Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 4

CLIENT NEWSLETTER Q3 2010

AMM AMERICAN MONEY MANAGEMENT, LLC 
 
 

SEC Registered Investment Advisor 
 
 

PO Box 675203, Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067     Tel 888‐999‐1395      Fax 866‐364‐1084     info@amminvest.com    www.amminvest.com 

THE BIG PICTURE


     Assessing the business and economic cycle is an important part of our investment process.  We often refer to this as 
“getting the big picture”.  Our second quarter letter pointed to historically low interest rates, low inflation, improving 
corporate  profitability  and  an improving  jobs  situation  as  ʺbig pictureʺ  factors  supporting  the  continued economic 
recovery.  These factors generally remain in place; however, our optimism on the strength of the broad recovery is 
somewhat reduced since our last communication.   Below, we outline some of the reasoning behind our tempered out‐
look along with a breakdown of where we see opportunity across a spectrum of assets. 

     ECONOMIC TUG-OF-WAR
     There is currently a tug of war between improving economic and company fundamentals on the one side, and con‐
cerns about debt‐related stress points and the longer‐term strength of the economic recovery on the other.  Those com‐
mitted  to  spending  our  way  to  recovery  (including  the  current  Administration  and  a  majority  of  the  Federal  Reserve 
Board)  are  focused  on  continued  government  stimulus  and  an  ʺeasy  moneyʺ  monetary  policy  (see  near  zero  interest 
rates) to maintain the momentum of the current recovery.  Economist Paul Krugman sums up this position in a recent 
New York Times op‐ed piece: 
 
ʺYes, America has long‐run budget problems, but what we do on stimulus over the next couple of years has almost no bearing on our 
  
ability  to  deal  with  these  long‐run  problems.    As  Douglas  Elmendorf,  the  director  of  the  Congressional  Budget  Office,  recently  put  it, 
 
ʹThere is no intrinsic contradiction between providing additional fiscal stimulus today, while the unemployment rate is high and many 
  factories and offices are underused, and imposing fiscal restraint several years from now, when output and employment will probably be 
  close to their potential.’ʺ 
 
 

Of course, to fund continued stimulus will likely require larger deficits and increased federal debt levels.  The past two 
years have made the consequences of too much debt painfully clear to individuals and businesses.  Some of the same 
basic math applies to the federal government.  By themselves, high debt‐to‐income levels do not necessarily strain re‐
sources. (Many people carry mortgage loads in excess of their annual incomes.)  However, when the interest rate on debt 
is higher than the rate of income growth, a problem starts to develop ‐ debt servicing eats up a progressively higher per‐
centage of income ‐ unless debt is paid down.   Over the last 28 years, there has been a long decline in the interest rate 
paid on the Ten Year U.S. Treasury Note (Chart A).  This has effectively allowed our federal government to issue more 
and more debt at increasingly favorable rates.   
Chart A 
P a g e 2

Chart B 

     Since  the  start  of  the  new  millennium,  the  amount  of  this  debt  held  by  Foreign  &  International  investors  has  bal‐
looned (Chart B).  While concerns about the national debt are not new, the massive increase in debt as a percentage of 
GDP (not seen since World War II) combined with the European debt scare in May have caused investors around the 
world to question both the ability of developed economies to repay their debts and the point at which creditors will de‐
mand a higher rate of return.  Regardless of when rates may rise in the future, it is clear that the global economy, while 
better off than it was in late 2008‐2009, still faces many challenges.  High government debt levels in the developed world 
will have to be dealt with through inflation, higher taxes, entitlements or a combination of the three.  None of these are 
particularly good for economic growth. 

CAPTURING RETURNS AND PROTECTING CAPITAL


     Regardless of how good, bad or, more often than not, conflicted the big picture, investment opportunities are de‐
termined by whether they are priced attractively relative to their ability to generate future growth and/or income.  An 
investment can be attractive even if the macro‐economic outlook is dark or unattractive even in an extremely positive 
macro environment.  As discussed in client meetings and prior communications, our first and most important decision is 
asset  allocation.    How  much  of  your  portfolio  should  be  invested  in  stocks,  bonds,  cash  and  other  diversifying  assets 
(real estate, commodities, etc...)?  Once we determine the appropriate asset mix, we will seek to invest in assets that we 
view as attractive at current price levels and given current economic conditions.  Below, we offer our current assessment 
of these core assets: 

BONDS:  Bonds typically serve as the backbone of a typical income or balanced account.  Historically, bonds offer 
lower volatility than stocks and are perceived as a safer asset class.  Over the last few years, we have increasingly 
used bond‐oriented investments in growth accounts as well.  Like all assets, however, bonds should be purchased at 
attractive prices.  Given the extremely low interest rate environment and massive inflows into bond funds over the 
last few years, we do not see significant value in the typical investment grade bond.  Longer maturity bonds, which 
will fall more in price in the event of rising interest rates, are especially unappealing at this stage in the business cy‐
cle.  Nevertheless, we still find some reasonable value in three classes of bond investment: 
 
  1. Emerging Market Bonds:  These bonds include the bonds of developing economies like Brazil and Indone‐
  sia.  Potential returns come from the interest income and our expectation that the economic fundamentals 
  (less debt and more growth) in many developing economies are very likely to lead to currency appreciation 
  (versus  the dollar) over a multiyear time frame.   
P a g e 3

Bonds (cont.) 
 

  2. Inflation Protected Bonds: Commonly known as TIPS (treasury inflation protected securities), the princi‐
  pal value of these bonds fluctuate with changes in inflation.  Given our view of higher future inflation, we 
  view these bonds as an attractive investment grade alternative to owning regular treasury bonds. 
 
  3. Shorter term investment grade (tax free and taxable) bonds: While we view longer maturity bonds as un‐
  attractive at current levels, some shorter‐term bonds (1‐7 years in maturity) are still relatively appealing at 
  current  levels.    If  interest  rates  do  begin  to  rise,  shorter  term  bond  holders  will  be  able  to  roll  into  higher 
  yielding bonds  at maturity. 

STOCKS:  Based  on  long  run  historical  risk/reward  profiles,  stocks  provide  higher  long‐term  returns  but  signifi‐
cantly greater volatility than bonds.  While stocks remain a core part of most growth and balance oriented invest‐
ment portfolios, we have lowered our weighting to this asset class in recent months. 
 
         1.  Emerging  Market  Stocks:    We  view  the  financial  strength,  demographic  makeup  (younger  popula‐
  tions)  and  growth  opportunities  in  these  countries  as  supportive  of  higher  stock  prices  over  the  next  3‐5 
  years. 
 
  2. Dividend Paying Stocks:  Some high quality stocks with the ability to pay dividends (generate income) are  
  currently attractive. 

DIVERSIFYING  ASSETS:    Diversifying  assets  include  non‐stock  and  bond  investments  like  gold  and  real  es‐
tate.  We continue to favor income producing global real estate via the Alpine Premier Properties Fund.  This fund is 
currently  trading  at  a  15%  discount  to  underlying  net  asset  value  and  yielding  approximately  7%.    Additionally, 
where  appropriate,  we  have  provided  accounts  with  exposure  to  broad  commodities  through  exchange‐traded 
funds.  Both of these investments are meant to provide some hedge against future inflation. 

SECOND QUARTER 2010 IN REVIEW


     After a strong first quarter, investor enthusiasm was tempered in May and June as concerns over the possibility of a 
sovereign debt default in Europe and the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico dominated headlines.  Year‐to‐date through June 
30th,  the  S&P  500  lost  6.7%,  International  stocks  (EAFE)  lost  13.2%  and  Bonds  (BarCap  US  Aggregate  Index)  gained 
5.3%.    The  strong  bond  performance  underlies  investor  uncertainty  about  the  strength  of  the  recovery  as  money  has 
flowed out of stock funds over the last few years and into bond funds for their perceived safety. 

COMPLIMENTARY RETIREMENT ANALYSIS FOR CLIENTS


     A  new  study  by  the  Employee  Benefit  Research  Institute  shows  that  high  percentages  of  Americans,  even  those  in 
upper‐income categories, are likely to run short of money after 10 or 20 years of retirement.  Almost two thirds of Ameri‐
cans in the two lowest pre‐retirement income brackets will run short of retirement income after 10 years.    After 20 years 
of retirement 29% of the next income bracket will run short of money after 20 years. Finally, 1 in 10 of the highest income 
bracket will run out of money after 20 years. 
 
     So, overall, over 45% of people working today from all income levels are at risk of running out of money during re‐
tirement.  While it is ideal for workers to start saving money very early in their careers, if you are in your later working 
years, strategies to increase retirement savings may be appropriate or even necessary so that you minimize the chance of 
running out of income during retirement.  Please contact our office if you would like to receive a complimentary re‐
tirement analysis. 
P a g e 4

     In  May,  we  sent  a  ʺMarket  Updateʺ  to  our  clients  via  email.    We  intend  to  send  more  of  these  updates  periodi‐
cally.  Please contact us if you did not receive the update, so that we can confirm your correct email address. 

     As always, we thank you for entrusting AMM to help you achieve your investment and retirement objectives.   
If you have any questions, concerns, or comments, please do not hesitate to contact us. 

Your Portfolio Management Team 

Gabriel Wisdom Michael Moore Jim Rhodes, CFA Mickey Christian Tom Jolls Joseph Dang, Esq.
Managing Director Chief Investment Officer Executive Director Executive Director Executive Director In-House Counsel
Glenn Busch Adele Canetti Bryan Case Allen Kay Robert Frazier Vicki Moore
Portfolio Manager Portfolio Manager Financial Advisor Financial Advisor Financial Advisor Operations Manager

   
AMERICAN MONEY MANAGEMENT, 
  LLC 
 
Mailing Address: PO Box 675203, Rancho Santa Fe, CA  92067 
 
14249 Rancho Santa Fe Farms Rd, Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067 
  www.amminvest.com 

Tel: (858) 755‐0909      Tel: (888) 999‐1395        Fax: (866) 364‐1084       E‐mail: info@amminvest.com