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Secondary Curriculum 2A Modern History

Professional Task
By Rachel Foster 17439190
Secondary Curriculum 2 Modern History Professional Task

Contents Page

Scope and Sequence ______________________________________________________________________________ pg 3.

Concept Map ___________________________________________________________________________________ pg 4.

Unit Outline __________________________________________________________________________________ pg 5-


22.

Assessment Schedule ____________________________________________________________________________ pg 23.

Assessment Task Details _______________________________________________________________________ pg 24-26.

Assessment Task _____________________________________________________________________________ pg 27-28.

Teacher Direction for Assessment Task ______________________________________________________________ pg 29.

Pre Assessment Task Lesson Plan ________________________________________________________________ pg 30 -38.

Post Assessment Task Lesson Plan ______________________________________________________________ pg 39 50.


Justification _________________________________________________________________________________ pg 51 -53.

Reference List ______________________________________________________________________________ pg 53 54.

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Course Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Preliminary Topic: Case Studies A Topic: Case Study B Topic: Core Study The Students start the HSC
Emmeline Pankhurst and The Meiji restoration: World at the beginning of course in this term.
the Suffragette Movement. nature and impact. 25% the 20th Century. 30%
25%

Syllabus outcomes: Syllabus outcomes: Syllabus outcomes:


P1.1, P1.2, P3.1 P2.1, P4.1, P4.2 P3.2, P3.3, P3.4, P3.5

Duration in weeks and Duration in weeks and Duration in weeks and


hours: hours: hours:
10 weeks and 30 hours 10 weeks and 30 hours 10 weeks and 60 hours

Course Term 4 (year 11) Term 1 Term 2 Term 3


HSC Topic: Core Study World Topic: National Study 25% Topic: Personality Study 25% Topic: International Study in
War I 1914- 1919: A source Germany 1918- 1939 Leni Reifenstahl 1902- 2003 Peace and Conflict 25%
based study. 25%
Syllabus outcomes:
Syllabus outcomes: Syllabus outcomes: H1.1, H3.4 Syllabus outcomes:
H1.2, H3.2, H3.3 H2.1, H3.1, H3.5 H4.1, H4.2

Duration in weeks and


Duration in weeks and Duration in weeks and hours: Duration in weeks and
hours: hours: 10 weeks and 30 hours hours:
10 weeks and 30 hours 10 weeks and 30 hours 10 weeks and 30 hours

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UNIT OUTLINE

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Subject: Modern History Course: Number of Weeks
Unit title: The World at the Prelim 10 weeks
Beginning of the 20th
Century
Key Concepts/ Big Ideas The importance of this learning
The nature of European Society: Students lay the foundations for their twentieth-century studies by investigating the forces and
- Rich and Poor ideas for change and continuity that shaped the early twentieth-century world using the
- Urbanisation and Industrialisation methods of historical inquiry (BOSTES, 2009, pg.24).
- Social Change Students will learn to:
- Forms of Government. - Ask relevant historical questions about the world at the beginning of the twentieth
Imperialism: century.
- Reasons for the growth of Imperialism - Locate, select and organise information from different types of sources, including ICT, to
- Impact of Imperialism on Africa and/or Asia describe and analyse relevant features and issues of the world at the beginning of the
and/or Middle East and/or the Pacific twentieth century.
- Colonial rivalries - Analyse the major events and issues relevant at the turn of the century.
Emerging forces and Ideas - Assess the forces for change and continuity at the turn of the century.
- Politics of the working class: socialism, trade - Describe and evaluate the role of key individuals and groups at the turn of the century.
unionism and Marxism - Evaluate the usefulness and reliability of sources.
- Anarchism - Account for and assess differing perspectives and interpretations of significant events,
- Nationalism people and issues at the beginning of the twentieth century.
- Internationalism and Globalisation - Present the findings of investigation on aspects of the period, analysing and synthesising
- Democracy and Liberalism information from different types of sources.
Causes of World War I - Communicate an understanding or relevant concepts, features and issues using
- Long Term and Short Term causes appropriate and well structured oral and/or written and/or multimedia forms including
ICT.
Unit context within Scope and Sequence Syllabus Outcomes
Term One Core Study 30% P1.1: describe the role of key individuals, groups and events of selected studies from the
eighteenth century to the present.
P1.2: investigate and explain the key features and issues of selected studies from the eighteenth
century to the present.
P2.1: identify forces and ideas and explain their significance in contributing to change and
continuity from the eighteenth century to the present.
P3.1: ask relevant historical questions.

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P3.2: locate, select and organise relevant information from different types of sources.
P3.3: comprehend and analyse sources for their usefulness and reliability.
P3.4: identify and account for differing perspectives and interpretations of the past.
P3.5: plan and present the findings of historical investigations, analysing and synthesising
information from different types of sources.
P4.1: use historical terms and concepts appropriately.
P4.2: communicate a knowledge and understanding of historical features and issues using
appropriate and well-structured oral and written forms.
Literacy Focus Numeracy Focus ICT Focus Differentiation
Build and develop literacy The use of timelines, ICT focus through the Providing scaffolded worksheets to students of low SES to
skills through well- remember key dates, times process of selecting and improve academic achievement.
structured presentation of and events will build finding appropriate
oral skills, presenting numeracy skills better help historical sources for Providing a work bank/glossary for EALD students to
findings of historical to understand key concepts analysis and investigation. improve English literacy skills.
investigation. and ideas, individuals and
events. ICT through the use of Provide annotated source examples for low SES and EALD
Succinct and well-structured multimodal presentation students to complete class activities.
demonstration of written Building knowledge on the demonstrating oral literacy
skills through short skills, behaviours and skills. Providing Gifted and Talented students with extended
response analysing different dispositions that students version of scaffolded worksheets to extend literacy skills to
types of sources and their need to use in a wide range improve academic achievement.
usefulness. of situations.
Class debate and group
discussions.

Week/ Syllabus Content Teaching and Learning Strategies including assessment for learning. Resources

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Sequence
Lesson One Key Concepts and Ideas: Introductory Lesson to the World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century. Textbook/
1. Anarchism Exercise Book.
P1.1 2. Socialism Whole class activity: Mind- Mapping Exercise. Key Features of
P1.2 3. Imperialism As a class construct a mind map discussing 1. What they already know about the World Modern History
P3.1 4. Industrialisation at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century, 2. What do they want to know about the By Bruce
5. Urbanisation World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century and 3. What they will know after we Dennett and
6. Globalisation have covered the World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century. Stephen Dixon.
7. Capitalism
8. Bourgeoisie Worksheet.
9. Proletariat Small Group/Individual Activity: Key Concept Matching
10. Nationalism In small groups or by themselves give the students a worksheet that asks them to match Devices (Phone,
certain definitions with their appropriate concepts or ideas. For EALD students provide IPad, Laptop)
them with a word bank or glossary that describes the key concepts and ideas so that
they have a better understanding of the task. For low SES students allow them to use Access to the
the textbook or internet to help them match the key concepts and ideas with their Internet or Wi-
appropriate definitions. Gifted and Talented students are to use their own knowledge Fi.
to complete this task.

Class Discussion:
As a class discuss what concepts they match with what definitions and clearly identify
why certain ideas match up with certain definitions and why some concepts are more
broad and harder to pinpoint. Students are to then change any mistakes and annotate
points made through class discussion to help them in future recall and determine
different keys concepts and ideas.

Lesson Two Long Term and Short Term Timeline Activity: Textbook Key
Causes of the First World War. In small groups review the timeline on page 90 of the textbook. For five minutes discuss Features of
P1.1 Imperialism. the different events from the timeline as a class and point out key moments from the Modern History
P1.2 timeline. By Bruce
P2.1 Key Concepts, Events, Dates Dennett and
P3.1 and Individuals. Short Answer Activity: Stephen Dixon.
Using the timeline, the textbook and access to the internet via student device answer

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the following questions. For EALD and students provide them with the page numbers Exercise Books.
where the can find the information to answer the questions in the textbook. For Gifted
and Talented students only give them access to the textbook to answer the questions. Devices (Phone,
IPad, Laptop)
1. Who was assassinated in Sarajevo? And what impact did this have on Austro-
Hungary? Access to the
2. Which countries were members of the Triple Entente and why? Internet or Wi-
3. Which countries were members of the Triple Alliance and why? Fi.
4. How long was the gap between the assassination in Sarajevo and the start of the
First World War? What impact do you believe the assassination had on the build
up to the First World War?
5. Who did Australia align themselves with in the First World War? Use map on
page 91.

Class Discussion:
As a whole class students are to present their findings and answers to the questions.
What different opinions did the students find and why? Discuss as a class the
importance on these timeline events for the World at the Beginning of the Twentieth
Century.

Lesson Three Imperialism: the reasons for Definition of Imperialism: Where one country possesses, governs or controls other Textbook Key
the growth of Imperialism countries beyond its own borders. Features of
P3.3 Modern History
P3.4 Students to read and review the world map on page 91 of the textbook. By Bruce
P3.5 Small Groups Activity: Dennett and
As a class discuss what Imperialism means and what affects it had on the World at the Stephen Dixon.
Beginning of the twentieth Century. For EALD and low SES students provide them with
the definition of Imperialism. Gifted and Talented students are to use their own Exercise Books.
knowledge and the textbook to answer the questions.

In small groups discuss the following:


- What impacts do you think Imperialism had on the world at the Beginning of the

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Twentieth Century?
- Do you think Imperialism exists today in the Twenty First Century? If so how
provide example?
- Why was Imperialism an important factor in the World at the Beginning of the
Twentieth century?

Class Discussion:
Students are to present their ideas and findings to the class. Discuss what they think
Imperialism is and what is meant for the World at the Beginning of the Twentieth
century.

Vanishing Close Activity:


Write the definition of Imperialism on the board and get students to recite the
definition. Start removing words one by one until students can give an informed
definition of Imperialism without looking at the definition.
Lesson Four Anarchism. Definition of Anarchism: An ideology that argues a society can be run without rules or Textbook Key
a government and that the abolition of these things will lead to freedom, equality and Features of
P1.1 justice. Modern History
P2.1 By Bruce
P4.1 Students to read and review source on page 95 of the textbook. Dennett and
P4.2 Stephen Dixon.
Small Group/Individual Activity:
Students are to use the source on page 96 of the textbook and find one other source in Exercise Books.
relation to Anarchism. For EALD and low SES students provide them with both sources.
Gifted and Talented students are to find their own using ICT methods. Using both of Devices (Phone,
these sources students are to develop their own definition, reasons for and against IPad, Laptop)
Anarchism.
Class Discussion:
Students are to present to the class their sources and findings and reasons for and
against Anarchism. As a class students must then construct their own definition of
Anarchism. From here write the definition of Anarchism on the board and discuss if the
class constructed definition matches or relates to the definition. Are any factors missing?

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Did the class find one point more important than another? Did the class construct a
more complex definition of Anarchism?
Lesson Five Politics of the working class: Class Activity: Textbook Key
Socialism, Trade Unionism, Using their own devices students are to spend 15mins researching the working class Features of
P1.1 Marxism and are to compile information on what the working class is, what are some conditions Modern History
P2.1 the working class faced and where did the idea of working class start? For EALD and low By Bruce
P3.5 Rich and Poor SES students guide them towards places they can find the information they need and Dennett and
P4.1 provide EALD students a glossary of terms so that they have a better understanding of Stephen Dixon.
Urbanisation and the concepts.
Industrialisation Exercise Books.
Students are then to watch a YouTube video on the Industrial Revolution a short very
brief introduction to what happened during the industrial Revolution and what it meant Devices (Phone,
for the working class. IPad, Laptop)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OF7-vN-aLOM

As a class students will share and discuss their findings and make connections between
what they found and what information was displayed during the video. After students
are to answer the following questions.

1. Where did the Industrial Revolution begin?


2. How did the working class begin?
3. What are some of the conditions the working class faced?
4. List some of the items that now exist and are used today due to Industrial
Revolution.
5. List at least 5 advantages and disadvantages on the Industrial Revolution and the
working class.
Students are then to watch another YouTube video on the Industrial Revolution.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhL5DCizj5c&list=PLBDA2E52FB1EF80C9&index=32

Class Discussion:
Students are to present and discuss with the class their answers to the questions and

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whether they found more information to add after watching the second video. As a class
discuss what the Industrial Revolution and the Working Class meant for the World at the
Beginning of the Twentieth Century. Furthermore discuss with the class how the
Industrial Revolution and the Working Class started Trade Unionism and how the
evolution of these things are vital to working conditions for everyone even in todays
society.
Lesson Six Socialism and Marxism Definition of Socialism: A system where wealth, land and property are owned and Textbook Key
controlled by the community as a whole rather than being privately owned. Features of
P1.1 Modern History
P2.1 Definition of Marxism: A political and economic theory developed by Karl Marx and By Bruce
P3.1 Frederick Engles that called for the abolition of private property and emphasised the role Dennett and
of the state in providing work and benefits for all leading eventually to a socialist order Stephen Dixon.
and a classless society.
Exercise Book
Students are to read pages 98-99 of the textbook and answer the following questions:
1. In what ways was Socialism similar to and different from Anarchism refer to Devices (Phones,
pages 95-96 of the textbook? IPad, Laptops)
2. What were the two major issues confronting Socialism as the century
developed?
3. Why is Socialism an important factor leading from the Industrial Revolution and
the introduction of the working class?
4. Can you provide any examples of how Socialism exists today?
5. What is a classless society? (Students may use their devices to assist them with
this answer).
For EALD and low SES students provide them with the definitions of Socialism and
Marxism to give them a clearer understanding in order to answer the questions.

Source Analysis:
Students are to review the source found on page 99 of the textbook and the information
from the questions to write a clear definition of Socialism and Marxism. EALD and low
SES students are to use the definitions given to them to construct a clearer and more
concise understanding of their own.

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Using the definitions and a source of their own students are to then to write a paragraph
answering the following question:

Using a source of your own finding critically analyse the usefulness of your source in
explaining Socialism and the advantages and disadvantages of Socialism?
EALD and low SES students are to use the source found in the textbook on page 99.

Give the definitions of Socialism and Marxism to the students is there any differences
between the ones they constructed earlier. As a class construct a clear and concise
definition of Socialism and Marxism drawing on both the student constructed and
standard definitions.
Lesson Seven Politics of the Working Class: Source Based Study: Textbook Key
Socialism, Trade Unionism, and Students are to use the information gained through previous lessons to conduct a source Features of
P1.2 Marxism. study on one of the following: Modern History
P2.1 1. The Working Class By Bruce
P3.1 Urbanisation. 2. Industrialisation Dennett and
3. Urbanisation Stephen Dixon.
Industrialisation. 4. Socialism
5. Marxism Exercise Book

Students are to choose one of the above and conduct a source based presentation, Devices (Phones,
students can find any of the following: posters, newspaper articles, photos, videos, IPad, Laptops)
songs, poems or maps to evaluate the usefulness and reliability of their chosen sources,
what they say about their chosen topic, and evaluate their impact on the World at the
Beginning of the Twentieth Century. Students must find a minimum of three sources.

Students are to use this lesson researching their topic further and finding their sources.
For EALD and low SES students provide them 2 out of the 3 sources to help them build
their research on chosen topic.

Students if not completed with complete for homework ready to present for the next
class.

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Lesson Eight Politics of the working class: Presentation of Source Based Analysis: Text book Key
Socialism, Trade Unionism and Students are to present to the class today their source based analysis topic carried on Features of
P1.2 Marxism. from previous class. Students are to then hand in their sources and findings, where they Modern History
P2.1 will be collated in a workbook under each topic, therefore students will have a self-made By Bruce
P3.1 Urbanisation. handbook evaluating and analysing their source based topics. Dennett and
Stephen Dixon.
Industrialisation.
Exercise Book
Devices (Phone,
IPad, Laptop)
Lesson Nine Urbanisation Definition of Urbanisation: A process, usually accomplished by Industrialisation where Textbook Key
people move from traditional life in the countryside to towns or cities. Features of
P3.5 Modern History
P4.1 Students are to watch the YouTube video linked below pausing throughout to allow for By Bruce
P4.2 note taking and answer the following questions: Dennett and
1. What is Urbanisation? Stephen Dixon.
2. What are some negative factors about Urbanisation?
3. What are some positive factors about Urbanisation? Exercise Book
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlbVhJMtdvk
Devices (Phone,
Students are then to watch the YouTube video linked below and answer the following IPad, Laptop)
questions:
1. What are Pull Factors?
2. What are Push Factors?
3. How is Urbanisation linked to Industrialisation?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4UCknuBNKg

Vanishing Close Activity:


Write the definition of urbanisation on the board, after discussing definition with the
class remove one word after another and until students are able to construct their own

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definition without looking up the answer.
Lesson Ten Pre Assessment Lesson

Lesson Eleven Nationalism Definition of Nationalism: The promotion of the interest of ones own nation above all Textbook Key
others. Features of
P1.1 Modern History
P2.1 Source Based Class Debate: By Bruce
P3.1 After discussing the definition of National with the class, students are to work in small Dennett and
groups being assign a country: Germany, Britain, France, and Australia. Students are to Stephen Dixon.
find a poster or photo of their assigned country and research what makes there assigned
country better than any other country. Exercise Book

As a class each group will present their findings and research on their assigned country Devices (Phone,
to the whole class and debate why their particular country is better than every other IPad, Laptop)
country. Students are then to answer the following questions:

1. What are some of the benefits of Nationalism?


2. Why are some of the implications of Nationalism?

As a class discuss the answers to the questions on Nationalism and why it was so
prominent in the World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century.
Lesson Twelve Capitalism Definition of Capitalism: An economic system that encourages individuals to make Textbook Key
profits through investments and the private ownership of goods, property and the Features of
P1.1 means of production, distribution and exchange. Modern History
P4.1 Students are to read this short webpage on Capitalism and answer the following By Bruce
P4.2 questions: Dennett and
Stephen Dixon.
1. Capitalism is a result of what?
2. What are the advantages of Capitalism? Exercise Book
3. What are the disadvantages of Capitalism?

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Devices (Phone,
http://www.worldsocialism.org/english/what-capitalism IPad, Laptop)
Small Group Work:
Working in small groups students are to create and design a product, which can be
anything (be creative). After spending time creating and designing their product the
groups are to sell their product to the rest of the class. Explaining why it is useful, how it
is important in their everyday and why they need it.

After each group has presented, the class will discuss the pros and cons of Capitalism
and means of ownership and production.

Lesson Globalisation Definition of Globalisation: The process of bringing together all of the worlds Textbook Key
Thirteen economies for the purposes of trade and a common culture. Features of
Modern History
P1.1 Students are to watched the YouTube video linked below and answer the following By Bruce
P3.1 questions: Dennett and
P3.2 Stephen Dixon.
1. What is Globalisation according to the video?
2. Name at least five examples that are products of Globalisation? Exercise Book
3. What are some advantages of Globalisation?
4. What are some disadvantages of Globalisation? Devices (Phone,
IPad, Laptop)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPD477FuqtY

Have a class discussion in response to their answers on the above questions. Lastly write
the definition of globalisation of the board and have a class discussion about better
improving the definition after what they have learned today.
Lesson Assessment Task
Fourteen

Lesson Internationalism Definition of Internationalism: The promotion of the belief in global cooperation Textbook Key
Fifthteen rather than national rivalry. Features of
Modern History

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P2.1 Class Discussion: By Bruce
P3.1 Discuss ideas around what the students think Internationalism means, and create a Dennett and
P4.1 mind-map of their ideas. Stephen Dixon.

After completing the mind-map give students the definition and compare their ideas Exercise Book
with the definition.
Devices (Phone,
Internationalism Pros & Cons: IPad, Laptop)
As a class create a Pros and Cons list on Internationalism. Discuss how Internationalism
can bring positive change for different countries and discuss how Internationalism can
be negative for those who own the means of production and labour. Gifted and Talented
Students to help guide and share ideas with low SES and EALD students.

Lesson Sixteen Post Assessment Task Lesson

Lesson Short term causes of WWI Class Discussion: Textbook Key


Seventeen Students are to read pages 100 -103 of the textbook. After reading about the Features of
background causes to World War I, class is to discuss their understanding on the reasons Modern History
P3.2 behind World War I. By Bruce
P3.3 Dennett and
P3.4 After the class discussion students are to spend time answering the following questions: Stephen Dixon.
P3.5 1. What were some of short-term causes for the start of World War I?
2. Many believe the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand was the cause of Exercise Book
World War I. Explain why you either agree or disagree?
Devices (Phone,
Small Group Source Analysis: IPad, Laptop)
In small groups students are to use the image linked below and critically analyse how the
source depicts short-term causes of World War I.
https://au.pinterest.com/pin/334462709805862312/
They are then to share their ideas and findings with the class and as a class create a
mind map depicting the different short-term causes of World War I. Make sure that low
SES and EALD students re paired with students that have higher academic

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achievement and can help them complete task.
Lesson Long term causes of WWI Small Group Activity: Textbook Key
Eighteen Students are to refer back to the Timeline in the textbook on page 90. Students in small Features of
groups are then to discuss what impact did Germany gaining Alsace-Lorraine from Modern History
P3.5 France in 1871 to the long-term cause of World War I. By Bruce
P4.1 Dennett and
P4.2 Stephen Dixon.

Exercise Book

Devices (Phone,
IPad, Laptop)

https://www.slideshare.net/janetdiederich/world-war-i-power-point Printed copy of


Class Discussion: MANIA sheet, or
As a class discuss what MANIA means and what each represents in relation to the long- display on smart
term causes of WWI. Create a mind-map on the long-term causes of WWI. As a class board.
discuss what reason they believe was the cause for WWI?

Class Debate:
Each group is to be allocated a country: Germany, Russia, Britain, France and Austro-
Hungary. Each group with their assigned country is to research why their country wanted
to go to war? What reasons did their country have to go to war? And what benefits
would they receive by going to war?

Each group/country is to then present their findings to the class, from this the class is to
have a debate on which country is to blame for starting World War I. Make sure each
group is diverse in academic ability making sure that low SES and EALD students are
with peers that can help them understand the task and complete the objectives of the
task.
Lesson Overview of Unit Part One Reviewing: The nature of European Society and Emerging forces and ideas. Textbook Key
Nineteen Features of

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- Rich and Poor Modern History
P2.1 Small Group Activity: By Bruce
P3.1 In small groups students are to construct a list or mind map about the rich and poor in Dennett and
P3.2 the World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century, making sure that low SES and Stephen Dixon.
P3.3 EALD students are split up between the groups and can lean on other peers for
guidance. The condition the working poor dealt with, what brought people to big cities,
what are some of the issues the rich and poor faced during this period of time. Exercise Book

Students are then to present their lists or mind maps to the whole class. Devices (Phone,
IPad, Laptop)
- Urbanisation and Industrialisation
Individual Activity:
Students are to work individually and answer the following questions using the
textbook, previous work and their own knowledge.
1. What is Urbanisation? Provide examples.
2. What is Industrialisation? Provide examples.
3. What are push and pull factors?
4. Name at least five products/inventions/everyday items as a result of
Industrialisation?
5. Why were Urbanisation and Industrialisation important factors in the World at
the Beginning of the Twentieth Century?
Students are then to swap their answers with the person next to them or with their
table groups and discuss as a class different response to the questions above. Students
are to add any information they may have missed to their answers.

- Politics of the Working Class: Socialism, Trade Unionism and Marxism

Small Group Activity:


Assign table groups one of the following Socialism, Trade Unionism, Marxism, Capitalism
and Nationalism. In their table groups students are to find a source related to their topic
and analyse its usefulness and reliability and also its importance to the World at the
Beginning of the Twentieth Century.

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As a class discuss table groups are to present their findings and sources to the whole
class. Review key concepts, definitions and ideas making sure students understand their
relevance to the World at the beginning of the Twentieth Century.
Lesson Twenty Overview of Unit Part Two Reviewing: The nature of European society and Emerging forces and ideas. Textbook Key
Features of
P3.4 Individual Work: Modern History
P3.5 Students are to write down, mind map or list any questions they have, ideas they do not By Bruce
P4.1 understand or any definitions they are unclear on about the World at the Beginning of Dennett and
P4.2 the Twentieth Century. Stephen Dixon.

Class Discussion:
As a class students are to share their questions and are to spend the rest of the lesson Exercise Book
gaining understanding and clearer ideas about the World at the Beginning of the
Twentieth Century. Devices (Phone,
IPad, Laptop)

Assessment Details Outcomes


Formal Assessment Task worth 30% of the total P1.1: describe the role of key individuals, groups and events of selected studies from the eighteenth
Preliminary course and is a source based analysis century to the present.
task. P1.2: investigate and explain the key features and issues of selected studies from the eighteenth century
to the present.
The assessment task will consist of three short P2.1: identify forces and ideas and explain their significance in contributing to change and continuity from
response sourced based questions and will the eighteenth century to the present.
evaluate the students understanding of analysing P3.1: ask relevant historical questions.
a sources usefulness and reliability and its P3.2: locate, select and organise relevant information from different types of sources.
importance to the World at the Beginning of the P3.3: comprehend and analyse sources for their usefulness and reliability.
Twentieth Century. P3.4: identify and account for differing perspectives and interpretations of the past.
P3.5: plan and present the findings of historical investigations, analysing and synthesising information
Students will have 50 minutes to complete the from different types of sources.
task with an additional 5 minutes reading time, P4.1: use historical terms and concepts appropriately.
students are not permitted to start writing until P4.2: communicate a knowledge and understanding of historical features and issues using appropriate
after the 5 minutes reading time. and well-structured oral and written forms.

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Students are not permitted to bring notes or
have access to any electronic devices during the
assessment task.
Evaluation of the Learning and Teaching Indicators of Learning
The evaluation of teaching and learning will take Indicators of Learning will be evaluated on the students success in the assessment task. Indicators will be
place throughout the unit through the class through the students ability to demonstrate formal literary responses to the assessment questions and the
discussions, whereby addressing any gaps in level of analysis of the sources. Another indicator of learning will be ability to critically analyse the sources
information, key ideas and events. Also providing usefulness and reliability. Furthermore an indicator of learning will be the ability to make clear and concise
additional support to EALD and low SES students connections to the sources importance to the key ideas and events in the World at the Beginning of the
by providing annotated sources, glossaries/work Twentieth Century.
banks on key concepts and ideas.

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Assessment Timetable:
Component Task One Task Two Task Three: Task Four: Weighting %
Case Study A: Case Study B: The World at the Examination
Emmeline Pankhurst The Meiji Restoration: Beginning of the
and the Suffragette nature and impact Twentieth Century.
Movement
Research and in-class Historical Investigation Source Analysis
essay
Term One Term Two Term Three Term Three
Outcomes P1.1, P2.1, P3.2, P3.5, P1.1, P2.1, P3.2, P3.3, P1.2, P2.1, P3.2, P3.5, P1.1, P1.2 P2.1, P3.3,
P4.2 P3.4, P3.5 P4.2 P3.4, P4.1, P4.2
Knowledge and 10 30 40
Understanding of
Content
Source- Based Skills 15 5 20
Historical Inquiry and 10 10 20
Research
Communication of 5 10 5 20
historical
understanding in
appropriate forms
Marks 15 20 30 35 100

Classroom Ready Stage Six Assessment Task

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Assessment Notification

Due Date: Week 10

Weighting: 30%

Core Topic:

The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

Context of the Task:

In class students have been learning about the core preliminary topic of The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century. Throughout this students
have learnt about various key concepts and ideas, events, people and places. This assessment task will address these key learnings and assess the students
ability to analyse source based texts to conduct a clear and concise response using their knowledge gained throughout his unit.

Outcomes to be Assessed:

P1.1: describe the role of key individuals, groups and events of selected studies from the eighteenth century to the present.

P2.1: identify forces and ideas and explain their significance in contributing to change and continuity from the eighteenth century to the present.

P3.3: comprehend and analyse sources for their usefulness and reliability.

P3.4: identify and account for differing perspectives and interpretations of the past.

P3.5: plan and present the findings of historical investigations, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources.

P4.1: use historical terms and concepts appropriately.

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P4.2: communicate a knowledge and understanding of historical features and issues using appropriate and well-structured oral and written forms.

The Assessment Task:

Students will be provided with three different sources on The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century and will be required to write three short
responses based on these sources. Students will be required to use their own knowledge on the topic and source analysis to complete this task. Students are
encouraged to review the class work in order to prepare for this task. The three source analysis questions will be worth 10 marks each and designed to test
students understanding of the unit of work. Students will have 50 minutes to complete this task and are encouraged to use their time wisely when
answering the assessment questions.

Assessment Criteria:

Students will be assessed on how well they:

- Identify different forces and ideas and examine their usefulness and significance to the World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century.
- Analyse sources for their usefulness and reliability.
- Describe the roles and influence of key individuals and events.
- Identify and account for differing perspectives and interpretations of the past.
- Use historical key terms and concepts effectively and appropriately.
- Provide clear and concise well structured written responses.

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Marking Criteria:

Marking Guide:
- Highly developed source analysis that is accurate and complex. Highly
- Demonstrates a high understanding of how the source could be used and be relevant to an historian. Developed:
- Source analysis is complete, clear and concise. 13-15
- Effectively analyses the usefulness and reliability of the source.
- Demonstrates a deep understanding of the course content.
- Demonstrates a deep understanding of the different forces and ideas relevant to the World at the
Beginning of the Twentieth Century.
- Effective understanding of the source material. Developing:
- Effective source-analysis that clearly investigates the usefulness and reliability. 10- 12
- The response is well written, and cohesive.
- Effective understanding of the different forces and ideas relevant to the World at the Beginning of the
Twentieth Century.
- Basic understanding of the source material, with attempts made to investigate the usefulness of the Pass: 5-9
source.
- Basic source-analysis and basic demonstration of the usefulness and reliability of the source.
- Fragmented and unclear, un-concise written response, does meet length requirements and does make a
sound attempt at question responses.
- Basic understanding of the different forces and ideas relevant to the World at the Beginning of the
Twentieth Century.
- Limited understanding of the source material Fail: 0-4
- Limited source-analysis, that fails to accurately investigate and analyse the course for its usefulness and
reliability and/or poor linking to its usefulness to a historian
- Poorly written response, that is not cohesive, and does not appraise the source at any level.
- Unsatisfactory response length, not in full sentences, or poorly written.
- Limited understanding of the different forces and ideas relevant to the World at the Beginning of the
Twentieth Century.

The World the Beginning of the Twentieth Century: Sourced Based Assessment Task

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Source A: Photo https://image.slidesharecdn.com/industrializationandnationalism-120416181423-
phpapp01/95/industrialization-and-nationalism-10-728.jpg?cb=1334604015

Question One: Using Source A and your own knowledge how does the source encapsulate life during the twentieth
century and how does it shape the world in which we live today. Please take into account the usefulness and reliability of
the source when constructing your response.

Source B: Excerpt from J. Joll The Origins of the First World War, Longman, London, 1984. Found in textbook Key
Features of Modern History by Bruce Dennett and Stephen Dixon.

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The building of the German navy led to the creation of a body of nationalist opinion and the development of an
aggressive imperialist rhetoric which contributed to making war seem acceptable and even desirable. The existence of
such a body of opinion was one of the factors which the German government between 1911 and 1914 had to take into
account.

Question Two: Using Source B and your own knowledge how does the source demonstrate Germanys reasons for
participating in World War One and how does this source use key concepts and ideas to shape the German government.
Please take into account the usefulness and reliability of the source when constructing your response.

Source C: Photo http://history105.libraries.wsu.edu/fall2014/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2014/08/fat-imperialism.jpg

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Question Three: Using Source C and your own knowledge, to what extent did Imperialism play a role in the lead up to
World War One? Please take into account the usefulness and reliability of this source when constructing your response,
students may also use Source A and Source B in their response.

Teacher Directions for Assessment Task:

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Students must have 50 minutes to complete with task. Students are not allowed any notes, mobile phones or access to
their devices throughout this task. The assessment task is formal and must take place under formal assessment
parameters. The task is individual and students must complete their own work.

Please provide students a copy of the source based assessment task and lined paper to complete their responses. Students
are allowed five minutes reading time before undertaking the task. Students are not allowed to disturb others if they
complete the task early, they are encouraged to read their responses and make any changes necessary. Students are
encouraged to use their time wisely and effectively in order to answer the questions properly and to the best of their
ability.

Once the task is complete, please collect the source based assessment task sheets given to student and their responses
with their names clearly labelled on the front of the task. Students are not allowed to take the source based assessment
task question sheet with them. Their responses will be marked and handed back to students promptly with appropriate
feedback and areas of further learning.

Pre Assessment Task Lesson Plan

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Topic area: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

Stage of Learner: Stage 6

Syllabus Pages: 25-26

Date: 2017

Location Booked: Classroom


Lesson Number: 10 / 20
Time: 60 minutes

Total Number of students: 25


Printing/preparation: Textbooks.

Outcomes

Assessment

Students learn about

Students learn to

P2.1: identify forces and ideas and explain their significance in contributing to change and continuity from the eighteenth century to the present.

30
P3.3: comprehend and analyse sources for their usefulness and reliability.

P3.5: plan and present the findings of historical investigations, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources.

In class formal assessment task. A source based analysis of three sources, which requires students to construct three well-written responses to proposed
questions.

The nature of European Society:

- Rich and Poor


- Urbanisation and Industrialisation
- Social Change
- Forms of Government.

Imperialism:

- Reasons for the growth of Imperialism


- Impact of Imperialism on Africa and/or Asia and/or Middle East and/or the Pacific
- Colonial rivalries

Emerging forces and Ideas

- Politics of the working class: socialism, trade unionism and Marxism


- Anarchism
- Nationalism
- Internationalism and Globalisation
- Democracy and Liberalism

Causes of World War I

Long Term and Short Term causes.

31
- Ask relevant historical questions about the world at the beginning of the twentieth century.
- Locate, select and organise information from different types of sources, including ICT, to describe and analyse relevant features and issues of the
world at the beginning of the twentieth century.
- Analyse the major events and issues relevant at the turn of the century.
- Assess the forces for change and continuity at the turn of the century.
- Describe and evaluate the role of key individuals and groups at the turn of the century.
- Evaluate the usefulness and reliability of sources.
- Account for and assess differing perspectives and interpretations of significant events, people and issues at the beginning of the twentieth
century.
- Present the findings of investigation on aspects of the period, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources.
- Communicate an understanding or relevant concepts, features and issues using appropriate and well structured oral and/or written and/or
multimedia forms including ICT.

Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities:

Recognising the land in which we reside and the Aboriginal Elders who take care of this land.

Explicit subject specific concepts and skills:

This lesson will be structured around source analysis and building the skills students will need to complete the assessment task. Low SES and EALD students
will have specific guidance from the teacher in order to ask any questions and gain a clearer understanding of source analysis so that they can effectively
complete the assessment task.

32
Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas

Intellectual Quality
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of important, substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats knowledge as something that requires active
construction and requires students to engage in higher-order thinking and to communicate substantively about what they are learning.

1.1 Deep knowledge

1.2 Deep understanding

1.3 Problematic knowledge

1.4 Higher-order thinking

1.5 Metalanguage

1.6 Substantive communication

Quality Learning Environment


This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and teachers work productively in an environment clearly focused on learning. Such pedagogy sets high and explicit expectations
and develops positive relationships between teacher and students and among students.

2.1 Explicit quality criteria

2.2 Engagement

2.3 High Expectations

2.4 Social Support

2.5 Students self regulation

2.6 Student direction

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Significance
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with students prior knowledge and identities, with contexts
outside of the classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all cultural perspective.

3.1 Background knowledge

3.2 Cultural knowledge

3.3 Knowledge integration

3.4 Inclusivity

3.5 Connectedness

3.6 Narrative

How the quality teaching elements you have identified are achieved within the lesson.

Teaching element Indicators of presence in the lesson

1.1 Deep Knowledge, 1.2 Deep Knowledge is demonstrated throughout this lesson through the class activity. A guided source based analysis
Deep Understanding and 1.4 demonstrates student understanding. Deep Understanding is present through participation of the class activity,
Higher- order thinking. classroom participation allow for understanding of the activity and the skills needed for the assessment task. Higher-
Order Thinking is present throughout the lesson also through the activity the ability to deconstruct a source or text is a
vital skill for the unit and the assessment task.

34
2.2 Engagement and 2.3 High Engagement is present through the whole class activity of source-based analysis. High expectations are placed on
Expectations. students for their ability to call upon background knowledge and understanding of what they have already learnt to
complete the task.

3.1 Background Knowledge Background knowledge will be used to complete the lesson activity on source-based analysis. Knowledge integration is
and 3.3 Knowledge evident through the outcome of the task and learning objectives.
Integration.

Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred

T/S

5 Students are to be seated promptly and ready to receive Teacher: Mark roll and wait for students to be seated and ready for instruction. T
instruction.

Student: Enter classroom quickly, be seated promptly and be ready to receive


instruction.

35
Resources: N/A

10 Introduction of assessment task Teacher: Hand out assessment notification to students about the formal assessment T
task taking place in two weeks time. Please talk students through the assessment
task and clearly explain the instructions, the outcomes and the expectations of
completion on the assessment task. Describe the details of the assessment task to the
students and discuss the marking criteria and what is needed in order to achieve a
high mark.

Student: Listen attentively to the instructions of the assessment task.

Resources: Assessment Task Notification.

15 Student now have time to ask questions about the Teacher: Answer questions related to assessment task. S
assessment task.
Student: Ask any questions about assessment task.

Resources: Assessment Task Notification.

20 PRU worksheet Teacher: Please handout the PRU worksheet to the students and talk them through S
the process of source analysis using the PRU method. Tell students that for the next
class activity they will be using this worksheet to complete the task.

Students: Listen to instruction and ask any questions about the PRU method.

Resources: PRU worksheet.

25 Class Activity: Source Based Analysis Teacher: Give students instructions of the activity. As a class we are going to S

36
deconstruct a source and together we will evaluate its usefulness and reliability and
how this source can be used by a historian and be relevant for study today. For low
SES and EALD students please instruct them to work together and that the teacher will
come and guide them thoroughly through the process, gifted and talented students to
work independently.

Student: Listen to instructions of task and open books to necessary page.

Resources: Textbook page. 97 Source 6.1 (Key Features of Modern History by Bruce
Dennett and Stephen Dixon).

30 First Part of the Activity on Source Based Analysis Teacher: Step One requires students to work by themselves and note take anything S
they find about the source it may be words they do not understand, usefulness and
reliability evidence or concerns, or anything they find interesting about the source,
please allow five minutes for the part.

Student: Students must for the first five minutes of the task work independently note
taking anything they find about the source.

Resources: Textbook, Workbook.

35 -40 Continuation of Step One Teacher: As directed above S

Student: As directed above

Resources: As directed above

40 -45 Second Part of the Activity on Source Based Analysis Teacher: Now students are to form groups and discuss what they found about the S
source using the PRU template start to deconstruct their ideas about the source
students have 5 minutes to complete this part. For low SES and EALD students please
guide them through the process and help them use the PRU template to start
deconstructing the source.

Student: Working in groups using the PRU template students are to start analysing

37
their source.

Resources: PRU template, workbook, textbook.

45 Class Source Analysis Teacher: As a class, please ask the students what they found about the using the PRU S
template, did they find any evidence of usefulness and reliability? Any words they did
not understand? Or anything they found interesting?

Student: Offer to the class any findings on the source.

Resources: Textbook, Workbook and PRU template.

50 Class Source Analysis Teacher: Now please bring up the teacher annotated source analysis on the source T
the students have been using. Guide the students through the process and pull out
any factors they missed during their own analysis and ask students to add this to
theirs. How did the teacher come to this analysis, what evidence was found, was the
useful and reliable?

Student: Listen and ask any questions throughout the modelled example of source
analysis.

Resources: Smart board.

60 Q&A Teacher: Leave a few minutes at the end of class to allow students to ask any S
questions about the upcoming assessment task or the in class activity on source
analysis.

Student: Ask any questions.

Resources: N/A

38
Reflection

What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this lesson?

The entire process has been long winded; I underestimated the mount of time certain elements of the assessment task would take. The construction of the
assessment task, the rubric and the unit outlines were by far the most difficult elements of this assessment. However it was rather insightful and eye
opening to complete, and at the end I did enjoy this task.

Outcomes:

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

39
Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording

2.1 This outcome in demonstrated throughout the lesson by asking students to analyse and deconstruct a source from the
textbook. The source itself encompasses a variety of different forces and ideas and ergo asks students to counter these
factors into their understanding of the source.

3.3 The class activity is designed for students to comprehend and analyse the source for its usefulness and reliability in order to
properly use the lesson template.

3.5 Students are encouraged throughout the entire lesson to present their ideas and findings about the source. Students are
encouraged to delve deep into the source using the lesson template given out to create a thorough understanding of source
analysis and synthesisation.

Other considerations

Complete the table blow by inserting the AISTL graduate standards that you are demonstrating and indicates the evidence from this lesson that should
comply with the standard.

Graduate Standards Evidence within this lesson

1.2 Understand how students learn Allowing students to have strongly developed source analysis skills in preparation for their assessment task
address this standard throughout the lesson plan; these skills have been built on throughout the unit and have
been continually assessed throughout the unit.

1.5 Differentiate teaching to meet the Differentiation is demonstrated throughout the entire unit outline. Low SES, EALD and Gifted and Talented

40
specific learning needs of students students have been addressed throughout both the unit outline and the pre assessment task lesson plan in order
across the full range of abilities. to make sure the students are all at the same level and ability before undertaking the assessment task.

2.2 Content selection and organisation The content addressed throughout this unit of work has been done so as they all interrelate with one another
and feed off each other. The content has been selected so that students get a wide range of differing ideas and
opinions in order to make informed decision and coherent written responses.

2.3 Curriculum, Assessment and The curriculum has been at the forefront of the unit outline and lesson plan in order to adequately create
Reporting assessment and learning. Formative assessment has been used throughout the unit of work to assess the
development of students in the lead up to the summative assessment task.

2.6 Information and Communication ICT has been entwined throughout the unit of work by integrated different methods for students to present class
Technology work and present ideas to the class.

3.1 Establish challenging learning goals Challenging learning goals has been embedded throughout the entire unit of work, students are asked to
demonstrate a wide range of literacy and numeracy skills.

WHS

What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in this lesson? Using your syllabus and support documents as well as
other WHS policy- Outline the key WHS considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?

It is imperative that the teacher makes sure that the classroom is safe learning space and that all risk issues ahs been addressed such as make sure there is
nothing students can slip or trip on, nothing I hanging from the ceiling, all electrical wires are safely managed and that tables and chairs are adequately
appropriate for use. If a risk issues does occur it is important that the teacher remains clam and clearly outlines school procedures in order to handle such
risk issues so that students do not become alarmed or cause more factors relating to risk. Lastly it is important for the teacher to monitor movement
throughout the classroom of the students to maintain safety and wellbeing.

41
Post Assessment Task Lesson Plan:
Topic area: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

Stage of Learner: Stage 6

Syllabus Pages: 25-26

Date: 2017

Location Booked: Classroom


Lesson Number: 16 / 20

42
Time: 60 minutes

Total Number of students: 25


Printing/preparation: Textbooks.

Outcomes

Assessment

Students learn about

Students learn to

P3.1: ask relevant historical questions.

P3.3: comprehend and analyse sources for their usefulness and reliability.

P3.4: identify and account for differing perspectives and interpretations of the past.

P4.1: use historical terms and concepts appropriately.

P4.2: communicate a knowledge and understanding of historical features and issues using appropriate and well-structured oral and written forms.

In class formal assessment task. A source based analysis of two sources, which requires students to construct two well-written responses to proposed
questions.

43
The nature of European Society:

- Rich and Poor


- Urbanisation and Industrialisation
- Social Change
- Forms of Government.

Imperialism:

- Reasons for the growth of Imperialism


- Impact of Imperialism on Africa and/or Asia and/or Middle East and/or the Pacific
- Colonial rivalries

Emerging forces and Ideas

- Politics of the working class: socialism, trade unionism and Marxism


- Anarchism
- Nationalism
- Internationalism and Globalisation
- Democracy and Liberalism

Causes of World War I

Long Term and Short Term causes.

- Ask relevant historical questions about the world at the beginning of the twentieth century.
- Locate, select and organise information from different types of sources, including ICT, to describe and analyse relevant features and issues of the
world at the beginning of the twentieth century.
- Analyse the major events and issues relevant at the turn of the century.
- Assess the forces for change and continuity at the turn of the century.
- Describe and evaluate the role of key individuals and groups at the turn of the century.
- Evaluate the usefulness and reliability of sources.
- Account for and assess differing perspectives and interpretations of significant events, people and issues at the beginning of the twentieth
century.

44
- Present the findings of investigation on aspects of the period, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources.
- Communicate an understanding or relevant concepts, features and issues using appropriate and well structured oral and/or written and/or
multimedia forms including ICT.

Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities:

Recognising the land in which we reside and the Aboriginal Elders who take care of this land.

Explicit subject specific concepts and skills:

This lesson will be structured around source analysis and building the skills students will need to complete the assessment task. Low SES and EALD students
will have specific guidance from the teacher in order to ask any questions and gain a clearer understanding of source analysis so that they can effectively
complete the assessment task.

Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas

45
Intellectual Quality
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of important, substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats knowledge as something that requires active construction and requires students to engage in
higher-order thinking and to communicate substantively about what they are learning.

1.1 Deep knowledge

1.2 Deep understanding

1.3 Problematic knowledge

1.4 Higher-order thinking

1.5 Metalanguage

1.6 Substantive communication

Quality Learning Environment


This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and teachers work productively in an environment clearly focused on learning. Such pedagogy sets high and explicit expectations and develops positive relationships between
teacher and students and among students.

2.1 Explicit quality criteria

2.2 Engagement

2.3 High Expectations

2.4 Social Support

2.5 Students self regulation

2.6 Student direction

Significance
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with students prior knowledge and identities, with contexts outside of the classroom, and with multiple
ways of knowing all cultural perspective.

3.1 Background knowledge

3.2 Cultural knowledge

46
3.3 Knowledge integration

3.4 Inclusivity

3.5 Connectedness

3.6 Narrative

How the quality teaching elements you have identified are achieved within the lesson.

Teaching element Indicators of presence in the lesson

1.1 Deep Knowledge, 1.2 Deep Knowledge is demonstrated throughout this lesson through the class activity. A guided source based analysis
Deep Understanding and 1.4 demonstrates student understanding. Deep Understanding is present through participation of the class activity, classroom
Higher- order thinking. participation allow for understanding of the activity and the skills needed for the assessment task. Higher-Order Thinking is
present throughout the lesson also through the activity the ability to deconstruct a source or text is a vital skill for the unit and
the assessment task.

2.2 Engagement and 2.3 High Engagement is present through the whole class activity of source-based analysis. High expectations are placed on students for
Expectations. their ability to call upon background knowledge and understanding of what they have already learnt to complete the task.

3.1 Background Knowledge Background knowledge will be used to complete the lesson activity on source-based analysis. Knowledge integration is evident
and 3.3 Knowledge through the outcome of the task and learning objectives.
Integration.

47
Tim Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred
e
T/S

5 Mark roll, students seated. Teacher: Mark roll and make sure students are seated and ready to receive instruction T

Student: Students promptly, ready to receive instruction

Resources: N/A

10 Discussion on Assessment Task Teacher: Ask students how they think they preformed in the assessment task. What S
questions or parts of the assessment task did they find challenging or difficult? Do
they have any questions about certain elements of the assessment task?

Student: This is the students opportunity to ask any questions they have about the
assessment task, what they felt they went well with and what they found difficult.

48
Resources: N/A

15 Hand back assessment task with attached feedback. Teacher: Please hand out the students assessment tasks with their attached T
feedback. Please give the students five minutes to review their feedback and ask any
questions.

Student: Please review assessment feedback and ask any questions about feedback.

Resources: Assessment Task with attached feedback.

20 Take students through general assessment feedback on Teacher: Please bring up power point on general assessment feedback for students T
Question One and discuss with the class the areas they preformed well in and the areas they need
improvement.

Question One Feedback: Students coherently analysed the photo well relating it to
the Industrial Revolution with ease. The area in which some students feel short was
their ability to provide enough evidence or examples of how the Industrial Revolution
shapes contemporary society. For example transportation the advancement of the
railway system, cars and clothing.

Student: Please ask any relevant question about Question One

Resources: Power Point on Feedback.

30 Take students through general assessment feedback on Teacher: Continuation of power point please start to address feedback on Question T
Question Two Two of the assessment task, the areas they preformed well and the areas of
improvement.

Question Two Feedback: In this question students struggled to pull apart key points in
the excerpt that could have developed their written response and gave it more depth.
For example body of nationalist opinion gave direct linking to the development of
Germanys nationalism views, this key point drives Germanys stance on going to
WWI. However students did make a good attempt at analysing the sources usefulness
and reliability and were able to make clear links to the question.

49
Student: Please ask any relevant questions about Question Two

Resources: Power Point on Feedback.

40 Take students through general feedback on Question Three Teacher: Continuation of power point start to address feedback on Question Three of T
the assessment task, the areas the students preformed well and the areas of
improvement.

Question Three Feedback: These question students preformed really well in, students
were able to effectively use to the source to account for key ideas and concepts
around Imperialism and the causes of WWI. However this question had a lot of room
for scope and various accounts and student seemed to miss the mark in relation to
expanding their ideas and opinions, however overall students preformed well in this
Question and were able to make a clear evaluation of Imperialism and the causes of
WWI.

Student: Ask any relevant questions about Question Three.

Resources: Power Point of Feedback.

50 Preparation for next class. Teacher: Please instruct students to read page 91, of the textbook in preparation for S
the next class and give them the opportunity to come and speak to the teacher if they
have any questions about the feedback they received on the assessment task
individually.

Student: Read page 91 of the textbook ready for next class, ask the teacher about any
questions they have in regards to their feedback.

Resources: Page 91 of the Textbook.

50
60 Continuation of above. Teacher: Directions as above. S

Student: Directions as above.

Resources: Directions as above.

Reflection

What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this lesson?

The entire process has been long winded; I underestimated the mount of time certain elements of the assessment task would take. The construction of the
assessment task, the rubric and the unit outlines were by far the most difficult elements of this assessment. However it was rather insightful and eye
opening to complete, and at the end I did enjoy this task.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording

3.1 This is measured throughout the task of giving students feedback on the assessment task and discussing how they could
have asked certain questions through analysis to strengthen their written response.

3.3 This demonstrated through the feedback on the assessment task and addressing the students ability to evaluate and
analyse a sources usefulness and reliability.

3.4 This is also demonstrated through the assessment feedback for students on the assessment task.

51
4.1 This is addressed through the student feedback within the post lesson of the assessment task, highlighting areas in which
students preformed well.

4.2 This is also discussed through the feedback on assessment given to students.

Other considerations

Complete the table below by inserting the AISTL graduate standards that you are demonstrating and indicates the evidence from this lesson that should
comply with the standard.

Graduate Standards Evidence within this lesson

3.5 Use Effective Classroom Effective classroom communication is demonstrated through the class discussion on the feedback of the
Communication assessment task, allowing students to ask nay relevant questions.

3.7 Engage parents/carers in the Discuss with parents any areas of improvement their child can develop from the assessment task to have greater
educative process academic success.

4.1 Support Student Participation Student participation is evident throughout the entire unit of learning the learning objectives and activities are
predominantly student centred and students are always encouraged to share their ideas and opinions.

4.5 Use ICT safely, responsibly and ICT is safely used through the power point on assessment feedback.
ethically

5.1 Assess student learning Student learning is assessed throughout the entire unit of work, however the demonstration of assessment of

52
student learning can be seen through the guided feedback presentation on the assessment task.

5.2 Provide feedback to students on Feedback is provided in three forms during this lesson, firstly through the written feedback attached to the
their learning. students assessment task, secondly throughout he feedback power point discussed throughout the lesson and
lastly the opportunity for students to ask any questions on their feedback is available.

WHS

What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in this lesson? Using your syllabus and support documents as well as
other WHS policy- Outline the key WHS considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?

It is imperative that the teacher makes sure that the classroom is safe learning space and that all risk issues ahs been addressed such as make sure there is
nothing students can slip or trip on, nothing I hanging from the ceiling, all electrical wires are safely managed and that tables and chairs are adequately
appropriate for use. If a risk issues does occur it is important that the teacher remains clam and clearly outlines school procedures in order to handle such
risk issues so that students do not become alarmed or cause more factors relating to risk. Lastly it is important for the teacher to monitor movement
throughout the classroom of the students to maintain safety and wellbeing.

53
Academic Justification

Scope and Sequence, Concept Map and Assessment Schedule:


The scope and sequence developed for this professional task has been modelled off the scope and sequence developed by the Board of Studies
for the 2009 Syllabus, it follows a clear and concise example of how students will build their historical investigation, source analysis and
historical understanding skills (BOSTES, 2009). The unit of work for The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century has been placed within
term three of the preliminary course allowing for students to lay a solid foundation of skills, knowledge and background in preparation for the
studies of the first World War in the first term of the HSC course. The decision to implement the scope and sequence this particular way allows
the students to develop the skills necessary to complete appropriate assessment and start the HSC course.

The concept map developed for this unit of work addressed a wide range of key concepts and ideas needed to study the World at the Beginning
of the Twentieth Century, which have been taken directly from the syllabus (BOSTES, 2009, pg.25). The concept map models the four distinct
yet interrelating topics and events that are inherently important to the study of this unit of work. Lastly the assessment schedule has also been
modelled off the Board of Studies proposed assessment schedule for the Preliminary Course (BOSTES, 2009). The assessment schedule allows
for students to effectively develop and gain feedback on their skills before undertaking this particular unit of work, where they will need a wide
range of skills in order to have academic success in the World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century such as such based skills and historical
understanding.

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Unit Outline:
The unit outline for this course has been developed with a wide range of pedagogical strategies deigned for engagement and development of
student learning. The unit outline has been broken down into twenty different lessons; this specific method of planning allows clear and
concise instruction, objective and assessment. I have chosen to break down my unit outline into twenty different lessons modelling from the
idea that students are consumers, they adapt quickly and appreciate the idea of content importance. Ergo my lessons are designed to give clear
objectives and guidelines to students focussing in on clear conceptual thought and key ideas surrounding this unit of work (Marsh, 2014, pg.
90). Furthermore I have chosen to differentiate for low SES and EALD students, gifted and talented students are also incorporated within the
scope of differentiating for these two learning abilities. It is apparent throughout the entire unit outline where differentiation is made, every
effort has been made to incorporate different methods of differentiation by focusing on multidisciplinary tasks, interactive learning,
collaborative learning and learning through exploration (Marsh, 2014, pg.136). By using different methods of differentiation low SES and EALD
students are given the opportunity to explore areas of strength and use these areas to build on other improvement areas. Moreover by giving
low SES and EALD students to opportunity to work with gifted and talented students allows scope for peer learning and peer mentoring,
learning through each other different ways of doing things allows for growth and development of all skills. An example of differentiation for low
SES and EALD students is demonstrated in lesson five of the unit outline, this specific demonstration allows for low SES and EALD students to
feel as though they are on the same wave length as the rest of the class and also gives them the confidence and encouragement to participate
in classroom activities without fear of misunderstanding; other examples throughout the unit outline include small group brainstorming,
discussion, questioning and simulations/role plays (Marsh, 2014, pg. 183).

Largely my pedagogical approach to this unit of work has been student centred, I believe it is important for students to learn and develop with
and through each other Marsh (2014, pg. 183) communicates, learning is a social process the development of learning and knowledge is
inseparable from the process of participating in a culture of practice. Therefore through this understanding of learning being a social process
the developed unit outline largely focuses on student collaborative lessons, there is a substantive focus of group and peer learning. However at
the end of almost every lesson there is allowance for class discussion the ability to for students to air their voice and discuss certain ideas and
opinions as I also believe students feel most confident and appreciated when they are given significance in the classroom, confirmation of their
ability to voice their opinions and ideas freely (Marsh, 2014 pg. 184).

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On the other hand the unit outline also addressed aspects of understanding by design and integration of ICT. Making use of technology is
important in todays classroom we are the generation of technological advancement which will continue to grow and change, evidence of ICT is
apparent throughout the unit of work activities such as finding sources, debates and smart board interactions are used to encourage
technological literacy and to allow the students to engage with something that is embedded within their everyday lives. UbD (understanding by
design) is evident throughout the unit of work by the use of assessment. Many different forms of assessment take place throughout the unit of
work mainly formative assessment, however formative assessment allows for both teacher and student understanding and growth, ergo the
lessons have been designed to assess the understanding of students and to assess the level of achievement throughout the lesson through
their design (Lyons, 2014, pg70).

Pre and Post Assessment Task Lesson Plans including the Assessment Task:
The Pre and Post Assessment Task Lesson Plans and the Assessment Task itself have all been designed with the Australian Professional
Standards of Teaching (2017) and the Board of Studies Syllabus (2009 pg. 24-25) outcomes in mind. Firstly the pre- lesson plan allows for clear
instruction and explanation of the assessment task and includes an activity for students to demonstrate and develop the key skills needed to
complete the assessment task which is an imperative part of have a positive classroom pedagogy (Lyons, 2014, pg.74). Moreover the pre-
lesson plan also addresses key AITSL objectives by establishing challenging learning goals (3.1) and effective classroom communication (3.5)
demonstrates a well-planned and concise lesson plans that allows for student developed and engagement (AITSL, 2017, pg. 5-6). On the other
hand the post lesson plan largely focuses on giving feedback to the students on the assessment task itself, giving clear feedback to students
addresses the areas of concern and also the areas of achievement for the students (Lyons, 2014, pg. 75). Lastly the assessment task itself is
designed to allow for achievement for all students and their varying levels of academic ability, by designed specific questions that guide
students towards an appropriate response allows for low SES and EALD students to understand more effectively but also allows for gifted and
talented students to strive construct strong written responses (Lyon, 2014, pg.70).

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