Apr 22, 2019 Mon, Apr 20, 2020 Mon, Apr 19, 2021
Jury Week (no classes)
Fri, Apr 27, 2018 Fri, Apr 26, 2019 Fri, Apr 24, 2020 Fri, Apr 23, 2021
Sat, May 05, 2018 Sat, May 04, 2019 Sat, May 02, 2020 Sat, May 01, 2021
Reading Weekend or Period
Sun, May 06, 2018 Sun, May 05, 2019 Sun, May 03, 2020 Sun, May 02, 2021
Last Day of Classes Mon, May 07, 2018 Mon, May 06, 2019 Mon, May 04, 2020 Mon, May 03, 2021
Reading Day(s) Tue, May 08, 2018 Tue, May 07, 2019 Tue, May 05, 2020 Tue, May 04, 2021
First day of final examinations Wed, May 09, 2018 Wed, May 08, 2019 Wed, May 06, 2020 Wed, May 05, 2021
Last day of final examinations Fri, May 11, 2018 Fri, May 10, 2019 Fri, May 08, 2020 Thu, May 06, 2021
Commencement Weekend Begins Sat, May 19, 2018 Sat, May 18, 2019 Sat, May 16, 2020 Sat, May 15, 2021
Commencement Weekend Ends Sun, May 20, 2018 Sun, May 19, 2019 Sun, May 17, 2020 Sun, May 16, 2021
Number of Class Days 70 70 70 70
Number of Reading Days 3 3 3 3
Number of Exam Days 3 3 3 3

Calendar Updated 01/26/17

*Fall semester start dates subject to change starting Fall 2019..