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APWH Team DBQ

Directions: With one other person, you will be completing a DBQ using
the following Google doc. Be sure to do the following:

1. Discuss the documents and come to an agreement on what


they mean and how they should be used.
2. Agree on groupings for the documents if grouping is necessary.
3. Agree on a accurate, comprehensive thesis statement.
4. Divide the DBQ into a fairly equal workload.
5. Copy and share this document with your partner. Write your
portion of the DBQ, helping your partner along the way.
6. Proofread what each other wrote, before exporting your DBQ to
Notability.
7. Once in Notability, label your work before submitting it.

Prompt

Using the following documents, analyze similarities and differences in the mechanization of the cotton industry in
Japan and India in the period from the 1880s to the 1930s. (2010 APWH DBQ)

Thesis BOTH:

The mechanization of the cotton industry in Japan and India from the period of 1880-1930s was similar in that
both utilized machine and hand made labor. The mechanization of the cotton industry in Japan and India from the
period of 1880-1930s was different in that the working conditions in both countries were diverse.

Contextualization Brian

Prior to the mechanization of the cotton industry, Japan and India mainly utilized hand spun techniques to produce
yards of cloth. With the discovery of machines and the ability to increase production speed tenfold, hand spun
labor workers were less needed and poor working conditions were prevalent.

Body Paragraph 1 Brian

The mechanization of the cotton industry in Japan and India from the period of 1880-1930s was different in that
the working conditions in both countries were diverse. Document 4, whom is written by a Buddhist priest, explains
that the main source of income for peasants were women working in factories. The document is written by a
Buddhist priest living in a rural area, which accounts for the concern of income in rural areas being largely decided
by women working in factories. Working conditions may have been lower for the women working in the factories as
they were paid higher but standards were lower. Document 3, which is written by two people explains the working
conditions and how sickness was prevalent during the work times and the poor wages that they were given. The
purpose of this document is to inform the audience that although they were paid, people with a sickness were
often taken away so work could continue to bring in money, while also not treating the sickened person. Document
5 is written by a Japanese industrialist, noting that people who accept lower wages are often located in farming
communities, which also explains perhaps why people paid for their own. This is written by an industrialist which
may account for the paying management and concern for working conditions. Working conditions can be inferred
to have been low due to the wages also being just as bad. Document 9 is written by a royal commission of labor,
who interprets the living conditions of the workers in the factory. The British labor commission analyzes that they
live in small rented huts and that the same people never stay with the same company for more than two years.

Body Paragraph 2 JD

The mechanization of the cotton industry in Japan and India from the period of 1880-1930s was similar in that
both utilized machine and hand made labor. In the beginning of the mechanization of the cotton industry in both
India and Japan, according to documents 1 and 2, both are charts that compare the Cotton production in both
India and China during the year of 1884-1914. Both relied heavily on hand woven and machine woven cotton.
However the machine industry increased the development of cotton and became the dominant way of cotton in the
year 1914. The amount of millions of pounds of cotton woven came from machines. The arrival of machines in
Japan and India during the period of 1880-1930s According to document six is that, the mechanization of the
cotton industry led to many people abandoning their home woven clothes and turned to machine woven clothes.
The textile industry owes its success to the mechanization of the cotton industry, thanks to native bankers and
investors.

Body Paragraph

Synthesis JD

the industrialization of the cotton industry in Japan and India increased the use of machines similar to the
industrialization of Europe which led to the creation and dependence on machines like the printing press and the
railroads, that still have an everlasting effect on society today.

Rubric - Team Opinion


Image at top of worksheet obtained from: http://thedailyengage.com/how-scientists-are-trying-to-link-two-brains-together/

Question:1
A-
One way in which civilizations maintained political control in the period 600 B.C - 600 A.D. was the
Mayans. The Mayans maintained political dominance through blood-letting rituals, which violently caused
an uproar later but asserted political dominance over South America. An empire which maintained political
control was the Roman Empire. They maintained this dominance through the senate and the assembly
which maintained political stability for centuries. Finally, the Han empire maintained political control over a
China due to the Confucian civil-service exam. This not only guaranteed able and just rulers, but also
helped in the long run when the civil service exam wasn't abolished until much later in the 18th century,
Question:2
A- One way in that the Silk roads and the Indian Ocean trade were similar was the trading of goods. On the
silk roads, items such as porcelain or tea were traded whilst on the Indian Ocean route, cotton textiles and
coffee were often exchanged for monetary value. Another way in which they were similar was the
exchange of culture was constant as many cultures or religions were blended on both routes. Christian
missionaries and Muslim missionaries often met and spread their culture, diffusing around the world for
years to come.
One way in which the silk roads and Indian Ocean trade routes were different was the geography of trade.
The silk roads were on dry land with many middle men establishing camps around the routes, while on the
Indian Ocean most of trade was overseas and often prioritized on ships.