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DEPARTMENT

OF
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

STUDENT HAND BOOK


IV Year B Tech I Semester (2017-2018)

Guru Nanak Institute of Technology


Ibrahimpatnam, Ranga Reddy District 501 506 (T.S)

OPERATIONS RESEARCH(A70352)

1
CONTENT

S.NO Particular Page No.

PART A

I GENERAL INFORMATION 3

II ACADEMICS (PEOs,POs) 4

III MONITORING AND GUIDENCE 8

PART B

1 OPERATIONS RESEARCH(A70352) 15

CHECK LIST

1.Syllabus

2.Lesson plan

3.Micro lesson plan

4.Assignment questions

2
PART A

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

I. GENERAL INFORMATION

About the College


Guru Nanak Institute of Technology was established in 2008 with a single -
minded aim to provide a perfect platform to students in the field of Engineering,
Technology and Management for their academic and overall personality development.
The College is approved by AICTE and affiliated to JNTUH, Hyderabad. At present
the College offers Six B. Tech programmes in EEE& IT with intake of 60 in each,
ECE& Civil and Mechanical Engineering with an intake of 120 and CSE with an
intake of 180.
Highlights:
Teaching methodology involves technical case studies, creative exercises, online
assignments & descriptive tests.
E-class rooms
Industry focused knowledge is imparted by R & D and Industry peer members.
Tie up with MNC companies and foreign Universities
State of art laboratories, sophisticated equipment and advanced software
Library is equipped with National and International Journals, 50000 volumes and
more than 7500 titles of books, NPTEL, SONET CDs and internet lab for students
and staff.
IEEE online journals and IEL online journals through AICTE INDEST
CONSORTIUM
Wi-Fi campus with 12 Mbps bandwidth.
Oracle, Microsoft Development suite, Microsoft academic license for Microsoft
Software Products, Ansys ,Proe softwares are available
State of art English Language lab and 800 computers connected with dedicated
high-end servers.
Scholarship and free books for meritorious students.
Book Bank Scheme facility to the students.
A new and unique Laptop lab with latest configuration Most of the classrooms are
fixed with LCDs and screens.

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All major professional societies student chapters like ISTE, CSI, IETE and IEEE,
SAE etc.

Training & Placement:

Modern training department is established as per the corporate standards.


Large Number of students placed with Microsoft Inc, Infosys, Mahindra Satyam
Ltd, Infosys, IBM, TCS, ADP, Wipro, Sutherland Technologies, CMC,
SEMANTIC SPACE and InfoTech Enterprises.
Industry experts are invited for guest lectures, seminars and student presentations
to maintain a strong Industry and Institution Interaction. Also, industrial visits are
arranged for students to enrich their knowledge.
Contact Information

Principal : Dr.S.Sreenatha Reddy 80966 09821


Vice Principal : Dr.M.Narendra Kumar 8096609840
HOD EEE : Dr.R.Vinothkanna 8498056996
HOD CSE : Dr. Senthil Kunar 8096609826
HOD IT :Dr. Subramanyan 8096609828
HOD ECE : Prof. B.Kedarnath 80966 09829
HOD MECH : Dr. B.Vijay Kumar 80966 09836
HOD CIVIL : Prof.Madhan Mohan 8096609827
HOD H & S : Dr. G.Srinivas 8096195678
Manager Admin : Mr. Col (Retd) Rajesh Kumar 8096611000
Administrative officer : Mr. S Antony 8297975251
Transport Officer : Mr. Sattar 8096609841
II. ACADEMICS
Mechanical Engineering

The department of Mechanical Engineering was established in the year 2009,


offering under graduate program now with an intake of 120. The prime objective of the
course is to provide students with a sound mechanical engineering education, advanced
learning methods and applications of mechanical engineering principles. The department
provides facilities for students to learn soft skills and achieve holistic personality. Majority of
the faculty members are actively involved in research activities in the fields of their

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specialization. They have published a good number of research papers in
International/National Journals and International/ National Conferences. The faculty in the
department interacts closely with industry enabling the graduates completely successful not
only at the national level but also at the global level. Metal joining technology, Nano
Technology, Vibration and Stability of Fluid conveying pipes and Exhaust emission analysis
of Dual fuel engines are the thrust areas of research.

VISION

To be a leading department of Mechanical Engineering in the region.

MISSION

1. Nurture young individuals into knowledgeable, skilful and ethical professionals in


their pursuit of Mechanical Engineering.
2. Nurture the faculty to expose them to world-class infrastructure.
3. Sustain high performance by excellence in teaching, research and innovations.
4. Extensive partnerships and collaborations with foreign universities for technology
upgradation.
5. Develop Industry-Interaction for innovation and product development.

QUALITY POLICY

GNIT is committed to provide quality education through dedicated and talented Faculty,
World- class infrastructure, Labs and Advanced Research Center to the students.

Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs)

PEO 1: Graduate shall have the ability to apply knowledge and Technical skills across the
disciplines and in emerging areas of Mechanical Engineering for higher studies, research,
employability and handle the realistic problems.

PEO 2 : Graduates shall possess managerial skills , maintain ethical conduct, sense of
responsibility to serve the society and protect the environment.

PEO 3: Graduates shall possess academic excellence with innovative insight, soft skills,
leadership qualities, knowledge of contemporary issues for successful professional career.

Programme Outcomes (POs)

a. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.


b. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.

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c. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within
realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and
safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
d. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
e. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
f. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
g. An ability to communicate effectively.
h. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a
global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
i. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
j. A knowledge of contemporary issues.
k. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for
engineering practice.

MAPPING OF Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) and PROGRAM


OUTCOMES (PO) FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Program Program Outcomes


educational j k
a b c d e f g h
Objectives i
I
II

III

Faculty Strength

The faculty in the department consists of doctorates, experienced Professors, Associate


Professors and Assistant Professors. An experienced System Administrator and well-qualified
programmers will conduct the Laboratories.

FACULTY LIST

S.NO NAME OF THE FACULTY Designation PHONE NO: E-mail


1 Dr.S.SREENATHA REDDY principal 8096609821 principal.gnit@gniindia.org
HOD &
2 Dr.B .VIJAYA KUMAR 8096609836 hodme.gnit@gniindia.org
Professor
3 Dr.V.SITARAM PRASAD Professor 9849329809 vsrprasad@yahoo.com
4 Dr.R.DHANASEKARAN Professor 9043793491 dhanagni@gmail.com
5 Mr.M. SRIHARI Asst Prof 9618272335 msrihari344@gmail.com
6 Mr. B.PRAVEEN KUMAR Asst Prof 8499993877 praveenbereddy@gmail.com
7 Mr. SK. HIMAM SAHEB Asst Prof 9949019555 himam.mech@gmail.com
8 Mr. A. VIJAY KUMAR Asst Prof 7036463491 vijaykumar.amicable@gmail.com
9 Mr. K.GOVARDHANA REDDY Asst Prof 8096039696 gova305@gmail.com
10 Mr. JAYANTH IVVALA Asst Prof 8978066556 ijayanth@outlook.com
11 Mr.K. DAYAKAR Asst Prof 9704121602 kolluru.dayakar@gmail.com
12 Mr.SK . AZGER PASHA Asst Prof 9553313925 azger.mecheng@gmail.com

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13 Mr. BASAVARAJA K.T Asst Prof 7075101218 basavaraj.kt5@gmail.com
14 Mr. MD.HAMEED Asst Prof 9440206860 mdhameed.mech@gmail.com
15 Mr. K. RAVI SANDEEP KUMAR Asst Prof 8099514020 konadeep@gmail.com
16 Mr. T. JAYA SRI RAM Asst Prof 9542630628 jayasriramt@gmail.com
17 Mr.M. SAMPATH KUMAR Asso. Prof 9948024576 loginsampath@gmail.com
18 Mr.A. YOGESH Asst Prof 9493037075 yogesh.avula@gmail.com
19 Mr. MARUTHI S.W Asst Prof 7204543401 maruti.sw@gmail.com
20 Mr.T.VENKATA RAMANA Asst Prof 9963376589 ramana302i@gmail.com
21 Mr.R.SATEESH KUMAR Asst Prof 9538574577 sateeshrevoor413@gmail.com
22 Mrs. SAKE VIJAYANIRMALA Asst Prof 9502646643 nirmala.vijji@gmail.com
23 Ms.M. SRAVANTHI Asst Prof 9490912468 mamidi.sravanthi91@gmail.com
24 Mr. N. RAMULU Asst Prof 9676431345 nenavathramulunaik@gmail.com
25 Mr. M.SREEDHAR Asst Prof 9041160436 madhanasreedhar@yahoo.com
26 Mr .Asit kumar parida Asst Prof 8895824689 asitkzone4u@gmail.com
27 Ms .V. PRAMILA Asst Prof 8008656437 salima342@gmail.com
28 Mr.P. JAYAKRISHNA Asst Prof 9491997264 jaya27by4@gmail.com
29 Mr.M.PRUTHVIRAJ Asst Prof 8496992434 psmudbi@gmail.com
30 Mr.SRINIVAS REDDY Asst Prof 7329838489 srinivasreddy.8619@gmail.com
31 Mr. S.SURESH Asst Prof 09986774711 suresh.rec74@gmail.com
32 Mr.PRADEEP.C Asst Prof 09036766959 ncp47@yahoo.com
33 Mr.VINOD ANGADI Asst Prof 8147720074 vin.angadi@gmail.com
34 Mr.KRISHNA KANTH.B Asst Prof 9590474101 bholekk@gmail.com
35 Mr. PRAVEEN.S Asst Prof 08147363630 prvns83@gmail.com
36 Mr.VIRAN KUMAR Asst Prof 8978645134 viranmec@gmail.com

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LIST OF NON TEACHING MEMBERS

Sl. No. Name of the Staff Designation


1 Mr. K Vidya sagar Lab Assistant
2 Mr. D Praveen Lab Assistant
3 Mr. V Sandeep Lab Assistant
4 Mr. V Bramhaiah Lab Assistant
5 Mr. Zafer ali khan Lab Assistant
6 Mr. S Naveen Kumar Lab Assistant
7 Mr. K Surya Narayana Lab Assistant
8 Mr. Krishna Murthy Lab Assistant

Course Calendar for the Semester (to be filled by the candidate)

S.No EVENT Duration


1 Conducting Workshop on 1 day
Advanced welding
2 Techniques for 2nd 3rd & 4th
years
3 Seminars for all years 1 day
4 NSS program for all years 2 days
5 Industrial Visit 2 days
6 Guest Lecture 3 days

Procedures for Laboratories

a. Equipment in the lab for the use of student community. Students must use the
equipment with care. Any damage caused is punishable.
b. Students should carry their observation book along with the record book with
completed exercises/ calculations while attending the lab.
c. Students are supposed to occupy the experiment setup allotted to them and
maintain discipline in the lab.
d. Labs can be used in free time / lunch hours by the students with prior permission
from the lab in-charge.
e. 15 marks are awarded for continuous evaluation in the laboratory. Lab records
need to be submitted on or before date of submission

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III. MONITORING AND GUIDANCE

1. Student Feedback
In case the students find it difficult to cope up / understand a particular subject, they
are advised to discuss it with the concerned Teacher /The Class Teacher/Counselor/HOD/
Principal.
Students can use the suggestion boxes for communicating their problems. Necessary
action will be taken by the concerned authorities. If required, Principal/HOD will discuss the
student to solve the problems.

Class Teacher:

S. No. Name of The Mentor Class Mobile Number


1 Mr. MARUTHI S.W II MECH-A 7204543401
2 Mr.M.PRUTHVIRAJ II MECH-B 8496992434
3 Mr.A.YOGESH II MECH-C 9493037075
4 Mr.N.RAMULU III MECH-A 9676431345
5 Mr. PRAVEEN.S III MECH-B 08147363630
6 Mr.PRADEEP.C III MECH-C 09036766959
7 Mr. A.VIJAY KUMAR IV MECH-A 7036463491
8 Mr. S.SURESH IV MECH-B 9986774711

9 Mr.VINOD ANGADI IV MECH-C 8147720074

Counselor:
One counselor is assigned to a group of 30students. Students can directly discuss their
college related or personal problems related to academics with them. The Counselors are
accessible to the students and they can talk to them, whenever they are free from class / lab
work. Counselors will interact with the students once in a fortnight and discuss the progress.

Class Representatives and their role:


Two students from each class are selected as Class representatives from the
department based on their academic performance and discipline.

Responsibilities of the Class Representatives:


Communicating the departmental / college directives & information to the students.
Communicating the Problems faced by the students and also communicating the
suggestions for improvement.
Coordinating academic events and co-curricular activities.

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Encourage students to interact for better studies& sharing the knowledge and information.

II-Semester Class Representatives are:

Class/Section Roll No. Name of the student

II-A 16831A0330 Mr.Raj Kumar(B)


16831A0334 Ms.Sindhuja(G)
II-B 16831A03B0 Mr.P.Arshad Khan(B)
16831A364 G.Sathya Nandini(G)
II-C 16831A03F2 Mr.Samuel(B)
16831A03E4 Ms.Syed Nasreen Banu(G)
III-A 15831A0315 SURYA

III-B 15831A0369 SANTHOSH

III-C 15831A03E8 AKHIL

IV-A 14831A0328 K.SAIKIRAN

IV-B 14831A0393 M.MANOJ KUMAR

IV-C 14831A03D2 D.SHASHANK

Role of a class Teacher:


Ensuring the conduct of classes
Monitoring the students attendance
SMS, phone calls to the parents and interacting with parents
Class Discipline
Arranging extra classes for coverage of syllabus
Ensuring the conduct of special tests, remedial classes for slow learners
Communicating the students attendance, Mid marks, special test marks,
attendance of Remedial classes etc.

Role of the Counselors

Talk to the student at least once in a fortnight

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Updating the counseling book
Problems of the student may be discussed with the concerned
faculty/mentor/HOD
Identify the strengths , weakness and motivate the student
Counselors will evaluate the student individually for the following:

a. Less marks in Internal exams


b. Continuous Absence (3 days)
c. Not understanding the subject
d. Students from Telugu medium
e. Assistance for back log subjects etc.

2. Special Tests:
Two Special tests will be conducted for students before the mid exams to improve
their performance in the mid examinations. If any student is not performed, he/she will be
asked to attend the re-exam to ensure the understanding of the subject. If required the teacher
will guide the student in the subject.

3. Remedial classes:
Remedial classes will be conducted for students who are academically weak and who
do not perform well in their internal examinations and special class tests.
4. Backlog Management
The Class Teacher maintains a complete record of Examination results of each student
and they counsel and guide them in preparing for backlogs. Students are provided with
material and important questions are discussed.

5. Correspondence with Parents


Parents will be informed about the performance of their ward from time to time during
the course period, however parents are advised to contact class Teacher / Department Head
periodically.

6. NPTEL Classes
Department conducts NPTEL classes with Technical DVDs as virtual/visual classes
through faculties from IITS, NITS and IIITS

PROGRAM: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

COURSE : OPERATIONS RESEARCH


COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The Students should be able to:
1. Know various applications of Operation research.
2. Apply fundamental concepts of operation research to day to day problems.

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3. Understand linear programming methods and their practical application.
4. Apply various assignment problems like transportation, travelling-salesman problems.
5. Understand the game theory applications.
6. Understand dynamic programming problems.
7. Apply simulation methods to industrial problems.
8. Understand the importance of inventory control applications.

COURSE OUTCOMES:
a. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the principles of operation research, and its
application.
b. Students will able to understand interdisciplinary nature and orientation of the subject.
c. Students will demonstrate an ability to apply the principles of linear programming methods.
d. An ability to apply methods of assignment problems, transportation, travelling salesmen
problems.
e. Understand how to apply game theory applications.
f. An ability to use the techniques of dynamic programming, simulation methods.
g. An ability to use the inventory concepts to the practical problems.

MAPPING OF THE COURSE OBJECTIVES WITH THE COURSE OUTCOMES

Course Outcomes
Course
Objectives
a b c d e f g
1 x

2 x
3 x
4 x
5 x x
6
7 x
8 x

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JNTUH-SYLLABUS:

13
Lesson Plan

Book 1 Operations Research / S.D.Sharma-Kedarnath

Book 2 Introduction to O.R/Hiller & Libermann (TMH).


Book 3 Operations Research / R.Pannerselvam,PHI Publications.

Chapters Nos No of
Unit Topic
Book 1 Book 2 Book 3 classes
Development Definition
I 1 1 8
Characteristics and Phases, Allocation

II TRANSPORTATION PROBLEM 2 3 7

II ASSIGNMENT PROBLEM 3 3 7

III SEQUENCING 4 5 7

III REPLACEMENT 5 5 7

IV THEORY OF GAMES 6 6 7

IV INVENTORY 7 7

V WAITING LINES 7 6

14
V DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING 8 7 7

V SIMULATION 8 7

Contact classes for syllabus coverage 70

Lectures beyond the syllabus 3

Special descriptive tests 2

Tutorial classes & Remedial classes 5

Total Classes 80

Micro lesson plan


Sl.No Name of the Topic to be covered Number of Cumulative no Date of
periods of periods Completion
Required required
Unit No I

01 Development Definition Characteristics and 1 1


Phases Types of models
02 operation Research models 1 2
applications.
03 ALLOCATION : Linear Programming Problem 1 3
Formulation
04 Graphical solution 1 4

05 Simplex method 2 6

06 1 7
Artificial variables techniques
07 Twophase method 1 8

08 Big-M method. 1 9

09 Duality Principle 1 10

Unit No II
07 TRANSPORTATION PROBLEM Formulation 2 12
Optimal solution,
08 unbalanced transportation problem 2 14
Degeneracy.
09 Assignment problem Formulation Optimal 2 16
solution -
10 Variants of Assignment Problem- 2 18

15
Traveling Salesman problem.

Unit No III

11 SEQUENCING Introduction Flow Shop 2 20


sequencing n jobs through two machines

13 n jobs through three machines 1 21

Job shop sequencing two jobs 1 22


throughmmachines.

14 REPLACEMENT : Introduction Replacement of 2 24


items that deteriorate with time when money value
is not counted and counted
15 Replacement of items that fail completely 1 25

group replacement. 1 26

Unit No IV

16 . THEORY OF GAMES : Introduction Minimax 2 28


(maximin) Criterion and optimal strategy
17 Solution of games with saddle points Rectangular 2 30
games without saddle points
18 2 X 2 games 2 32

19 dominance principle 2 34

20 m X 2 & 2 X n games 2 36

21 graphical method 2 38

22 INVENTORY : Introduction Single item 2 40


Deterministic models
23 Purchase inventory models with one 2 42
price break and multiple price breaks shortages are
not allowed

24 Stochastic models demand may be 2 44


discrete variable or continuous variable
25 Instantaneous production. Instantaneous demand 2 46
continuous
demand and no set up cost.
Unit No V

26 WAITING LINES : Introduction Single Channel 3 49


Poisson arrivals exponential service times with
infinite population and finite population models

16
27 Multichannel Poisson arrivals exponential 3 52
service times
with infinite population single channel Poisson
arrivals
28 DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING : Introduction 3 55
Bellmans Principle of optimality.

29 Applications of dynamic 3 58
programming- capital budgeting problem
30 shortest path problem 3 61

31 linear programming problem 3 64

32 SIMULATION : Definition Types of simulation 6 70


models
Contact classes for syllabus coverage 70

Lectures beyond the syllabus 3

Special descriptive tests 2

Tutorial classes & Remedial classes 5

Total Classes 80

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Assignments -- Unit 1
Use the graphical method to solve the following LP Problem
Maximize Z = 2 x1 + 3 x2
subject to the constraints
x1 + x2 30
1. x2 3
x212
x1 20
x1 - x2 0
x1; x20.
Solve the following LP Problem by two phase method
Minimize Z = x1 - 2x2 -3x3
subject to the constraints
2.
-2x1 + x2 +3x3 = 2
2x1 + 3x2 + 4x3 =1
x1, x2 , x3 0.
Solve the following LPP by penalty Method
Maximize Z = x1 + 2x2 + 3x3 - x4
subject to the constraints
x1 + 2x2 + 3x3 = 15
3.
2x1 + x2 +5 x3=20
x1 + 2x2 + x3 + x4 = 10
x1, x2, x3, x4 0.
Explain the various applications of OR.
4.
What are the advantages and limitations of OR?
5.

Unit 2

Determine the Optimum basic feasible solution to the following Transportation problem.

1.

2.
18 the optimal.
Check if the following assignment is optimal. If not find
Optimize the following Transportation Problem.

3.

Five lectures have to deal a subject common to five different branches of engineering. Due to understanding level
of the branches and the efficiency of lecture, the probable number of periods of 45 minutes required for each
lecturer is given in the following matrix. A particular lecturer, namely, Mrs. Aparna refuses to go to CSE branch
and IT students do not accept Mr. Prasad. Obtain an optimal arrangement.

4.

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Solve the transportation problem given in table

5.

Unit 3
A computer contains 10,000 resistors. When any resistor fails, it is replaced.
The cost of replacing a resistor individually is Re.1 only. If all the resistors
are replaced at the same time, the cost per resistor would be reduced to 35
paise. The percentage of surviving resistors say S(t) at the end of month and
the probability p(t) of failure during the month t are given in the table below.
1.

What is the optimal replacement plan?


Explain the four elements that characterize a sequencing problem.
2.
Find the sequence that minimizes the total elapsed time (in hours) required to
complete the following tasks. Each job is processed in the order ACB

3.

Write a short notes on the capital equipment replacement.


4.
Six jobs go _rst over machine I and then over II. The order of the completion
5. of jobs has no signi_cance. The following table gives the machine times in
hours for six jobs and the two machines.

20
Unit 4
Define:
i. Competitive game;
ii. Pure strategies;
1.
iii. Mixed strategies
iv. Two-person zero-sum (or rectangular) game,
v. Payoff matrix.
Player A and B, each take out one or two matches and guess how many
matches the opponent has taken. If one of the players guesses correctly, then
2. the loser to pay him as many rupees as the sum of the number held by both
players. Otherwise, the pay out is zero. Write down the payoff matrix and
obtain the optimal strategies of both players.
Which competitive situation is called a game?
3.
Obtain the optimal strategies for both players and the value of the game for
two-person zero-sum game whose payoff matrix is given in table

4.

Obtain the strategies for both players and the value of the game for two-person
5.
zero-sum game whose payoff matrix is given in table

21
A person repairing radios finds that the time spent on the radio sets has an
exponential distribution with mean 20 minutes. If the radios are repaired in
the order in which they come in and their arrival is approximately Poisson with
6.
an average rate of 15 for 8-hour day, what is the repairman's expected idle
time in each day? How many jobs are ahead of the average set just brought
in ?
Discuss about Kendal's Notation for queuing models.
7
A telephone exchange has two long distance call operators. The telephone company
finds that during the peak load, long distance calls arrive in a Poisson fashion at an
average rate of 15 per hour. The length of service on these calls is approximately
8 exponentially distributed with mean length 5 minutes.
(a) What is the probability that subscriber will have to wait for his long distance
call during the peak hours of the day?
(b) If the subscribers will wait and serviced in turn, what is the expected waiting time?
The arrivals at a telephone booth are considered to be following Poisson process
with an average time of 10 minutes between one arrival and the next. Length of the
9. phone call is assumed to be distributed exponentially with a mean of 3 minutes.
(a) What is the probability that a person arriving at the booth will have to wait?
(b) What is the average length of queue that forms from time to time?
A T.V. repairman finds that the time spent on his jobs have an exponential distribution with mean of 30 minutes. If
he repairs sets in the order in which they come in, and if the arrival of sets is approximately Poisson distribution
10.
with an average rate of 10 per 8 hour day, what is repairmen's expected idle time each day? How many jobs are
ahead of the average set just brought in?
Unit 5
The manager of a company manufacturing car parts has entered into a contract of
supplying 1000 numbers per day of a particular part to a car manufacturer. He
finds that his plant has a capacity of producing 2000 numbers per day of the part.
1. The cost of the part is Rs.50. Cost of holding stock is 12% per annum and set up
cost per production run is Rs.100. What should be run size for each production
run and total optimum cost/month? How frequently should production runs be
made? Shortage is not permissible.
A newspaper boy buys papers for 3 paisa and sells them for 7 paisa each. He can
not return unsold newspapers. Daily demand has the following distribution.
2. If each day's demand is independent of the previous day's, how many papers should
he order each day?
No.of 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

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Customers
Probability 0.01 0.03 0.06 0.10 0.20 0.25 0.15 0.1 0.05 0.05
Derive the expression for EOQ of Wilson Harris Inventory Model. A company uses 10000 units per year of an
item. The purchase price is Rs. 1 per item. Ordering cost is Rs. 25 per order. Carrying cost per year is 12% of the
3.
inventory value. Find EOQ and the number of orders per year. If the lead time is 4 weeks and assuming 50
working weeks per year, find the reorder point.
Discuss various selective Inventory control techniques used in stores management and compare them. A certain
item costs Rs. 235 per ton. The monthly requirement is 5 tons and each time the stock is replenished, there is a set-
4.
up cost of Rs. 1,000. The cost of carrying inventory has been estimated at 10% of the value of the stock per year.
What is the optimum order quantity?
Distinguish between P-System and Q-System of inventories with examples. A Company uses 24000 units of a raw
material which costs Rs. 12.50 per unit. Placing each order costs Rs. 22.50 and the carrying cost is 5.4% per year of
5.
the average inventory. Find the economic order quantity and the total inventory cost (Including the cost of the
material)

Solve the following LPP by dynamic programming:


Maximize Z = 50x1 + 100x2; Subject to
2x1 + 3x2 48,
6.
x1 + 3x2 42,
x1 + x2 21,
x1, x2 0.
Use Bellman's principle of optimality to find the optimum solution to the following
problem:
Minimize Z = y2+ y2+ y3
7.
Subject to the constraints
y1+y2+y3 15
y1, y2, y3 0.
Solve the following LPP by dynamic programming:
Maximize Z = 8x1+7x2
Subject to
8.
2x1+x2 8;
5x1+2x2 5;
x1, x2 0.
Maximize Z = 3x1+5x2
Subject to
x1 4
9. x2 6;
3x1+2x2 18
x1, x2 0.
Solve the problem using dynamic programming method.
A medical representative located at city 1 has to travel to city 10. He knows the distance of alternative routes from
10. city 1 to city 10. Find shortest possible route. Also find the shortest routes from any city to city 10. The possible
routes and corresponding distances are as given below.
From City To city Corresponding Distance in km
1 2,3,4 4, 6, 3
2 5,6,7 7, 10, 5
3 5,6,7 3, 8, 4

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4 5,6,7 6, 10, 5
5 8,9 4, 8
6 8,9 3, 7
7 8,9 8, 4
8 10 7
9 10 9

Discuss about simulation models and significance.


11.
What are the advantages of simulation? Explain Monte-Carlo simulation.
12.
How can simulation help to optimize the inventory?
13.
Define simulation. Explain about applications of simulation in various situations.
14.
Explain about simulation. Discuss about limitations of simulation.
15.

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