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Standards-Aligned Lesson Plan Template

Subject(s): _Figurative Language______________________________ Grade: __6th ______

Teacher(s): _Chelsea Griffith________________ School: __Killybrooke______ Date:__4-6-17___


Part I GOALS AND STANDARDS (TPE3.1)
1. Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.5a
Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context.

2. State Content Standard Addressed (History/Social Science, Science, Physical Education, Visual and Performing Arts):

3. ELD Standard Addressed: (include Part I, II; Communicative Modes A. Collaborative, B. Interpretive, C. Productive; and Proficiency Level
addressing Emerging, Expanding, Bridging)

ELD.Pi.B.6.8.EX.
Analyzing language choices Explain how phrasing, different words with similar meaning (e.g., describing a character as stingy versus
economical), or figurative language (e.g., The room was like a dank cave, littered with food wrappers, soda cans, and piles of laundry)
produce shades of meaning and different effects on the audience.

4. Learning Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?) STUDENT-FRIENDLY TRANSLATION

Students will be able to use and illustrate onomatopoeia in context. You will be able to use and illustrate
Blooms- create onomatopoeia in context.

5. Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are STUDENT-FRIENDLY TRANSLATION
these outcomes essential for future learning?)(TPE1.3) Figurative language is a writing tool
Students need to learn about the different types of figurative language because they are a set of that adds special effects to different
tools that writers use to go beyond the literal meaning of a word or phrase. It adds special effects to types of writing.
types of writing. Students need to be able to identify figurative language in context and to
understand its purpose of being used.
6. Essential Questions (TPE1.5):
What is the purpose of figurative language?
What is onomatopoeia?
How can I use onomatopoeia in the real world?
Part II STUDENTS INFORMATION (TPE1.1,3.2)
7. Class Information:

a. Total number - There are 28 students from the ages of 11-12 in this class. 11 boys and 17 girls.
b. English Learners/Standard English Learners There are ten students that are English only students. There are seven students that
have been reclassified as English only students. There are eleven students that are currently classified as English learners. There
are four students that are at the CELDT level Intermediate. There are six students at the CELDT level Early Advanced. There is one
student at the CLEDT level of Advanced.
c. Students with Special Needs There are two students who have IEPs in this class. These two students are pulled out of the
classroom every day to work in a different classroom with the schools specialist. Both students are diagnosed with Special
Learning Disability. Both of these students are English Language Learners at the Intermediate CELDT level. The first student is a
female and she spends each day during ELA and the afternoon with the specialist. She has a low IQ level and learning goals that
are set for her to make improvements rather than meeting grade level standards. This students IEP requests that she is able to
have longer time to complete her assignments, and is able to take her work to the specialists classroom to complete it there. The
second student spends the same amount of time with the specialist and has been making major improvements with his reading
level. His reading level is still below grade level but is working hard to make those improvements. His IEP requests that he works
towards meeting his learning goals and is given extra amount of time for tests and assignments. He misses a lot of class time but
takes assignments with him to complete in the other classroom,
d. Academic language abilities, content knowledge and skills in content area - Students are familiar with different types of figurative
language from previous lessons in lower grade levels. This is the fourth lesson in the unit of Figurative Language. Students have
already learned about similes, metaphors, and personification.
e. Linguistic background There are fifteen students that are able to speak and understand Spanish fluently. There are two students
that are able to speak and understand Vietnamese fluently. There is one student that is able to understand Vietnamese but not
speak it fluently. There are ten students that only speak English.
f. Cultural background (home/family) There are fifteen students that have a Hispanic cultural background. There are three students
that have a Vietnamese cultural background. There are ten students that have a White cultural background.
g. Health considerations (if any) There is one student that wears a hearing aid in her left ear. She brings extra batteries with her to
school and there are batteries in the health office if she needs to exchange them during school. There are two students who have a
vision impairment and where there glasses inside and outside the classroom.
h. Physical development factors that may influence instruction in this academic content area According to ASCDs Developmental
Characteristics of Children and Youth, students at this age have an improved motor development and coordination, especially for
boys, who excel in physical achievement. Girls are at their adolescent peak for growing, which may result in awkwardness in
handling the rapid body change. I have seen this with the boys in my class and how they are eager to do any type of physical
activity and often are upset if they have to miss P.E.
i. Social development factors that may influence instruction in this academic content area According to ASCDs Developmental
Characteristics of Children and Youth, peers become a source of behavior standards and models and team games are popular.
These students need opportunities to make decisions and their interest in the opposite sex begins to intensify, I have seen this
with my students that they tend to act the same way their groups of friends are acting inside and outside of the classroom. They
are also spending more time talking with the opposite sex and making nonverbal ques like playing with the other persons feet
under the tables during class.
j. Emotional development factors that may influence instruction in this academic content area According to ASCDs Developmental
Characteristics of Children and Youth, students between the ages of 11-13, tend to lack self-confidence, shy, and worries about
others opinions about themselves. Students are sometimes unpredictable with their emotions and physical changes result in
great emotional stress. Some of my students present a lack of self-confidence and second-guess their answers when participating
in lessons. These students often start their response to the whole class discussion with, Im not sure if I am right, or I think I did
this wrong, but I have not personally experience any students having distracting emotional stress inside or outside of the
classroom that was not expected of the students age.
k. Interests/Aspirations (relevant to this academic area) - Students are interested in having the upcoming week off for spring break.
They are very athletic, and most students play soccer together during recess. Students also play soccer, dance, baseball, and
softball outside of school. Half of the students are participating in the schools talent show the last day before spring break. These
students are performing skits and working hard on their props and practice these last couple of days leading up to the talent
show.
8. Anticipated Difficulties (Based on the information above, what difficulties do you think students may have with the content? Please specify
anticipated difficulties for English Learners, Standard English Learners, and/or students with special needs. )):
ELLs
May struggle with creating an illustration of an onomatopoeia word.
May struggle with creating a comic strip using onomatopoeia words (at least 2 different ones)

Special Needs
May struggle with working with certain people in groups
May struggle with staying focused during the lesson

Social/Emotional
May struggle with staying on task
Part III - LESSON ADAPTATIONS (TPE3.5,4.4)
9. Modifications/Accommodations (What specific modifications/accommodations are you going to make based on the anticipated difficulties? Ex:)
Please specify modifications/accommodations for English Learners, Standard English Learners, and/or students with special needs. )

ELLs
Students are paired with a partner/small group of students that will support them in completing the task.
Students are given examples via PowerPoint of different types of illustrations using onomatopoeia.

Special Needs
Students are placed with appropriate partners/small group that will keep them on task
Students will be engaged in the material because it is about comic book strips
Students will be able to express their creativity in their illustrations and comic book strips.

Social/Emotional
Students will be engaged in the material because it is about comic book strips
Students will be able to express their creativity in their illustrations and comic book strips.
10. 21st Century Skills Circle all that are applicable

Communication Collaboration Creativity Critical Thinking

Describe how the 21st century skill(s) you have circled will be observed during the lesson (TPE1.5,3.3):

Communication: Students will work together with their groups to discuss, plan, and identify onomatopoeia in interactive activities.
Collaboration: Students will work together with their groups to discuss, plan, and identify onomatopoeia in interactive activities.
Creativity: Students will create their own illustration using onomatopoeia.
Critical Thinking: Students will create their own comic book strip using onomatopoeia.

11. Technology - How will you incorporate technology into your lesson? (TPE4.4, 4.8)
PowerPoint
Document Camera
12. Visual and Performing Arts How will you provide the students with opportunities to access the curriculum by incorporating the visual and
performing arts? (TPE1.7)
Students will create a comic strip using illustrations and captions to illustrate the use of onomatopoeia.

Part IV - ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING (TPE1.8,5.1)


13. Assessment Criteria for Success: (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in
a successful product/process? What does success on this lessons outcomes look like?)

a. Formative:

b. Summative (if applicable):


Students comic book strip and partner illustration.
c. Attach rubric here (and copy and paste your objective above your rubric):

4 3 2 1
Used two or more Used two onomatopoeia Used one onomatopoeia Used zero-one
onomatopoeia words in words in context but it words in context and it onomatopoeia words in
Onomatopoeia Words context that makes sense. does not make sense, The makes sense, The context but it does not
The onomatopoeia words onomatopoeia words onomatopoeia wordsmake sense, The
match the cartoons match the cartoons do not match the onomatopoeia words does
description. description. cartoons description.
not match the cartoons
description.
Illustration of assigned Illustration of assigned Illustration of assigned Illustration of assigned
Partner Illustration onomatopoeia word is onomatopoeia word is onomatopoeia word is onomatopoeia word is not
clear and matches the not as clear or matching not correct. complete and student did
sound. the sound. not participate.
d. How do you plan to involve all students in self-assessment and reflection on their learning goals and progress? (TPE5.3)

Part V - INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURE


14. Instructional Method: Circle one Direct Instruction Inquiry Cooperative Learning

15. Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)
PowerPoint
Examples of Comic strip
Paper for illustration
Examples of illustrations
Document Camera
Onomatopoeia words for each group
Comic strip illustration

16. Procedure (Include estimated times. Please write a detailed procedure, including questions that you are planning to ask.):
OPEN:

(5 mins)
Open with displaying the question via PowerPoint, What do you think you know about Onomatopoeia?
Allow students 30-60 seconds to answer the question on a piece of paper before collecting it.
Then ask whole class to have a few students share out what they already knew about onomatopoeia.

Change slide to display the objective; You will be able to use and illustrate onomatopoeia in context.
BODY:

(15-mins)
Provide students with the definition of Onomatopoeia via PowerPoint
(When a words pronunciation imitates its sound.)
Discuss the visuals (Boom! Splat! And Boink!)

Play the 40-second video of other examples of onomatopoeia words.

Change slide to one that says, Where do we see onomatopoeia?


Discuss with class where in the real world we see onomatopoeia.
Have students discuss with a partner to see if they can think of a different place or specific example they have seen an onomatopoeia word.
Allow students time to discuss then call on a few students to share with the whole class.

Change slide to display examples and what noises they make.


Discuss all of the examples and when they are used. For example: Honk would be used if you were talking about something related to a car.
We will discuss what the purpose/effect of this type of figurative language does to writing.

(5-10 mins)
Change slide to display directions for the illustration.
Explain direction to students.
Preview examples: of sheep, rooster, and basketball hoop
Ask if there are any questions before handing out words.
Then, hand out the assigned word to each pair/small group along with a paper to illustrate on.
Start the timer.

(5-10 mins)
When the timer goes off, ask students to put away the colored pencils and pencils and listen as each group shares what they drew.
Display each groups illustration and discuss as a whole class.
When finished, change to the next slide.
Ask the class to turn and tell their partner the definition of onomatopoeia,
(allow them to explain to their partners)
Ask for a volunteer to share with the whole class the definition before moving on.

(5 mins)
Next, I will display examples of comic strips that include onomatopoeia words.
We will discuss what the purpose/effect of this type of figurative language does to writing.
Then I will change the slide. I will explain the independent practice that students will be doing. Students will create a comic strip that
includes at least 2 onomatopoeia words. I will refer back to the examples shown. I will ask for any questions.

CLOSE:
(10 mins)
Students will complete their own comic book strip independently.

Marzanos 9 Strategies: (4) Homework and Practice, (5) Non-Linguistic Representations, (6) Cooperative Learning
Part VI REFLECTION (TPE6.1)
1. Please include your rubric data here. Include 5 student work samples low, medium, high, EL, & Student with Special Needs. On student
work samples, please include scores according to rubric categories

4 3 2 1
Used two or more Used two onomatopoeia Used one onomatopoeia Used zero-one
onomatopoeia words in words in context but it words in context and it onomatopoeia words in
Comic Strip context that makes sense. does not make sense, The makes sense, The context but it does not
The onomatopoeia words onomatopoeia words onomatopoeia words make sense, The
match the cartoons match the cartoons do not match the onomatopoeia word does
description. description. cartoons description. not match the cartoons
description.
Illustration of assigned Illustration of assigned Illustration of assigned Illustration of assigned
Partner Illustration onomatopoeia word is onomatopoeia word is onomatopoeia word is onomatopoeia word is not
clear and matches the not as clear or matching not correct. complete and student did
sound. the sound. not participate.

Student Comic Strip Partner/ Small Total


Group Illustration
(Med) Jason 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Marian Absent
Sebastian 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Nicole 3 4 7/8 (88%)
Melissa 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Carlos 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Antonio 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Genesis 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Makaila 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Jenny 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Cesar Absent
Breezy 4 4 8/8 (100%)
(High) Kyra 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Brianna 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Aaron 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Kimberly 4 4 8/8 (100%)
(ELL) Emy 3 4 7/8 (88%)
Liliana 4 4 8/8 (100%)
(SN) Julia 3 4 7/8 (88%)
Jordan 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Evan 4 4 8/8 (100%)
(Low) Jayden 2 4 6/8 (75%)
Julianna 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Daniela 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Lucas 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Konnor 4 4 8/8 (100%)
Riley 3 4 7/8 (88%)
Isabelle 4 4 8/8 (100%)

21/26= 4 26/26= 4 21/26= 100%


4/26= 3 4/26= 88%
1/26= 2 1/26= 75%
0/26= 1

2. Were the students successful at achieving the lesson objective?


a) If so, explain which areas in which students were successful, according to your data analysis.
Students were successful at achieving the lesson objective based off the data analysis. According to the date 21/26 (81%) of students
earned 100% on both the comic strip and their partner illustration of an onomatopoeia word. The data also shows that 4/26 (15%) of
students earned 88% overall on their comic strip and partner/small group illustration.
Students would earn a 4 for their partner illustration if they actively participated, explained the illustration correctly, and the illustration
matches the assigned onomatopoeia word. Each small group/partner were assigned different onomatopoeia words to avoid groups
repeating the same words and from copying the examples provided. Partners/small groups were strategically placed to encourage students
full participation and support needed for some of the English language learners and other students that struggle in this area. The data
provides evidence that all students (26/26 100%) were able to achieve the lesson objective with the partner/small group illustration by
earning a 4/4.
Students would earn a 4 for their independent comic strip if they used two or more onomatopoeia words that match the illustrations and
completed at least the 5 out of 6 boxes provided. The data provides evidence that 21/26 (81%) of students achieved the learning objective of
this lesson. These students clearly illustrated two or more onomatopoeia words that makes sense. Students that earned a 3 for this activity
either used one onomatopoeia word and used 5 out of the 6 boxes provided. The data provides evidence that 4/26 (15%) of students
achieved the learning objective of this lesson. These students did not use two onomatopoeia words in their comic strip.
b) If not, explain which areas in which students were not successful, according to your data analysis. Why do you think they were not able
to achieve the lesson objective in these areas?
There was one student who earned 75% overall on his comic strip and partner illustration. The one student that earned 50% on his comic
strip failed to complete the assignment. He used one word in his comic strip instead of using two in context. However, this student was
successful in achieving the learning goal during the lesson while working with his small group to create an illustration. This student was
actively participating during this activity and did not have any questions regarding the directions for the comic strip independent activity.
3. What instructional strategies did you use to help students achieve the lesson objective? Which subject-specific pedagogical skills did you
employ to help students be successful? (Reference TPE Part 2: Subject-Specific Pedagogy)
The first instructional strategy I used in this lesson was activating students prior knowledge. This was done when students wrote down
what they thought they already knew about onomatopoeia. Then students shared with a partner what they wrote down and then shared
whole class. This class discussion reminded students the purpose of figurative language and what elements of figurative language they have
already learned in this unit. Sharing with their partners helped them gain some insight if some students did not have prior experience with
the word onomatopoeia. The second instructional strategy I used in this lesson was that students were provided with opportunities to
develop oral communication and interpersonal skills. Throughout the lesson, students were asked to share their thoughts with a
partner/small group and then to share with the whole class. Students were also asked to work with a partner/small groups to illustrate an
assigned onomatopoeia word. Then students were asked to explain their illustration to the class. These activities help develop oral
communication and interpersonal skills. The third instructional strategy I used in this lesson was the use of academic language and making
language comprehensible to students. This was done through multiple means of representation. The academic language that was
emphasized in this lesson was the correct use of the word onomatopoeia. When students presented their partner illustrations, students
began by saying, Our onomatopoeia word was, _____. In whole class discussions students were encouraged and applied the use of the
academic language. This academic language was clearly defined, described, and illustrated for students to comprehend. Plenty of examples of
words and illustrations via PowerPoint to provide students with multiple means of explanations. The fourth instructional strategy I used in
this lesson was providing students with a print rich environment. There is a wall in the classroom that is designed around this figurative
language unit. This wall includes the definitions and examples of the figurative language elements they have already learned (simile,
metaphor, and personification). The fifth instructional strategy I used in this lesson was that all instructional materials were appropriate to
the interests and abilities of my students. The partner work and independent activity was interactive and engaging because students were
working together to create an illustration that represents the onomatopoeia word. This kept students interested because it gave them a
chance to express their understanding through illustration and allowed them to show their creativity. Then students were interested in the
independent activity to be able to make a comic strip that uses any two or more onomatopoeia words. It was clear that all students were
interested in these activities.
4. What would you change about the lesson and why (according to your data analysis)?
After reflecting on the data from the lesson, discussing the lesson with both my master teacher and university advisor, there are a few things
I would have changed about the lesson. One thing I would change is that I would have incorporated some type of audio clips that made
sounds where students would answer what onomatopoeia word represents the sound that is heard. This was a suggestion from my
university supervisor after the lesson. This would have been a great addition to the lesson to ask students to identify the onomatopoeia word
that matched the sound they heard.
The second thing I would change is to allow for more time for students to complete the partner illustration and to present on it. Initially, I
thought that eight minutes would be enough for my students to complete an illustration after discussing what to draw. Students were given
two minutes to plan their illustration before the eight minutes started. Students were actively participating and it seemed that they could
have used an extra 5 minutes to present their best illustration. The third thing I would change would be to add to the independent
assignment in a way to involve their parents. To do this, students would be assigned to ask a parent if they know what onomatopoeia was
and to record their responses. Then to explain to their parents what they learned the word was. Then to come up with three examples of
onomatopoeia words they have used before. This would be a great opportunity to involve parents in the students learning and to help build
an experience with this type of figurative language for my students. The last thing I would change add a class what do you think you know
chart that we would return to at the end of the class to add what they have learned. The beginning of the lesson started with a discussion of
what students already might know about onomatopoeia and if I recorded our discussion and responses on chart paper, it would have been
effective to revisit it at the end of the lesson. I would ask students what they now know about onomatopoeia and add it to a column on the
same chart paper. This would support students and ELLs with furthering their understanding at the end of the lesson.

Classroom Lessons ONLY: After presenting your lesson in your BST classroom, please review and reflect on student work related to this lesson.
Make copies of student work for levels of high, middle, low, EL, and Student with Special Needs, and write your comments on the copies.

HIGH COMIC STRIP


HIGH PARTNER/SMALL GROUP ILLUSTRAION