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AbigailJones

ForensicSupervisor
1234RamonaLn.
Petaluma,CA,94954
(707)456-7890
ajones19@petk12.org

OBJECTIVE
Iamsearchingforajobinforensicsciences,specificallyinforensicinvestigation.Iam
pursuingacareerthatchallengesmeandthathasoptimalroomforgrowthand
development.

SUMMARY
Ihaveprevioustraininginthiscareer,andhaveheldsteadyjobsinwhichIregularly
gather,preserve,andtestevidence.Iamaccustomedtoworkingefficientlyand
productively,inamannerthatworkswellinmycareer.

EXPERIENCE
IrvinePoliceDep,California-ForensicSupervisor
December2028-PRESENT
Supervised&trainednewCSIpersonnel
Assistedadministration&oversawdailyoperations

Winston-salemPoliceDep.,NorthCarolina-ForensicServicesTechnician
November2023-August2028
Technicalandphysicalinvestigativework
Gatheredandpreservedevidence

BureauofCriminalInvestigation,MinnesotaDepartmentofPublicSafety,
Minnesota-Internship
June2022-July2022
Sixteenweekinternship
Workedalongsideoflaboratorystaffmembers

EDUCATION

UniversityofCalifornia,Riverside,RiversideCA-Bachelorsin
Forensicsciences/MastersinCrimeSceneInvestigationA ugust2019-
June2023

SKILLS
Alistofmyskillsandaptitudesinclude:
- ProficientincollectingandanalyzingevidencesuchasDNA,fingerprints,fluids,
anddrugs
- Analyzingfluidsandtissuesfordrug/poisoncontent
- Experiencedinattendingcrimescenesandworkingwithlawenforcement
- Trainedtogivescientificexplanationsincourt

REFERENCES
- Dr.MeshganMohdAl-Awar-GeneralDepartmentofForensicScienceforthe
NationalPoliceofDubai.

Telephone:(+9714)3163321/3163130
Mobile:(+97150)4537733
Email:drmeshkan@yahoo.com

- IsaiUrasa-Professorandchairman,Hamptonuniversity

Phone:
757-727-5398
Email:isai.urasa@hamptonu.edu-

Abigail Jones

Ms Gardner

English 10 H

9 March 2017


Plethora of Possibilities: A Reflection

Since I was young, I was always interested in mysteries. Scooby-Doo was my

favorite television show, and I read all of the Nancy Drew novels by the time I was ten.

Putting clues together was always something I could do for hours on end. Due to my

previous infatuations with mystery, the career choice of forensic investigation fell into place.

For a long while, I was at a loss of what profession I wanted to pursue. I knew

anything in the medical career was off limits, careers involving children were a lost cause,

and a job in government just seemed like a headache. I was failing to find anything that

peaked my interest. Finally after a look at both my past and present interests, I settled on a

career in criminal justice, more specifically in forensic sciences.

For this project, I closely researched all the different positions within forensics and

what they specialized in. I greatly broadened my perspectives on what forensic sciences

careers are. After getting an in depth understanding of positions I was interested in, I

began to look for colleges. Thinking about college is something I do frequently, whether I

choose to or not. It has always been at the back of my mind, and has for a while been a

source of stress. We are pressured from such a young age to figure out what we want out

of life. We are constantly asked what we want to do when we grow up and what colleges

we hope to attend. These questions have always seemed overwhelming and unrealistic to

me. I have never known what I wanted to do, but how could I? I have such little

experience within the work world that it is hard for me to make informed decisions about

a career. I did not know how other people did it; I had known people that from age five

knew they wanted to be a doctor or a veterinarian. What ultimately led me to settling on a

career was my past. My early fascination with mystery lined up perfectly with a career in

forensics. So, I pushed past my fear of the future and observed a selection of colleges.


After viewing an abundance of colleges that carried programs in forensics, I decided to

look closer at the University of California, Riverside.

To get an even better understanding of a career in forensics, I emailed Samantha

Evans, a Senior Criminalist with a masters in Forensic Science. She provided me with

complex, well-rounded answers about everything from her level of schooling to what she

considers the most rewarding part of her job. She explained that she loves that the cases

she works on can be seen as puzzles, always evolving pieces that eventually connect to

create a larger whole. Ms. Evans also shared that for her, the most difficult part of her job

is testifying in court, due to the amount of public speaking it requires. I can relate closely

to both of these responses. The ways in which cases resemble puzzles is very intriguing,

and, unfortunately, I also struggle with speaking in front of crowds. All of her responses

were aspects of the job to keep in mind, and they ultimately assisted me in achieving a

much better understanding of what it means to work in forensics.

In the end, all of this research has greatly helped me in finally finding something I am truly

interested in and excited to pursue. After gathering information about this field and interviewing

someone who works in it every day has truly opened my eyes to the plethora of possibilities

presented within this career. I hope to further my knowledge not only about this career, but ways to

excel within it.