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BULLETIN OF ASIAN GEOGRAPHY Spring, 2017

Volume Issue

BULLETIN
OF ASIAN GEOGRAPHY
The Bulletin of Asian Geography is published twice a year at the Department of Geography, University of Wisconsin, Platteville, 53818.
H. Todd Stradford, Editor Phone 608.342.1674, Fax 608.342.1088, email: stradfot@uwplatt.edu

Note from the Chairs


Hello fellow geographers,
Inside this issue: Greetings from AGSG chairs. Hope this
Chairs Report 1 finds you all in good health.
Business Meeting 2016 Agenda 2
If you sit back and think, you will find
AAG Undergraduate Affinity Group 2
Geography in almost everything. Be it
113th AAG Annual Meeting 3 health and wealth, migration and refu-
Chandana Mitra & Xinyue Ye
Mobile Session App 4
gees, presidential election, blue and Co-Chairs of the AGSG
red states, Russia and its policies, cli-
AGSG Sessions 5
mate variability, inflation, economics covering aspects of migration, hazards,
RSA Student Research Awards 22 and trade. Can you name anything urban landscape, climate, geopolitics
which is not either political geography and spatial analysis. We congratulate
Other Sessions on Asia 23
or economic geography or spatial ge- the organizers of the sessions who
China Specialty Group Keynote 24
ography or human geography? We have put in an effort to make AGSG
March for Science 31 sometimes tend to overlook the fact presence felt at AAG.
2016 Asian Symposium Recap 32 that geography is such a rich and To further your involvement with AGSG
Member Notes 33
deep discipline. So to celebrate geog- crowd, please come to our Business
raphy as a discipline we invite you to Meeting on Saturday, 4/8/2017, from
Historical Glimpses 34
Boston to present and discuss re- 11:50 AM - 1:10 PM in Room 108,
AGSG Publications 35
search and share fun facts with fellow Hynes, Plaza Level. Your presence will
Where in Asian World? 39 geoscientists. encourage the AGSG 2017 award win-
Call for Papers 40
The geographies of Asia has always ners and also help augment a more
Officer Contact List 44
captured a lot of attention at AAG, just enriching AGSG involvement in AAG in
not because of the hugeness of the the years to come.
continent but the variety of social, See you all in Boston.
physical and cultural dimensions with-
in the continent. This AAG again, Asia Cheers,
will bring forth many interesting ses-
sions spreading across its sub-regions, Chandana and Xinyue.
BULLETIN
OF ASIAN GEOGRAPHY Page 2

2017 AGSG Business Meeting Agenda Saturday. April 8, 2017. 11:50-1:10

4341 Asian Geography Specialty Group 4. New Business:


Business Meeting a. Election Results
Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 11:50 AM - 1:10 PM in i. Asia Director
Room 108, Hynes, Plaza Level ii. Asia Director
iii.
b. Awards:
Tentative Agenda: i. AGSG Distinguished Service Award
1. Call to order ii. AGSG Best Graduate Student Paper Compe-
2. Approval of minutes from 2015 AGSG ABM, Chicago, tition
IL iii. AK Chakravarti Award for best student pa-
3. Continuing Business: per on South Asia (co-sponsored with Re-
a. Briefing from SG Chairs Meeting gional Development & Planning SG)
b. Secretary Treasurers report iv. AGSG Student Travel Awards with thanks to
c. State of the group and activities: Area Directors
i. Membership and listserv membership 5. Other business
ii. Number of sessions organized 6. Adjournment
d. Website issues: Volunteers required
e. Regional Reports (news from the regions from Please attend if you are near Room 108, Hynes, Pla-
Area Directors and/or other members) za Level on Saturday from 11:50 AM - 1:10 PM.
f. Efforts towards international attendance and col-
laboration, including IRSEC work

Undergraduate Student Affinity Group at the 2017 AAG Meeting


The 2017 AAG Annual Meeting in Boston will be the first since a.m. and Friday, April 7th at 3:20 p.m.
the establishment of the new Undergraduate Student Affinity
Scavenger Hunt for Undergrads: Tackle our Pho-
Group (USAG) and over 400 undergraduates have already reg-
to Scavenger Hunt designed for undergraduate attendees to
istered to attend the meeting. To celebrate and engage this
help discover different aspects of the meeting. View and
important part of the AAG community, there will be events,
download the Undergrad Photo Scavenger Hunt PDF under
activities, and resources geared for undergraduate students to
Essentials in the AAG Mobile app. The first two undergradu-
network with their peers and colleagues, expand their involve-
ate students to show their completed photos and checklist to
ment in and understanding of our discipline, and learn skills to
AAG Staff at the AAG Booth will get $20 credit to spend.
build their careers.
Undergrad Meetup Area at the International Re-
Undergraduate students attending the upcoming Annual Meet-
ception: Music, refreshments, and catching up with colleagues
ing in Boston should be sure to check out the following:
new and old are all features of the International Reception.
Newcomers Guide to the Meeting: First time
Undergraduate Student Affinity Group Business
attending an Annual Meeting? Check out this guide for tips
Meeting Want to help steer the direction of the new Under-
and tricks to navigating the largest geography conference in
graduate Student Affinity Group? The USAG Business Meeting
the world.
is on Thursday, April 6th, from 8:10 to 9:10pm in the Vineyard
http://www.aag.org/galleries/conference-files/
Room on the 4th Floor of the Marriott.
Newcomers_guide_handout_version_2017.pdf
AAG Jobs & Careers Center and the AAG Careers
Suggested Itinerary for Students: Overwhelmed
in Geography Fair & workshops at the Jobs & Careers Center
by the thousands of presentations and unsure where to start
found on the 2nd Level of the Hynes Convention Center, in
planning your day? Get started with the suggested itinerary
and around Rooms 203, 204, and 205.
for students, available under Essentials in the AAG Mobile
app. Consider also using #AAGUndergrads to interact
with other undergraduates in attendance and to build your
AAG Snapshot Talk on Student Membership: As
peer and professional network via social media.
part of the new AAG Snapshots series at the Annual Meeting,
AAG staff will be giving brief informational talks in the AAG
Communications Center, including the topic Make the Most of
your Student Membership, presented on Wed., April 5th at 10
BULLETIN
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113th AAG Annual Meeting, 5 April 9 April 2017


Boston
http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting

Travel Restriction Legal Assistance


Resources

MIRA, the Massachusetts Immigrant and Ref-


ugee Advocacy Coalition, has provided a list
of resources for any international travelers
that may encounter difficulties upon arrival at
Boston Logan International Airport. These
resources include:
https://www.miracoalition.org/travel-ban

Airport Lawyer, volunteer lawyers protect-


ing refugees and travelers
https://www.airportlawyer.org/

International Refugee Assistance Pro-


ject, organized assistance from law students
and lawyers https://refugeerights.org/

Appleseed Network, helping vulnerable immigrants and refugees


http://www.appleseednetwork.org/immigrationcollaborative/

ACLUM, the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, also provides legal assistance related to civil
liberties violations and issues of unfair treatment by the government.
https://aclum.org/resources/seek-legal-assistance/

The preliminary program can be queried for sessions by using the page at:
http://meridian.aag.org/callforpapers/program/index.cfm?mtgID=63
There is also an app download for your Apple, Android, Blackberry, or Laptop. Download links can be
found at the following AAG page:
http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/program
search sessions by day, group or type or just browse the abstracts and participants listings
create your own schedule of events by adding your favorite sessions to your calendar
receive updated changes to sessions and events from organizers
browse exhibitor listings
take notes during sessions and send as emails and also rate the sessions
view the list of local places to experience during your visit, including restaurants, landmarks and muse-
ums
locate various sessions by tapping on areas of each floor plan within the maps icon

The tip sheet for the app is on the following page.


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AGSG Sponsored Introduction:


D. Asher Ghertner - Rutgers University
& Cosponsored Sessions Panelists:
Sai Balakrishnan
4307 Asian Geography Specialty Group Jennifer Robinson - University College London
Business Meeting Balakrishnan Rajagopal
Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 11:50 AM - 1:10 PM in Gautam Bhan - Indian Institute for Human Settlements
Room 108, Hynes, Plaza Level Discussant:
AbdouMaliq Simone

Wednesday 1162 Emerging Urban Landscape in Global


South 1
Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in
Panel Session: Kent, Sheraton, Third Floor
1158 Author Meets Critics: Gautam Bhan's In
the Public's Interest: Evictions, Citizenship, Session Description: Urban areas of all kinds and shapes
and Inequality in Contemporary Delhi are undergoing immense structural and social changes in
Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in the Global South owing to the emergence of new World
Gardner B, Sheraton, Third Floor Order. Individual and institutional responses to such
changes are keys to resilience at individual level and re-
Session Description: This Author-Meets-Critics panel brings newal at the institutional level. Researching the social and
together a range of urbanists to discuss Gautam Bhan's economic processes that shape urban landscape of the
newest book, In the Public's Interest: Evictions, Citizenship global south is a consistent tradition within Geography and
and Inequality in Contemporary Delhi, published in 2016 by other disciplines dealing urban since the seminal work of T.
the University of Georgia Press's Geographies of Social Jus- McGee. Systematic withdrawal of state as a service provid-
tice and Transformation Series. The book examines the er and sudden non-functioning of urban local bodies
legacy of mass evictions of some of the city's poorest brought on horizons the scores of multinational, regional
neighborhoods, called bastis, as a way to understand how and local corporate and entrepreneurs in land and housing
the urban poor are disenfranchised in the name of "public market. With new regimes of finance capital and percolat-
interest" and, in the case of Delhi, by the very courts ing ideals of 'utopian dreams,' the real estate sector is the
meant to empower and protect them. Studying bastis, prime avenue of 'hyper accumulation.' Entrepreneurial gov-
Bhan argues, provokes six lines of inquiry applicable to ernments are producing spaces for the development of
critical urbanism: 1) how informality shapes conceptions of knowledge parks and high-tech enclaves for smart busi-
the production of space, 2) how "good governance" has nesses by providing premium infrastructures, often at the
retooled patterns of growth in contexts of urban redevelop- cost of dispossessing the non-valued. Understanding the
ment, 3) new openings for exercising substantive citizen- factors operating at different scale and their varied out-
ship rights in the face of the narrowing of previous entitle- come in various cities across Global South is an important
ments to the poor, 4) how subaltern subjects use these task for policymakers and stakeholders concerned. The
rights to leverage new claims to the city, 5) the role of the proposed session aims to bring together papers from a
judiciary in opening and foreclosing possibilities for a just variety of disciplinary perspectives and spatial scales that
city, and 6) changing relations between inequality and de- would help further our understanding of the social, political
mocracy in the wake of speculative urbanism. Bhan uses and economic processes restructuring urban landscape of
these concerns to explain evictions and prompts panelists the Global South.
to further reflect on what they tell us about "the city that is
as well as the city that can be." We welcome papers that may include, but are not limited
Sponsorships: to:
Urban Geography Specialty Group The role of governance and government in shaping
Development Geographies Specialty Group urban landscape in the Global South
Asian Geography Specialty Group Utopia-dystopia of urban citizens in the Global South
Organizers: Accounts of resistance and/or resilience in Global
D. Asher Ghertner - Rutgers University South cities
Chairs: Changing Urban Landscape and Social Movements -
D. Asher Ghertner - Rutgers University persistent and upcoming
(Continued on page 6)
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Page 6

(Continued from page 5) In the English-speaking world, "Eurasia" has largely be-
Growing urban land market and informality come a collective term for some, many, or all of the post-
Social and political structures contributing 'hyper ac- Soviet states, and sometimes Mongolia.
cumulation.' Russian nationalist and geopolitical notions associated with
Smart cities and emerging issues of accumulation and "Eurasia" remain controversial and quite powerful in histor-
dispossession ical-cultural, academic, political and ideological debates.
Methodological approaches to urban informalities and Other claims suggest that the amalgam "Eurasia" helps
hyperization blur an imagined division between the European and Asian
Sponsorships: "continents," a long alleged ethno-nationalist partition that
Asian Geography Specialty Group has been a cornerstone of the Euro-American worldview.
Urban Geography Specialty Group In multiple ways, it may seem implausible that any spatial
Regional Development and Planning Specialty Group label could be reasonably inclusive and flexibly definitive to
Organizers: resolve the naming of a specialty group that includes mem-
Diganta Das - Nanyang Technological University bers with research interests spanning the breadth of geo-
Bikramaditya K. Choudhary - Jawaharlal Nehru Univer- graphic sub-themes and extending from the Pacific to the
sity Atlantic (but often including neither).
Chair: Marking more than ten years of specialty group member
Bikramaditya K. Choudhary - Jawaharlal Nehru Univer- debates, an official name change, and three millennia of
sity history, this call for panelistswhich dovetails with the pa-
Papers: per session "New Eurasianisms: Liminal Geographies Be-
8:00 AM Jennifer Y. Pomeroy - York College of Pennsylva- tween Europe and Asia," is an open invitation for partici-
nia pants who would like to discuss the multiple imaginaries,
A Woman's Place? Examining Urban Social Space in contestations, and opportunities associated with the label
India "Eurasia."
8:20 AM Sayoni Bose - Governors State University Sponsorships:
From Land Reforms to Land Grabbing in India: Chang- Russian, Central Eurasian, and East European Specialty
ing Class Relations and Contingent Alliances in Singur Group
8:40 AM Daniel Fischelli - University of North Texas Asian Geography Specialty Group
Identity, Othering, and Displacement: How Imagined Political Geography Specialty Group
Geographies Are Complicit in the Production of Reli- Organizer:
gious Violence in Jakarta, Indonesia Jeremy Tasch - Towson University
9:00 AM Matt Wade - UC Berkeley Chair:
Academics in the Finance Capital: The Role of Situated Jeremy Tasch - Towson University
Expertise in Making Jakarta "Mega"
9:20 AM Mehebub Rahaman - Jawaharlal Nehru Universi- 1262 Emerging Urban Landscape in Global
ty, New Delhi South 2
Peripheralization of Slums? A Study on Emerging Spa- Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM
tial Concentration of Slums in Indian Cities in Kent, Sheraton, Third Floor

Panel Session: Session Description: Urban areas of all kinds and shapes
1191 RCEEE and its Pivot to Eurasia are undergoing immense structural and social changes in
Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in the Global South owing to the emergence of new World
Nantucket, Marriott, Fourth Floor Order. Individual and institutional responses to such
changes are keys to resilience at individual level and re-
Session Description: After more than a decade of intermit- newal at the institutional level. Researching the social and
tent discussions on whether to retain RCEEE as a specialty economic processes that shape urban landscape of the
group name, specialty group members voted for a name global south is a consistent tradition within Geography and
change at the 2016 AAG in Chicago. Although specialty other disciplines dealing urban since the seminal work of T.
group members expressing an opinion agree that "Eurasia" McGee. Systematic withdrawal of state as a service provid-
as a group name is an improvement over the more awk- er and sudden non-functioning of urban local bodies
ward "RCEEE," the term can be contentious, and there is brought on horizons the scores of multinational, regional
neither consensus nor agreement among its meanings, and local corporate and entrepreneurs in land and housing
implications, and ramifications. market. With new regimes of finance capital and percolat-

(Continued on page 7)
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Page 7

(Continued from page 6) Agencies in the Reproduction of Rural Migrants Daily


ing ideals of 'utopian dreams,' the real estate sector is the Consumption Spaces
prime avenue of 'hyper accumulation.' Entrepreneurial gov- 11:00 AM Ramachandraiah Chigurupati - Centre for Eco-
ernments are producing spaces for the development of nomic & Social Studies, Hyderabad, India
knowledge parks and high-tech enclaves for smart busi- Inter-referencing as a coercive power -Singapore's role
nesses by providing premium infrastructures, often at the and business plan in Amaravati greenfield city (India)
cost of dispossessing the non-valued. Understanding the 11:20 AM Chang-Yu Hong - Portland State University
factors operating at different scale and their varied out- Evaluating Changes of Citizens' Values on Identification
come in various cities across Global South is an important of Hydrological Vulnerability between the Past and Pre-
task for policymakers and stakeholders concerned. The sent for Sustainable Watershed Planning in the Future
proposed session aims to bring together papers from a
variety of disciplinary perspectives and spatial scales that 1406 Geographies of South Asian Migration
would help further our understanding of the social, political and Diasporas
and economic processes restructuring urban landscape of Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 12:40 PM - 2:20 PM in
the Global South. Room 107, Hynes, Plaza Level

We welcome papers that may include, but are not limited Session Description: Geographical research on South Asian
to: diasporas today encompass a fertile field. Comprised of
The role of governance and government in shaping migrants and diasporic subjects with ties to India, Sri
urban landscape in the Global South Lanka, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Nepal, the diversity of
Utopia-dystopia of urban citizens in the Global SouthSouth Asian migrants pose fundamental questions on both
Accounts of resistance and/or resilience in Global the shared and divergent features of some of the world's
South cities most populous migrants and diasporas. On the one hand,
Changing Urban Landscape and Social Movements - South Asian migrants and diasporic subjects have been
persistent and upcoming examined through their particular contexts of settlement
Growing urban land market and informality and the distinct contacts that are maintained across multi-
Social and political structures contributing 'hyper ac-
ple sites. On the other, research has also stressed the ne-
cumulation.' cessity of tracing connections across the linguistic, region-
Smart cities and emerging issues of accumulation and al, religious, and national distinctions that comprise the
dispossession South Asian diaspora. In this paper session, we bring to-
Methodological approaches to urban informalities and gether works that will examine the South Asian diasporas
hyperization in all its complexity.
Sponsorships: We are looking for contributions on a wide range of sub-
Asian Geography Specialty Group jects related to the South Asian diaspora including those
Urban Geography Specialty Group that address, but are not limited to:
Regional Development and Planning Specialty Group patterns of settlement
Organizers: political organizing and activism
Diganta Das - Nanyang Technological University tensions between national and regional identities
Bikramaditya K. Choudhary - Jawaharlal Nehru Univer- comparative assessment of the experiences of South
sity Asian immigrant groups
Chair: Sponsorships:
Diganta Das - Nanyang Technological University Cultural Geography Specialty Group
Papers: Asian Geography Specialty Group
10:00 AM Bikramaditya K. Choudhary - Jawaharlal Nehru Organizers:
University Christabel Devadoss - West Virginia University
Spaces of Contested identity and Hindutva Politics in Ishan Ashutosh - Indiana University
Banaras Chair:
10:20 AM Dipendra Nath Das - Jawaharlal Nehru Universi- Ishan Ashutosh - Indiana University
ty, New Delhi, India Papers:
Sweta Bhusan - Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Del- 12:40 PM Christabel Devadoss - West Virginia University
hi, India The Indian Tamil diaspora: Soundscapes and scalar
Growth Dynamics in Urban Agglomerates: A Study On identity
Kolkata Urban Agglomeration, India
10:40 AM Min Zhang -
Yinchao Yang - (Continued on page 8)
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Page 8

(Continued from page 7) We invite participation from colleagues that are working
1:00 PM Ishan Ashutosh - Indiana University across disciplinary domains, in either quantitative or quali-
South Asian Diasporas and the 1965 Immigration and tative. Themes could include (but are not limited to):
Nationality Act
1:20 PM Zhixi Zhuang - School of Urban & Regional Plan- Residential segregation in inner city
ning, Ryerson University, Canada Transport-induced segregation (e.g. high-speed bullet
South Asian Place-making in Suburban Toronto train station, metro stations)
1:40 PM Kavitha Ramsamy - Rutgers Jiaoyufication (an extended category of education-led
Migration, Racialization and Urban Conflict: the Case of gentrification)
Jersey City Studentification
2:00 PM Melissa Erica Holmes - University of Tennessee Inaccessibility to services (e.g. public transport,
Community Forming Practices of Burmese Refugees in the healthcare, and digital data)
United States Perceptions of environmental pollution, health risks,
flooding and crime
1438 Inequality in urbanisation of Global Methods of data collection, analysis, and modelling
South: segregation, gentrification and inac- (e.g. big data)
cessibility Patterns, processes and dynamics in the inequalities
Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 12:40 PM - 2:20 PM in Policy implications of the examined inequality for
Independence East, Sheraton, Second Floor planning and governance practices.
Comparative case studies
Session Description: Many countries have been experienc- Sponsorships:
ing rapid urbanisation such as China and India. The urbani- China Specialty Group
sation level (proportion of urban population) in China is Asian Geography Specialty Group
estimated to reach 75% by 2050. Such rapid urbanisation Development Geographies Specialty Group
has resulted in large-scale urban growth (e.g. Cheng and Organizers:
Masser, 2003; Wu et al., forthcoming), urban sprawl and Jianquan Cheng - Manchester Metropolitan University
urban regeneration, which is a prevalent phenomenon in Qiyan Wu - East China Normal University
not only developing but also developed countries such as Zhenshan Yang - Institute of Geographical Sciences at
USA and Europe. There have been massive studies in the Chinese Academy of Sciences
published literature on economic and environmental im- Chair:
pacts of urban growth such as air, water and soil pollution, Jianquan Cheng - Manchester Metropolitan University
energy consumption and ecological safety. However, there Papers:
is little study on social impacts of urban growth (Nguyen, 12:40 PM Discussant: Qiyan Wu - East China Normal Uni-
2010), which may include segregation (e.g. Wu et al., versity
2014), Jiaoyufication (Wu et al., 2015), inaccessibility to 12:50 PM Chunhui Liu - Geographic and Oceanographic
services (Jin et al., 2014) and data (Cheng et al., 2016), Sciences, Nanjing University
health risk perceptions, and other social justice issues, Shenjing He - Department of Urban Planning and De-
which have demonstrated a certain level of social and spa- sign, Faculty of Architecture, University of Hong Kong
tial inequality and inequity. Sustainable development prin- Qiyan Wu - The Center for Modern Chinese City Stud-
ciple has been incorporated into national and local develop- ies & School of Urban and Regional Science, East China
ment strategies in these countries. This will be a challenge Normal University
for urban planning and urban governance, which should Chen Zhou - Swette Center for Environmental Biotech-
consider these social issues into process of their planning nology, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University
practice. Emerging New White-collar Workers in China and Their
Restricted Social Mobility in the Post-Crisis Era
This session seeks to expand the current thinking of ine- 1:05 PM Tao Song - Institute of Geographic Sciences and
quality in urbanisation across the global south by inviting Natural Resources Research, CAS
papers that examine social and spatial inequality through Chinese Pairing Aid pollicy for regional balanced devel-
theoretical, methodological and empirical insights into the opment
social impacts of urbanisation. We would like to explore 1:20 PM Dai Teqi - Beijing Normal University
together how these issues are reasonably conceptualised, Liao Cong -
measured, modelled and interpreted in a variety of politi- Optimizing school allocating from effective accessibility
cal, social, economic and cultural contexts. towards equal access - a case study on Shijingshan,
Beijing
(Continued on page 9)
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Page 9

(Continued from page 8) Rural-Urban Migration and Circularity in China: Analysis


1:35 PM Jianquan Cheng - Manchester Metropolitan Uni- of Longitudinal Surveys in Anhui, 1980-2009
versity 3:20 PM Cindy Fan - UCLA
Inequities in the perceived environmental health risks Tianjiao Li - Peking University
and interventions in a fast developing country - China Familization of China's Floating Population
1:50 PM Introduction: Jianquan Cheng - Manchester Met- 3:40 PM Xiaoman Liu - Department of Geography and
ropolitan University Resource Management, The Chinese University of
1:55 PM Qiyan Wu - The Center for Modern Chinese City Hong Kong
studies & school of urban and Regional science, East Jianfa Shen - Department of Geography and Resource
China Normal University Management, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Displacement and Middle Class Remake: the Produc- Non-local working experiences of China's rural return
tion of Jiaoyufication Space in Urban Nanjing, China migration
2:10 PM Discussant: Zhenshan Yang - Institute of Geo- 4:00 PM Wenfei Winnie Wang - University of Bristol
graphical Sciences at Chinese Academy of Sciences Social impact of return migration on women return
migrants
1538 Migration, Circularity, and Return Migra-
tion in China Thursday
Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in
Independence East, Sheraton, Second Floor Panel Session:
2211 Area Development and Policy
Session Description: Migration is one of the most pressing
Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in
questions in China not only because of its magnitude but
Room 200, Hynes, Second Level
because it is central to understanding China's economic
and social changes. The floating population, a common
Session Description: Area Development and Policy Plenary
indicator of internal migration in China, amounted to about
Session: Regional development in an era of slow global
300 million or about 22% of China's population in 2015.
economic growth
Internal migration in China is hardly a unidirectional or one
-off activity. Far from it, the phenomena of circularity, fam-
Regional Studies Association, China Geography Specialty
ily migration as well as return migration are increasingly
Group (CGSG) and Asian Geography Specialty Group
notable. The five papers in this session examine one or
(AGSG) are pleased to announce a plenary session on re-
more aspects of these changes, using rich data drawn from
gional development for publicizing a new journal Area De-
recent and longitudinal sources including censuses, sur-
velopment and Policy (ADP). ADP was launched in 2016 by
veys, and interviews during the period from the 1980s to
Regional Studies Association (RSA) in collaboration with
as recently as 2016. Such data are rigorously analyzed,
the Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Re-
revealing cutting-edge findings and new trajectories of
sources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and it is
population movements in China.
published by Taylor and Francis. ADP is developed against
Sponsorships:
such a background that emerging economies are playing a
China Specialty Group
more and more important role in the world economic de-
Asian Geography Specialty Group
velopment while they are facing challenges that are often
Population Specialty Group
quite different from the ones faced by developed econo-
Organizers:
mies. These issues are however often not reflected in the
Cindy Fan - UCLA
existing academic literature. ADP is aimed to open up
Wenfei Winnie Wang - University of Bristol
these new fields of enquiry, to stimulate and encourage
Chair:
research into them and to publish the results.
Xiaobo Su - University of Oregon
Papers:
To address the challenges faced by regions, this plenary
2:40 PM Xingna Nina Zhang - School of geographical
session will invite Prof. Gordon Clark from Oxford Universi-
Sciences, University of Bristol
ty to deliver a themed talk on regional development in an
Multilevel Gravity Model of Migration: the Role of Re- era of slow global economic growth. The global financial
gional Income Divides-a Case Study of China's Inter- crisis, the Euro crisis, BREXIT and slowing Asian economic
provincial Migration in 2010 growth all have significant impacts on region development
3:00 PM Chen Chen - Asian Demographic Research Insti-
all over the world. Prof. Clark will try to explain how and
tute, Shanghai University
why nation-states have run out of fiscal capacity and mon-
Cindy C Fan - Geography, UCLA
(Continued on page 10)
BULLETIN
Page 10

(Continued from page 9) etc.), this session examines how local political/cultural
etary policy, and face extraordinary pressures to rein-in elites adjust to certain "universalisms," on one hand, while
credit and borrowing. His questions include: how are re- other peripheral actors negotiate particularisms (personal
gions to cope with these forces? Will global integration via connections, local symbols, legal pluralism, etc.) on the
networks of exchange make-up the difference or might other. What are the tensions; what are the limits of con-
those networks also be drawn into the orbit of their nation- trol, and what are the limits of particularism? How do the
states (for some regions, but not all regions)? Are there works of local actors reflect tensions between Centers and
two paths to the future - one a race to the top, the other a Peripheries?
race to the bottom? How can we facilitate the race to the Sponsorships:
top wherein regions take-over as the engines of global eco- Russian, Central Eurasian, and East European Specialty
nomic growth bypassing the paralysis evident in nation- Group
states and trading blocs? Political Geography Specialty Group
Sponsorships: Asian Geography Specialty Group
Asian Geography Specialty Group Organizers:
China Specialty Group Jeremy Tasch - Towson University
Regional Development and Planning Specialty Group Chair:
Organizers: Jeremy Tasch - Towson University
Xinyue Ye - Kent State University Papers:
Weidong Liu - Chinese Academy of Sciences 10:00 AM Meagan Todd - University of Colorado
Chairs: Morality Politics of Mosque Construction in Russia: The
Weidong Liu - Chinese Academy of Sciences Re-opening of Moscow's Cathedral Mosque
Introduction: 10:20 AM gnes Eross - Geographical Institute RCAES
Weidong Liu - Chinese Academy of Sciences Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Panelists: Patrik Ttrai - Geographical Institute RCAES Hungarian
Gordon L. Clark - Smith School of Enterprise and the Academy of Sciences
Environment Katalin Kovly - Geographical Institute RCAES Hungari-
Discussants: an Academy of Sciences
Eric S. Sheppard - UCLA Effects of Ukraine crisis in Transcarpathia: snapshots
George C.S. Lin - University of Hong Kong from the periphery
Organizing Committee: 10:40 AM Jarmo Kortelainen - University Of Eastern Fin-
Weidong Liu, Co-Chair (liuwd@igsnrr.ac.cn, Chinese land
Academy of Sciences and Regional Studies Association) Pertti Rannikko - University of Eastern Finland
Xinyue Ye, Co-Chair (xye5@kent.edu) Place and mobility in Russian forest peripheries
Michael Dunford, Co-Chair (m.f.dunford@sussex.ac.uk) 11:00 AM Gerard Toal - Virginia Tech
Sally Hardy, CEO of RSA, "Occupied Territories": A Geopolitical Frame in Post-
(sally.hardy@regionalstudies.org) Soviet Space
Yuko Aoyama, Clark University (yaoyama@clarku.edu) 11:20 AM Discussant: Jeremy Tasch - Towson University

2253 Managing the Periphery and Marginaliz- Panel Session:


ing the Center 2491 Land Politics in Asia: Frontiers, Borderlands,
Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Histories
Dalton A, Sheraton, Third Floor Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in
Nantucket, Marriott, Fourth Floor
Session Description: Eurasia's "cultures of the periphery"
continue to be marked by "contestations over legitimacy." Session Description: In an age characterized by migration
Typically obligated to accept certain categorizations from to cities, global land grabs, and the industrial-scale produc-
their Centers, "peripheries" have a long history of finding tion of agricultural "boom" crops, it is hard to imagine that
themselves involved in, responding to, and influenced by frontiers might still exist. And yet, throughout Asia and
changing ideological-cultural policies, which can leave much of the world, new frontiers seem always to be open-
space for cultural, ethnic, and symbolic particularisms. This ing up, even as existing ones seem never to be fully
session draws together several cases from diverse Eurasian tamed. This panel session features scholars working on
peripheries, where particularism encounters the interven- frontiers, borderlands, and other sensitive spaces across
tion of the Center or replies to it. Acknowledging consider- Asia to examine spatial imaginaries at the ground level,
ations of political and economic re-territorizations (e.g..,
the European Union, Brexit, the Eurasian Economic Union, (Continued on page 11)
BULLETIN
Page 11

(Continued from page 10) Bimal Kanti Paul - Kansas State University
where the social relations of place and land are contested Thomas Crawford - Saint Louis University
and worked outoften in unexpected ways. Chair:
In light of ongoing research, the session presents cutting- Munshi Rahman - Saint Louis University
edge scholarship on the use, access, and ownership of land Papers:
in order to examine the societies in which land is emplaced 3:20 PM Bimal Kanti Paul - Kansas State University
and to explore the environments that are produced. From Bidhan Acharya - Central Department of Population
land reform in 1950s Vietnam and urban displacement in Studies, Tribhuvan University
1980s Cambodia to ongoing disputes on the India- Kabita Ghimire - Kansas State University
Bangladesh border, Chinese development in Tibet, and Effectiveness of earthquakes relief efforts in Nepal:
land grabs in Laos and Indonesia, land has long figured at Opinions of the survivors
the center of political and economic life in Asia. Grounded 3:40 PM Prajjwal Panday - Nichols College
in ethnographic and historical approaches, panelists draw Climatic hazards in the Himalayan region
on research experience in the region to offer a comparative 4:00 PM Sierra Ross Gladfelter - University of Colorado
perspective that speaks to the diversity of sites in Asia and Boulder
beyond. The panel forms part of an ongoing collaborative Training Rivers, Training People: Interrogating the
project among an interdisciplinary network of American making of resilient riparian communities in the face of
and international scholars brought together by their shared global climate change
concern with land politics in Asia. 4:20 PM Shouraseni Sen Roy - University of Miami
Sponsorships: Spatial Patterns of Long Term Trends in Daily Temper-
Political Geography Specialty Group atures across the Indian Subcontinent
Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group 4:40 PM Brian W. Okey - Indiana University of Pennsylva-
Asian Geography Specialty Group nia
Organizers: Subrata Chattopadhyay - Indian Institute of Technolo-
Christian C. Lentz - UNC Department of Geography gy, Kharagpur
Reece Jones - University of Hawaii at Manoa Haimanti Banerji - Indian Institute of Technology, Kha-
Jonathan Padwe - University of Hawaii - Manoa ragpur
Chair: Sudeshna Ghosh - Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Erin Collins - American University Student Field Studies in India I: Rajarghat Slum, Kolka-
Panelists: ta.
Christian C. Lentz - UNC Department of Geography
Emily Yeh - University of Colorado Friday
Jonathan Padwe - University of Hawaii - Manoa
Michael B. Dwyer - University of Berne, Switzerland 3119 Transnational Migration and Discursive
Geographisches Institute Practices in the Host Society
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Room
210, Hynes, Second Level
2595 Hazards, Disasters, and Human Dimen-
Session Description: This Session intends to present empir-
sions in the Context of South Asia ical papers on contemporary human migration and immi-
Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in
grants' discursive practices at multiple places.
Falmouth, Marriott, Fourth Floor
Sponsorships:
Ethnic Geography Specialty Group
Session Description: This session welcomes papers/studies
Cultural Geography Specialty Group
that address issues related to natural hazards and man-
Asian Geography Specialty Group
made disasters, risks perceptions, and vulnerabilities in
Organizers:
South Asia. However, we are open to all different perspec-
Su-Jeong Kim - Ewha Womans University
tives and paradigms related to human-environmental stud-
Chair:
ies and application of geospatial techniques addressing
Jiyeon Shin - The University of Tokyo
socio-economic, environment, and health related issues in
Papers:
the context of South Asia.
8:00 AM Jiyeon Shin - The University of Tokyo
Sponsorships:
Youngmin Lee - Ewha Womans University
Asian Geography Specialty Group
Transformation of Ethnic Enclave by Negotiations of
Organizers:
Munshi Rahman - Saint Louis University
(Continued on page 12)
BULLETIN
Page 12

(Continued from page 11) Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
Trans-migrants' Ethnic Groups in Flushing Koreatown, - What do China and the study of China mean in nowadays
New York City geographical research?
8:20 AM Su-Jeong Kim, Ph.D Candidate - Ewha Womans - How can China be studied more than a subject, but as an
University entity, relation, process, nexus?
Ethnic Diversity, Competition and Negotiations in the - What and how are theories used in and/or built from the
Garment Industry, Los Angeles study of China? What are the theoretical potentials and
8:40 AM Hyunseo (Helene) Park - Ewha W. Univ. challenges in the study of China?
Muslim Ethnicity and 'Doing Halal' in Korea: Discursive - What kind of implications can be drawn from studies in/
Practices of Halal Food Globalization on China for broader concerns in fieldwork methods?
- Where and how to locate China in comparative studies?
3149 China as Methods I Sponsorships:
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Bea- Asian Geography Specialty Group
con E, Sheraton, Third Floor China Specialty Group
Urban Geography Specialty Group
Session Description: In 1989, Mizoguchi Yuzo published Organizers:
China as Method and called for reversing Eurocentric theo- Yimin Zhao - London School of Economics
ry and epistemological framework (Mizoguchi 2011 Yueming Zhang - University of Birmingham
[1989]). For Mizoguchi, the end of conceiving China Yang Yang - University of Colorado At Boulder
"should be the 'study of China' that transcends China" (cf. Chairs:
Chen 2010, 252). In other words, China is a method when Yueming Zhang - University of Birmingham
understanding the world is the purpose - and in this multi- Papers:
plied "world", as Chen Kuan-Hsing reminds us (ibid., 253), 8:00 AM Julie Ren - London School of Economics
both China and Europe are elements. It is here that we can Murray Mckenzie -
see some affinities between Mizoguchi's position and re- (Extra)ordinary Beijing: On urban ontologies and artis-
cently rising comparative urbanism to study the world of tic practice
cities (Robinson, 2006). 8:20 AM Yimin Zhao - London School of Economics and
Political Science
Mizoguchi's proposition has methodological significances Space as Method: Field Sites and Encounters in Bei-
for it helps replace the vertical principle of history (which is jing's Green Belts
teleological and dominated by Eurocentric theories) by a 8:40 AM Junxi Qian - Department of Geography, The Uni-
horizontal view of space-time where different elements are versity of Hong Kong
juxtaposed. Seeing in this way, claims of universalisation Provincialising the West, de-parochialising China: some
should be questioned, and investigations on the dynamic reflections from China's urban centres and ethnic pe-
space-time are urgently needed. Some endeavours can be ripheries
witnessed in the literature, such as Wang Hui's (2011) dis- 9:00 AM Xiaoran Hu - Queen Mary University of London
cussion on "trans-systemic society" and "trans-societal sys- China in the African Imaginary and the Problems of
tem," yet more efforts are required to rethink how and to Solidarity
what extent China can be a method to understand the 9:20 AM Discussant: Jennifer Robinson - University Col-
world. This critical reflection on seeing China as a method- lege London
ology approach can be potentially productive in geograph-
ical inquiries on/in/related to China. 3169 Transnational Cultural and Natural Herit-
age in Asia: Contours of Boundary-
In this session, we aim at continuing the proposition put Transgressing Memoryscapes (I)
forward by Mizoguchi almost three decades ago and focus Friday, 4/7/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in
on how the "study of China" may yield methodological and/ Regis, Marriott, Third Floor
or epistemological implications for not only studying China
but also geographical inquiries in general. "China" is more Session Description: Our session intends to bring together
than a field site, especially in the contemporary world the two highly complex fields 'heritage' and 'culture' on the
where "the spectre of global China" (Lee, 2014) can be one hand, and a clear regional focus on Asia, on the other
seen everywhere. Hence, we invite theoretical and empiri- hand, though with the inclusion of outreach to other re-
cal contributions that concern methodological and episte- gions over time.
mological implications of the "study of China," with "China"
being broadly defined as the starting point and hopefully
transcended at the end. (Continued on page 13)
BULLETIN
Page 13

(Continued from page 12) ology approach can be potentially productive in geograph-
Sponsorships: ical inquiries on/in/related to China.
Recreation, Tourism, and Sport Specialty Group In this session, we aim at continuing the proposition put
Asian Geography Specialty Group forward by Mizoguchi almost three decades ago and focus
China Specialty Group on how the "study of China" may yield methodological and/
Organizers: or epistemological implications for not only studying China
Rudi Hartmann - University of Colorado but also geographical inquiries in general. "China" is more
Chair: than a field site, especially in the contemporary world
Rudi Hartmann - University of Colorado where "the spectre of global China" (Lee, 2014) can be
Papers: seen everywhere. Hence, we invite theoretical and empiri-
8:00 AM LeiLei Li - Shenzhen university cal contributions that concern methodological and episte-
China's modern industrialization and industrial heritage mological implications of the "study of China," with "China"
preservation: a critical review from a transnational and being broadly defined as the starting point and hopefully
dark heritage perspective transcended at the end.
8:20 AM Yong Tang - Chengdu University of Technology
Contested Narrative at Hanwang Earthquake Memorial Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
Park: Travel Motivations, Sought Experiences and Per- - What do China and the study of China mean in nowadays
ceived Values geographical research?
8:40 AM Shengrong Chen - - How can China be studied more than a subject, but as an
The globalization of commemoration: Changing Natural entity, relation, process, nexus?
Disaster Memorial Landscapes in China - What and how are theories used in and/or built from the
9:00 AM Discussant: Mary Mostafanezhad - University of study of China? What are the theoretical potentials and
Hawai'i at Manoa challenges in the study of China?
- What kind of implications can be drawn from studies in/
on China for broader concerns in fieldwork methods?
3249 China as Methods II - Where and how to locate China in comparative studies?
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Sponsorships:
Beacon E, Sheraton, Third Floor Asian Geography Specialty Group
China Specialty Group
Session Description: In 1989, Mizoguchi Yuzo published Cultural Geography Specialty Group
China as Method and called for reversing Eurocentric theo- Organizers:
ry and epistemological framework (Mizoguchi 2011 Yimin Zhao - London School of Economics
[1989]). For Mizoguchi, the end of conceiving China Yueming Zhang - University of Birmingham
"should be the 'study of China' that transcends China" (cf. Yang Yang - University of Colorado At Boulder
Chen 2010, 252). In other words, China is a method when Chairs:
understanding the world is the purpose - and in this multi- Yimin Zhao - London School of Economics
plied "world", as Chen Kuan-Hsing reminds us (ibid., 253), Papers:
both China and Europe are elements. It is here that we can 10:00 AM Ding Fei - University of Minnesota - Minneapolis
see some affinities between Mizoguchi's position and re- From Xinjiang to Addis Ababa: Encountering China at
cently rising comparative urbanism to study the world of its "periphery" and "frontier"
cities (Robinson, 2006). 10:20 AM Yang Yang - University of Colorado At Boulder
Displaying Connections between Chinese and Global
Mizoguchi's proposition has methodological significances Muslim Communities through Fashions in Transnational
for it helps replace the vertical principle of history (which is Urban Space in the Hui Quarter in Xi'an
teleological and dominated by Eurocentric theories) by a 10:40 AM Jing Luo - Tsinghua University
horizontal view of space-time where different elements are Of "Other" People: The Exotic Landscape of Chinese
juxtaposed. Seeing in this way, claims of universalisation Diasporas (and Its Rejection) in Boston
should be questioned, and investigations on the dynamic 11:00 AM Wing-shing Tang - Hong Kong Baptist U
space-time are urgently needed. Some endeavours can be Not 'China as Methods' but 'Chinese "dialectics" as a
witnessed in the literature, such as Wang Hui's (2011) dis- Methodology: The Tongbian Approach
cussion on "trans-systemic society" and "trans-societal sys- 11:20 AM Discussant: Max D. Woodworth - The Ohio
tem," yet more efforts are required to rethink how and to State University
what extent China can be a method to understand the
world. This critical reflection on seeing China as a method-
(Continued on page 14)
BULLETIN
Page 14

(Continued from page 13) scholars with varied backgrounds to examine the dimen-
3269 Transnational Cultural and Natural Herit- sions, dynamics, sources, and polices of spatial inequality
from multiple perspectives.
age in Asia: Contours of Boundary-
Transgressing Memoryscapes (II)
Research Questions on spatial inequality typically include
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in
the following:
Regis, Marriott, Third Floor
What are the nature, pattern and structure of spatial
inequality?
Session Description: Our session intends to bring together
How is spatial inequality displayed in terms of conver-
the two highly complex fields 'heritage' and 'culture' on the
gence/divergence, dimension (e.g., economic/income,
one hand, and a clear focus on Asia, on the other hand,
health and quality of life), scale (e.g., urban, regional and
though with the inclusion of outreach to other regions over
global) and time?
time
What are the underlying mechanisms of spatial ine-
Sponsorships:
quality and what are the roles of institutions, geography,
Recreation, Tourism, and Sport Specialty Group
and globalization?
Asian Geography Specialty Group
What are the effects and consequences of spatial ine-
China Specialty Group
quality?
Organizers:
How are spatial inequality linked to poverty and social
Rudi Hartmann - University of Colorado
justice?
Chair:
How can developments in GIS and big data be used
Rudi Hartmann - University of Colorado
to advance our knowledge?
Papers:
What are theoretical and policy implications of re-
10:00 AM Rudi Hartmann - University of Colorado
search?
Memorial Sites of the Pacific War 1937 - 1945 in China,
How polices can be advanced to promote a more eq-
in Japan and in the U.S.: A case for transnationalizing
uitable and sustainable society?
divergent commemoration practices?
10:20 AM Xiaolin Zang - Utrecht University
Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the
Bouke van Gorp - Utrecht University
following:
Hans Renes - Utrecht University
Outcomes: income, social, health, education, digital,
The Interpretation of Colonial Heritage in Four Chinese
innovation, environmental inequalities, etc., and their inter-
Cities ? Identity and Professional Perspectives
active effects
10:40 AM Neda Moayerian - Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Trajectory/Dynamics: Timing, effects of intergenera-
& State University
tional inequality, levels of development
Local Non-Governmental Organizations' Role in Glocali-
Scale: From global to local and everyday life, with an
zation Process in Developing Countries
emphasis on the regional scale
11:00 AM Discussant: Velvet Nelson - Sam Houston State
Space/Place/Network: Spatial association/
University
agglomeration/clustering, core-periphery relations, uneven
nature of inequality, space/place as agents etc.
3450 Spatial Inequality, Justice and Policy II: Processes/Mechanisms: Globalization, liberalization,
China and India marketization, institutional change, decentralization, urban-
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Bea- ization, geography
con F, Sheraton, Third Floor Procedures/Policies/Justice: Role of institutions, policy
effects and options, justice, planning
Session Description: Inequality has been intensified in Methodology: Spatiotemporal modeling, big data, so-
many countries, and has once again become a hotly debat- cial media etc.
ed topic, engaging top world leaders. Equity has even be- Sponsorships:
come a top sustainable development goal of the UN's post- China Specialty Group
2015 development agenda, and the focus of the war on Asian Geography Specialty Group
poverty has been shifted towards the war on inequality. Regional Development and Planning Specialty Group
Spatial inequality is an important dimension of inequality Organizers:
and has also drawn renewed scholarly interest. Recent de- Yehua Dennis Wei - University of Utah
velopments in geographic information system (GIS) has Chair:
empowered geographers to provide more nuanced analysis Javier Revilla Diez - University of Cologne
of spatial inequality. However, the existing knowledge is
(Continued on page 15)
fragmented and partial. This session intends to attract
BULLETIN
Page 15

(Continued from page 14) search, and ultimately develop a network of individuals or
Papers: groups focusing on Asian urban climates for potential fu-
1:20 PM Yehua Dennis Wei - University of Utah ture collaborations.
Spatial Inequality in China and Asia
1:40 PM Felix Haifeng Liao - University of Idaho We welcome papers that address (but need not be limited
Yehua Wei - University of Utah to) the following themes:
Regional Inequality in China: Trends, Scales and Mech- - As one of the featured themes of AAG2017, current as-
anisms sessment or novel developments in methodological tech-
2:00 PM Yanning Wei - Grand Valley State University niques within urban meteorology and climatology dealing
Spatial Inequality as State Development Strategy and with research uncertainties for spatio-temporal contexts;
Poverty Reduction in China - Case studies into urban climate phenomena that apply
2:20 PM Sudhir K. Thakur - California State University observational, remote sensing, or modelling methodologies
Sacramento across a spectrum of geographical scales;
The Economic Geography of Public Debt in India: A Communication and incorporation of geographical re-
Spatial Analytic Approach search into planning, policy-making and urban stake-
2:40 PM Corey Johnson - holder undertakings in Asian cities.
Purva Sharma - University of North Carolina, Greensbo- Sponsorships:
ro Climate Specialty Group
A Study on Spatial Variation in the Urbanization of In- Asian Geography Specialty Group
dia Regional Development and Planning Specialty Group
Organizers:
3484 Special Session on urban climatology in Winston T. Chow - National University of Singapore
Asia Chandana Mitra - Auburn University
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Fair- Chair:
field, Marriott, Third Floor Winston T. Chow - National University of Singapore
Papers:
Session Description: An important aspect of this "Asian 1:20 PM Jennifer K. Vanos - UC San Diego
Century" is the rapid urbanisation currently taking place Robert Brown - Texas A & M University
throughout the continent; for instance, the United Nations Eichi Kosaka - University of Tokyo
projected that ten out of the largest 15 (including the top Akiko Iida - University of Tokyo
seven) urban agglomerations on the planet will be located Makoto Yokohari - University of Tokyo
in Asia by 2030. The development of these megacities, and Microclimatic Design of the 2020 Olympic Marathon
all urban areas of different spatial extents, leads to inad- Route: Establishing a Baseline for Thermal Comfort
vertent modifications towards weather and climate across 1:40 PM Amir A. Aliabadi - University of Guelph
multiple geographical scales. These alterations include the E. Scott Krayenhoff - Arizona State University
urban heat island (i.e. increased urban warmth relative to Negin Nazarian - Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research
the city's surroundings), and air pollution due to emissions & Technology Centre, Singapore
arising from anthropogenic activities. Academic research - Lup Wai Chew - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
mainly through the field of urban climatology into the Peter R. Armstrong - Masdar Institute of Science and
physical mechanisms, biophysical impacts of, and suggest- Technology
ed adaptation towards these phenomena is relatively well- Afshin Afshari - Masdar Institute of Science and Tech-
developed; however, there is still a predominant bias of nology
such studies either being based at or originating from, Leslie K. Norford - Massachusetts Institute of Technol-
North American or European cities. A concern about this ogy
spatial disparity in studies is that such research findings Effects of Roof Edge Roughness on Air Temperature
may not be as successfully applied in Asian cities, where and Pollutant Concentration in Urban Canyons
there may be substantial differences in climate, demo- 2:00 PM Iain Douglas Stewart - University of Toronto
graphic and socio-economic contexts. Metabolic Heat Production by Human and Animal Popu-
lations in Asian Megacities
With this geographical disparity in mind, the primary objec- 2:20 PM Yanxu Liu - Peking university
tive of this session is to highlight current urban weather Jian Peng - College of Urban and Environmental Sci-
and climate research taking place in Asia. We aim to pro- ences, Peking University
vide a forum for geoscientists to share their scientific and Influence of landscape pattern on land surface temper-
social scientific knowledge, exchange ideas for policies to- ature in Shenzhen City, China
wards urban resilience arising from applications of re- (Continued on page 16)
BULLETIN
Page 16

(Continued from page 15) Scale: From global to local and everyday life, with an
2:40 PM Winston T. Chow - National University of Singa- emphasis on the regional scale
pore Space/Place/Network: Spatial association/
Geographies of Asian urban climates: past, present, agglomeration/clustering, core-periphery relations, uneven
future? nature of inequality, space/place as agents etc.
Processes/Mechanisms: Globalization, liberalization,
3550 Spatial Inequality, Justice and Policy III: marketization, institutional change, decentralization, urban-
China ization, geography
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Bea- Procedures/Policies/Justice: Role of institutions, policy
con F, Sheraton, Third Floor effects and options, justice, planning
Methodology: Spatiotemporal modeling, big data, so-
Session Description: Inequality has been intensified in cial media etc.
many countries, and has once again become a hotly debat- Sponsorships:
ed topic, engaging top world leaders. Equity has even be- China Specialty Group
come a top sustainable development goal of the UN's post- Asian Geography Specialty Group
2015 development agenda, and the focus of the war on Economic Geography Specialty Group
poverty has been shifted towards the war on inequality. Organizer:
Spatial inequality is an important dimension of inequality Yehua Dennis Wei - University of Utah
and has also drawn renewed scholarly interest. Recent de- Chair:
velopments in geographic information system (GIS) has Felix Haifeng Liao - University of Idaho
empowered geographers to provide more nuanced analysis Papers:
of spatial inequality. However, the existing knowledge is 3:20 PM Wen Chen - Nanjing Institute of Geography and
fragmented and partial. This session intends to attract Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
scholars with varied backgrounds to examine the dimen- Regional integration in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD):
sions, dynamics, sources, and polices of spatial inequality a path towards fragmentation or confederation?
from multiple perspectives. 3:40 PM Weiye Xiao -
Research Questions on spatial inequality typically Spatial mismatch between floating population and job
include the following: opportunities in Shanghai
What are the nature, pattern and structure of spatial 4:00 PM Li Huang - University of Idaho
inequality? Haifeng Felix Liao - University of Idaho
How is spatial inequality displayed in terms of conver- Understanding regional development mechanisms in
gence/divergence, dimension (e.g., economic/income, Zhejiang, China from 1981 to 2013: spMorph and geo-
health and quality of life), scale (e.g., urban, regional and graphical and temporal weighted regression approach-
global) and time? es
What are the underlying mechanisms of spatial ine- 4:20 PM Beibei Ma -
quality and what are the roles of institutions, geography, Dongqian Xue -
and globalization? Jing Huang -
What are the effects and consequences of spatial ine- Spatial Distribution Characteristics Of Income And Pov-
quality? erty In Xi'an Based On Micro-regional Perspective
How are spatial inequality linked to poverty and social 4:40 PM Hao Huang - Illinois Institute of Tecchnology
justice? Yehua Wei - University of Utah
How can developments in GIS and big data be used The Spatial-Temporal Hierarchy of Inequality in Urban
to advance our knowledge? China
What are theoretical and policy implications of re-
search? Panel Session:
How polices can be advanced to promote a more eq- 3616 Publishing books with top university presses
uitable and sustainable society? and commercial publishers
Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the Friday, 4/7/2017, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in Room
following: 205, Hynes, Second Level
Outcomes: income, social, health, education, digital,
innovation, environmental inequalities, etc., and their inter- Session Description: From an international set of perspec-
active effects tives, the future of research monographs was critically dis-
Trajectory/Dynamics: Timing, effects of intergenera- cussed in the 2009 issue of Progress in Human Geography
tional inequality, levels of development (Ward et al. 2009: 101-26). Based on their earlier panel
(Continued on page 17)
BULLETIN
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(Continued from page 16) Session Description: Since 2013, China has been talking
discussion at the 2007 RGS-IBG conference, all contribu- about a new Silk Road. The slogan has become, One Belt
tors collectively agreed that "for the future of geography, One Road referring to the Silk Road Economic Belt (by
research monographs are important. Whatever the national land) and 21st Century Maritime Silk Road (by sea). Offi-
context, they remain barometers of an intellectually vibrant cials in the People's Republic of China have articulated a
discipline" (p.103). The specificities of publishing research mode of economic and geopolitical ties across the Asian
monographs, however, remain relatively underdeveloped sphere. In September 2013, President Xi while in Kazakh-
and less understood. This session brings together senior stan proposed a Silk Road Economic Belt linking China,
editors at two top university presses (Harvard and MIT) Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and on to Iran, Rus-
and several leading human geographers who have success- sia, Turkey and Europe (Xinhua 9/7/2013). In October
fully published their recent monographs with top university 2013, President Xi while at an ASEAN Forum in Indonesia
presses (Chicago, Cornell, Harvard, MIT, Oxford, Princeton, proposed a 21st Century Maritime Silk Road linking China
Stanford, etc) and commercial publishers (Routledge, and ASEAN (Wu, 2013). The two announcements set up
Sage, Wiley-Blackwell, etc). The panel's aim is to examine China's linkages with neighbors across Asia and into Eu-
critically (1) why publishing with these presses is so im- rope for trade connections as well as infrastructure linkag-
portant; (2) how to go about getting them interested in es.
and publishing our work; and (3) what pitfalls to avoid This session examines geopolitical and international trade
when preparing the proposals for and negotiating the con- relationships concerning China, Mongolia, Russia, Kazakh-
tractual terms with these publishers. Like Ward et al. stan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan,Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka,
(2009), we firmly believe publishing scholarly monographs Myanmar, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Indonesia, and
should remain a key objective, if not the objective, in dis- Philippines among others.
seminating significant geographical research work, particu- Sponsorships:
larly to scholars in all other social sciences. This panel thus Asian Geography Specialty Group
hopes to draw upon the collective experience and wisdom China Specialty Group
of these established geographers and to encourage early Russian, Central Eurasian, and East European Specialty
career geographers to think optimistically about publishing Group
their work as monographs with leading presses and pub- Organizers:
lishers. Stanley Toops - Miami University
Sponsorships: Chairs:
China Specialty Group Stanley Toops - Miami University
Development Geographies Specialty Group Papers:
Asian Geography Specialty Group 5:20 PM Zhouying Song - Institute of Geographic Scienc-
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group es and Natural Resources Research, CAS
Economic Geography Specialty Group Piping Gong - Institute of Geographic Sciences and
AAG Careers and Professional Development Theme Natural Resources Research
Organizers: Weidong Liu - Institute of Geographic Sciences and
Henry Wai-chung Yeung - National University of Singa- Natural Resources Research
pore Foreign Trade Between China and "OBOR" Countries
Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen - SUNY-Buffalo and Its Economic Impacts
Chair: 5:40 PM Alexander C. Diener - University of Kansas
Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen - SUNY-Buffalo Mongolian Mobilities as a Microcosm of Eurasia's New
Introduction: Silk Roads
Henry Wai-chung Yeung - National University of Singa- 6:00 PM Lili Wei - Lanzhou University
pore Lijuan Si -
Panelists: Jing Zhang -
Rob Kitchin - National University Of Ireland Maynooth Regional Differences in Urbanization: A Case Study of
Michael Storper - UCLA Urban Agglomerations in Northwestern China
Emily Yeh - University of Colorado 6:20 PM Nicholas James Cosmas - US Military Academy
Beth Clevenger - MIT Press Imaginary Conflict: the 21st Century Maritime Silk
Jeff Dean - Harvard University Press Road and the "Rebalance to the Pacific"
6:40 PM Stanley Toops - Miami University Xinjiang and
3686 China's New Silk Road China's Belt and Road Initiative
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in Salon
I, Marriott, Fourth Floor
(Continued on page 18)
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Session Description: This authors-meet-critics session dis-


(Continued from page 17)
cusses Yuko Aoyama and Balaji Parthasarathy's new book
Saturday "The Rise of the Hybrid Domain: Collaborative Governance
for Social Innovation" (Edward Elgar). Conceptualising the
rise of the hybrid domain as an emerging domain that
4125 Human-environment interactions and adapta- overlaps public and private interests, this book explores
tion to climate change in the context of Bangladesh how corporations, states, and civil society organizations
Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in develop common agendas, despite the differences in their
Room 305, Hynes, Third Level primary objectives. Using evidence from India, it examines
various cases of innovation with social impacts in educa-
Session Description: We invite theoretical and empirical tion, energy, health and finance, as a means to deliver so-
contributions exploring human-environment interactions lutions for some of the most pressing social challenges of
and adaptation to climate change in the context of Bangla- the 21st century.
desh. Sponsorships:
Topics include (but are not limited to): Economic Geography Specialty Group
adaptation to climate change Development Geographies Specialty Group
environmental degradation Asian Geography Specialty Group
human impacts on the environments Organizers:
coastal environments Rory Horner - University of Manchester
impacts of climate change on agriculture Chairs:
riverbank erosions Rory Horner - University of Manchester
climate migrants Introduction:
tropical cyclones, floods, earthquakes, lightening Rory Horner - University of Manchester
Michael Storper - UCLA
Sponsorships: Panelists:
Asian Geography Specialty Group Erica Schoenberger - Johns Hopkins University
Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group Bish Sanyal - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Organizers: Yuko Aoyama - Clark University
Munshi Rahman - Saint Louis University Balaji Parthasarathy - International Institute of Infor-
Bimal Kanti Paul - Kansas State University mation Technology
Thomas Crawford - Saint Louis University
Chair: 4293 Japan after 3/11: Global Perspectives on
Munshi Rahman - Saint Louis University the Earthquake, Tsunami, and Fukushima
Papers:
Meltdown
8:00 AM Munshi Rahman - Saint Louis University
Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in
Thomas Crawford - Saint Louis University
Orleans, Marriott, Fourth Floor
Space time patterns of recent natural and man-made
disasters in Bangladesh
Session Description: Extreme events in nature attract spe-
8:20 AM Bidita Jawher Tithi - University of California, Da-
cial interest because of their dramatic violence and the hu-
vis
man suffering they often inflict. The Japanese live in one of
'We are People of Sea-Water': Exploring Environmen-
earth's vulnerable seismic zones and have developed towns
tal Vulnerabilities and Human Rights of a Displaced
and villages on the coast. They have sited factories and
Fishing Community in South-Eastern Bangladesh
industries next to the coast. Then, with a clap, a boom,
8:40 AM Lauryn Bragg - Oak Ridge National Laboratory
and a roar, the earth shakes, followed by a platoon of gi-
Emma Walcott-Wilson - University of Tennessee
ant waves so loaded with energy it has its own tsunami.
Eric Axley - Oak Ridge National Laboratory
The water cuts a swath along the coast of Tohoku. So it
Occupancy Reporting for Manufacturing in Bangladesh
went on March 11, 2011 (3/11 the Japanese use that label
9:00 AM SUBARNA CHATTERJEE - Kansas State University
the way Americans talk of 9/11), another extraordinary
Lightning related casualties in Bangladesh in 2016
chapter of living dangerously in Japan's seismic zone.
March 28, 2011).
Panel Session: Sponsorships:
4163 Authors Meet Critics: Aoyama with Parthasa- Asian Geography Specialty Group
rathy's "The Rise of the Hybrid Domain"
Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in (Continued on page 19)
Commonwealth, Sheraton, Third Floor
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(Continued from page 18) domestic investors seek certainty and guidance and the
Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group population demand urgent attention to improvements to
Energy and Environment Specialty Group their daily lives. Some foreign governments also press their
Organizers: case for stalled projects and agreement to new initiatives.
Unryu Suganuma - J. F. Oberlin Univesity This proposed session welcomes papers from diverse per-
Chair: spectives on the spatial, environmental, social, economic
Pradyumna P. Karan - University Of Kentucky and political aspects of the transition evolving in Myanmar.
Papers: Our aims for this panel are: first to enhance our knowledge
10:00 AM Introduction: Pradyumna P. Karan - University and understanding of the changes that are taking place,
Of Kentucky their likely consequences and their impacts on the diverse
10:05 AM Yukio Yotsumoto - Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific Uni- groups within Myanmar; second, to stimulate exchanges
versity amongst researchers with an interest in Myanmar and
Shunichi Takekawa - Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific Universi-third, to continue to develop a research network of individ-
ty uals with a focus on Myanmar in order to facilitate poten-
The Social Aspects of Fukushima Residents' Sufferings tial research collaborations.
after the 3.11 Nuclear Disaster We welcome papers with focus on any of the following, but
10:25 AM Kenji Yamazaki - Iwate University by no means exclusive, topics:
Process of forming the disaster culture - Propagation Borderland governance, development and economic
and formation of a phrase "Tsunami-ten-den-ko (Run dynamics;
away immediately to a hill to stay alive)" Environmental issues of resource sector projects;
10:45 AM Tomoko Yamazaki - Iwate University Mega projects and regional development;
School and Disaster Culture in Sanriku Coast, Japan Rural to urban migration, welfare and resettlement;
11:05 AM Unryu Suganuma - J. F. Oberlin Univesity Tourism and its impacts on communities;
Nuclear Energy Politics of Fukushima in Japan Trade, foreign investment and aid;
11:25 AM Discussant: Pradyumna P. Karan - University Of Urbanization and urban development
Kentucky Sponsorship:
Asian Geography Specialty Group
Organizers:
4307 Asian Geography Specialty Group Chung-Tong Wu - Western Sydney University
Business Meeting Xiaobo Su - University of Oregon
Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 11:50 AM - 1:10 PM in Marion Sabrie - Center for Southeast Asian Studies
Room 108, Hynes, Plaza Level Chair:
Marion Sabrie - Center for Southeast Asian Studies
Papers:
1:20 PM Jacob Shell - Temple University
4415 Myanmar in Transition: Democracy, De- Three Possible Futures for Myanmar's Unique Popula-
velopment and Social Change I tion of Trained Elephants
Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in 1:40 PM Hunter Marston - Brookings Institution
Room 204, Hynes, Second Level Myanmar's National Union (and Reconciliation) Will
Take Decades
Session Description: In April 2016, a democratically elected 2:00 PM Xiaobo Su - University of Oregon
government, led by the NLD, took office in Myanmar mark- Gender, Ethnicity, and Citizenship: Female Burmese
ing a new beginning for the country. The new government workers in Chinese border cities
has the challenge and burden of heightened expectations. 2:20 PM Jasnea Sarma - National University Of Singapore
It is obvious transition to democracy and what it means for 'Home' is from Kachinland to Assam - Oral histories
development and social change will take time to unfold. and Emotional Geographies of Border Transgressions
While the new government takes the necessary steps to and Connected Ethno-Nationalisms in India and Myan-
formulate policies for the challenges of the past decades, mar.
for example, ethnic armed groups and sectarian conflict, 2:40 PM Discussant: Marion Sabrie - Center for Southeast
economic challenges, resource management, environmen- Asian Studies
tal issues and social transformations await attention. Steps
to tackle issues such as peace with ethnic armed groups,
sectarian conflicts, burgeoning squatter settlements, illegal
buildings and development and land ownership illustrate
the complexity of these issues. However, international and (Continued on page 20)
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(Continued from page 19) Papers:


4515 Myanmar in Transition: Democracy, Develop- 3:20 PM Chung-Tong Wu, Western Sydney University
ment and Social Change II Development, Urbanization and Poverty Reduction:
Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Lessons for Myanmar
Room 204, Hynes, Second Level 3:40 PM Soe Win Myint - Arizona State University
Chuyuan Wang - Arizona State University
Session Description: In April 2016, a democratically elected An Examination of the impacts of Urbanization on the
government, led by the NLD, took office in Myanmar mark- Environment: Experiences from current and former
ing a new beginning for the country. The new government capitals of Myanmar
has the challenge and burden of heightened expectations. 4:00 PM Scott Jennings Melbourne - University of Hong
It is obvious transition to democracy and what it means for Kong
development and social change will take time to unfold. Quantifying the green spaces absorbing urban growth
While the new government takes the necessary steps to in Yangon, Myanmar
formulate policies for the challenges of the past decades, 4:20 PM Marion Sabrie - Paris 13 University
for example, ethnic armed groups and sectarian conflict, Yangon City metamorphoses since 2010: toward a pos-
economic challenges, resource management, environmen- sible sustainable development?
tal issues and social transformations await attention. Steps 4:40 PM Peilei Fan - Michigan State University
to tackle issues such as peace with ethnic armed groups, Jiquan Chen - Michigan State University
sectarian conflicts, burgeoning squatter settlements, illegal Zaw Naing - Mandalay Technology, Myanmar
buildings and development and land ownership illustrate Zutao Yang - Michigan State University
the complexity of these issues. However, international and Khaing Moe Nyunt - Yangon City Development Com-
domestic investors seek certainty and guidance and the mittee
population demand urgent attention to improvements to Zin Nwe Myint - Yangon University
their daily lives. Some foreign governments also press their Jiaguo Qi - Michigan State University
case for stalled projects and agreement to new initiatives. Soe Myint - Arizona State University
This proposed session welcomes papers from diverse per- Extreme climate events, globalization, and capital relo-
spectives on the spatial, environmental, social, economic cation: Urbanization and sustainability in Yangon, My-
and political aspects of the transition evolving in Myanmar. anmar
Our aims for this panel are: first to enhance our knowledge
and understanding of the changes that are taking place, 4650 Contemporary Issues in Rural China
their likely consequences and their impacts on the diverse Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in
groups within Myanmar; second, to stimulate exchanges Beacon F, Sheraton, Third Floor
amongst researchers with an interest in Myanmar and
third, to continue to develop a research network of individ- Session Description: Change in rural China represents a
uals with a focus on Myanmar in order to facilitate poten- major driver for virtually all major issues facing contempo-
tial research collaborations. rary China. Of course, these include agricultural issues
We welcome papers with focus on any of the following, but such as food safety, food security, and commodity produc-
by no means exclusive, topics: tion and trade. More broadly, however, concerns regarding
Borderland governance, development and economic social inequality, environmental degradation, culture
dynamics; change, and the growth of the rural economy are all rooted
Environmental issues of resource sector projects; in the fast-changing social relations between urban and
Mega projects and regional development; rural places in China. The great changes occurring in rural
Rural to urban migration, welfare and resettlement; China are also important in their own rightgiven the siza-
Tourism and its impacts on communities; ble share of the nation's citizens that continue to live and
Trade, foreign investment and aid; work in these places. This session surveys some of the
Urbanization and urban development most important contemporary rural issues including rural
Sponsorships: urbanization, methods of farm land valuation and redistri-
Asian Geography Specialty Group bution, and environmental degradation and restoration in
Organizers: pastoral regions.
Chung-Tong Wu - Western Sydney University Sponsorships:
Xiaobo Su - University of Oregon China Specialty Group
Marion Sabrie - Center for Southeast Asian Studies Asian Geography Specialty Group
Chair: Rural Geography Specialty Group
Xiaobo Su - University of Oregon
(Continued on page 21)
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(Continued from page 20) lagged far behind the pressing needs of the low-income
Organizers: groups.
Gregory Veeck - Western Michigan University In the Chinese context, rocketing housing price in large
Chairs: cities and limited provision of affordable housing have
Gregory Veeck - Western Michigan University pushed many into despair. Adding to this problem is the
Papers: urban-rural dichotomy that institutionalizes and perpetual-
5:20 PM Wenjing Jiang - Clark University izes the inferiority of rural migrants in the city, who have
Marketization of Agricultural Land Use Rights and Rural amounted to more than 270 million in recent years. Central
Restructuring in China to the housing affordability problem haunting many Chi-
5:40 PM Yue Wang - Beijing Normal University nese cities is the predominant land revenue-driven urban
Xuemin LIU - Beijing Normal University growth model, or the "land-centred urban transformation"
Ruiyin DOU - Beijing Normal University termed by Lin (2007). Against this backdrop, different
Yu ZHANG - Beijing Normal University strategies have been developed both from top-down and
The Study of Resource Value Accounting of the Farm- bottom-up. On the one hand, the central government has
land in North China Plain announced an unprecedentedly large-scale affordable
6:00 PM Zhendong Luo - Nanjing University housing development plan to construct 36 million units of
New urbanization from below in China: The character- affordable housing during the12th five year plan (2011-
istic, mechanism and trend of rural urbanization driven 2015). On the other, informal housing strategies are thriv-
by E-commerce ing on the collective land owned by villagers whose farm-
6:20 PM Gregory Veeck - Western Michigan University land has been encroached by the waves of urban expan-
Charles Emerson - Western Michigan University sion in the past three decades. Urban villages have shel-
Zhou Li - Rural Development Institute, Chinese Acade- tered millions of rural migrants. Meanwhile, a distinctive
my of Social Sciences mode of semi-illegal housing development, namely small
Fawen Yu - Rural Development Institute, Chinese property right housing has quietly taken up a considerably
Academy of Social Sciences large proportion of existing housing stock.
EVI Assessment of Grassland Change under Post-2000 Seemingly, these two mechanisms of affordable hous-
Policy Interventions: A Case Study of Eight Pastoral ing development led by the state and the village collective
Counties in West China, 2000 -2015 respectively are targeting different social groups and
6:40 PM Discussant: Clifton W. Pannell - University of evolve along parallel paths independent of each other. Ex-
Georgia isting studies also rarely link these two dynamics together
to examine affordable housing development. However,
Sunday both mechanisms closely hinge upon the dual land system
and land provision issues and can actually complement and
learn from each other in many ways. We therefore call for
5142 Formal and informal dynamics of afforda- papers looking at both the formal and informal dynamics of
ble housing development affordable housing development. We welcome papers ad-
Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in dressing (but not limited to) the following issues:
Back Bay Ballroom A, Sheraton, Second Floor 1) To examine the dynamics of formal and informal afford-
able housing development from both production side and
Session Description: As an important redistributive means consumption side, i.e. the mechanism of land and housing
to improve the well-being of marginal groups, affordable supply and the different patterns of formal and informal
housing has long been the focal point of academic research affordable housing consumption;
and policy making worldwide. The 2008 global financial 2) To assess the advantages and problems associated with
crisis centralized on housing economy once again brought formal and informal affordable housing development from
housing affordability into the limelight of social economic the perspectives of property rights and transaction cost;
research. The importance of affordable housing concerning 3) To analyze the inter-relationship between the two
homelessness, quality of life, social mix has been widely modes of affordable housing development;
recognized. In developed countries, affordable housing has 4) To investigate the financing strategies of formal and
been used as a governing and planning tool to address the informal affordable housing provision;
problems of residential segregation and sociospatial ine- 5) To evaluate different impacts of formal and informal
quality. Nonetheless, after the collapse of the welfare state affordable housing on residents and communities.
and the rise of neoliberal policies in advanced capitalist Sponsorships:
economies, affordable housing development has been sub- Urban Geography Specialty Group
ordinated to the imperative of economic growth, and has
(Continued on page 22)
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(Continued from page 21) regional contrasts in 'North versus South' and 'East versus
China Specialty Group West', 'rural versus urban divide' and the dichotomy of
Asian Geography Specialty Group 'coastal versus hinterland development'. This session
Organizers: brings together contrasting themes which addresses the
Shenjing He - The University of Hong Kong overarching question of urban development in India, mid-
Youqin Huang - SUNY - Albany dle class women in a burgeoning urban space of Delhi,
Chair: multi- cultural experience in the urban landscapes in Cal-
Shenjing He - The University of Hong Kong cutta which has been inhabited by ethno burbs/ethnic en-
Papers: claves of Chinese descent in Kolkata and Indian and Filipi-
8:00 AM Shenjing He - The University of Hong Kong no descent in New Jersey. Further, this session discusses
Bridging formal and informal dynamics of affordable the French architect Le Corbusier, planned and post inde-
housing development in urban China pendent modern city of Chandigarh, and will also discuss
8:20 AM Youqin Huang - SUNY - Albany trends of urbanization in North-eastern region of India.
Informal Housing and Housing Mobility in Chinese Cit- Sponsorships:
ies Regional Development and Planning Specialty Group
8:40 AM Linda Shi - Massachusetts Institute of Technolo- Asian Geography Specialty Group
gy Organizers:
Xi Qiu - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Rajrani Kalra - California State University - San Bernar-
Zachary Beaird Lamb - Massachusetts Institute of dino
Technology Sudhir K. Thakur - California State University Sacra-
Lawrance Vale - Massachusetts Institute of Technology mento
Hongru Cai - MIT Chair:
Tenure Security and Urban Resilience: The Power of Jayasree Borah - GNRC Hospital
Collective Title in China's Urban Villages Papers:
9:00 AM Daniel You-Ren Yang - Department of Sociology, 8:00 AM Rajinder S. Jutla - Missouri State University
Tunghai University Chandigarh, the Modernistic City: Its Success & Failure
The property-led relocation, institutionalized rent gap 8:20 AM John Ponstingel - Binghamton University
and housing stratification in Shanghai Filipino and Asian Indian Experiences in Jersey City,
New Jersey: The Role of Institutions
5156 Exploring the India and Indian urban 8:40 AM Sudeshna Ghosh - Indiana University Of Pennsyl-
landscapes vania
Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Haimanti Banerji - Indian Institute of Technology, Kha-
Hampton B, Sheraton, Third Floor ragpur
Subrata Chattopadhyay - Indian Institute of Technolo-
Session Description: Urban geography is a field of changing gy, Kharagpur
contours. With the forces of intermingling, assimilation, Brian Okey - Indiana University Of Pennsylvania
migration the urban landscape in both the Western and Student Field Studies in India II: Chinatown, Kolkata.
developing world are changing. India is a nation character- 9:00 AM Jayasree Borah - GNRC Hospital
ized by 'prosperity amidst poverty', 'unity and diversity', Pattern of Urbanization in North-east India

Regional Studies Association Student Research Awards


The Regional Studies Association (RSA) is committed to support students and
early career researchers and following below are some of the many initiatives
that we oer to help grow students and early career researchers careers, influ
ence and research.

With best wishes,


Daniela Carl

Research funding, support and awards (next page)


(Continued on page 23)
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Page 23

(Continued from page 22)


RSA Early career research grant schemes
Application deadline: 31st May 2017
This award is open to single applicants in their early career (five years between the date shown on the PhD certificate
and the application deadline). The award is provided to support a discrete piece of regional studies and/or regional sci-
ence research. The value of the award is up to 10,000 and has a maximum time span of 18 months.
For more details see http://www.regionalstudies.org/funding/page/early-career-grant-scheme

RSA Travel grant


Application deadlines: 31st May 2017, 31st August 2017, 30th November 2017
We offer members up to 500 towards travel costs when attending a non-RSA event. Recipients of the Travel Grant
must be members of the Association at the time of the application, at the time of travel and claim.
For more details see http://www.regionalstudies.org/funding/page/rsa-travel-grant

RSA Awards
Application deadline: 31st May 2017
Nominations (both self-nominations and third party nominations) are being sought for the RSA:
Nathaniel Lichfield/ Recent Master Student Award: Applicants need to have graduated with a master`s de-
gree in regional studies and related fields in 2016.
PhD Student Award: Applicants need to be registered PhD students who have not yet received their PhD certifi-
cate.
Routledge Early Career Award: Applicants need to be early career researchers within five years of the date on
their PhD certificate or equivalent.
The Awards ceremony will take place at the Presidents Event on 16th November 2017 in London, UK. The prize for
each of these Award is:
A cheque for 500;
A certificate;
Up to 200 discretionary fund toward attending the 2016 RSA President's Event (transport costs).
For more details on RSA Awards see http://www.regionalstudies.org/funding/page/rsa-awards-2017

Selected papers on Asia that are not in AGSG Sponsored Sessions


There are many papers that could have been placed in one of the AGSG sessions but were not. Please use the search
function on your mobile app or on the AAG website to find more of the like. These are just a selected few.

3189 All Things Nuclear in a Post-Fukushima Con- 3689 All Things Nuclear in a Post-Fukushima Con-
text: Geographical Perspectives - 1 text: Geographical Perspectives - Panel Discussion
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Vine- Friday, 4/7/2017, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in Vine-
yard, Marriott, Fourth Floor yard, Marriott, Fourth Floor
3289 All Things Nuclear in a Post-Fukushima Con-
text: Geographical Perspectives - 2 Session Description: The nuclear disaster in Fukushima,
Japan in 2011 and the subsequent radioactive contamina-
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in
tion in the region has impacted the ways in which we view
Vineyard, Marriott, Fourth Floor
and deal with nuclear power, radioactivity in the environ-
3489 All Things Nuclear in a Post-Fukushima Con- ment, and the complex assemblage of actors in the energy
text: Geographical Perspectives - 3 industry and communities. Five years after the incident, the
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Vine- concerns about the effects of the disaster persist and the
yard, Marriott, Fourth Floor new issues and challenges related to nuclear power and
3589 All Things Nuclear in a Post-Fukushima Con- radioactivity continue to arise. This multiple-session series
text: Geographical Perspectives - 4 aims to provide an opportunity to share knowledge, experi-
ences, and questions among researchers who have been
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Vine-
engaging in a wide range of issues related to radioactivity,
yard, Marriott, Fourth Floor
(Continued on page 25)
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(Continued from page 23) 4:05 PM Yumiko Yamamoto - Colgate University


nuclear energy, nuclear accident/disaster, nuclear prolifera- Daisaku Yamamoto - Colgate University
tion, and other relevant events and phenomena. Our paper Women Cultivating Diverse Economies in a Nuclear
sessions and panel discussion will address the following Host Community: A Case Study of Kashiwazaki, Japan
nuclear-energy related topics, not limited to the Fukushima
region: isotope techniques in geography; environmental Poster #005: Japanese Enka Music and the Five
impacts; geographies of health, radiation, contamination Themes of Cultural Geography is part of the Poster
and decontamination; social and community impacts and Session: Human Geography Poster Session II
responses; social and economic impacts of power plant
Friday, 4/7/2017 at 8:00 AM.
decommissioning; knowledge, expertise and information;
sustainability and progress; demographics and migration;
gender and diverse economies; reconstruction and govern- Dennis J. Edgell - University of North Carolina at Pembroke
ance; use of geospatial techniques; urban-centric challeng- This presentation will examine geographic aspects of Japa-
es. nese "Enka" music. Enka is style of Japanese traditional
Sponsorship(s): music and folk songs. It has increased in popularity in re-
Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group cent years, and has made its way into popular culture.
Energy and Environment Specialty Group This research grew out of assignments used in a college
Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group Cultural Geography course. The purpose is to appreciate
Papers: and understand this unique cultural phenomenon. Second-
8:30 AM Carolynne Hultquist - Pennsylvania State Univer- ly, to explore the five-themes framework as conceived by
sity Jordan-Bychkov -- as a classroom teaching method, and as
Radiation from Fukushima: Policy, Information, and a vehicle for independent student research.
Technology
9:00 AM Hiroyuki Kaneko - Rikkyo University The five themes framework are: Region, Diffusion, Ecolo-
Why People Continue to Consume Local Food?: Radio- gy, Interaction, and Landscape. The region theme maps
active contamination and the use of resources. the location and distribution of the musical genre, including
10:00 AM Takehito Noda - Ritsumeikan University any regional variations. The diffusion theme includes the
Why did farmers who desired early restart farming re- contagious, relocation and stimulus diffusion of the genre
ject the policy to decontaminate nuclear polluted farm- within Japan, and internationally. The cultural ecology
land? A case study of Kawauchi Village, Fukushima theme frequently appears in environmental references in
10:15 AM Bien Xuan Do - Department of Geography, Hi- song. The interaction theme clarifies Japanese how Enka is
roshima University, Japan causally related to other aspects of Japanese culture and
Factors that Influence Migration Location Choices in economy. The landscape theme will explore Enka's unique
the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Displacement iconography and imagery in song and the tangible land-
10:45 AM David W. Edgington - University Of British Co- scape.
lumbia 1121 Food, water, and change over time
The Road Back: Arrangements for Recovery of Popula-
Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in
tion and Jobs in the Futaba District of Fukushima Pre-
Room 301, Hynes, Third Level
fecture
11:00 AM Mitsuo Yamakawa - Faculty of Economics,
9:00 AM Su Guandong - Hiroshima University
Teikyo University
Great East Japan earthquake/ nuclear disaster and Fu- Spatial Mapping and Analysis of Farmland Abandon-
kushima urban area master plan ment and Its Determinants at National and Regional
1:20 PM Noritsugu Fujimoto- Toyo University/Visiting Pro-
Levels in Japan
fessor - Fukushima University Abstract:
Regional economic boom after the nuclear disaster: In the recent years, Japan has experienced a rapid in-
Political economy, governance and reconstruction poli- crease of farmland abandonment rate. However, there are
cy in Fukushima few researches focusing on national level analysis and the
1:35 PM Masayuki Seto - Fukushima University determinants of farmland abandonment in Japan are not
Akira Takagi - Kumamoto Gakuen University completely clear. Abandoned farmland in Japan can be de-
International transferring of disaster management fined as land that has not been cultivated for more than
knowledge one year and there is no indication that it will be cultivated
1:50 PM Makoto Takahashi - University of Cambridge over the next few years.
Enacting Nuclear Expertise: a performative analysis of
post-Fukushima workshops and exercises (Continued on page 26)
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(Continued from page 25) where movement for biodiversity conservation and ongoing
This paper analyzed the farmland abandonment condition U.S. military expansion coexist, I argue that everyday tour-
from a national scale using agricultural administrative units ism encounters serve as a space where various discourses
as the data samples. From ArcGIS 10.2.2, the spatial pat- of the human-nature relationship are articulated and prac-
terns of agriculture farmland abandonment in different re- ticed. Examining the local ecotourism practices and how
gions of Japan are clearly displayed. As for the reasons and national policies are actualized and understood, this
determinants, based on the national agricultural census presentation challenges the widely-used framework of eco-
data in 2010 we employed multiple linear regression model tourism as a binary economic-ecological management tool
and geographically weighted regression model to conduct and calls for examining a broader political, economic, and
the analysis by dividing the determinants into environmen- ecological context to discuss how discursively and material-
tal, economic and social aspects. ly tourism development may shape the place.
We have found that, farmland abandonment in Japan has
displayed significant spatial characteristics and autocorrela-
2157 Knowledge mobility and co-production in the
tions, high farmland abandonment rate regions mainly con-
making of eco-cities in the global South
centrated in Chubu, Chugoku/Shikoku and Kanto compared
to other regions which have a good agriculture condition. Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in
In addition, among our selected variables, the "arable land Gardner A, Sheraton, Third Floor
rate of self-subsistence household" has the strongest effect
on farmland abandonment, and its explanation ability in- 8:00 AM Zack Lee
creased from central regions to north and south. Lastly, Sofia Shwayri - Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Uni-
the explanation ability of variables is different from region versity of California - Berkeley
to region while farmers' labor condition is more prone to When Vision Meets Reality: The mobility of Songdo as
cause the farmland abandonment. an eco-city model
Abstract:
1649 Staging the Nation: Tourism and the Geopolit- Many eco-city projects are experimental sites where visions
ical Gaze of technologically advanced, environmentally friendly cities
are brought to bear. Policymakers see these places as
Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in models that need to be both shared and sought after due
Beacon E, Sheraton, Third Floor to the immediate challenges of rapid urbanization, environ-
mental degradation, and disaster resiliency. Yet, the mobil-
4:40 PM Sayaka Sakuma - University of Hawaii at Manoa ity of policies rest on the assumption that the model has
Rise of Ecotourism Development in Okinawa, Japan been deemed successful. Most eco-city projects though are
Abstract: in different stages of development. None have been com-
The role of tourism in Japan has been fluid while encom- pleted, while assessing their impacts will be further in the
passing a wide range of national interests from inserting an future.
image of 'economic superpower' in the industrialized global This situation has not deterred policymakers from the Phil-
community (Leheny 2003), balancing trade surplus be- ippines in adopting South Korea's Songdo International
tween other countries (Carlile 2003), and to fueling mas- Business District as the model for the country's first eco-
sive investment in domestic construction industry (Rimmer city project called Clark Green City. From a series of in-
1992, McCormack 1991) while serving for advancement of depth interviews and archival analysis, this paper intends
the country. With the rising concerns of ecological conser- to describe a process by which an incomplete eco-city pro-
vation, the discourse of ecotourism, often contested yet ject has been adopted and translated into another context.
powerfully perpetuated in the global tourism sector, Personal relationships and policy tours are vital to the pro-
emerged in Japan as a strategic tool to navigate the coun- cess as well as the desire to build a "modern" city in a con-
try's ever-growing hospitality industry. text where the planning context has been historically weak.
I will introduce how ecotourism policies in Japan reflect The initial enthusiasm though was tempered by the reali-
global and national political-economic interests by examin- ties of actually building the project. Policymakers' own local
ing policies, advertisements and newspaper articles. I will experience and the development of key performance indi-
further focus on Okinawa, the Japan's 'troubling' prefecture cators enabled the project to become more grounded in
with the history of Battle of Okinawa and long-lasting infa- the Philippine context. There was a pivot away from Song-
mous call as 'the poorest prefecture.' Yet Okinawa is also do but traces of it is embedded in Clark Green City's mas-
known as one of the most well-known tourism prefectures. terplan.
Drawing on ethnographic work at the rural forest villages (Continued on page 27)
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(Continued from page 26) Abstract:


Home gardens are exclusively and ubiquitously subsist-
2168 The Futures of Atlases - Papers ence-based component across different landscape con-
Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in St. texts, and thus considered relatively independent of identi-
Botolph, Marriott, Second Floor ty and transformations of its landscape "matrix". However,
studies have revealed intertwined coexistence between
8:18 AM Gregory H. Chu - U Wisconsin-La Crosse commercial and subsistence agriculture in rural land that is
Jongnam Choi - Western Illinois University more complex than cross-canceling. (Zimmmerer 2014,
Chul Sue Hwang - Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea Turner 2016, Mwavu, 2016). This study takes a historical
Nation Building and the Structure of The National Atlas investigation of cash crop introduction on home garden
of Korea subsistence agrobiodiversity(1970-2015), drawing on PI's
Abstract: fieldwork data from Jeju, Korea in 2015. This study investi-
Collections of maps or an atlas can be structured subtly to gates the relationship between (successful and farmer-led)
convey a particular theme. This paper examines the struc- citrus introduction to the region and subsistence farming
turing of The National Atlas of Korea as a striking effort to on and off home gardens. Geographic literature guides the
cartographically express South Korea's nation-building pro- study by providing perspectives to understand livelihood,
cess from a war-torn state to the world's 11th largest agricultural modernization, and also place-based under-
economy in only six decades. The Atlas is structured into standing of agrobiodiversity. Findings reveal that, although
five chapters: Territories; Government and local autonomy; nowadays traditional subsistence agrobiodiversity is mostly
Transformation and development of the land; Korea in the lost and/or spatially "shrunk" into home gardens, home
world; and Maps of Korea (topographic). The first chapter garden boundary could be blurry and farmers take ad-
vantage of unexpected lands as home gardens: such as
sets its territorial history and current territorial extent. The
second chapter summarizes its government and democratic unused floor of citrus scrubland. Ironically, this practice is
process. The third chapter highlights its massive decades- only expected to increase as citrus farms are being thinned
long "Spatial Planning" process and achievements on eco- out(for quality control) and becoming greenhoused due to
nomic developments, infrastructures-building, and high price pressure from economic liberalization. Home gardens,
tech advancements that are expertly and systematically along with diversified temporary livelihoods and never-
expressed cartographically. The Atlas uses many sequential obsolete practices of wild gathering of plants and animal
maps and data portrayal techniques to display spatial ele- foods, show how smallholders have dynamically combined
ments such as site-selection for government office disper- non-citrus strategies to ensure livelihood security. Also, the
sions; infrastructures for rapid transportation, housing dis- study also reveals role of citrus' "accidental"
persion, energy diversifications; population re-distribution traits(shrubbiness), and the role of colonial family network
with goals of achieving optimal quality of life; heavy and and village network in technology transfer of agrobiodiver-
light industrial plant sitings; conservations of its environ- sity and associated land change.
ments and cultural heritages while new cultural trends are
being developed. The fourth chapter places Korea as an
4614 Maps and Mapping as Historical Method
important global actor. The Atlas also includes physical
settings of the entire Korean Peninsula plus limited demo- Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in
graphic, urban, migration, and economic maps of North Room 203, Hynes, Second Level
Korea while downplaying political conflicts with its northern 6:00 PM Sangmyeoung Moon - University of Southern Cali-
nuclear sibling. Collectively, the cartographic contents be- fornia Korean Heritage Library
come coherent and clear expressions of nation-building Description of Korea in Western old maps - Through
and the overall Korean national pride regardless of politics. the Western Old Maps of the USC Korean Heritage Li-
brary
4427 Food system transitions 3: Gardening and ur- Abstract:
ban agriculture Old maps reflect the information and awareness of the lo-
cal people of that time. they were nevertheless a very im-
Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in
portant source for the subjective awareness of them.
Room 307, Hynes, Third Level
Korea in the the 17th century Western maps appeared ad-
1:20 PM Yooinn Hong - Penn State University
jacent to China as peculiar spindle or rectangular shapes,
How farmers "make it work": home garden plant diver- indicating the lack information about Korea of that time. As
sity reveals smallholder adaptation to stresses of his- Korea's shape gets more accurate in the 18th century
torical commercial citrus introduction in Jeju, Korea (Continued on page 28)
(1970-2015)
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Page 28

(Continued from page 27) However, today's India is radically different from the India
Western maps, Liuzaobian appears. It was rows of willow of 1950s. Sustained economic growth, for example, has
trees planted in Northeast China for the purpose of creat- transformed the country's economic base from agriculture
ing boundaries for the Manchus' territory. However, Liu- to services making India the fifth largest economy of the
zaobian in early western maps show as if they were the world in the last two decades. Our preliminary analysis of
national borders between China and Korea, another indica- the database of ITPI of registered planners reveals several
tion that the cartographer did not know much about Man- interesting trends. For instance, nearly half of the planners
churia and Korea. are now based in ten metropolitan cities even as there are
Maps made in the Choson dynasty show different charac- only 4,650 registered planners for 7,935 towns and cities
teristics from those made in China in a few ways. This with over 38 million urban population.
paper will focus on two of those characteristics: Ningguta
and the size of Korea relative to China. Ningguta was the
4406 Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change
name of the place that controlled the Northeast area of the
Qing Dynasty. Curiously, this obscure place name com- Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in
monly appears prominently in Choson's maps in contrast to Room 107, Hynes, Plaza Level
the Chinese maps that rarely showed it. In Puckeji-do, a 1:40 PM Keith Bosak - The University of Montana
series of maps of the North territory of Korea made in Cho- Sarah Halvorson - the University of Montana
son, the Korean peninsula is depicted much bigger than it Impacts of Climate Change and socio-economic change
is in the maps made in China. on indigenous people in the Indian Himalaya
These distinguishing characteristics of Choson maps are Abstract:
reflected in western. These suggest a new possibility that This paper presents results from research conducted in the
the late Choson maps directly influenced the western map- Indian Himalaya in 2013 and 2016, with the purpose of
makers. understanding how local indigenous people are being af-
fected by climate change, how socio-economic conditions
are changing and finally, how climate change and socio-
4699 Regional Development and Urban Planning economic change might be driving changes in the socio-
Series V ecological systems of the region. Rapid development is
Saturday, 4/8/2017, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in beginning to occur in many Himalayan countries as climate
Vermont, Marriott, Fifth Floor change impacts are beginning to become widespread. In
6:40 PM Ashok Kumar - School of Planning and Architec- the Indian Himalaya, mountain environments are particu-
ture, New Delhi larly susceptible to climate-induced environmental change;
Sanjeev Vidyarthi - University of Illinois At Chicago changes that are affecting the productivity and reliability of
Mapping the Planners of Urban India traditional subsistence practices, threatening existing
household livelihood strategies, and increasing vulnerability
Abstract: to water-related hazards among resource-dependent popu-
This presentation will map and enumerate India's profes- lations. At the same time, rapid socioeconomic changes are
sional planning fraternity. In contrast with much of the re- occurring. One major and observable shift is in livelihoods.
cent scholarship devoted to the many informal aspects of Specifically, people are shifting toward commercialized ag-
urban India, we know very little about the formal side of riculture and away from subsistence agriculture in order to
country's contemporary planning practice. By illustrating gain income to participate in a modern lifestyle. In addi-
the spatial distribution and select characteristics such as tion, economic development projects such as roads and
age, gender, and education, etc. of the planning fraternity, dam building reduce access to valley bottoms and conser-
working across the country's diverse regions and rapidly vation initiatives restrict access to forests and alpine re-
growing urban centers, our aim is to highlight the changing gions; traditional ecological knowledge and practices dwin-
nature of India's formal planning practices. dle and people are left with no alternative but to earn in-
As is well documented, eight middle aged men met in Oc- comes using the limited natural resources available. Linking
tober 1949 (two years after independence) to initiate the changing local conditions with broader socio-economic
Indian Board of Town Planners, precursor to the Indian changes provides a contextual approach to understanding
Town Planning Institute (ITPI). Obtaining state support, the increasing marginalization of mountain people and en-
the ITPI soon became the apex national body overseeing vironments with the ultimate goal of developing strategies
the planning profession in post-colonial India and helped to foster resilience in the face of rapid changes.
set up the first planning School at New Delhi in the 1950s.

(Continued on page 29)


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Page 29

(Continued from page 28) Poster #056: Perceptions and experiences of environ-
mental change in the Uttarakhand Himalaya, India
1107 A Changing Rural Asia
Abstract:
Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in
Global climate change has important implications for mem-
Room 108, Hynes, Plaza Level
bers of Himalayan communities, where a majority of resi-
9:20 AM Barney Warf - University of Kansas dents maintain livelihoods that are based on subsistence or
Combatting Rural Poverty in India with Telecenters small-scale agriculture, seasonal pastoral migration, and/or
Abstract: localized natural resource extraction. This study asks about
India's national and state-level governments have become how climate-related change is playing out 'on the ground' -
the world's leaders in attempting to reduce rural poverty specifically in terms of perceived levels of household vul-
through the use of information technology. To mitigate its nerability, adaptive capacity, and sources of resilience to
digital divide, both the national state and local administra- rapid environmental change over different sectors. To ex-
tions have erected a series of programs that put into place amine these issues, we conducted a questionnaire-based
internetworked telecenters in small villages, through which study near the Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary. In-depth
farmers can check crop prices, apply for social insurance household questionnaire interviews were conducted over a
programs, and obtain deeds to land. Rural incomes have 5-month period in 2015 with a random sample of 250 re-
risen and opportunities for graft and bribery have declined spondents from 16 area villages in an effort to record their
as a result. Karnataka has been especially innovative in this demographic characteristics, observations of environmental
regard. This paper examines the origins of India's tele- change over the past 20 years (weather and precipitation
centers initiatives, their differential usage by gender, and patterns, changes to agroecological systems, forest ecolo-
the factors that contribute to their successes or occasional gy, and wildlife sightings), concerns about environmental
failures. conditions, sources of information about the environment,
and perceived barriers to/opportunities for adaptation.
This poster presents our initial results, showing that "very
5156 Exploring the India and Indian urban land- high" levels of concern (modal response) are reported
scapes across all of these categories. Emergence of new agricul-
tural diseases and pests was also reported by over 90% of
Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in respondents as a related problem of concern; increase in
Hampton B, Sheraton, Third Floor field- or village-based wildlife sightings was reported by
9:00 AM Jayasree Borah - GNRC Hospital over 70%, while a decrease in wildlife sightings was also
Pattern of Urbanization in North-east India reported (approximately 60%). The low level of confidence
reported regarding perceived ability of the Forest Depart-
Abstract:
ment to help respondents cope with adaptation was offset
North-east India, the study area is one of the least urban-
by faith in effectiveness of local (panchayat-level) and
ized parts of India with its poor infrastructure, agrarian
state-level government.
background of economy and low rate of industrialization.
There is also a wide spatial disparity observed in the pro-
cess of growth and development of different orders of ur- 2293 Emerging geographical thoughts in China
ban centers. In the present work an attempt has been
made to study the pattern of urbanization and the chal- Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in
lenges and strategies for the planning of both the urban Orleans, Marriott, Fourth Floor
agglomerations and the small towns for the balanced re- 10:20 AM Collin Livingston Chambers - Syracuse University
gional development of this isolated part of the country cov- China, Geography, and the Global Class War
ered by hills, mountains and plateaus and diverse socio-
cultural groups of people. Abstract:
The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) contains almost 20%
of the world's population. It is talked about in the popular
3120,3220 Human Geography Poster Session II press on almost a daily basis, and is constantly going
through dynamic and radical societal changes. Thus, a
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 8:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Hall thorough and scientific understanding of its political econo-
C, Hynes, Second Floor my and society is of utmost importance. Though geograph-
8:00 AM Monica V. Ogra* - Gettysburg College ic work on China has been on the rise, there is much truth
Upma Manral - Wildlife Institute of India to what Cressey (1934) said over 80 years ago, that "so
Ruchi Badola - Wildlife Institute of India little is actually known about [China]that it will be many
Lincoln M. Butcher* - Gettysburg College (Continued on page 30)
BULLETIN
Page 30

(Continued from page 29) technologies. While rural farmers adopt green revolution
years before an adequate treatment of it will be possible" technologies and weigh economic benefit of grain subsidies
(p. vii). His statement is true not in the sense that we do I assert that greenhouses will become commonplace, a
not have enough rich empirical studies that are filled with result of Chinese governmentality.
concrete economic and political realities in China, but in
the sense that we are lacking in theoretical frameworks,
that exist on the global scale, to explain what shapes and 1190 Wine I: Old and New World Wines and Viticul-
changes the internal and external political economy of Chi- ture
na. In this essay I argue that human and economic geog- Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in
raphers in general, and the geographers who study China Yarmouth, Marriott, Fourth Floor
in particular can benefit from employing a global class war
theoretical framework to better understand the PRC's posi- 8:40 AM Do Yeon Lim - Seoul National University
tion in global economic and political space, and how it af- Knowledge Transfer and Regional Evolution: A case
fects their political economy. A global class war theoretical study of the wine industry in the Eastern Foot of Helan
framework can better understand the dialectical relation- Mountain region, Ningxia, China
ship between the global capitalist system (i.e., imperialism)Abstract:
and the inner political-economic workings of the PRC. Despite its relatively long history, only recently has the Chi-
nese wine industry started to gain popular attention global-
ly. Notably, the Eastern Foot of Helan Mountain region in
3429 Compass Rose Session | Student Illustrated Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region is a rapidly developing
Paper Competition wine producing region which had more or less 10 wineries
Friday, 4/7/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Room until 2010, but now, in 2016, has more than 100 wineries.
309, Hynes, Third Level The purpose of this research is to examine intra- and inter-
regional knowledge transfer in the wine industry cluster
1:30 PM Lucas Ysidro Reyes - California State University and to analyze the influence of knowledge transfer on re-
Long Beach gional co-evolution using building blocks from evolutionary
Degradation of Rural Tibetan Livelihoods Through economic geography such as lock-in, de-locking, and the
Green Revolution Technologies evolution of networks. Data were acquired from in-depth,
Abstract: semi-structured interviews conducted in July-August, 2016.
This abductive field study explores changing agricultural Results indicate that while most intra-regional communica-
conditions and practices on the Tibetan Plateau. Chinese tion has been helpful for the production and sales of indi-
government policies encourage citizens to "Develop the vidual wineries, inter-regional communication impacts have
West" and China faces problems feeding their expanding varied depending on the regions between which the firms
population. Land in these sparsely populated areas is have interacted and the relevance of, and accessibility to,
harsh, traditionally inhabited by Tibetan and Uygur minori- knowledge from foreign wine regions. Moreover, institu-
ties; nearly 70% of the total land area is suitable range- tional co-evolution is shown to be a factor impacting indus-
land, degrading from poor grazing practices and less than trial and regional development.
1% is arable. As Ethnic Han migrate to Tibet how the rug-
ged landscape, historically hidden by the great Himalayas
and Kunlun Mountains, will support this migration material-
izes. How will the rural Tibetan landscape sustain migrating
Chinese? Through textual discourse that is supported by
field research, agricultural practices are assessed. Follow-
ing Robbins' degradation and marginalization thesis and
the Boserup hypothesis, I explore the works of Goldstein,
Paltridge, Yeh et. al and argue that the Chinese govern-
ment addresses this nourishment problem through policy,
an intricate display of governmentality. The rural Tibetan
livelihood is marginalized and degraded through these Chi-
nese government policies noted by Goldstein designed to
bring the greater Tibetan population into a market driven
economy. Visiting five sites and conducting four interviews
I document how rural Tibetans are encouraged to grow
more grains through subsidies, to abandon the use of yak
as a beast of burden and to adopt more green revolution
BULLETIN
Page 31
BULLETIN
Page 32

2016 Asia Symposium at the AAGRecap


The Asia Symposium: Showcasing Asian Geographies featured 16 paper and panel sessions with over 60 speak-
ers, plus a keynote lecture featuring Professor Henry Wai-Chung Yeung of the National University of Singapore. The five
topics:
Analytical Methods linking Economic, Climate, Hydrology & Policy Research
Vulnerability, Security and Environmental Risk
Chinas Silk Road Project
Development and Sustainability in Asia
Keynote Lecture by Henry Wai-Chung Yeung: Rethinking Asia in the New Global Economy
The Asian Geography Specialty Group convened a special Asia Symposium
as part of the 2016 AAG meeting in San Francisco. The symposium high-
lighted Asias importance in the 21st century, inter-regional connections
within and outside Asia, and national and international cross-disciplinary
approaches to understanding the region. The well-attended symposium in-
cluded 16 paper sessions and 65 individual research presentations repre-
senting geographic research from across Asia. The Symposium also included a keynote lecture by Professor
Henry Yeung from the National University of Singapore. Dr. Yeungs presentation featured material from his
latest book, Strategic Coupling: East Asian Industrial Transformation in the New Global Economy (Cornell Uni-
versity Press). The Asian Geography Specialty Group co-chairs thank everyone who made the Asia Symposi-
um such a success.
BULLETIN
Page 33

Notes from members


Ian Rowen, PhD na Geography Specialty Group at the AAG.
This summer, I will start as Assistant Professor and Nice to see that there are a bunch of young folk com-
founding faculty member of the new Geography Pro- ing up in the AGSG ranks.
gramme at Nanyang Technological University in Sin- I doubt if my position at the University of British Co-
gapore. I have worked on the Committee for The lumbia will be replaced though; my department
Geopolitics of Transitional Justice in a contested state seems to be heading in a different direction, with 2
at the International Journal of Transitional Justice. new hires in native indigenous Indian studies.
I have also been a
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Academia Sinica, Insti- Xinyue Ye (Kent State) served as Co-Chair of the 8th
tute of Ethnology International Symposium of Spatially Integrated So-
Associate researcher, French Centre for Research on cial Science and Humanities in Nanjing, as the Pro-
Contemporary China (CEFC) gram Chair & Proceeding Publication Co-Chair (EI) for
the 25rd International Conference on Geoinformatics
in Buffalo, and the Co-Chair of the International Con-
ference on Geo-informatics in Sustainable Ecosystems
David Edgington and Society in Wuhan.
Field Work: Lately Ive been working in Yokohama He also is starting a Visiting Professorship at the Cen-
and Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. ter for Geographical Analysis in the Institute for
I'm retiring next year, so my appearance at the Bos- Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University,
ton AAG will be my last. working with Robert J. Sampson, a Henry Ford II Pro-
fessor and Director of the Social Sciences Program at
I have also successfully handed over the reigns to the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.
successors of the Japan Studies Association of Cana-
da (JSAC), the Canadian Association of Geographers
Geographies of Asia Study Group (CAG), and the Chi-

Contact
George Pomeroy, Ph.D., AICP
Shippensburg University
Email: gmpome@ship.edu
BULLETIN

Page 34

Historical Glimpses, the AGSG Bulletin - Fall 1989


Correction: In the last issue, Fall 2016, Historical Glimpses should have read Spring 1989.
Bheru L. Sukhwal editor, again has received very little material.
The AGSG, along with the Historical Geography and China Specialty Groups co-sponsored a guest
lecture by William Skinner at the 1990 Toronto AAG annual meeting.
Geography in America volume, edited by Gary Gaile and Cort Wilmott was published in the sum-
mer of 1989. The chapter on Asian Geography was led by Professor P.P. Karan and helped by
Shakibal-Khameri, James Hafner, Kenji Oshiro, Nanda Shrestha, and David Dickason. It was also
guided by previous officers of the AGSG, William Noble and Ashok Dutt.
The Bylaws of the AGSG are reprinted in this issue.
The 3rd International Asian Urbanization Conference will be held in January 1991 in New Delhi.
Travel grant funding by the AGSG to attend this meeting is proposed by Chair David Dickason.
Officers of the AGSG:
Chair: David Dickason, Western Michigan University
Secretary-Treasurer: James L. Cobban, Ohio University
Regional Directors:
East Asia: Gil Latz
Southeast Asia: Thomas R. Leinbach
South Asia: Richard P. Palmieri, Mary Washington College
Southwest Asia: Frank J. Costa, University of Akron
Honors Committee: P.P. Karan, University of Kentucky
Clifton W. Pannell, University of Georgia
Editor: Bheru L. Sukhwal, Univeristy of Wisconsin, Platteville
Himanshu R. Betal from the University of Calcutta was a Visiting Professor at the University of
South Carolina, Columbia.
Chris Drake was in China and Japan on a Faculty Development Grant.
Gopal S. Kulkarni, Indiana University, was part of a six-member US team to take part in the first
U.S.-Swedish Seminar on Development of Marginal Areas in Developed Countries held at the
University of Karlstad, Sweden.
Gopal S. Kulkarni has also been invited to deliver a keynote address at the IGU regional symposi-
um on Limits to Rural Land Use in developed Countries in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Bheru Sukhwal visited the Rajasthan canal region during the Summer of 1989 to collect material
for a research paper.
The University of Kentucky Department of Geography is offering a Summer Field Program in the
Himalaya for 6 weeks in 1990 to be held in Simla, India. The entire cost per person is $2500.
Martin Glassner, Southern Connecticut State University, requests information or complete cita-
tions of any materials concerning the international transport arrangements of any land-locked
country or countries.
The I.G.U. Regional Conference on Asian Pacific countries will be held in Beijing, in August, 1990.
Frank J. Costa, Ashok K. Dutt, Laurence J.C. Ma, and Allen G. Noble published Urbanization in
Asia: Spatial Dimensions and Policy Issues through University of Hawaii Press.
Paying dues for the AGSG was still part of the functions of the specialty group but a member had
to indicate which groups he belonged on the AAG Form. The dues year for both was now the
same.
BULLETIN

Page 35

Recent AGSG Member Publications & Presentations:


Brickell, K. and Springer, Simon. 2016. `3.11' disaster", Paper presented at the Associa-
'Introduction to contemporary tion of Collegiate Schools of Planning annual
Cambodia'. The Handbook of meeting, Portland OR, November.
Contemporary Cambodia. Eds. Li, X., Mitra, Chandana., Dong, L., Yang, Q. 2017.
Brickell, K and Springer, S. Lon- Understanding land use change impacts on mi-
don: Routledge. croclimate using Weather Research and Forecast-
Brickell, K. and Springer, Simon. ing (WRF) Model, Physics and Chemistry of the
Eds. 2016. The Handbook of Earth. DOI: 10.1016/j.pce.2017.01.017
Contemporary Cambodia. Lon- Rowen, Ian & Rowan, Jamie. 2017. Taiwan's
don: Routledge. Truth and Reconciliation Committee: The Geopol-
Chang, I-Chun Catherine, Helga Leitner and Eric itics of Transitional Justice in a contested state.
Sheppard. 2016. A Green Leap Forward? Eco- International Journal of Transitional Justice.
State Restructuring and the Tianjin-Binhai Eco- https://doi.org/10.1093/ijtj/ijx001
city Model Regional Studies, Rowen, Ian. 2017. Touring in heterotopia: Travel,
DOI:10.1080/00343404.2015.1108519 sovereignty, and exceptional spaces in Taiwan
Chen, J., J. Gao, F. Yuan and Y.Dennis Wei 2016. and China. Asian Anthropology, 16(1), 20-34.
Spatial determinants of urban land expansion in Shen, J. and Y.Dennis Wei (2017). The impact of
globalizing Nanjing, China. Sustainability 8, 868. environmental regulations on the location of Pol-
DOI:10.3390/su8090868. lution-intensive industries in China. Journal of
Chen, Sulan and Juha I. Uitto. 2016. Cleaner Production 148: 785-794.
Accountability Delegation: Empowering Local Springer, Simon. 2016. Apocalypse then, apoca-
Communities for Environmental Protection in Chi- lypse now: the exile and arbitrary detention of
na. Development. DOI:10.1057/s41301-016- Cambodias homeless. Policy Forum. http://
0025-1. www.policyforum.net/apocalypse-apocalypse-
Choi, W., S. Kang, J. Choi, J.J. Larsen, C. Oh, and now/
Y. Na. 2016. Characteristics of Deforestation in Springer, Simon. 2016. Homelessness in Cambo-
the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (North dia: the terror of gentrification. The Handbook
Korea) between the 1980s and 2000s, Regional of Contemporary Cambodia. Eds. Brickell, K. and
Environmental Change, DOI: 10.1007/s10113- Springer, S. London: Routledge.
016-1022-3 (http://link.springer.com/
article/10.1007/s10113-016-1022-3) Springer, Simon. 2017. Klepto-neoliberalism: au-
thoritarianism and patronage in Cambodia.
Edgington, David W. 2016. How Safe is Safe States of Discipline: Authoritarian Neoliberalism
Enough? The Politics of Decon- and the Crises of Capitalism. Ed., Tansel, C. B.
tamination in Fukushima, in M. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
Yamakawa and D. Yamamoto
(Eds.) Unravelling the Fukushi- Springer, Simon. 2017. Neoliberalism in South-
ma Disaster, London, east Asia. Routledge Handbook of Southeast
Routledge, 80-106. Asian Development. Eds. McGregor, A., Law, L.
and Miller, F. London: Routledge.
Edgington, David W. "`Building
back better along the Sanriku
coast of Tohoku, Japan: five years after the
(Continued on page 36)
BULLETIN
Page 36

(Continued from page 35) Tyner, James A., Sokvisal


Tyner, James A. 2017. Kimsroy, Chenjian Fu, Zheye
Memory, Landscape, and Wang, and Xinyue Ye, An Em-
Post-Violence in Cambodia pirical Analysis of Arrests and
(London: Rowman & Little- Executions at S-21 Security-
field International). Center during the Cambodian
Genocide, Genocide Studies
International 10, no. 2 (2016):
268-286.
Tyner, James A., Xinyue Ye,
Sokvisal Kimsroy, Zheye
Wang, and Chenjian Fu, Uitto, Juha I. 2016. The Envi-
Emerging data sources and ronment-Poverty Nexus in Eval-
the study of genocide: a pre- uation: Implications for the
liminary analysis of prison data Sustainable Development
from S-21 security-center, Goals. Global Policy 7 (3): 441
Cambodia, GeoJournal 81, no. -447.
6 (2016): 907-918.

Urban Landuse Study of Chinese Cities Underway

Gregory Veeck and Charles Emerson (Geography, quantitatively assess change in time-series agricultur-
Western Michigan University) wish to report a new al and green space land cover/land use (LC/LU) data
project surveying agricultural land use over time in for the entire metro region spanning the 100+years
large cities in China. The first step is a case study of from the Republican Era (1911-1949) to the present.
Nanjing that will, hopefully, serve as Early assessments will be made us-
a pilot project for a later multi- ing the historical map series for
national effort. Nanjing, map layers generated from
This case study will create a GIS a set of already-acquired aerial pho-
(geographic information system) for tographs from 1929, and other his-
the years from 1911 to 2016 so as torical maps of the city archived at
to definitively test an important Nanjing University. Post-1975 LC/LU
component of the Ginsburg-McGee maps will be derived from a variety
desakota hypothesis. These schol- of satellite imagery including Hyperi-
ars working in the late 1980s pre- on, ASTER, Landsat 1-5, 7 and 8
dicted that Asian metropolitan re- (including TM and MSS), Operational
gions, unlike similar places in West- Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal In-
ern nations and traditions, will consistently allocate frared Sensor (TIRS) using endmember partial pixel
and maintain agricultural land and labor resources analysis.
within metropolitan boundaries. Funding for the pilot study has been acquired from
Working with faculty in the School of Architecture and the Milton and Ruth Scherer Fund of Western Michi-
Urban Planning of Nanjing University, the study will gan University.
BULLETIN

Page 37

Understanding Contemporary China, 5th edition


Robert E. Gamer and Stanley W. Toops, editors. CONTENTS
2017. Understanding Contemporary China, 5th edi- IntroductionR.E. Gamer.
tion. Boulder: Lynne Rienner. 978-1-62637-653-3
China: A Geographic PrefaceS.W. Toops.
https://www.rienner.com/title/
Understanding_Contemporary_China_5th_edition The Historical ContextR. Murphey.
China today bears little resem- Chinese PoliticsR.E. Gamer.
blance to the country introduced Chinas EconomyS. Tong and J. Wong.
in the first edition of Under-
China Beyond the HeartlandL.T. White and R.E.
standing Contemporary China,
Gamer.
published nearly two decades
ago. International RelationsR.E. Gamer.
Even in just the past five years, Population Growth and UrbanizationR. Ma.
dramatic changes have occurred Chinas Environmental ProblemsR.L. Edmonds.
under the leadership of Presi-
Family, Kinship, Marriage, and SexualityW. Jan-
dent Xi Jingping. This new edi-
kowiak and X. Zang.
tion of the book reflects those
changes, exploring the impact of Women and DevelopmentL. Bossen.
new domestic policies; Chinas role as a behemoth in ReligionH. Chan and A.Y.C. King.
the world economy; its rapidly modernizing infrastruc-
ture; its expanding military presence in the region; Literature and Popular CultureC.A. Laughlin.
the environmental challenges it confronts; and much Trends and ProspectsR.E. Gamer and L.T.
more. The result is an accessible, well-grounded look White.
at the most crucial issues affecting China today. Forthcoming, Summer 2017

International Studies: An Interdisciplinary approach to global issues.


S. Anderson, M. Peterson, and Stanley Toops. 2017. Change; and The Globalization of
International Studies: An Interdisciplinary approach to Modern Sports.
global issues. 4th ed. Boulder : Westview. Sheldon Anderson is professor
9780813350493 of history at Miami University. He
https://westviewpress.com/books/international-studies- is the author of five books: The
july-2017/ Politics and Culture of Modern
This core text is the first to provide a much-needed inter- Sports , Condemned to Repeat It,
disciplinary approach to international studies. Emphasizing A Cold War in the Soviet Bloc, A
the interconnected nature of history, geography, anthropol- Dollar to Poland Is a Dollar to Rus-
ogy, economics, and political science, International Studies sia, and the forthcoming The For-
details the methodologies and subject matter of each disci- gotten Legacy of Stella Walsh.
pline then applies these discipline lenses to seven regions: Mark Allen Peterson is profes-
Europe; East Asia and the Pacific; South and Central Asia; sor of anthropology and interna-
sub-Saharan Africa; the Middle East and North Africa; Latin tional studies at Miami University. He is the author of Con-
America; and North America. This disciplinary and regional nected in Cairo and Anthropology and Mass Communica-
combination provides an indispensable, cohesive frame- tions.
work for understanding global issues. Stanley W. Toops is associate professor of geography
The fully updated fourth edition includes four new global and international studies at Miami University. He is coau-
issues chapters: The Refugee Crisis in Europe; The Syrian thor of The Routledge Atlas of Central Eurasian Affairs and
Civil War and the Rise of the Islamic State; Global Climate co-editor of Understanding Contemporary China.
BULLETIN

Page 38

Book: Fair Trade and Organic Initiatives in Asian Agriculture: The Hidden Realities

Rie Makita & Tadasu Tsuruta Asian, reveal the realities


ISBN: 978-1138653146 of applying Fair Trade
Date: 17 March 2017 and organic certification
https://www.routledge.com/Fair-Trade-and-Organic- systems within Asian ag-
Initiatives-in-Asian-Agriculture-The-Hidden- riculture. In doing so,
Realities/Makita-Tsuruta/p/book/9781138653146 they challenge the fact
that most Fair Trade
In addition to constituting an evolving area of inquiry studies have been under-
within the social sciences, agricultural certification, taken by Western schol-
and particularly its Fair Trade and organic compo- ars who have tended to
nents, has emerged as a significant tool for promoting focus on Latin American
rural development in the global South. This book is and African producers.
unique for two reasons. First, in contrast to existing Drawing on a wealth of
studies that have tended to examine Fair Trade and grounded case studies
organic certification as independent systems, the conducted in India, Thai-
studies presented in this book reveal their joint appli- land, and the Philippines,
cation within actual production settings, demonstrat- this pioneering study on double certification makes a
ing the greater complexity entailed in these double significant contribution to studies on Fair Trade and
certification systems through the generation of con- organic agriculture beyond Asia.
tradictions and tensions compared with single certifi-
cation systems. Second, the authors, who are both

Book: Evaluating Climate Change Action for Sustainable Development


Uitto, Juha I., Jyotsna Puri and Rob D. van bilateral aid agencies,
den Berg, eds. 2017. Evaluating Climate Change Ac- and academia. The au-
tion for Sustainable Development. Springer. thors share methodolo-
gies or approaches used
This authoritative book presents the ever pro- to better understand
gressing state of the art in evaluating climate change problems and assess
strategies and action. It includes perspectives from interventions, strategies
independent evaluations of the major international and policies. They also
organizations supporting climate action in developing share challenges en-
countries, such as the Global Environment Facility. countered, what was
The first section of the book sets the stage and pro- done to solve these and
vides an overview of independent evaluations, carried lessons learned from
out by multilateral development banks and develop- evaluations. Collectively,
ment organizations. Important topics include how pol- the authors illustrate the
icies and organizations aim to achieve impact and importance of evaluation in providing evidence to
how this is measured, whether climate change is guide policy change to informed decision-making.
mainstreamed into other development programs, and
whether operations are meeting the urgency of cli- The open source ebook and the hard copy are
mate change challenges. The following sections focus available on the Springer website at
on evaluation of climate change projects and policies http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319437019
as they link to development, from the perspective of
international organizations, NGOs, multilateral and
BULLETIN

Page 39
Journal of Global Resources (JGR)
We cordially invite you to submit a paper in the Journal of Global Resources (JGR), (ISSN: 2395-3160 Print, ISSN: 2455-
2445 Online). JGR is a biannual international journal, which aims to provide and encourage the scholars and academi-
cians globally to share their professional and academic knowledge in the fields of natural resources, land, water, energy,
forest, human resources, environment, biodiversity etc.
For detail guidelines please go to http://www.isdesr.org. Manuscripts may be submitted as an e-mail attachment in
*.doc file format to: globalresources2015@gmail.com
JGR is an international academic journal that publishes papers of the high quality in natural resources, environmental
science, GIS etc. Manuscripts come from different parts of the world. Authors please use the following guidelines:
1. Submission of original paper in MS word format in the font size of 11 Arial on A-4 size sheets clearly indicating Title, Subtitle, Abstract, Key words, Introduction,
analysis, conclusion and references, Name of Author(s), Institutions, Email Address, mobile number, contact address should be necessary.
2. The paper length should be between 10 to 15 pages or maximum 2100 words.
3. The text should be preceded by an abstract of 250-300 words, which should be followed by 5-7 key words.
4. Figure should be numbered consecutively, as Figure 1, Figure 2 etc.
5. Table should be numbered consecutively, titled and keyed in the text.
6. References should be arranged in alphabetical and chronological order of author's surname, initials, year of publication, Title of
book/article, publisher, place of publication, page numbers.
7. Acceptance by Review Committee to be notified immediately.

8. There is no publication fee but after acceptance of paper subscription of journal is mandatory before publication.

Where in the Asian World?

Last Issue: Tashich-


hoedzong ( ) is a
Buddhist monastery and
fortress on the northern
edge of the city of Thim-
phu in Bhutan. A building
has stood here since 1216,
but fires, earthquakes, and
rebuilds have evolved the
structure into this 1968
form.
Photo by Todd Stradford

Hint: The Shout of Victory bridge on the river is a drawbridge that hasnt lifted since 1970.
BULLETIN

Page 40

3rd Annual International Conference on Urban Planning and Property Development (UPPD 2017)

Given your interests and contributions to research and academia, we invite you/your research students to
submit a paper to 3rd Annual International Conference on Urban Planning and Property Development (UPPD
2017) which will be held on 9th - 10th October 2017 in Singapore.
UPPD provided a forum and opportunity for delegates from more than 30 individual Universities from about
20 countries to share their research, practice and educational initiatives with an international audience. You
may visit the following link for UPPD prior years accepted and published papers
http://www.urban-ppd.org/PriorYearsPaper.html

The full paper submission deadline is on 31st May 2017. Hope that provides adequate time
for you to complete the paper submission.

If you need more time or have questions, please email us at secretariat@urban-ppd.org. For more infor-
mation, please visit the UPPD 2017 website: http://www.urban-ppd.org/index.html.

Workshop on Okinawa: Identity, History and Culture


June 9 to 18, 2017

Sponsored by:

Japan Studies Association


The University of Hawaii Na-
tional Resource Center-East
Asia (NRCEA) and
The University of Hawaii Center for Japa-
and cultural sites.
nese Studies
with the cooperation of The Center for Okina- We are offering several travel awards ranging
wan Studies between $700 and $1000. We encourage earlier
applications to facilitate travel plans and to help
Workshop Content
JSA trip leaders make final arrangements for
lodging in Okinawa.
The workshop anticipates interest primarily from
faculty form the Humanities and Social Sciences,
Application deadline: 31 March 2017
so the broad themes below would largely re-
spond to their professional needs. These themes For more information, check out the website at:
would be explored through expert talks and
presentations, and through participants engage- http://www.japanstudies.org/workshop-on-okinawa-june-
ment with museum collections, historic places 2017.html
BULLETIN
Page 41

Call for Papers - Journal of Geography and Earth Sciences


ISSN: 2334-2447 (Print) 2334-2455 (Online)

Journal of Geography and Earth Sciences is an international natural science journal that seeks to publish arti-
cles related to physical process and spatial patterns at the earth's surface, physio-geographical elements and
their interaction, global change and its regional response, characters and management of natural resources,
landscape ecology and environmental construction, remote sensing, geographic information system and their
applications in geographical research. The journal strives to strengthen connections between research and
practice, so enhancing professional development and improving practice within the field of geography and
earth sciences. The journal follows double-blind peer review process.
The journal is published by the American Research Institute for Policy Development that serves as a focal
point for academicians, professionals, graduate and undergraduate students, fellows, and associates pursuing
research throughout the world.
The interested contributors are highly encouraged to submit their manuscripts/papers to the executive editor
via e-mail at editor@aripd.org. Please indicate the name of the journal (Journal of Geography and Earth Sci-
ences) in the cover letter or simply put Journal of Geography and Earth Sciences in the subject box during
submission via e-mail.
The journal is Abstracted/Indexed in CrossRef, CrossCheck, Cabell's, Ulrich's, Griffith Research Online, Google
Scholar, Education.edu, Informatics, Universe Digital Library, Standard Periodical Directory, Gale, Open J-
Gate, EBSCO, Journal Seek, DRJI, ProQuest, BASE, InfoBase Index, OCLC, IBSS, Academic Journal Data-
bases, Scientific Index.
E-Publication FirstTM
E-Publication FirstTM is a feature offered through our journal platform. It allows PDF version of manuscripts
that have been peer reviewed and accepted, to be hosted online prior to their inclusion in a final printed jour-
nal. Readers can freely access or cite the article. The accepted papers are published online within one week
after the completion of all necessary publishing steps.
DOI number
Each paper published in Journal of Geography and Earth Sciences is assigned a DOI number, which ap-
pears beneath the author's affiliation in the published paper.
JGES is inviting papers for Vol. 5, No. 1. The online publication date is June 30, 2017. Submission Deadline:
March 31, 2017.
For any additional information, please contact with the executive editor at editor@aripd.org
Website: http://www.jgesnet.com

To make Solutions more available to everyone interested in achieving global sustainability and a
better world for all we have launched a new website.
The new site allows you to register and subscribe to Solutions, Join the Solutions Society, and
become part of the global movement to build a better and more sustainable world.
How can you do this? For a USD $19.50 annual subscription, you not only receive 6 issues of
The Solutions Journal digital versions per year, you also receive regular updates on Solutions
activities and conferences. You can become part of the team developing and promoting global solutions to the challenges we
are facing on the planet: https://www.thesolutionsjournal.com/membership/
WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Connect with us and tell us about your solution.
Join the Solutions Team today.

Visit us online at Http://www.thesolutionsjournal.com


BULLETIN
Page 42

Call for Papers


We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the Tenth and Eleventh
Global Studies Conferences. We invite proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions,
posters/exhibits, colloquia, virtual posters, or virtual lightning talks.

Founded in 2008, the conference is held annually in different locations around the world, each selected for its
particular place in the dynamics of globalization. Intellectually, the conference takes three steps: the first is a
"this-worldly" step, mapping the details and extrapolating to big picture analyses in order to interpret what is
at times challenging, dangerous, and excitingly positive about the "New Globalization." The second step is to
set this New Globalization in the context of earlier globalizationswhat are the continuities, and what is gen-
uinely new? The third step is to re-examine and redefine the very concept of globalizationin theoretical,
anthropological, and philosophical terms. The conference works between the most fastidiously empirical and
profoundly generalizing modes of engagement with one of the central phenomena of our contemporary exist-
ence. The conference features research addressing the annual themes.

For more information regarding the conferences, use the links below to explore our conference websites.
________________________________________
2017 Conference - Singapore
The Tenth Global Studies Conference will be held 89 June
2017 at the National University of Singapore in Singapore.
Submit your proposal to the 2017 conference by 8 March 2017.
http://onglobalization.com/2017-conference

2018 Conference - Granada, Spain


The Eleventh Global Studies Conference will be held 2930 July
2018 at the University of Granada in Granada, Spain.
Submit your proposal to the 2018 conference by 29 March
2018.
http://onglobalization.com/2018-conference

South Asia Conference


46th Annual Conference
October 26-29, 2017
Contact Information
The Center for South Asia
University of Wisconsin-Madison
1155 Observatory Drive
203 Ingraham Hall
Madison, WI 53706

http://southasiaconference.wisc.edu/
BULLETIN
Page 43

Call for Papers


We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the Twelfth
and Thirteenth International Conferences on Interdisciplinary Social Sciences. We invite proposals for paper
presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, colloquia, virtual posters, or virtual lightning
talks.
Founded in 2006, the International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Sciences examines the nature of
disciplinary practices in the study of society and the interdisciplinary practices that arise in the context of
"real world" applications of social research and theory. The conference also investigates what constitutes
"science" in a social context and the connections between the social and other sciences. The focus of papers
ranges from the finely grained and empirical (research practices and results exemplifying one or more disci-
plines) to wide-ranging multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary perspectives on knowledge and method. The
conference features research addressing the annual themes.
2017 Conference - Hiroshima, Japan
The Twelfth International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Scienc- es
will be held 2628 July 2017 at the International Conference Center in
Hiroshima, Japan.
Submit your proposal to the 2017 conference by 26 March 2017.
http://thesocialsciences.com/2017-conference

2018 Conference - Granada, Spain


The Thirteenth International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Sci-
ences will be held 2527 July 2018 at the University of Granada in Gra-
nada, Spain.
Submit your proposal to the 2018 conference by 25 March 2017.

2017 NCRGE Transformative Research in Geography Education program

The National Center for Research in Geography Education cluded in a proposed thematic research group.
invites proposals to develop new collaborative and interdis- Priority Areas: Proposals are welcome on any ge-
ciplinary research networks addressing major ques- ography education research topic that directly sup-
tions and challenges in geography education. ports the Road Map Project research agenda. Of
Through this program, NCRGE aspires to strength- special interest this year are proposals to establish
en geography education research processes and new research groups in the areas of assessment,
promote the growth of sustainable, and potentially informal geography education, and teacher educa-
transformative, lines of research. tion and training (pre-service or in-service), includ-
ing work related to GeoCapabilities
Synopsis: This program will establish thematic research (www.geocapabilities.org).
groups to support the implementation of the Road Map
Project research agenda. Funds may be requested to cata- Application deadline: May 15, 2017 at 5:00 pm local pro-
lyze group research planning and networking through re- posers time.
search fellowships, research meetings, and research clear-
inghouse activities. Funding: NCRGE anticipates the availability of $60,000 to
support projects under the 2017 Transformative Research
program. Proposals may request a maximum of $20,000 for
Eligibility: The lead Principal Investigator must be a U.S.- projects lasting up to 12 months.
based researcher affiliated with a university or organization Visit http://www.ncrge.org/funding/ for the full program
currently in the NCRGE research coordination network. In- description and application guidelines
ternational collaborators are encouraged and may be in-
BULLETIN
OF ASIAN GEOGRAPHY
Page 44
AREA DIRECTORS:
AGSG OFFICERS
Southeast Asia: Michael Glass
Co-CHAIRS: Urban Studies Program Southwest Asia: Pengyu Zhu
University of Pittsburgh Department of Geography
Chandana Mitra 3500 Wesley W. Posvar Hall Hong Kong University
Department of Geology & Geography 230 S. Bouquet Street Email: pengyuzhu2002@yahoo.com
Auburn University, Suite 2046J, Haley Center Pittsburgh, PA 15260
Auburn, Alabama 36849 Tel: 412.648.7459
Phone: 334.844.4229 Email: glass@pitt.edu Central Asia: Stanley Toops
Email: chandana@auburn.edu Department of Geography
Miami University
Xinyue Ye
Department of Geography
East Asia: Jamie Doucette 110 Shideler Hall
Arthur Lewis Building-1.045 Phone: 513.529.5558
Kent State University, 413 McGilvrey Hall
School of Environment, Education and Develop- Email: toopssw@miamioh.edu
325 S. Lincoln Street
ment
Kent, OH 44242-0001
The University of Manchester
Phone: 330.672.7939
Manchester M13 9PL
Email: xye5@kent.edu
Tel: +44 (0) 161 306 6000 Student Rep: Aparna Parikh
Email: jamie.doucette@manchester.ac.uk Department of Geography
SECRETARY/TREASURER: Penn State University
336 Walker Building
South Asia: Daniel Esser
Jennifer Pomeroy School of International Service
University Park, PA 16802
Department of History and Political Science Tel: 814-865-3433
SIS - 221
York College of Pennsylvania Email: aparna@psu.edu
American University
Humanities Center, Room 105
4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW
York, PA 17403-3651
Washington, DC 20016
Phone: 717.815.1529
Tel: 202.885.1892
Email: jpomeroy@ycp.edu
Email: esser@american.edu

Upcoming AAG Meetings


5 April - 9 April 2017 Middle States Division Southwest Division
AAG 113th Annual Meeting http://msaag.org http://www.sw-aag.org
Boston, MA James Kernan Jason Julian
Email: kernan@geneseo.edu Email: jason.julian@txstate.edu
Fall Meeting: 25-28 October 2017
AAG Division web sites/chairs: Huntsville, TX
New England/St. Lawrence Valley Divi-
East Lakes Division sion
http://eldaag.wildapricot.org/ http://aagnestval.wpengine.com/ West Lakes Division
Mandy Munro-Stasiuk Christopher Cusack http://community.aag.org/westlakes/
Email: mmunrost@kent.edu Email: ccusack@keene.edu Susy Svatek Ziegler
Fall Meeting: 12-13 October 2017 Email: suziegle@nmu.edu
Pacific Coast Division
Great Plains/Rocky Mountains Division http://apcgweb.org
April 10-14, 2018
http://clas2.ucdenver.edu/rmgpaag/ Dennis Dingemans
AAG 114th Annual Meeting
Brandon Vogt Email: rddd@dcn.org
New Orleans, LA
Email: bvogt@uccs.edu Fall Meeting: 25-28 October 2017
Chico, California
Middle Atlantic Division Southeast Division
http://sites.google.com/site/aagmad/ http://www.sedaag.org
Tracy Edwards Ron Kalafsky
Email: tedwards@frostburg.edu Email: kalafsky@utk.edu

BULLETIN OF Todd Stradford, editor University of Wisconsin, Platteville Phone: 608.342.1674


ASIAN GEOGRAPHY Email: stradfot@uwplatt.edu 262 Gardner Hall
Fax: 608.342.1088
1 University Plaza
Platteville, WI 53818