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POETRY LEARNING SEGMENT: TOTAL POINTS 50.

To The Core: Preparatory Analysis of Text, Close Reading, and Creating Formative Writing Tasks

PAT: Preparatory Analysis of Text (PAT) for Teachers: 10 POINTS


CCCS. Whatever
Please note: A text can be defined as print or image. Length depends on they are reading,
purpose, as well as student language performance levels. Texts for close reads students must also
may vary in length from a phrase to paragraph to an excerpt to a whole article or show a steadily
chapter. Text types may include fiction, informational, poetry, print or symbol, growing ability to
video, illustration, a musical score, explanations, descriptions, narratives, discern more from
interpretations, essays, and arguments. and make fuller use
of text, including
making and
Title: Sympathy increasing number of
connections among
Author/Artist: Paul Laurence Dunbar ideas and between
texts, considering a
Source: poets.org wider range of textual
evidence, and
Genre: Poetry becoming more
sensitive to
Name of Lesson, Learning Segment, or Unit: inconsistencies,
ambiguities, and poor
Freedom for the Birds reasoning in texts
A (p.7).
Poetry Learning Segment for To Kill a Mockingbird
Using
Sympathy by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Part 1: Complete numbers 1-6. Use this page as a worksheet or annotate the text directly.

1. A. Mark significant words, notes, symbols, phrases, measures, and passages.

Sympathy Related Poem Content Details


BY PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR
I know what the caged bird feels, alas!
When the sun is bright on the upland slopes;
When the wind stirs soft through the springing grass,
And the river flows like a stream of glass;
When the first bird sings and the first bud opes,
And the faint perfume from its chalice steals
I know what the caged bird feels!

I know why the caged bird beats his wing


Till its blood is red on the cruel bars;
For he must fly back to his perch and cling
When he fain would be on the bough a-swing;
And a pain still throbs in the old, old scars
And they pulse again with a keener sting
I know why he beats his wing!

I know why the caged bird sings, ah me,


When his wing is bruised and his bosom sore,
When he beats his bars and he would be free;
It is not a carol of joy or glee,
But a prayer that he sends from his hearts deep core,
But a plea, that upward to Heaven he flings
I know why the caged bird sings!

2. Reread and highlight or copy here the most significant phrases for this lesson. Three or
four is plenty.

I know what the caged bird feels


Till its blood is red on the cruel bars;/For he must fly back to his perch and cling
And a pain still throbs in the old, old scars/And they pulse again with a keener sting
I know why the caged bird sings

3. Add one more element of the text that resonates to you.

The use of figurative language within the poem is something to be focused on, but specifically
the use of bird metaphors really resonates with me and can tie in with the bird metaphors
throughout the novel. The use of the bird being caged creates an image that can be understood
in reference to what occurred within the novel and during the time period.

4. What necessary words or phrases might students struggle to understand?

the river flows like a stream of glass


Chalice, fain, bough, keener, opes
upland slopes
It is not a carol of joy or glee
And the faint perfume from its chalice steals

5. As a specialist in your discipline, what do you take away from this text?

This poem uses the metaphor of a caged bird to bring to light the issues of injustice and
oppression which were prevalent in the time Paul Laurence Dunbar wrote this poem but are
also themes spread throughout To Kill a Mockingbird. It is also clear that the speakers
feelings of oppression can be seen in our society today, and therefore we can understand how
these issues have changed while also remaining present in our world.
6. What would you want your students to take away from this text? You will return to this.

Students should take away the understanding of Dunbars use of extended metaphor and
figurative language within the poem Sympathy to express themes of race, injustice, and
oppression. They will be able to relate the poem to the time period in which it was written
along with the time and setting of To Kill a Mockingbird. They will be able to better
understand the issues that were present at the time and how it could have felt to be a part of
that era. They can also relate the bird in the poem to different characters in the book such as
Arthur Boo Radley and Tom Robinson. Finally, students can relate these themes from the
poem and novel to our society today, and see how these issues have changed or not changed.

7. How might you connect #6 to the CCSS?

Reading Standards for Literature 6-12: Grades 9-10, Key Ideas and Details: 2. Determine a
theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text,
including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective
summary of the text.
o Students will underline/highlight, the figurative language within the poem and will
discuss what themes they discovered through Dunbars use of extended metaphor and
how the bird represents oppression through its distress in the cage.

Part II: Complete numbers 7-12. Be Selective. Leave blank whats not relevant.

8. Note the density of information and some key concepts and ideas:

What background knowledge would students need to approach this text?


o Students would need to know what figurative language and extended metaphor are, and
how they can be used in poetry.
o Some historical context about racism and oppression in the late nineteenth and early
twentieth centuries.
What information in the text is most important?
o Through the extended metaphor of the caged bird, it is important to understand that the
bird is not singing and beating its wings out of happiness but instead out of anger and
fear of its oppression. It is seeking freedom and thus is depicting the oppressive racism
and judgement that was/is occurring in the world.
What key concepts in the text are most important?
o The use of extended metaphor (the bird) as a vehicle to depict the themes of freedom
and oppression, injustice, and racism.
o The use of repetition at the beginning and end of each stanza to show the speakers
understanding of how the caged bird feels.

9. Levels of Meaning:

Are there multiple levels of meaning? What are they? (Story, argument, perspective, ideas)
o Yes, there are multiple levels of meaning, as the poem itself is speaking from the birds
experience being caged and unable to fly free, while we also receive the speakers
views as well through the use of the repetition in each stanza.
o The song that the bird is singing can be misinterpreted as a happy song but is actually
the birds plea for freedom from his oppressive cage.
o Deeper meaning: the bird represents racism within society and the oppression of
African American people.
10. Complexity and Voice:

In terms of literary elements, what is the point of view? (1st person, objective)

o First person point of view

Whose story is it?

o The poem is telling the birds story but more directly the story of African
Americans in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This is seen
through Dunbars use of personal pronouns (I) throughout the poem, showing
that he understands the birds pain.

Is there a subtext or counter position?

o Dunbars understanding of the bird and his oppression within the cage can be seen
as a subtext within the poem.

Is the text chronological? If not, how is time used in the text?

o The poem seems to follow a fairly chronological timeline as it follows the birds
struggle to free himself and be a part of the beautiful world outside of his cage.

11. Figurative and Idiomatic Language:

Are there analogies, metaphors or figurative or idiomatic expressions in the text?

o Extended metaphor: The caged bird compared to an oppressed person

o Simile: And the river flows like a stream of glass;

o Repetition: First and last line of each stanza,

o Alliteration: When the wind stirs soft through the springing grass

Are ideas concrete or abstract (or some combination thereof)?

o Mixture of abstract and concrete images throughout the poem.

Is there word play, humor or irony?

Is any of the language potentially misleading?


o The first stanza can seem misleading as it presents the image of how beautiful
the outside world is while the rest of the poem depicts the oppressive cage that
the bird in confined in.

12. Purpose and Audience


What is the authors purpose? (To express, reflect, inquire, explore, inform, explain,
analyze, interpret, persuade, evaluate, judge, propose a solution, or seek common ground)?

o The authors purpose is to express his empathy with the oppression of the bird
locked in a cage. He is using the bird as a metaphor for the oppression that
African Americans were experiencing at the time.

Who is the audience?

o The audience for this poem can be anybody, but more specifically those who have
been oppressed or felt oppressed in their lives. He is trying to empathize with
them while also creating an image, for those who may not understand, of what it is
like to be oppressed.

13. Genre, Structure, Linguistic Features, and Presentation of Information

What genre is this text?

o Poem, lyric

How is the text organized? Are there headings? text boxes? side bars? images?

o The poem is organized into three stanzas that are seven lines each.

Vocabulary is there specialized language necessary for students to know?

o Chalice, fain, bough, keener, opes

Linguistic Features- (Sentence length? Verb tense? Subordination? Tone? Register? Style?)

Part III: PAT to Plan. Complete numbers one through nine.


Close Readings with Leveled Discussion Questions Leading to A Formative Writing Assessment

CCCS (select a cluster of two or three). Refer back to Part I. Why Do We Teach
Reading Standards for Literature 6-12: Grades 9-10, Key Ideas and Close Reading
Details: 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in Strategies?
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it To make sense of the
emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an text, its plot, setting,
objective summary of the text. characters, messages,
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the and purpose.
text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the To explore human
cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., motive and character,
how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a and help students
formal or informal tone). develop curiosity for
other experiences or
Language Standards: Vocabulary Acquisition and Use: 5. Demonstrate
connect student
understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances
beliefs to other
in word meanings.
perspectives.
Learning Objectives (Refer to Part 1: question 6: What do want your students To analyze an
to take away from the text?) argument, its claim,
Students should take away the understanding of Dunbars use of evidence, logic, and
extended metaphor and figurative language within the poem Sympathy emotional appeal.
to express themes of race, injustice, and oppression. They will be able To appreciate the
to relate the poem to the time period in which it was written along with authors craftits
the time and setting of To Kill a Mockingbird. They will be able to graceful rhetoric
better understand the issues that were present at the time and how it and stylistic choices
could have felt to be a part of that era. They can also relate the bird in and to name and
the poem to different characters in the book such as Arthur Boo explore literary and
Radley and Tom Robinson. Finally, students can relate these themes speaking and writing
from the poem and novel to our society today, and see how these issues techniques.
have changed or not changed. To support students
in developing
independent reading
General Procedures: strategies.
Decide if students will do a cold read before a close read.

Design distinct purposes for each read: What does it say? What does it
mean? Why does it matter? There is no maximum number of readings.

Less is more. Less is more. Less is more. Save some questions for
discussion and skills for another lesson.

Number the paragraphs.

Allow time to process between each read. Whole class discussion. Small
group or pair talk. Journal or quick writes. Clarify or organize
annotations and notes. Integrate ELD support: post responses using
Graphic Organizers, such as Say Mean Charts, web or bubble maps,
Cause and Effect T Charts

14. Can you adapt, modify, or rewrite the text without compromising complexity of ideas,
purpose, register or feeling? If so, attach the adapted text to this worksheet.

This poem would lose meaning and historical context if rewritten due to the extent of
metaphor used, who the author was, and when it was written.

15. Can you make the text (ideas or structure) more accessible before reading? How?
Supplemental materials, images, primary sources

Provide a background about Paul Laurence Dunbar and his rise as an African American
poet.
Provide background about the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, when this poem
was written. (After Civil War)
Discuss some vocabulary that might be difficult in the poem
Refresh on figurative language and metaphor
16. First Read and time to process. What does it say? Ask students questions about headings,
titles, who, what, when, where, and how facts.

After the first read, I will ask students what they think the poem says and how it made them
feel. I will then open up for discussion about their responses. I will also ask how the title
relates to the poems topic, and what images were created when they read.
17. Second Read and time to process. What does it mean? How does the text work? This is a
start of an analysis. Ask students to find opinions, points made, connections to other ideas, and to
define words and phrases in context.

For the second reading, I will ask students to highlight/underline examples of figurative
language (language using or containing a figure of speech; metaphorical, not literal. Allusion,
hyperbole, metaphor, personification, simile, etc.) that they find in the poem. I will then ask
them to share what they found while reading, and explain what literary device it is. They can
then discuss what images are created through these example and what it adds to the meaning of
the poem.

18. Third Read and time to process. What does it matter? Analysis meets interpretation. Ask
students about the authors purpose, points, about whether they agree or disagree with points in
the reading, and why, why, why.

For the final reading, I will ask the students to answer the questions: Who is the speaker?, Who
is the poems audience?, What is the theme of the poem?, Who might the bird be?, What might
the cage represent?, How it relates to To Kill a Mockingbird, and What character from To Kill
a Mockingbird could be the bird from the poem? They must have supporting evidence for their
answers. Then, after giving them time to answer the questions while reading, I will then have
them share out their answers and open up a discussion so the class can share ideas.

Part IV. Reading to Writing and Designing a Formative In class Writing Assessment
CCCS Skills:
Summary
Citing textual evidence
A focus to connect ideas from the text, the readers response, and the world about.

19. Create a prompt in the form of a what-do-you-think question. Prompts may be taken from
or connected to final unit essay writing prompts
What is the relationship between the bird and the speaker in the poem?
What does the birds song represent?
What does the cage represent?
Why is the bird caged?
What does the bird represent?

20. Develop a simple rubric that minimizes (eliminates) take home grading. In class formative
assessments can focus on one part of part of the rubric. Student work need not be collected. Focus
on summary, or evidence, or connections separately. Assess.
Students share ideas and responses with the class
Students are writing answers and annotating poem properly
Stamp each students response and annotations for points and have them put it in their English
binder (Stamped work section/stamp directory) to be entered in the grade book when that
grading periods work section is turned in (Binder procedure already in place in the classroom)
When entering stamps into grade book check to see that students responses are correct and
follow instructions and show comprehension of the topic.

EXAMPLE RUBRIC
Response Paper: Prompt
Succinct summary of the Writing shows engagement in and a response to the
readings readings and what makes each reading significant
Summaries are comprehensivethat is the message in a
nutshell
References cited and text quoted The writing includes direct or indirect connections to the
texts
The writing may cite other texts as well
A focus that connects ideas, A focus takes this from summary or report to a central
yours, the readings, and the idea and response to that idea
world about. Not easy: but a central idea or focus connects the
readings to you and how you view
teaching/education/learning. This is Deweys intelligent
reflection.
Comments:

LEARNING SEGMENT LESSON PLAN ELA (35 HOURS OF INSTRUCTION)

Part I: Lesson Focus: 10 POINTS

A. General Topic: Grade(s): # Days/Periods (3-5 hours):

Poetry Learning Segment for To Kill a Mockingbird


using 9th Grade Four 55-minute periods over
Sympathy by Paul Laurence Dunbar four days
(Using extended metaphors about birds to
represent injustice, oppression, and innocence)

B. Texts (texts may be other than print, like music, art, video)

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (Book)

Sympathy by Paul Laurence Dunbar (Handout)


C. Analysis of The Core Text:
1. Complete a Preparatory Analysis of Text (PAT) for each text used in the LS. Use the PAT worksheet.
2. What do you want students to know, understand, and do?

1. See PAT above

2. What do you want students to know, understand, and do?


o Students should take away the understanding of Dunbars use of extended metaphor and
figurative language within the poem Sympathy to express themes of race, injustice, and
oppression. They will be able to relate the poem to the time period in which it was written
along with the time and setting of To Kill a Mockingbird. They will be able to better
understand the issues of oppression and injustice that were present at the time and how it could
have felt to be a part of that era. They can also relate the bird in the poem to different
characters in the book such as Arthur Boo Radley and Tom Robinson. Finally, students can
relate these themes from the poem and novel to our society today, and see how these issues
have changed or not changed over time. I want students to be able to annotate a poem,
understand the use of figurative language within poetry, and understand how the
themes/symbols present in Sympathy relate to those that are within To Kill a Mockingbird. I
then want the students to write their own found poem using the novel and poem, to express
how they understand the themes present in the story.
(Journal topic)

D. Questions for Inquiry

What is figurative language? What is metaphor?


How can figurative language be used to convey theme?
How does Paul Laurence Dunbar use metaphor to create the themes of injustice and oppression?
What does the cage represent?
What does the birds song represent?
Why is the bird caged?
What is the relationship between the speaker in Sympathy and the caged bird?
What does the bird represent?
What character from To Kill a Mockingbird does the caged bird represent?
o How/why is that character a caged bird?

E. Learning Objectives

Students will read and annotate Sympathy by Paul Laurence Dunbar to understand the literary devices
used to create the images and themes present within the poem. They will then compare the image of
the caged bird in the poem to the themes and characters in To Kill a Mockingbird. To show their own
knowledge of the themes present in the novel and poem, students will write a found poem using words
and phrases from both texts. Students should take away the understanding that figurative language use
within the poem Sympathy is a vehicle to express the themes of race, injustice, and oppression.
Students will also have a historical context to understand these issues and how they play a role in the
poem and novel. They will be able to relate the image of the bird to characters that are present within
To Kill a Mockingbird, while also looking at the bird symbolism that is present throughout the novel.
Students will practice annotating poetry, figurative language use, interpreting poetry, and
communicating themes and symbols found within poetry and text.
Students will show knowledge and understanding of these skills and topics by writing their own found
poems.

F. California Common Core Standards


Reading Standards for Literature 6-12: Grades 9-10, Key Ideas and Details: 2. Determine a theme or
central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it
emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Reading Standards for Literature 6-12: Grades 9-10, Craft and Structure: 4.Determine the meaning of
words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze
the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a
sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
Writing Standards 6-12: Grades 9-10, Production and Distribution of Writing: 4. Produce clear and
coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose,
and audience
Speaking and Listening Standards 6-12: Grades 9-10, Comprehension and Collaboration: 1. Initiate
and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-
led) with diverse partners on grades 910 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and
expressing their own clearly and persuasively
Language Standards 6-12: Grades 9-10, Vocabulary Acquisition and Use: 5. Demonstrate
understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

F. Central Focus of Learning Segment (main text, learning objectives, reading strategies, speaking and writing performance goals)

Students use the poem Sympathy by Paul Laurence Dunbar to explore how figurative language such as
metaphor and simile, shape the poems themes and meaning. Through multiple readings, annotation,
and discussion, students will uncover the meaning within Dunbars poem and discuss how it relates to
the characters, symbols, and themes within Harper Lees To Kill a Mockingbird. Students will
uncover the importance of figurative language in creating a deeper meaning within poetry and
literature, and will demonstrate their knowledge by creating their own found poems. They will then
share their poems in pairs, discuss their ideas, and share out to the class what they discussed.
Main text: To Kill a Mockingbird
o Poem: Sympathy
Learning Objectives:
o Understanding figurative language, specifically metaphor and simile
o Understanding the importance of practicing poetry annotation
o Communicate themes and meanings within poetry and text
o Discuss how the themes are presented in the poem and book respectively and how they are
related
o Create found poems from the annotated poem and text to show understanding of common
themes and language use
Part II: Progression of Learning and Assessments: 10 POINTS

G. Progression of Lesson Tasks

Prereading:
o Refresh students knowledge and understanding of figurative language and poetic devices.
(language using or containing a figure of speech; metaphorical, not literal. Allusion,
hyperbole, metaphor, personification, simile, etc.) Review handout Literary Terms for Short
Story Unit discuss how figurative language is used within poetry
o Review annotation
o Discussion about Paul Laurence Dunbars background and life
o Introduce Sympathy poem
Reading:
o First read: Read poem aloud to students
After first read: ask students what they believe the poem is saying literally and how it
made them feel.
Ask students for any words they did not understand, and discuss the meaning and
definition of those words
o Second read: Students will read the poem silently to themselves while highlighting/underlining
figurative language they find.
After second read: ask students to share what figurative language they found in the
poem. Discuss what the author is doing throughout regarding the use of figurative
language, specifically metaphor and simile.
o Third read: Students will read the poem again silently to themselves paying extra attention to
the figurative language that was discussed.
After third read: ask students what they believe the author is saying/what the meaning
of the poem is. Discuss this in relation to the context about Dunbars life and the time
the poem was written.
Students will work individually or in groups to answer critical thinking questions about the poems
themes and language use
As a class we will discuss answers to the critical thinking questions while looking closely at the poem
for evidence
Students will then use their critical thinking questions to write a paragraph about how the bird in the
poem relates to the themes and characters they have seen so far in To Kill a Mockingbird
Class discussion about paragraphs and what themes and characters the students were able to relate the
texts to.
Introduction to found poetry, give example and model for students how a found poem is created.
Assign a found poem, have students use their annotated poem and novel to create their own poem that
reflects the themes within each piece.
Finish the poem for homework and add an illustration that highlights the theme they chose for their
poem
Share found poems in partners and discuss what figurative language is used in each poem, explain
illustration, then share out to the class for a final wrap up discussion.

H. Formative Assessments: During Instruction. I. Summative Assessments: After Instruction.

Check that students understand annotation by Students will turn in their paragraphs,
circulating around the room to see that they are annotated poems, and critical thinking
highlighting, underlining, etc. on the section they are questions as a stapled packet
to be reading. o I will look over the packet to
see that students annotated
Working with partner by sharing ideas and asking properly, answered the
questions questions fully, and wrote a
paragraph that properly
Ask for students to participate in discussion and to answers the assignment and
share their found poems uses the perfect paragraph
Ask questions that will assess students grasp of format. (Format that students
figurative language present within the poem and have been working on since
book. For example, ask what words specifically beginning of the year).
emphasize the theme of oppression. The found poems will be hung up
Using the found poem as a formative assessment so around the room.
students can show their own knowledge of the
themes and language present within the texts.
J. Teaching Resources (Visuals, Materials, Handouts)
Sympathy Poem Handout
Paul Laurence Dunbar History Handout
Paragraph Assignment worksheet
Found Poem Assignment Handout (Source: mrneuendorff.weebly.com)
Literary Terms to Know for Short Story Unit Handout (already given to students and in their English
Binder)
Critical Thinking Questions

K. What Are The Language Demands?


California English Language Development (ELD) Standards

Select the ELD Standards that align with key Learning tasks. (G). Reference appropriate ELD performance level descriptions for Emerging,
Expanding, and Bridging to create appropriate language supports and scaffolds for your students.
2-4 Maximum. Have fewer and think more about how you will support your ELD students.
Part 1: Interacting in Meaningful Way

A. Collaborative

1. Exchanging information and ideas with others through oral collaborative discussions on a range of social and academic
topics
Emerging: Engage in conversational exchanges and express ideas on familiar current events and
academic topics by asking and answering yes-no questions and wh-questions and responding using
phrases and short sentences
o Asking wh-questions such as what is a metaphor, what is a simile, what is an example of
figurative language, asks students to provide an a short answer that requires some prior
knowledge thinking.
Expanding: Exchanging information/ideas: Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions,
sustaining conversations on a variety of age and grade-appropriate academic topics by following turn-
taking rules, asking and answering relevant, on-topic questions, affirming others, providing additional,
relevant information, and paraphrasing key ideas.
o By asking students to talk in pairs about the meaning and themes within the poem, they can help
one another, through conversation, grasp what themes are present. Bringing the discussion of the
poems meaning down to a paired discussion can allow those who need more time to think, or
are struggling to find the meaning, a chance to formulate ideas and understanding before the
class discusses and moves on.
o Returning to class discussion to create a list of themes throughout the poem provides a general
understanding for everyone of what the poem is about, and allows for students to build upon
their own ideas and knowledge by having a basis of understanding.
Bridging: Exchanging information/ideas: Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions, sustaining
conversations on a variety of age and grade-appropriate academic topics by following turn-taking rules,
asking and answering relevant, on-topic questions, affirming others, and providing coherent and well-
articulated comments and additional information.
o Discussing how the poem relates to the time period it was written in and Dunbars life, allows for
students to engage in discussion that provides additional information that cannot be understood
from just reading the poem literally. By getting students to engage in a class discussion about
how the poem relates to historical context, students can comment on how the poem has a deeper
meaning.

2. Interacting with others in written English in various communicative forms (print, communicative technology and
multimedia)

3. Offering and justifying opinions, negotiating with and persuading others in communicative exchanges

4. Adapting language choices to various contexts (based on task, purpose, audience, and text type)

B. Interpretive

5. Listening actively to spoken English in a range of social and academic contexts

6. Reading closely literary and informational texts and viewing multimedia to determine how meaning is conveyed explicitly
and implicitly through language

7. Evaluating how well writers and speakers use language to support ideas and arguments with details or evidence depending
on modality, text type, purpose, audience, topic, and content area

8. Analyzing how writers and speakers use vocabulary and other language resources for specific purposes (to explain, persuade,
entertain, etc.) depending on modality, text type, purpose, audience, topic, and content area
Emerging: Analyzing language choices Explain how a writers or speakers choice of phrasing or specific
words (e.g., describing a character or action as aggressive versus bold) produces nuances and different
effects on the audience.
o Discussing difficult vocabulary present within the poem, allows students to analyze why those
words are part of the poem and why they are important to its meaning. By making the language
more accessible to the students, they can better understand the authors purpose.
Expanding: Analyzing language choices Explain how a writers or speakers choice of phrasing or
specific words (e.g., using figurative language or words with multiple meanings to describe an event or
character) produces nuances and different effects on the audience.
o Annotating the poem and looking for specific uses of figurative language such as simile and
metaphor allows students to uncover themes present within the poem. By discussing the use of
figurative language, students are able to understand the meaning behind the images that are
created.
Bridging: Analyzing language choices Explain how a writers or speakers choice of a variety of different
types of phrasing or words (e.g., hyperbole, varying connotations, the cumulative impact of word
choices) produces nuances and different effects on the audience.
o Paired discussion about how the figurative language in the poem enforces its themes and coming
together as a class to create a list of themes allows for an understanding of how the word and
phrase choice creates the poems meaning.
C. Productive

9. Expressing information and ideas in formal oral presentations on academic topics

10. Writing literary and informational texts to present, describe, and explain ideas and information, using appropriate
technology
Emerging: Writing: Write short literary and informational texts (e.g., an argument about water rights)
collaboratively (e.g., with peers) and independently
o Students annotate the poem on their own and answer critical thinking questions with full
sentences in pairs. By using engaging in these writing exercises, students are able to synthesize
what they have read, find the meaning of the poem, and explain in their own words.
Expanding: Writing: Write longer literary and informational texts (e.g., an argument about water rights)
collaboratively (e.g., with peers) and independently by using appropriate text organization
o By writing a paragraph using their annotation and critical thinking question responses, students
are able to present their own thinking about what themes are present in both the poem and novel.
By using their perfect paragraph format, students are able to properly format a paragraph that
provides commentary and evidence about what themes they believe to be related in the book and
poem.
Bridging: Writing: Write longer and more detailed literary and informational texts (e.g., an argument
about water rights) collaboratively (e.g., with peers) and independently using appropriate text
organization and register.
o Using the annotations, critical thinking questions, paragraph, and novel to write a found poem.
By writing a found poem, students are using their knowledge base about what themes are present
within the texts and are finding their own materials to support that claim while also writing in an
appropriate format.

11. Justifying own arguments and evaluating others arguments in writing

12. Selecting and applying varied and precise vocabulary and other language resources to effectively convey ideas

Part II: Learning About How English Works

A. Structuring Cohesive Texts

1. Understanding text structure

2. Understanding cohesion

B. Expanding & Enriching Ideas

3. Using verbs and verb phrases

4. Using nouns and noun phrases

5. Modifying to add details

C. Connecting & Condensing Ideas

6. Connecting ideas

7. Condensing ideas
IV. DAILY LESSON PLANS: 20 PONTS
Note: Expand as needed.

Day _1_: Agenda Written for Students

Agenda Period 4
Figurative Language Review
Annotation Review
Sympathy by Paul Laurence Dunbar
Homework: Bring annotated poem to class tomorrow

Progression of Learning:
Instructional Strategies, Questions to Support Learning, Scaffolds, and Assessments

Time Into Possible Questions Formative Assessments

Check students knowledge and What is Ask students what they


understanding of figurative language figurative remember about figurative
and poetic devices. Review handout language? language.
Literary Terms for Short Story Unit Example of Ask for volunteers to share
discuss how figurative language is used metaphor examples of figurative
within poetry, specific focus on Example of language.
10 metaphor and simile (write examples on simile
Min board) How do we Check for understanding
Review annotation, model for class annotate a piece by asking if there are any
(Highlight important words or phrases, of poetry? questions.
figurative language, literary devices,
Getting students to
write questions one margin of the poem, discuss and provide
write the poems meaning on the other examples of figurative
margin) language
What do you
think this poem
Introduce Sympathy poem, hand out will be about
5 poem and lead into discussion about based on the
Min poet title?
Discussion about Paul Laurence Form the title
Dunbars background and life. I will into a question to
discuss when and where Dunbar was help guide
born and lived. I will then give a small reading.
background about his life and about the
time in which the poem was published.

EL Literacy Focus
Focus is on students understanding of figurative language and annotation of poetry. They will
develop skills to understand literary devices and how and why annotation is useful. I am
opening up for discussion and student provided examples so that there is a chance for students
to process verbally and to hear from others about the topics. By referencing prior handouts,
students will be able to build upon prior knowledge that they have about figurative language
and annotation.
Through

Reading Sympathy:
o Read poem aloud to students. I Ask students Class discussion
will have students follow along what they about difficult
on their handout as I read the believe the poem vocabulary in the
poem aloud slowly. is saying literally poem.
Discuss difficult and how it made Ask for students
vocabulary and what they them feel. to try and define
believe the poem is Ask students for the words.
literally saying. any words of Ask students to
o For a second read, students will phrases they did share what they
read the poem silently to not understand annotated in the
themselves while and discuss the poem.
highlighting/underlining any meaning and Circulate around
30 figurative language they find, definition of the room to see
Mins and annotate as they read. those words. that everyone
Discussion about what Ask students to knows they
students annotated and share what should be silently
what figurative language figurative reading and
they found in the poem. language they annotating the
Annotate copy on ELMO found. poem.
as class gives examples What is the Turn discussion
o For the third read of the period, doing with after third reading
students will read the poem figurative to a paired
again silently to themselves language in the discussion so that
paying extra attention to the poem? students can
figurative language that was What metaphors synthesize their
discussed. and similes did thoughts and
Ask students to share you find while generate a
what they believe is the reading? common theme
meaning of the poem and What do you and meaning.
how it can relate to the believe the
time it was written in. author is saying?
Discussion may have to What is the
be in pairs before brought meaning of the
to the whole class level poem?
so students can have a How can we
way to collect their relate this to
thoughts and hear what Dunbars life
others have to say. and/or the time it
was written?

EL Literacy Focus
Focus is on reading and annotating the poem to gather the meaning and themes while also being
aware of how the author is using specific literary devices and language. By annotating student
provided responses on the ELMO, those who are struggling to find literary devices, can still
follow along and understand what exactly they were looking for. Bringing the discussion of the
poems meaning down to a paired discussion can allow those who need more time to think, or
are struggling to find the meaning, a chance to formulate ideas and understanding before the
class discusses and moves on.
Beyond
Come back together as a class and What themes did Students share
create a list of what themes are present you find in the themes that they
10 within the poem. poem? found in the poem
Mins
o Write list on the board and ask What elements Sharing what they
students to copy it down on their of figurative believe to be the
annotated poem. language helped meaning of the
I will have students keep the annotated enforce the poem.
poem in their English Binder and theme you
explain to them that they will need it for found?
the next days work. What is the
poem about?

EL Literacy Focus
Focus on creating a list of themes throughout the poem to build upon for the rest of the lesson.
Students will have a base knowledge about what the poem Sympathy is about and how Dunbar
uses figurative language to enforce his themes.

Note: Attach relevant documents, such as worksheets, assessments, rubrics, scoring guides, etc.
IV. DAILY LESSON PLANS: 20 PONTS
Note: Expand as needed.

Day _2_: Agenda Written for Students

Agenda Period 4
Read Sympathy
Discuss Themes in Sympathy
Critical Thinking Questions Worksheet Sympathy
To Kill a Mockingbird Themes/Characters
Theme Paragraph Assignment
Homework: Finish Theme Paragraph

Progression of Learning:
Instructional Strategies, Questions to Support Learning, Scaffolds, and Assessments

Time Into Possible Questions Formative Assessments

Read Sympathy aloud to students to What themes did we find in


refresh on what the poem is about. the poem? Students sharing with the
class
Give an example of
10 Go over list of themes compiled from figurative language used in Referencing poem and notes
Min the day before. the poem? from prior discussion

What is the meaning of the


poem?

EL Literacy Focus
Focus on strengthening basis of knowledge about poems meaning, themes, and figurative
language use. Making sure that students understand the poem before going deeper into the
language and meaning.
Through
Assign Critical Thinking Questions Does anyone have Circulate around the
Worksheet for students to work on in questions about the Critical classroom to make sure that
pairs. Thinking Worksheet? students are working and
understand the assignment
o Each student will fill out their What similarities do you and questions.
own sheet but will collaborate as notice between the caged
a pair to find answers. bird and Boo Radley? Students are working
together collaboratively to
Discuss answers to Critical Thinking What similarities do you complete the worksheet
35 Questions Worksheet notice between the caged questions.
Min o Groups will share out the bird and Tom Robinson?
answers they found for each of Students share their answers
the critical thinking questions How are the themes we and discussions with the
have been looking at in class.
Sympathy related to To
Talk about themes and characters in To Kill a Mockingbird? Check for understanding
Kill a Mocingbird that are similar to class discussion and note
Sympathy taking
o Look at how themes of race,
injustice, freedom, oppression,
etc. are present in both the novel
and poem How does the figurative Students will turn in critical
o Discuss how the caged bird in language in the poem thinking questions which
the poem is similar to Tom support the meaning and allows me to see where they
themes? are at individually.
Robinson and Arthur Boo
Radley.
o Have students take note about
discussion as I write key points
on the board
Students put their notes and Critical
Thinking Worksheet in their English
binder to turn in with their Paragraph
tomorrow.

EL Literacy Focus
Focus on understanding relationship between the novel and poem. Building upon figurative
language knowledge and themes by describing how the themes develop through the use of
figurative language. Picking out important passages to use for found poem assignment.
Beyond
Assign Theme paragraph for homework. Does everyone understand
10 o Students will use the perfect the homework assignment?
Min paragraph format to write a Check-in with students
Are there any questions about how they are feeling
paragraph answering the about what is due about the themes in the
questions: How does the caged tomorrow? texts.
bird in Paul Laurence Dunbars
Sympathy, relate to the Does everyone understand
characters and themes we have the themes we are looking
seen so far in To Kill a at?
Mockingbird? Describe one
theme that is shared between the
poem and novel? How do the
authors use figurative language
to support this theme?

EL Literacy Focus

Focus on using evidence from the texts to support discussion about theme and figurative
language. Using writing to synthesize ideas that were explored in class.

Note: Attach relevant documents, such as worksheets, assessments, rubrics, scoring guides, etc.
IV. DAILY LESSON PLANS: 20 PONTS
Note: Expand as needed.

Day _3_: Agenda Written for Students

Agenda Period 4
Discuss Critical Thinking Questions and Theme Paragraph
Introduction to Found Poetry
To Kill a Mockingbird and Sympathy Found Poem
Homework: Finish Found Poem Assignment

Progression of Learning:
Instructional Strategies, Questions to Support Learning, Scaffolds, and Assessments

Time Into Possible Questions Formative Assessments

Circulate around room to


Students share paragraphs in pairs and What themes did you make sure students are
then volunteer to share with whole class choose to write about? sharing their paragraphs
15 o In groups of two, students read
Mins Were there any questions Students are working
their theme paragraphs to each about the home work? collaboratively in reading
other and discuss the themes and listening
they chose Did anybody have
o Ask for a few students to share trouble writing about Students share ideas and
their paragraphs with the class their theme? discuss themes

Volunteers to share
paragraph with class

EL Literacy Focus
Focus on student sharing their written responses which express their comprehension with the
themes and language used in the novel and poem. Collaborative discussion about writing.
Through
Check for understanding:
Introduce found poetry What do we know about Has anyone written a found
o Explain to students how found found poetry? poem?
poetry works and is created
What themes can we use in Students are working on
o Provide an example of found
our found poems? finding
35 poem for students to get an idea quotes/words/phrases from
Mins of how the process works Does everyone understand the texts to use in their
Give students found poem assignment how to write a found poems.
o Students will collect words and poem?
phrases from the poem and novel
to use in a found poem about a
specific theme.
o They will create a 10 line poem
from the words/phrases they
found and will accompany the
poem with an illustration that
depicts the theme.
Work on collecting words and phrases
to use in their found poem
o Work individually or in pairs to
make a list of words and phrases
relating to the theme they are
going to be using.

EL Literacy Focus
Focus on students using their knowledge of figurative language and themes in texts to write and
illustrate their own found poems.
Beyond

5 Wrap-up by checking in on how Check for understanding:


Mins students are doing collecting their What are some words and Asking about what students
phrases and words for their poems. phrases that you found? have collected so far for
their poems and what
Remind students of the poem guidelines What literary devices are devices they are using.
you using in your found
poem?

EL Literacy Focus

Focus on students discussion of the words and phrases they have fund to use form their poems.
Reflect on literary devices and themes that are being used.

Note: Attach relevant documents, such as worksheets, assessments, rubrics, scoring guides, etc.
IV. DAILY LESSON PLANS: 20 PONTS
Note: Expand as needed.

Day _4_: Agenda Written for Students

Agenda Period 4
To Kill a Mockingbird Themes
Share Found Poem in Partners
o Discuss selected themes and illustrations
Share Found Poems and discussions with class
Wrap Up-Turn in work

Progression of Learning:
Instructional Strategies, Questions to Support Learning, Scaffolds, and Assessments

Time Into Possible Questions Formative Assessments

Ask students to list themes we have


discussed thus far and describe how they What themes have we Students share responses
are presented in the novel or poem. discussed thus far? with class and reference
15 text
mins
o Write the responses on the board What literary devices are
for students to refresh and take used in the novel and Actively taking notes on
notes poem? discussion
Provide an example
Ask students to list literary devices that
are present in the poem and novel and How did was the found
provide examples poem writing process?
o Write responses on board so
students can take notes

EL Literacy Focus
Focus on students finalizing understanding of themes and language use within poem and novel,
and compiling notes to use for further discussions and lessons on the novel.
Through

Students pair up and share their found What literary devices were Students are sharing their
poems and illustrations with a partner. used in these poem? poems in pairs
o Read found poem and then
30 What is the theme that this Students share poem with
Mins
describe the figurative language poem is discussing? class
elements used, discuss theme,
and explain how illustration What does the illustration Participate in discussion of
depicts poem say about the poem? language, themes and
After each partner shares, volunteers illustrations.
from the class will then share, and we
will have short discussions about each Students give feedback on
theme that is presented to the class. peers poems.
EL Literacy Focus
Focus on collaborative sharing of found poems and discussion of chosen images and themes.
Sharing out with the entire class to get a general idea of the most common and prevalent
examples within the texts.
Beyond

10 Wrap up lesson with final thoughts on Did you like this poem? Collect found poems.
mins poem and how it made students feel Why or why not?
Collect packet of writing
Students turn in found poem to be hung
How did the poem make assignments to look over
in classroom you feel? and assess students strengths
Students turn in stapled packet and weaknesses to better
(annotated poem, critical thinking Have you ever felt like the prepare them in areas of
questions, and theme paragraph). caged bird described in the need.
poem?

EL Literacy Focus

Focus on wrapping up lesson by getting students opinions of poem and how it made them feel.
Collect assignments to assess students progress and understanding.

Note: Attach relevant documents, such as worksheets, assessments, rubrics, scoring guides, etc.