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23rd Anniversary

c o m i t é

m e s d e l a
n o v i e m b r e

h e r e n c i a p u e r t o r r i q u e ñ a
COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE
WOULD LIKE TO EXTEND IS SINCEREST GRATITUDE TO THE SPONSORS AND SUPPORTERS OF
PUERTO RICAN HERITAGE MONTH 2009

CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK


AMER HOTEL/INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS GROUP

NEILSEN MEDIA RESEARCH


1199 SEIU
IPRO HEALTH CARE QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

HOSTOS COMMUNITY COLLEGE NBC4/TELEMUNDO


SANOFI-AVENTIS LEHMAN COLLEGE
CON EDISON BETTER LIVING NOW
EL DIARIO/ LA PRENSA NYU MEDICAL CENTER
BRONX LEBANON HOSPITAL CENTER LINCOLN MEDICAL & MENTAL HEALTH CENTER
UNITED FEDERATION OF TEACHERS NYS UNITED TEACHERS, NYSUT
COLGATE PALMOLIVE BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB
ST. BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER INSTITUTE FOR THE PUERTO RICAN/HISPANIC
GOYA FOODS, INC. ELDERLY
ASPIRA OF NEW YORK

MEMBER AGENCIES
INSTITUTE FOR THE PUERTO RICAN/HISPANIC ELDERLY
ASPIRA OF NEW YORK
EL CENTRO DE ESTUDIOS PUERTORRIQUEÑOS
EL MUSEO DEL BARRIO
EUGENIO MARÍA DE HOSTOS COMMUNITY COLLEGE
LATINOJUSTICE – PRLDEF
NATIONAL CONGRESS FOR PUERTO RICAN RIGHTS - JUSTICE COMMITTEE
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LATINO POLICY
PROMESA
PUERTO RICO FEDERAL AFFAIRS ADMINISTRATION

PUERTO RICAN HERITAGE MONTH FISCAL AGENCY


INSTITUTE FOR THE PUERTO RICAN/HISPANIC ELDERLY
105 EAST 22ND STREET
NEW YORK, NY 10010
(212) 677-4181; (212) 777-5106 (FAX)
WW.COMITENOVIEMBRE.ORG

SPECIAL THANKS TO: JAIME BELLO, LUIS CORDERO, HENRY CRUZ, SULIEKA CABRERA DRINANE, WAL-
LACE EDGECOMBE, ANGELO FALCON, MARTHA LAUREANO, MARIA T. MATOS, TERESA A. SANTIAGO,
ANGEL SANTINI, AND LILI SANTIAGO SILVA

© 2009 COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE


ARTWORK BY: ARNALDO ALICEA
LAYOUT: LUIS CORDERO, CEMIUNDERGROUND
PHOTOGRAPHY: DEBORAH URBAEZ & ROBERT FIGUEROA
EDITOR: TERESA SANTIAGO
23rd Anniversary
c o m i t é

m e s d e l a h e r e n c i a
n o v i e m b r e

MESSAGE ON BEHALF OF COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE


p u e r t o r r i q u e ñ a

For the past 23 years, Comité Noviembre, CN has been celebrating Puerto Rican Heritage Month in this country. A non-
profit organization dedicated to commemorating and acknowledging the contributions Puerto Ricans have made to this city,
state and nation. CN is composed of ten of the oldest and most prestigious Puerto Rican organizations: the Institute for the
Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, ASPIRA of New York, el Museo del Barrio, Eugenio María de Hostos Community College,
el Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueños, the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration, the National Institute for Latino
Policy, the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights – Justice Committee, PROMESA and LatinoJustice PRLDEF. This
volunteer coordinating body plans and promotes CN’s annual programs and events.

The charge of CN is to create awareness of our rich culture, language, and heritage and to acknowledge and take ownership
of it everyday but specifically during the month of November. The annual theme is developed with the understanding that
beyond celebrating our heritage, it must help to motivate, mobilize and empower our community around critical concerns.
This year’s theme: Puertorriqueño… de nuestras raíces nace un pueblo, speaks to the strong foundation of the Puerto
Rican community around the world, of our perseverance, ingenuity, pride and achievements. The theme explores and ex-
amines our unique ancestral roots and the very fabric that makes us Puerto Rican. It calls for us to take ownership of our
culture and heritage to promote and protect it. Everyday as a community, we contribute to the development and success of
this city, state and nation. The artistic rendition of our theme by artist Arnaldo Alicea of Comerio, Puerto Rico, captures the
essence of our message and clearly expresses the stronghold our roots have that bridges our two communities and celebrates
and acknowledges that aqui y alla, somos todos puertorriqueños – un pueblo.

CN is thrilled that historian and author Jesús Omar Rivera, affectionately known as El Boricuazo will be our 2009 Spokes-
person, gala honoree and will conduct his acclaimed show for the first time in New York, Puertorriqueñidad…Defendiendo
nuestra imagen on Saturday, November 14, 2009 at Hostos Community College. Please join us. I assure you that you will
experience a “Boricuazo” moment that you will remember for the rest of your life. His enthusiasm, energy and love for all
things Puerto Rican is contagious. He will leave you with a renewed sense of self, pride, determination and a challenge to
go forth and teach others.

This journal also carries interesting, cultural, political and educational information that we hope will be of interest to you.
We pride ourselves in being able to discuss all aspects and issues of our community – with respect, objectivity and pride.
The articles include: (1) “Boricuas in New York City: An Historical Inventory of the Past Year,” (2) “Puerto Ricans and
the 2010 Census: Si Quieres Frutos, Sacude el Árbol,” (3) “40th Anniversary of the Young Lords” (4) “The Resurgence of
the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights – Why Now?” (5) Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s Journey from
Humble Beginnings to the highest Court of this Nation (6) In the Health care reform debate, Puerto Rican Voices Must
unite to be heard, (7) “Statehood, a civil rights issue. A matter of Equality”, and (8) summaries and updates on our annual
programs.

Most importantly, we want to share with you the inspiring stories of our Lo Mejor de Nuestra Comunidad award recipients
– truly exceptional, dedicated individuals who are the unsung heroes of our community and who are making a difference
in not only the Puerto Rican community but society as a whole. The Lo Mejor de Nuestra Comunidad award honors Puerto
Ricans whose pride in their heritage and strength of character have empowered themselves and inspired others to make sig-
nificant impact on our community. What is important to understand is that these award recipients are chosen by CN from
nominations submitted by the community. The selection process is never easy but this year was particular difficult because
the nominations were all outstanding. CN chose ten individuals.

For twenty-three years, CN has created and developed programs all geared to the support and enhancement of educational
opportunities and leadership development for our youth with a cultural twist. These programs are firmly rooted in the be-
lief, that in order to succeed in life, you must pursue a higher education, give back to your community through volunteer
efforts and know your cultural ancestral history. In order to secure that our youth have better educational opportunities the
CN Scholarship Awards Program (CNSAP) was established and has awarded $170,000 in scholarships since its incep-
Comité Noviembre Board Members and 2008
Honorees

tion fourteen years ago, an average of 12 scholar-


ships a year and with a college graduation rate of
90%. An additional $7,000 has been awarded in
the Richie Pérez Scholarship for Peace and Justice.
The 2009 recipients of both scholarship programs
are highlighted in the journal. You will be awed
by the clear sense of self and strength of charac-
ter of these selfless and inspiring people that are
building our communities and making a difference
early on in their lives.

This year’s benefit event will take place on Friday, November 13, 2009, at the NY Hilton in Manhattan and will honor: Car-
los A. Picón, Curator in Charge, Department of Greek and Roman Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Katilia Velez, creator
of Nuyoricans Against MTV’s True Life “I’m a Nuyorican” a documentary that portrayed Puerto Ricans in a stereotypical
negative light and Jesús Omar Rivera, El Boricuazo, historian & author who is also our 2009 Spokesperson.

The proceeds of this annual event, supports all of our programs and allows CN to provide free programming and information
to the community year round as well as scholarship dollars. Our programs include: two scholarship programs, the annual
Leadership Development – Role Models Forum, conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA
personnel, the Artisans Fair & Exhibit, the Health Fair, the educational trip to Puerto Rico, “Buscando Nuestra Raíces”,
the Day of Community Service & Social Responsibility and food drive, a Three Kings celebration and toy drive, the an-
nual CN/El Diario La Prensa full color Puerto Rican Heritage Month Supplement, the production of this commemorative
calendar journal, the artist competition, selection and commission process, the annual educational commemorative poster,
selection of a spokesperson, the kick-off celebration and annual benefit event, the Lo Mejor de Nuestra Comunidad and
Puerto Rican Heritage Awards, our website information as well as cultural and health related workshops, forums and events
sponsored by CN.

Many events have been planned throughout New York State as well as New Jersey and Puerto Rico to celebrate our rich
culture, traditions and history. CN urges everyone to participate in these events including our 4th Annual Artisans Fair
that will take place on Saturday, November 21, 2009, from 10AM – 7PM at Hostos Community College in the Bronx and
our First Annual Health Fair that will run concurrently. The Health component of the Fair was added because of the great
number of residents concentrated in the Bronx and neighboring boroughs with chronic diseases such as diabetes, high blood
pressure, heart disease and obesity.

The 14th annual Day of Community Service and Social Responsibility scheduled for Sunday, November 22, 2009 at IPRHE/
UPACA Senior Center in Manhattan from 11AM – 4PM where CN along with ASPIRA of New York, Inc. will be conduct-
ing a food drive to create Thanksgiving baskets for the poor of New York.

This year the Puerto Rican community made historic accomplishments from the first Puerto Rican in space Astronaut Jo-
seph Acaba to the confirmation of Justice Sonia Sotomayor to the highest court of this nation to the unprecedented national
Latino voter turnout for a historic Presidential election with Puerto Ricans leading the way. We have a lot to be proud of let
us make a pact – a commitment to take ownership of our history, traditions and culture, past, present and future. Let us live
in the moment of the history that we make each day, standing up for what we believe in and supporting causes that enhance,
promote, preserve, and protect our culture, history, language, community and natural resources.

May our hearts swell with pride at the knowledge and privilege of being born Puerto Rican and that no matter where you
live in this world de nuestras raíces nace un pueblo!

For Comité Noviembre

Teresa A. Santiago, Chairperson


Inter American University of PR, San Germán
Inter American University of PR, San Germán
comite noviembre 2009
spokesperson & honoree

Jesus Omar Rivera


Whenever we talk about positive contributions by Puerto Ricans, we often hear the
same old list of people. But, in actuality, the contributions of Puerto Ricans are much
more expansive than been recorded. Jesus Omar Rivera aka El Boricuazo is making
it his mission to educate people on who Puerto Ricans really are and what they have
accomplished in this country and around the world. His battle cry is: “Perdona el lu-
cimiento, es que soy puertorriqueño” “Excuse me for bragging, but I’m Puerto Rican”

Rivera, a writer, tour guide, historian, and public speaker, became famous and has
touched the hearts of Puerto Ricans all over the world for his extensive knowledge
about facts of international importance about Puerto Rico and its people. His book, :
“Boricuazo — Tu orgullo nacional,” [“Boricuazo — Your National Pride”] is a collec-
tion of many of these facts and their historical background, which makes the reader re-
alize the significant impact that Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans have had on the world.

From the time he was a kid, Rivera was always attracted to all kinds of information
regarding Puerto Rico and would eagerly read every possible book and magazine he
could get his hands on that would educate him about his country. Rivera started collecting information and facts that were curious,
interesting and less known to Puerto Ricans. He created his own tables and statistics. The more he educated himself, the more he
realized that there was so much information that existed, that was publicly unknown, and not taught in school.

Every day, his discoveries about Puerto Rico made him feel more and more proud of being Puerto Rican. At the age of 21, Rivera
became a national tour guide and found the perfect forum to transmit his knowledge about the island. He loved traveling around the
island talking to foreigners as well as Puerto Ricans about all the things that originated from Puerto Rico. At 23 he had the opportu-
nity to work at the Bénédict School in San Juan as the Academic Director of the Department of Tourism and Airlines. He convinced
his professors and the administration to create and develop an academic institute with a 100% Puerto Rican focus. The school agreed
and the department grew and expanded to the campuses in Isabela, Barranquitas, and Manatí. The pride that every student reflected
in their studies turned it into the academic department with the most enrolled, retained, graduated, and employed. After this pro-
found professional experience, Rivera had the opportunity to direct and coordinate the programs of Tourism and Airlines at Emory
College at both the Bayamón, and Caguas campuses, and more recently he headed the Program of Tourist Guides and Operators of
Excursions for National Center of Tourism Studies in Hato Rey.

Today, Rivera’s professional life is completely concentrated and focused on conducting talks, training workshops, seminars, cours-
es, and conferences throughout Puerto Rican and abroad. In recent public appearances Rivera includes portions of the content of
“Boricuazo — Tu orgullo nacional,” [“Boricuazo — Your National Pride”] in which he shows why Puerto Ricans have a reason or
two for being proud.

The book in Spanish is divided in 40 themes, from science to geography, population, education and arts. In it, Rivera overlooks
world-famous Boricuas and concentrates on relatively lesser-known figures such as the 10 Puerto Rican women in NASA, or Arturo
Alfonso Schomburg, who gave his name to the famed Harlem Center for Research in Black Culture.

Rivera frequently appears and participates in national TV programs such as WAPA-TV’s A Calzón Quita’o and had a weekly ap-
pearance on Las Noticias a las 12 of the Univisión Puerto Rico where he had 300 interventions with a section called “El Boricuazo”
(Boricuazo TV). “El Boricuazo” is also a weekly column in the newspaper Primera Hora and can be heard on Radio La MEGA
106.9 Monday, Wednesday and Fridays from 5:30AM – 10AM on the morning show, “el Circo de La Mega, Jesús Omar presents
Boricuazo with Funky Joe, Ganster and Daniela Droz. The station is the number one station in Puerto Rico and can be viewed on
www.elcirco.net. Rivera has written two plays, “Objetivo Patria,” and “Asi Nacio la Nación, El Gran Secreto,” which appeared in
different parts of Puerto Rico in 2008 and 2009.

“No sé cuanto tiempo esté en ESTA vida, pero lo único que le pido a Dios es que en todas las vidas que me falten por vivir, me
permita nacer siempre en esta tierra y siempre, ser puertorriqueño.”
Jesús Omar Rivera
23rd Anniversary
c o m i t é

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h e r e n c i a p u e r t o r r i q u e ñ a

Arnaldo Alicea Concepción was born in New


York, the youngest child of Don Nicolás Alicea
Rodríguez y Doña Mariana Concepción Rive-
ra. His family returned to Comerío, Puerto Rico
where Arnaldo began to take art lessons in ele-
mentary school with “Sisito” Avilés and in high
school with Ángel Luis Pérez Vega. He later
studied at the Puerto Rican Institute of Culture’s
Escuela de Artes Plásticas with artists such as
Lorenzo Homar, Augusto Marín, Fran Cervoni,
Rubén Moreira, Mirna Báez, José R. Alicea, Fé-
lix Rodríguez Báez and Julio Rosado.

At 21, Arnaldo created the Department of Arts


and Culture for the Municipality of Comerío and
served as its first director. During this period, he
created the architectural design of the current pub-
lic plaza, as well as the seal and banner of Com-
erío.

He stands out as a landscape and portraiture artist,


painting well known public figures such as former
Governor of Puerto Rico Rafael Hernández Colón,
Arnoldo Alicea

collection of the RHC Foundation, former Chair-


men of the House of Representatives Luis Ernesto
Ramos Jordan, the former President of the Senate
Antonio Faz Alzamora, among others.

Since 1989 to the present, he runs his own graphic


design agency Arnaldo Alicea Art & Design and
continues to create art by commission, mostly for
private collections.
About the Poster

Raíces
Throughout the island of Puerto Rico the beautiful
Flamboyán tree is an umbrella of shade when in full
bloom. Its’ brilliant red flowers and yellow stamens
are nestled along the massive branches, in the comfort
of lacy leaves. Our tree not truly, yet, in full bloom
but with the promise of greatness, its roots, protecting,
strongly securely, the flag – the universal symbol of
Puerto Rico – and its indigenous creature, el coqui,
symbolizing el pueblo incased in a sphere – a circle
– the symbol of unity.

The greatness of this national tree, embracing both the


mainland and the island, making, the unique symbiotic
connection between both. The two bodies of water,
in New York, and San Juan merging flowing into
each other and creating one, nourishing, purifying our
roots, strengthening the foundation of our community
around the world. This tree is the personification of
Este cartel pretende mostrar una parte importante de our perseverance, ingenuity, pride and achievements
nuestra rica cultura, costumbres y expresiones que and the knowledge that we as a united community can
nos han elevado a las más altas cumbres como pueblo overcome any obstacle however great.
puertorriqueño. De nuestras raíces nace la mezcla de
razas que forman este pueblo único y vibrante, lleno Puerto Ricans live on every corner of this world, we’ve
de un arcoíris de diferentes matices. Nuestra gente even been to space and back. No matter our life’s
luchadora ha contribuido desde las diferentes ramas circumstances what connects, each of us is the strong
del arte, las ciencias, las matemáticas, la política hasta binding roots that are uniquely ours. From our ancestry,
lograr un amplio y hermoso tapiz que plasma lo que Taino, Spaniard and African our roots are defined and
somos y lo que soñamos. eternal, the very fabric that makes us Puerto Rican.

Miremos y busquemos nuestras raíces, donde nacemos Like the Flamboyán tree and the coqui we have been
como pueblo. Los invitamos a indagar en lo más destined and blessed to be Puerto Rican our strong
profundo de nuestra historia y ejecutorias que nos massive roots bridges our two communities and
inspira a lograr las metas que en nuestro corazón celebrates and acknowledges that we are one family
anhelamos para el futuro. Los distintos géneros que no matter where we are in the world. We must
forman parte de nuestra idiosincrasia como pueblo, always remember that de nuestras raíces nace un solo
estas raíces profundas y llenas de historia te llenaran de pueblo.
orgullo en afirmar…soy puertorriqueño. No te olvides
de rescatar la memoria ancestral de tus orígenes, y de Teresa Santiago
tantos hombres y mujeres puertorriqueños que al pasar
el tiempo han dejado un legado y que continuamos
dejando nuestras huellas en cada rincón del mundo.

De Nuestras Raíces Nace Un Pueblo…

Angel Santini
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MISSION
Comité Noviembre’s mission is to commemorate and acknowledge all aspects of Puerto Rican life from the social and cultural to the
educational, economic and political. The charge of CN is to create an awareness of the rich culture, language and heritage of the Puerto
Rican community and to acknowledge its numerous contributions to this state and nation. Established in 1987, Comité Noviembre is
the only collaboration of its kind in the United States that bring together the collective talents and resources of the oldest and most pres-
tigious Puerto Rican organizations: the Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, ASPIRA of New York, the Association of His-
panic Arts, el Museo del Barrio, Eugenio María de Hostos Community College, el Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueños, the Puerto Rico
Federal Affairs Administration, the National Institute for Latino Policy, the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights - Justice Com-
mittee, and the LatinoJustice PRLDEF. This coordinating body plans and promotes Comité Noviembre’s annual programs and events.

ANNUAL SPOKESPERSON
Each year, CN selects a spokesperson that is making a difference in this country, empowering others and shaping, not only our future as
Puerto Ricans, but the future of all Americans. They have all played an important role in leaving our unique imprint in the current and
future history of this country.

Our past spokespeople have been:


1990 - Musician and activist Willie Colón
1991 - Radio talk show host Malin Falú
1992 - Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer and New York City Public School Chancellor Dr. Joseph A. Fernandez
1993 - Former Surgeon General of the United States Antonia Novello
1994 - Actor and community activist Luis Guzman
1995 - Actress Lauren Velez; and salsa diva India
1996 - Actor Jimmy Smits
1997 - The “king of Latin music” Tito Puente
1998 - Actress and AIDS activist Rosie Perez
1999 - Welter Weight Champion of the World Felix “Tito” Trinidad
2000 - Internationally acclaimed Latin Jazz artist Dave Valentin
2001 - NYPD officer and tenor Daniel Rodriguez
2002 - Admiral Richard H. Carmona, MD, MPH, FACS, US Surgeon General Commander, USPHS
2003 - World renown singer Danny Rivera
2004 - Salsa sensation Tito Nieves
2005 - Singer and entertainer Frankie Negron
2006 - Daisy Martinez, Chef, Entrepreneur and Host of “Daisy Cooks”
2007 - Ana Ortiz, co-star, Ugly Betty
2008 – Melina León, singer/entertainer

THEME DEVELOPMENT
Each year, CN selects a theme with a two-fold purpose: to celebrate Puerto Rican Heritage and to motivate, mobilize and empower
our community. This year’s theme: Live your Culture…¡Vive Boricua!, challenges us to take ownership of our culture, traditions and
heritage. Being Puerto Rican is not just on special days, or months, but every day of our lives. Everyday as a community, we contribute
to the fabric of this city, state and nation. The theme addresses the importance of our achievements as a community and the significant
impact it has had and will continue to have on society. The theme seeks to challenge us to learn about our pioneers, feel proud of who
we are and where we come from and commit ourselves to promote and teach others about our culture, traditions, heroes and the great
contributions Puerto Ricans have made to this country.

1987 - “Building on our Heritage to Create Our Future/Our Children and our Youth”
1988 - “Empowerment….From the Shadows to the Light …de las sombras al Poder”
1989 - “Count on Us…Si Nos Nos Cuentan No Contamos”
1990 - “From the Homeland to the Mainland,”
1991 - “La Mujer Puertorriqueña…La Verdadera Borinqueña,”
1992 - “Los Encuentros del Pasado….Nuestra Determinación Para Forjar el Futuro
Encounters of the Past…Our Determination to Shape the Future,”
1993 - “Reconquista ‘93: Affirming our Identity Preserving our Community”
1994 - “Nuestro Poder Puertorriqueño: Usalo! Define Nuestro Destino,”
1995 - “The Puerto Rican Renaissance: The Sprit of Commitment …The Power of Action. Live it!,”
1996 - “United, Moving Forward…The Future is Ours,”
1997 - “In the Mix: Voices that Affirm Our Vibrant Heritage...Voces Que Afirman Nuestra Herencia Dinámica”
1998 - “Puerto Ricans Confronting the Challenges of a Changing World,”
1999 - “Puerto Ricans for the New Millennium: Facing the Dawn of the New Age”
2000 - “Entendiendo Nuestro Pasado Creamos Nuestros Futuro,”
2001 - “Puerto Ricans United for World Peace Puertorriqueños Unidos Para la Paz Mundial,”
2002 - “Salud Boricua,”
2003 - “Nuestra Herencia Cultural es el Camino al Futuro…Our Cultural Heritage is the Path to the Future,”
2004 - Preserving our Legacy, Cultural Affirmation, Community Empowerment & Social Justice:
Preservando Nuestro Legado … Afirmación Cultural, Poder Comunitario y Justicia Social
2005 - “Boricua! Atesora lo tuyo…Boricua! Treasure What is Your!”
2006 - “Comité Noviembre…mes de la herencia puertorriqueña, XX Aniversario…
Celebrando con orgullo nuestra cultura…Hoy, Mañana y Siempre!”
2007 - Encuentro con Nuestra Patria
2008 – Live your Culture…¡Vive Boricua!

COMMEMORATIVE JOURNAL/ARTIST/ POSTER


The annual journal calendar becomes a collector’s item because of the articles and historical information that it provides. These essays
and articles, written by community activists, educators, artists and CN members, are published annually in several newspapers ranging
from The New York Daily News, El Diario La Prensa, as well as the San Juan Star and El Nuevo Día in Puerto Rico. The journals are
distributed to educational, cultural and community organizations. Over 250 events and activities are sponsored and held by community
based organizations, cultural institutions and government officials throughout New York alone.

Since its inception, the annual CN poster has been in high demand by teachers and educators. The competition to be the commissioned
artist of CN and design the coveted poster has also been exciting throughout the years and has led to the promotion, acknowledgement
and exposure of very talented Puerto Rican artists. The poster is created each year to promote and inform the public about Puerto Rican
Heritage Month and to create an artistic expression of the organization’s theme. The poster is distributed throughout New York, New
Jersey and the tri-state area.

ANNUAL EDUCATIONAL CULTURAL TRIP TO PUERTO RICO “BUSCANDO


NUESTRA RAÍCES”
Buscando Nuestras Raíces is an adventure into a cultural and educational experience for Puerto Ricans and others who want to explore
the richness of Puerto Rico’s culture, ancestral roots and history. Making this trip a reality was a natural progression of CN’s mission
and goals. The itinerary takes into account that many of us, although we visit the island frequently, rarely visit the cultural and historical
sites and landmarks unique to Puerto Rico and renowned throughout the world. It is a journey participants will remember for many years
to come. The third annual Buscando Nuestra Raíces trip is being planned for the summer of 2009.

PUERTO RICAN HERITAGE MONTH KICK-OFF CELEBRATION


The CN Puerto Rican Heritage Month kick-off event usually takes place each year on the last Thursday of October. At this event, CN
honors Puerto Rican community heroes through Lo Mejor de Nuestra Comunidad Awards, unveils its annual poster and distributes its
journal calendar of event. This event is free for the community. Over 300 key community and business leaders as well as elected officials
attend this very festive, musical and cultural event.

LO MEJOR DE NUESTRA COMUNIDAD AWARD


Through Lo Mejor de Nuestra Comunidad award, CN recognizes outstanding individuals who are the unsung heroes of our community
and who are making a difference in the Puerto Rican communities of this country. Puerto Ricans whose pride in their heritage and
strength of character have empowered themselves and inspired others to make significant impact on the community are recognized. The
recipients of this award are chosen by CN from nominations submitted by the community. These individuals are honored at the kick-off
celebration of Puerto Rican Heritage Month.

CN’S ANNUAL GALA BENEFIT


The CN Annual Gala Benefit was instituted in 1996 at its tenth anniversary to raise funds for its scholarship awards program. To date
the event has continued to attract key leaders of New York’s Puerto Rican community and Corporate America. The annual gala benefit
is scheduled for Friday, November 14, 2008 at the NY Hilton in Manhattan. The proceeds of this event supports the CN Scholarship
Awards Program, the Richie Perez Scholarship for Peace & Justice, the Annual Artisans Fair & Exhibit, the Annual “Buscando Nuestra
Raíces” educational trip to Puerto Rico, workshops, forums and events sponsored by CN, annual programs which are organized by our
youth to serve the poor and underserved of the community, like the Day of Community Service & Social Responsibility and food drive
as well as the Annual Three Kings celebration and toy drive.

CN’S PAST GALA HONOREES


1996 - Dr. Antonia Pantoja, founder of ASPIRA, Goya Foods and Luis A Miranda, President of Miranda y Más
1997 - Actress Miriam Colón, Carlos L. Santiago, Vice President, NYNEX, Millie Herández Becker, President &
CEO, Westchester Air, Tonio Burgos, President, Burgos & Associates and Carlos D. Nazario, Jr. President
& CEO, Metro Beer and Soda Distributors.
1998 - Nereida S. Andino, Former Deputy Manhattan Borough President, Actress Jennifer Lopez, Fernando L.
Perez, Senior Specialist for Customer Outreach, Con Edison and Polito Vega, on-air personality for La Mega.
1999 - Dr. Antonia C. Novello, NYS Commissioner of Health, Carlos M. Morales, Esq., Senior Vice President and
General Counsel, Merrill Lynch & Company, Angelo Figueroa, editor-in-chief, PEOPLE en Español and
The Young Lords Party.
2000 - Roberto Clemente Jr., Broadcast Analyst/New York Yankees and President of The Roberto Clemente
Foundation, Susan Hernandez, attorney at Law and Carol Robles Román, Senior Vice President and
General Counsel, Puerto Rico Industrial Development Company, and Jose O. Agiuar, President & CEO,
Kleener King Industries.
2001 - Selma Betancourt, Director of External Communications, Health Plus, Dr. Ricardo R. Fernandez, President,
Herbert H. Lehman College, Luis Garden Acosta, Founder & CEO, El Puente, Inc., and Denise Quiñones,
Miss Universe 2001.
2002 - Vice Admiral Richard Carmona, MD, MPH, FACS, United States Surgeon General Commander, USPHS,
Nydia Caro, Singer and Entertainer, Debbie Delgado Vega, Founder and Chairperson of the Latino
Organization for Liver Awareness, Carmen Gomez Goldberg, President, AVET Transit, Inc. and José R.
Sánchez, CSW, ACSW, Senior Vice President, Generations+ Health Network.
2003 - Dr. Ricardo Alegría, Historian/Anthropologist, the Honorable Sila María Calderón, Governor, Puerto Rico,
Danny Rivera, Humanitarian, world renowned Puerto Rican Singer, Rafaél Tufíño, el Pintor del Pueblo.
2004 - Orlando Figueroa, Space Mission Director, Deputy Associate Administrator for Programs, NASA
Headquarters, Jorge Ramos, Anchor, Telemando 47, Ada Rodríguez, Chief Marketing Officer, Health Plus
and In Memoriam, Richard Perez, former Young Lord, Community Activist, co-Founder, the Justice
Committee, National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights.
2005 - Mary E. Medina, Executive Director, Center for Trustee Initiatives and Recruitment, Greater New York
Hospital Association, Dennis Rivera, President, 1199 SEIU, Monsi C. Roman, Chief Micro biologist environ
mental Control and Life Support Systems Design and Development Group, NASA/Marshall Space
Flight Center and Salsa Sensation Frankie Negron
2006 - Lynda Baquero, Anchor, News Channel 4, Luis Fonsi, international recording artist and producer, Anthony
D. Romero, Executive Director, American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU and Daisy Martinez, Chef,
Entrepreneur and Host of Daisy Cooks.
2007 - Dr. Diana Caballero and Dr. Luis O. Reyes, Education Activist, Antonio Martorell, Renowned Artist, Poet,
Author, Yolandita Monge, International Recording Artist, Lisa Thon, Fashion Designer and Ana Ortiz, Co-
Star, Ugly Betty
2008 – Catherine Gonzalez, Senior Architectural Designer, Thornton Tomasetti; Hector Feliciano, Author, The Lost
Museum, Margarita Lopez, Community Activist, Board Member, NYC Housing Authority, Carlos Alberto, Couture
Fashion Designer, and Melina León, Singer/Actress

In 2001, because of the tragic event of September 11th, CN decided to hold a luncheon instead of a dinner which continued until 2005
when the event moved back to an evening event with a spectacular gala at the world famous Copacabana.

CN’S ANNUL PUERTO RICAN ARTISANS FAIR & EXHIBIT


In 2006, in celebration of its 20th anniversary, CN, established the Annual Puerto Rican Artisans Fair & Exhibit. Making this fair a
reality was a natural progression of CN’s goals and mission. CN invited Puerto Rican artisans from throughout the US and Puerto Rico
to participate in this Fair. Over 40 artesanos puertorriqueños participated and the event boasted an attendance of over 5000 people in
this very first Fair.

For the two years, CN transformed, Hunter College West Building into a typical Puerto Rican plaza with a fountain, palm trees, piragua
and coquito carts and artists, sculptors, vejigante mask makers promoting and selling their wares from colorful kiosks while musical
and cultural acts entertained throughout the day. Like the typical Puerto Rican festive atmosphere of las fiesta patronales that take place
in each town of Puerto Rico., traditions and folklore. Last year, CN moved the Artisans Fair & Exhibit to the Church of St. Paul the
Apostle because it outgrew the Hunter College venue capacity for participants. The Fair was once again a huge success. Over 60 artisans
participated and a steady attendance of 5000 people throughout the day.

This year the Fair will take place at Eugenio María de Hostos Community College, 500 Grand Concourse in the Bronx from 10AM to
7PM. As in previous years, CN conducted workshops for children and adults, like mask making, the history of the three kings’ celebra-
tion, Taíno storytelling in order to make sure that our youth learned about our culture.
This Fair is an opportunity to kick-off your holiday shopping season and purchase unique Puerto Rican original gifts for that special
person on your list and, at the same time support our artesanos.

FIRST ANNUAL COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE HEALTH FAIR


CN has added a health component to the Fair because of the great numbers of Puerto Ricans and Hispanics with chronic diseases such
as diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. Specifically, in the Bronx, where the numbers of cases are disproportionately higher,
than in other parts if this City and State and in several instances the Country. CN will utilize the fair to conduct screenings and provide
much needed education on these life threatening conditions and issues of prevention. Since the Artisan Fair already attracts substantial
participation CN believes that it will be saving lives by also adding this segment to the Fair. The Health Fair will run concurrently with
the Artisans Fair.

This Health Fair will allow residents of this highly underserved community, which includes an area of the South Bronx which has the
highest concentration of cases of chronic diseases such as diabetes in this country, as well as heart disease, high blood pressure and
asthma in this entire City, to check and screen for these illnesses in a fun, festive, non-threatening atmosphere and at the same time sup-
port local artisans and learn about Puerto Rican culture and history.

CN’S DAY OF COMMUNITY SERVICE AND


SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
The Day of Community Service and Social Responsibility, was established in 1995 to coincide with the theme: “The Sprit of Commit-
ment …The Power of Action. Live it! For the past thirteen years, CN has set aside the Sunday before Thanksgiving as a day of com-
munity service and social responsibility in commemoration of November 19th, traditionally known as Puerto Rican discovery day or as
we like to call it Puerto Rican “encounter” day. The event began as a day when people participated in several volunteer efforts that aided
the Puerto Rican community and its organizations to show the spirit of commitment and the power of action. Over the years, this event
has been a great success and organizations throughout the city have benefited from this collaboration, including homeless and battered
women’s shelters and senior centers as well as individual families. Through this effort, CN has collected coats, clothing, food and toilet-
ries for these organizations. In recent years, the food drive has been instituted and CN along with ASPIRA of New York spearhead the
event. This year’s event will take place on Sunday, November 23, 2008 at the UPACA Senior Center/IPRHE, 1940 Lexington Avenue
(between 119th and 120th streets) in Manhattan from 11AM. to 4PM.

CN SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS PROGRAM


Since its inception, CN has placed special focus on educational excellence and leadership development as the key to the future of the
Puerto Rican community. To this end, in November of 1996 in celebration of its tenth anniversary of Puerto Rican Heritage Month, the
CN Scholarship Awards Program (CNSAP) was established. To date, CNSAP has awarded 160 scholarships. The scholarship recipient
receives $1,000.

Last year, to commemorate our 20th anniversary, CN enhanced the Scholarship Program to continue to award the top two scholars
$1,000 scholarships each year until graduation. These scholars must maintain a 3.5 grade point average and documented community
work within the Puerto Rican community to continue to receive the 4-year $1,000 scholarship.

THE RICHIE PEREZ SCHOLARSHIP FOR PEACE & JUSTICE


In 2004, the Puerto Rican community lost an advocate, community leader and urban warrior. Richie Pérez was a beloved activist and
leader in the fight for social justice and human rights. He brought integrity, zeal and unity to many causes to which he was committed,
which included the struggle for racial justice and against police brutality, Puerto Rican independence and universal human rights. A
former Young Lord and founding member of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, Richie believed greatly in the power and
potential of young people to create social change. He personally mentored many youth and believed that the torch of the movement for
justice had to be passed on to the next generation.

In his memory, Comité Noviembre has established the Richie Pérez Scholarship for Peace and Justice. The award recognizes Puerto
Rican young people for their commitment, activism and achievements in any of the areas of human rights and social justice. This an-
nual award will both promote the advancement of new leaders in the movement for peace and justice, and also invest in their continued
growth by providing support for their ongoing education and political development The scholarship recipient will receive a $1,000. To
date five scholarships have been awarded.

ANNUAL COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE/NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE


ADMINISTRATION, NASA LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT ROLE MODELS
PROGRAM
To ensure that young adults have the opportunity to meet and interact with professionals in all fields and careers, CN established a lead-
ership development forum in partnership with NASA Puerto Rican/Latino personnel last year. The forum took place at Hostos Com-
munity College in the middle of the South Bronx. Several Puerto Rican/Hispanic microbiologist, scientist and engineers from NASA
Centers conducted a presentation on Careers at NASA to a group of Latino high school and college students interested in engineering,
biology and the study of space.

The event was a huge success. Having professionals that looked liked these young adults, speak their language and had similar back-
grounds at these high level positions at NASA reinforced their career goals and dreams. Having NASA personnel address these young
people reinforces the mission of CN’s leadership development program and give these young people a day they will remember for the
rest of their lives.
23rd Anniversary
c o m i t é

m e s d e l a
n o v i e m b r e

h e r e n c i a p u e r t o r r i q u e ñ a

Ce le bra ndo Lo Mejo r de N uestra C o mun i dad

Rev. Carmen Hernandez is CEO/Founder/Outreach/


Pastor of Stratford Community Services, Inc. Giving
Kids/Youth a Chance. As an advocate and activist
in the Soundview section of the Bronx for the past 25
years, Rev. Carmen Hernandez has helped empower at
risk inner city kids and has proved to be a vital part
of the South East Bronx community. For twenty years
Rev Carmen Hernandez

Rev. Carmen Hernandez has coordinated Stratford An-


nual Back 2 School Jam Block Parties.

Realizing that the future of the community depended


on building a stronger business outlook and seeing the
need to empower small business owners to create a pos-
itive environment in the neighborhood, Rev. Hernandez
organized small business owners and the community to
work together as one family.

Rev. Carmen has also helped build other organizations


such as the Bronx Hispanic Chamber of Commerce,
Latin Hip Hop Summit at Lehman College with Mr.
Russell Simmons and the Bronx Christmas Parade. She
is currently working towards the first Macys Thanks-
giving Parade in the Bronx. She is founder and presi-
dent of the first NYC LGBT Chamber of Commerce,
Inc.

Rev. Carmen Hernandez, has won numerous awards


for her hard work and community service, among them
the Groundbreaker Latina Leader award in the United
States in 2006 by Catalina Magazine; and the NY State Regional & International Small
Business Administration, “SBA” Award. In December she will be awarded ‘Our Youth’s
Hispanic GLBT Activist of the Year’ for her commitment and continuous support for our
youth and community.
Ce l eb r ando Lo Mejo r d e Nuestra C o m un idad

Nydia Rodriguez-Edgecombe was born in Orocovis,


Puerto Rico and raised in San Juan among eight other
siblings. She moved to New York in 1976 and began
working at Eugenio María de Hostos Community Col-
lege of The City University of New York in August 1977.
Her tenure at Hostos spans 36 years, starting as a college
assistant in the Admissions Office to becoming Assistant
Director of Admissions in 1982 and by 1986 Director.
In 1992 the Admissions and Recruitment Offices were
merged and Mrs. Rodriguez Edgecombe assumed du-
ties as the Director of the newly formed office. In June
2003, she became the first Director of Alumni Relations
at Hostos Community College, building this important
office from the ground up. She has implemented the first
Hostos Alumni Homecoming and Parade with an atten-
dance of over 900 people.

In addition to her responsibility at Hostos, Nydia finds


Nydia Edgecombe

time to volunteer in many community organizations


and for important causes in our community. She was
an instrumental volunteer for the Association of His-
panic Arts’ fund raising committee in a very difficult
time in the organization’s history. Her creativity, ideas
and fundraising savvy assisted the organization. Ms.
Rodriguez-Edgecombe is a long-time activist in the stop
English-Only movement and active member of the Na-
tional Congress for Puerto Rican Rights – working on
their Campana para el Censo. She is one of the founders
of the Hostos C.C. Aids Task Force, advisor to the Puerto
Rican Club and has organized and managed the Hostos
Community Chorus and has done extensive volunteer
work for the Hostos Study Abroad and Creative Campus
Programs.
Ce l eb r ando Lo Mejo r d e Nuestra C o m un idad

Ibrahim González recently completed his first video docu-


mentary, The Promise to Teach, the Power to Learn, an
intimate profile Bronx middle school, striving to provide
bold new paradigms for teaching and learning. He worked
camera on Melvin Van Peebles’ most recent film, which was
screened at the 2008 Tribecca Film Festival. Presently, he
is scoring music for a soon to be released independent film,
The Last Audition, and has produced and directed a short
film about Retumba! – the all women Caribbean music per-
formance troupe.

He has produced numerous radio programs for Pacifica Ra-


dio, WBAI. Among the long list of achievements are: Live
From The Nuyorican Poets Café, In The Moment and
The Barrio Block. He is currently hosting and producing
WBAI’s Friday edition of Wake Up Call.

Ibrahim Gonzalez
Photography is a lifetime passion and his work has been ex-
hibited at Cemi Gallery in Spanish Harlem, the Black Whale
in City Island, Art on Main Street in Yonkers, St. Mary’s
Hospital in Rockland County,Patricia’s II in Throggs Neck,
and Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx.

Professor González teaches music and audio recording at


Manhattan College and has worked as a teaching artist in lo-
cal schools for various arts organizations including, Warner
Music Group, The Bronx Council on the Arts, Community
Works, Arts Connection The Westchester Philharmonic, The
Westchester Symphony and Carnegie Hall. He heads three
bands as a percussionist and keyboardist; The Nuyorican Jazz Experience, The
Ibrahim González Quintet (Salsa), and an .experimental ensemble, Overnite Ca-
bal, for which he composes.

His spiritual calling led him into Islam right on the heels of his activism within the
political movements of the 60’s and 70’s. He was one of the founders of the first
Puerto Rican Muslim organization, Alianza Islamica, an organization founded in
El Barrio dedicated to community service and raising the awareness of the rich
Islamic Heritage that Latinos have inherited via Andalucia and West Africa.

Don Ibrahim González is the proud father of five adult offspring and six grand-
children. He currently resides in the Northwest Bronx where he continues his
community activism and where he is seen now and then, riding his bike.
Ce l eb r ando Lo Mejo r d e Nuestra C o m un idad

Clarisel Gonzalez was born in East Harlem and raised in


the South Bronx of Puerto Rican parents. She is a graduate
of Fordham University, earning a BA in media studies and
psychology. Clarisel has a vast journalistic background as
an editor and reporter and has served at publications such
as Tiempo New York, Manhattan Times, The San Juan Star,
among others. She is currently the New York Latino Com-
munity Examiner for www.examiner.com and is a freelance
writer for DTM (Defining Trends Magazine), a NYC-based
publication dedicated to Latino trends. She is also an inde-
pendent producer and animal rights activist.

She is the founder, publisher and editor of Puerto Rico Sun


Communications, an independent multimedia social entre-
preneurship aimed at informing, empowering and building
community online since 2002. PRSUN Communications
publishes several blogs and social networks which focus on
Clarisel Gonzalez

themes related to Puerto Ricans and the Diaspora, as well


as PRSUN Radio, an online talk show highlighting Puerto
Ricans, as well as the PRSUN TV project.

As a photographer, she curates and exhibits at galleries on-


and off-line. She is founder and administrator of the grass-
roots NYC Collective of the Puerto Rican Photographic So-
ciety. Her photos have been published by a variety of print
and online sources, including the cover art for Mayor Mike
Bloomberg’s invitation to the Gracie Mansion reception in
honor of the 2009 National Puerto Rican Day Parade; “La-
tino America: A State-by State Encyclopedia” edited by
Mark Overmyer-Velazquez; and the Bronx Puerto Rican Pa-
rade Day website.
Ce l eb r ando Lo Mejo r d e Nuestra C o m un idad

Melinda Gonzalez is an activist, artist, educator


and mentor. Her intense love for and commitment
to the Puerto Rican community was instilled by
her parents at an early age. She has carried that
pride with her as an Aspirante in high school. In
college, Melinda co-chaired the annual Latino
Collegiate Conference, attracting more than 600
college students throughout the Northeast, to raise
awareness and keep students involved in social
justice issues..

Mentored by Richie Perez at the National Con-


gress for Puerto Rican Rights, Melinda was active
in mobilizing the Puerto Rican community against
police brutality and in support of the release of the
Puerto Rican political prisoners. She was also a
founding member of the Puerto Rico Collective

Melinda Gonzalez
(PRC), an ad-hoc committee established to ad-
dress the centennial of the U.S. invasion of Puerto
Rico. Recently, she was involved in raising aware-
ness among Brooklynites about the work of the
Broadway Triangle Community Coalition who is
fighting for Latino representation in the planning
of Williamsburg-Bushwick’s last remaining, larg-
est parcel of undeveloped land.

For the last several years, Melinda has co-direct-


ed BombaYo, a youth group with her compañero,
Jose L. Ortiz, training young people on how to
dance and play bomba, emphasizing their role in
preserving this Puerto Rican cultural tradition.

As the Education Coordinator at El Puente’s Williamsburg Lead-


ership Center, Melinda works tirelessly to ensure that the next
generation of Puerto Ricans, Latinos and other students of color
gain access to quality higher education. She promotes academic
excellence while supporting their artistic endeavors as they ac-
tively continue the struggle for human rights and equality.

Melinda’s commitment to social justice and the well being of


Puerto Ricans is part of the fabric of her being, where she works
towards a world where peace and justice is for all.
Ce l eb r ando Lo Mejo r d e Nuestra C o m un idad

Elisha Miranda is an award-winning novelist and film-


maker, whose work has integrated issues of popular cul-
ture, race, feminism, politics and visual aesthetics into
unique hybrid narrative forms. Also being both a cultural
activist and entrepreneur, Elisha is committed to elevating
the quality of entertainment both through her personal ini-
tiatives and business ventures. With her business partner
Sofia Quintero, she founded Sister Outsider Entertainment,
a multimedia production company which is developing
several projects for television, film and stage including the
upcoming internet series SANGRIA STREET, the feature
documentary RACE WARS and the off-Broadway theater
production of PANDORA’S which premiered at Theater
Row in New York City.

Elisha graduated magna cum laude from the University of


California at Berkeley with a dual BA in Ethnic Studies
Elisha M. Miranda

and English. After years working as a teacher and Execu-


tive Director of a non-profit organization, Elisha received
the prestigious Community Fellowship at MIT, where she
graduated with her Master’s in City Planning.

In 2003, Elisha earned her MFA in directing and screen-


writing from Columbia University. Her feature script
OUTSIDE THE WALL about a Puerto Rican graffiti art-
ist struggling to be the next Frida Kahlo garnered many
awards, including the 2005 Tribeca-All-Access Winner.
Elisha was also featured in 2005 as one of HISPANIC
MAGAZINE’S, “Emerging Latina Voices in Filmmaking.

Elisha is also a writer under the pen name, E-Fierce . Her


debut young adult novel, THE SISTA HOOD: ON THE
MIC (the first book in a four part series) about a multi-ra-
cial, all female hip-hop crew was an official Latino Book
Award Select. Her second book in the SISTA HOOD se-
ries will be released in October of 2009. Currently, she is
writing her memoir RAISING CANE about four generations of Puerto Rican women from the sugar
cane fields to urban life.

Elisha co-founded Chica Luna Productions to identify, develop and support other women of color seek-
ing to make socially conscious entertainment. Chica Luna launched The F-Word, a comprehensive
filmmaking institute for women of color based in East Harlem in New York City. Elisha has also been
an instructor of screenwriting/directing at SUNY Purchase, Bard College and the City College of New
York and is a current Artist in Residence for the National Book Foundation’s Book Up NYC. She is a
member of the Lavin Agency, a highly selective speakers bureau for artists, activists, intellectuals and
celebrities.
Ce l eb r ando Lo Mejo r d e Nuestra C o m un idad

Hilda Rivera-Pantojas received an MA in Dance


Education at Teachers College, Columbia Univer-
sity and BA in Theater and Dance from the Univer-
sity of Puerto Rico. She is presently a member of
the Faculty at Boricua College and the Director of
Danza Fiesta: Baile y Teatro Puertorriqueño based
in New York City.

She was a dancer and choreographer for Gibaro de


Puerto Rico for more than two decades in which she
performed Puerto Rican folklore in many festivals
around the world. She served as director and chore-
ographer for the opening and closing ceremonies of
the XXIII Pan-American Games held in San Juan,
Puerto Rico. Ms Rivera –Pantojas directed 1,536
students who performed dances from Latin Ameri-
can countries. Because of her success in this proj-
ect, she co-founded and directed Ballet Isleño for 8
years. During Ms. Rivera-Pantojas direction, Ballet

Hilda Rivera-Pantojas
Isleño performed in the annual Macy’s Thanksgiv-
ing Day Parade and consequently won first prize for
their participation in this event.

After more than thirty years as a dance teacher,


professional dancer and choreographer, Hilda Ri-
vera-Pantojas realized her lifelong dream to create
a Puerto Rican Folk dance company by founding
Danza Fiesta; Baile y Teatro Puertorriqueño.

Ms. Rivera-Pantojas is currently working on the cre-


ation of a model dance curriculum in Puerto Rican
public schools, and a book about folk Puerto Rican
dances. She has received numerous awards from
Puerto Rican institutions based in NYC amongst
these; La Casa de la Herencia Puertorriqueña and
el Instituto de Puerto Rico. Most recently, Ms. Ri-
vera-Pantojas has been distinguished with the Union
Square Award, recognizing her for a bilingual dance
workshop program developed for children of the
public school 114 located in the South Bronx.
Ce l eb r ando Lo Mejo r d e Nuestra C o m un idad

Rafael J. Rivera-Viruet was born in Utuado, Puerto Rico and living


in the mountains he could not attend school, since the nearest one
was over 20 miles away, so at the age of nine he was sent to New
York. He lived in the South Bronx and graduated from Morris High
School with high honors. After graduating from Baruch College with
a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and Finance, Rafael
became the first Puerto Rican in New York to be hired by the presti-
gious accounting firm of Price Waterhouse & Co.

During the 1960s and 1970s, Rafael was active in the political scene
to improve the quality of life of the residents of the South Bronx. He
became a liaison for Congressman James Scheuer and special aide to
Assemblyman Robert Garcia. The importance of education lead him
to join ASPIRA as a member of the Board of Directors.

His financial background was instrumental in learning the “business


of show business” where he worked on film and television projects as
The Captain Kangaroo Show, On Golden Pond and Sophie’s Choice,
Rafael Rivera Viruet

and produced the original animation dialog tracks for Marvel Com-
ics’ animation series Spiderman, Fantastic Four and Iron Man for
Fox Television Network.

Rafael realized that Latinos were not being properly represented in


the film and television industry, he spearheaded the formation of the
Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, the Latino Film Proj-
ect Program at Universal Studios, and the National Hispanic Media
Coalition to increase opportunities for all Latinos.

In 1996, Rafael returned to Puerto Rico, and was instrumental in form-


ing the Association of Independent Producers (APCA) to increase
employment and production activity in the Island. He wrote and pro-
duced a number of programs and documentaries for PBS including
The Golden Age of Salsa, which chronicles the birth and history of Salsa music. He was then contracted
by the City of San Juan, Puerto Rico to produce the award winning documentary film that preserves the
culture of the Island: San Juan - A City for All. In 2005, Rafael was selected by the Center for Puerto
Rican Studies at Hunter College to write, produce and direct the documentary film series Politics Con
Sabor, which chronicles the history of the empowerment of Hispanics in New York State from the early
1920s to the present. In 2007, Rafael was selected by EL DIARIO/LA PRENSA as a recipient of the El
Awards and was honored as the Padrino of the Yonkers Puerto Rican Day Parade.

Rafael is also an award winning author of the coffee table book Hollywood… Se Habla Español, which
chronicles one hundred years of Latinos in Hollywood films and establishes the Hispanic Hollywood
Hall of Fame, yesterday… today and tomorrow
Ce l eb r ando Lo Mejo r d e Nuestra C o m un idad

Trinity Aurelia Padilla was born in New York City


and raised in the Bronx, NY. She received her B.A.
in Political Science and M.B.A with in Finance and
International Business from Pace University.

Trinity works as the Senior Financial Analyst for


PepsiCo, Inc. and is a spokesperson for the Hispan-
ic Community via PepsiCo’s Adelante and WOC
(Women of Color) organizations.

In 2000 she received the Comité Noviembre Schol-


arship while at Pace University. In 2003, she won
the title of Miss Puerto Rico – NPRP. Trinity’s
experience and travel with the National Puerto
Rican Day Parade was a magnificent journey that
heightened her knowledge of Puerto Rican culture
and stimulated her passion for community affairs.
Trinity volunteered with the National Puerto Rican
Day Parade Pageant Committee from 2004 through
Trinity A. Padilla
2006, aiming to empower and encourage young
women within the Latino community to achieve
their academic and social ambitions.

In 2006, Trinity was nominated and sworn in to


serve on the Board of Directors to the National
Puerto Rican Day Parade, Inc. as Executive Secre-
tary. Trinity has continued to work with the annual
Miss Puerto Rico- NPRP pageant in addition to
various events and projects related to the organiza-
tion. Trinity’s community efforts were recognized
in 2007, when “Entre Nosotras,” Inc., Hon. Carmen
E. Arroyo - NYS Assemblywoman, and Hon. Peter
Rivera presented Trinity with the 2007 Young La-
tina Role Model recognition.
Ce l eb r ando Lo Mejo r d e Nuestra C o m un idad

Rosa Valentin is an individual that devotes her time, en-


ergy and talent to promoting and educating Puerto Ricans
and others about our Puerto Rican culture and heritage.
Her daily and sometimes multiple blast emails on the is-
sues that are affecting our community from petitions to
make Judge Sonia Sotomayor, the first Latina Supreme
Court Justice, to now naming a street after her, to promot-
ing the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights Annual
Conference to sending information on employment oppor-
tunities to everyday events and information on new up and
coming young Latino entertainers ad musicians. The up-
lifting news about our community that she distributes truly
promotes, acknowledges and celebrates the Puerto Rican
community. What is also unique about her and her out-
reach is that she engages you into action by her inspiring
words on an issue, a play, a book, a concert or conference
at the end of the email you are either, smiling, laughing,
proud, or “pissed off” and ready to do something about the
Rosa Valentin

situation. Rosa is our electronic Puerto Rican community


news guru.

By profession, she is an Administrative Assistant to the


Assistant Vice President for Faculty and Staff Relations of
The Graduate Center CUNY..She is presently pursuing a
Bachelor’s degree in Public Administratio at John Jay Col-
lege of Criminal Justice. Rosa is a producer and web coor-
dinator of the Diamante Show, and Board Member of the
Green Thump Diamante Gardens on 118th Street in Span-
ish Harlem. As Vice President of the New Jersey Fiestas
Patronales Committee she helped raised over $70,000 for
educational scholarships and donations to other non-profit
organizations. She is an active member of her communi-
ty serving as a member, volunteer and activist of several
community based organizations, including the National
Congress for Puerto Rican Rights.
The Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc. is a nonprofit multi-service organization serv-
ing New York’s growing Latino and other ethnic/racial minority seniors, and their families. The Institute
serves over 100,000 minority seniors every year through its central offices in Manhattan, four borough
offices, and ten senior centers across the City. These senior centers are located in the City’s neediest neigh-
borhoods and several are based in public housing developments.

The Institute provides critical multi-lingual multicultural counseling, case management, advocacy, infor-
mation and referral services, and housing to New York’s most vulnerable population ---senior citizens,
who live on small fixed incomes, are all too often abused and alienated, and live in fear for their future
health and well-being. IPR/HE is an advocate and defender of their rights and entitlements under the law,
with special programs to prevent seniors from falling prey to fraud, abuse, domestic violence, crime , and
malnutrition. The Institute’s mission is to make their “golden years” fruitful, peaceful and fulfilled by di-
rectly impacting on the quality of their lives through our intervention programs mentioned above, as well
as our many social and cultural activities, civic empowerment education, leadership development training,
and conferences and workshops on important topics for seniors and their families. The Institute is also
home to the dynamic Hispanic Senior Action Council with over 6000 members and network of 100,000
participants.

The Institute serves as an important resource for non-profit organizations, government agencies and busi-
nesses throughout the United States and Puerto Rico by providing technical assistance, training, and con-
sultation in areas such as culturally responsive service delivery and access to minority communities. The
Institute founded the Minority Aging Defense Council, co-founded the Hispanic AIDS Forum, sponsored
the Coalition of Hispanic Service Providers, and is a founding member of Comite Noviembre.

Suleika Cabrera, President, IPR/HE & First Vice Chair, Comite Noviembre
Angel Santini, IPR/HE Staff & Coordinator, Comité Noviembre
Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly
105 East 22nd Street Suite 615, New York, NY 10010, (212) 677-4181; (212) 777-5106
IN THE HEALTH CARE REFORM DEBATE
PUERTO RICAN VOICES MUST UNITE TO BE HEARD
…MAINLAND POVERTY AND ISLAND UNEQUAL ACCESS
TO HEALTH CARE FUNDING
DEMAND IT!
By Suleika Cabrera Drinane
Institute for Puerto Rican and Hispanic Elderly, Inc.
The face of our city is changing. Today nearly fifty percent of the city’s older population is made up of
minorities and/or immigrants. Puerto Ricans represent the largest percentage of New York City’s older
Hispanics, and is still its largest ethnic population.

Boricuas continue to battle high levels of unemployment, poverty, and low academic achievement.
Significant health disparities, lack of adequate or no health insurance, and the lowest average family income
among all Hispanics makes Puerto Ricans particularly vulnerable to the ills of our current dysfunctional
health care system — both those living here on the mainland and those living back home on the Island.

Though Puerto Ricans were granted citizenship in 1917 and had already started to migrate to the mainland
as early as the late 1800s, the largest numbers arrived to the northeast and New York City in particular,
after WWII. Notwithstanding citizenship, Puerto Rican older adults today—many of them Veterans and
their spouses here and on the Island, battle lack of access to quality health care and are disproportionately
dependent on Medicare and/or Medicaid to cover their care.

They also face additional barriers to high-quality medical care from the lack of Spanish speaking and
culturally-competent healthcare providers, to the need to travel long distances to their approved providers’
offices, to lack of finances to pay for out-of-pocket expenses and prescription drugs. As a result, they bear
a disproportionate burden of illness and premature death.

Adding insult to injury for all Puerto Ricans, back on the Island almost four million U.S. citizens are not
treated equally under all Federal health care programs. For example, allowable Federal Medicaid support
in the 50 states is approximately $330 for each participant per month, compared to just $20 per participant
in Puerto Rico.

The reality of aging and retirement for those living in poverty and that face numerous health disparities
and chronic diseases puts all Hispanics that disproportionately suffer these realities at a tremendous and
dangerous disadvantage in effecting the Health Care Reform debate. Within this context, our mainland
Puerto Rican elderly and their families are particularly invisible.

The blatant systemic discrimination from Washington towards the Island that treats our elderly and families
living there as second class citizens when it comes to Federal underwriting of health care, creates an even
greater need for all Boricuas to unite and ensure that the debate addresses the needs of all of our people
here, and in Puerto Rico.

We must support President Obama’s campaign to reform healthcare, and demand that one of its main
tenets be absolute and equal access to quality care for all U.S. citizens wherever they happen to reside.
The Puerto Rican and Hispanic community must come together and stand ready to aggressively pursue the
IN THE HEALTH CARE REFORM DEBATE
PUERTO RICAN VOICES MUST UNITE TO BE HEARD...continued

success of these measures, right now.

We must advocate for a comprehensive and effective health reform policy that takes into consideration
the needs of all Hispanic and other minority seniors and families. Comprehensive health care reform
should: reduce long-term growth of health care costs for business and government; protect families from
bankruptcy or debt because of rising health care costs; guarantee choice of doctors and health plans;
invest in prevention and wellness; improve patient safety and quality of care; assure affordable, quality
health coverage for all Americans; maintain coverage when individuals change or lose their jobs; and end
barriers to coverage for people with pre-existing medical conditions.

Given the serious health disparities in our communities of color, we must also ensure effective health
care reform via expansion of Medicare, Medicaid, and CHIP; subsidized coverage for the near-poor;
private sector catastrophic insurance policies; state subsidies for uncompensated care—and expansion of
the Federal Community Health Center Program and the National Health Service Corps.

As Puerto Ricans we must make sure that it becomes a priority for the Obama Administration to end
current eligibility and funding disparities in the treatment of Puerto Rico, and finally bring the Island to
full parity in funding and quality of care within the American national health care system. Puerto Rico
and its residents must have full participation in the Medicaid, Medicare, and CHIP programs as part of
any health care reform initiative.

The Institute for Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc. (IPR/HE) has been an advocacy and multi service
organization for the past 33 years in this City. IPR/HE also created the 6000 member Hispanic Senior
Action Council to organize and promote civic participation and advocate for equal treatment and access to
services for all Hispanics and minorities in this city, state and nation.

The IPR/HE network is totally committed to health care reform that can garner broad bipartisan support,
preserve the parts of the existing health care system that work, ensures equitable access for all Americans,
expands coverage, and increases quality of care. As a Puerto Rican/Hispanic organization we stand with
Puerto Rico to seek justice and equity for our elderly and families on the Island, once and for all.
HISTORY
ASPIRA was founded in New York City in 1961 by Dra. Antonia Pantoja to com-
bat the exorbitant dropout rate among Puerto Rican high school youth and became
incorporated in New York State on May 24th, 1965. In 1968, ASPIRA of America
(today known as the ASPIRA Association now based in Washington, D.C.) was
created. Since then, the ASPIRA movement has grown and established additional
SASPIRA associate offices in Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, Pennsyl-
vania and Puerto Rico.
MISSION
To foster the social advancement of the Puerto Rican/Latino community by supporting its youth in the pursuit of
educational excellence through leadership development activities and programs that emphasizes commitment to the
community and pride in the Puerto Rican/Latino culture.
VISION STATEMENT
To be the premier Latino youth-serving organization in New York, to the 38%, roughly 1.1 million New York City
public school students who are Latino, aspire to improve their lives and community by exercising their leadership
skills and by achieving educational excellence.
ABOUT ASPIRA OF NEW YORK, INC.
ASPIRA of New York, Inc. serves over 8,000 Latino youth and families annually in the areas of youth development,
educational achievement, leadership and parent engagement. ASPIRA’s current menu of program services, incor-
porate both in-school and after school programs with over 85% of all services being delivered on school grounds.
These programs and services include:
• Over 25 ASPIRA leadership clubs in High Schools
• Drop-out prevention and attendance improvement services in high schools and middle school
• SAT preparation courses
• College counseling and other advisement services
• 21st Century Community Learning Centers
• After School neighborhood based services in the Mott Haven and Kingsbridge sections of the Bronx
• ASPIRA volunteer Initiative Program which links corporate and individual volunteers as mentors androle mod-
els for ASPIRA Youth
• In recent years ASPIRA of New York, Inc. has become active in the arena of small school reform resulting in
the creation of:
• The Marble Hill School for International Studies, a small college-preparatory high school focusing on global
awareness and language acquisition.
• The Bronx Studio School for Writers and Artists, a small 6th — 12th grade combined middle & senior high
school located in the heart of the South Bronx
ASPIRA of New York is committed to:
• Effectively engaging Latino youth and their families.
• Collaborating with organizations that affect the lives of young people in a positive way.
• Seeking to positively change attitudes among young people and between youth and adults.
• Preparing young people to be leaders and decision makers in all aspects of their lives.
• Working to influence policies and practices that reflect the aspirations and contributions of young people as full
valued members of the communities they live in and of society at large.

ASPIRA OF NEW YORK, INC.


520 Eighth Avenue, 22nd Floor, New York, NY 10018
(212) 564-6880, (212) 564-7152 (f), www.nyaspira.org
Hector Gesualdo, Executive Director
Hector Artiles, Student Leadership Program

ASPIRA: “to aspire”


COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE
mes de la herencia puertorriqueña
&
ASPIRA OF NEW YORK

15TH ANNUAL
DAY OF COMMUNITY SERVICE AND
SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2009
IPRHE/UPACA Senior Center
1940 Lexington Avenue (between 119th and 120th Streets) NYC
11AM TO 4PM

FOOD DRIVE - NON-PERISHABLE FOODS

ITEMS NEEDED TO CREATE A TYPICAL PUERTO RICAN THANKSGIVING MEAL


RICE 5LB BAG OF POTATOES COOKIES
GANDULES MAYONNAISE PERMALOT MILK
CANNED HAMS CRANBERRY SAUCE SODA
BROWN SUGAR/MAPLE SYRUP GRAVY COFFEE
CLOVES STUFFING (BOX) SUGAR
CANNED SLICED PINEAPPLES CANNED FRUITS MEDIUM/LARGE BASKETS
CANNED YAMS (PINEAPPLES, PEACHES, FRUIT NAPKINS
CANNED VEGETABLES COCKTAIL)
(CORN, GREEN BEANS MIXED) CRACKERS
For the past fourteen years, Comité Noviembre has set aside the Sunday before Thanksgiving as a day of community
service and social responsibility in commemoration of November 19th, traditionally known as Puerto Rican discovery day
or as we like to call it Puerto Rican “encounter” day. The purpose of the day is to show the spirit of commitment and the
power of action. Over the past years, this event has been a great success and organizations throughout the city have ben-
efited from this collaboration, including homeless and battered women’s shelters and senior centers as well as individual
families.
Community service and social responsibility are the strongholds of the Puerto Rican community. Throughout the years
our experience has shown us that when we dedicate ourselves to improving the quality of life of those around us, we build
a more unified and stronger society.
Comite Noviembre urges you to conduct your own food drive at your work place, church, school or simply participate in
this day as a volunteer

Live the Spirit of Commitment and the Power of Action Come Join Us!
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED BEFORE AND AFTER THIS DATE FOR FOOD COLLECTION AND DISTRIBUTION!

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT HECTOR ARTILES AT ASPIRA (212) 564-6880 x. 115
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Highlights of the 14th Annual


CN/ASPIRA DAY OF COMMUNITY
SERVICE & SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

Last year, the event was supposed to start at 11AM at the


IPRHE/UPACA Senior Center in East Harlem when ASPIRA
students, Comité Noviembre members and volunteers arrived
at 10AM to set up for the event and open the doors, the line of
people waiting to receive our food donations went around the
corner most there since 8AM. They came from as far as Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx. By 2PM the over 4,500
cans of food collected by the 18 ASPIRA Clubs were gone and 110 turkeys distributed. And still there was a list of
over 50 families that did not receive.
CN along with ASPIRA of New York conducted a food drive of non-perishable foods, to create Thanksgiving
dinner baskets for the poor of New York. The goal was to create 75 food baskets. The ASPIRA Clubs in 18 high
schools around the entire City of New York conducted food drives at each of the clubs. The drive garnered over
4,500 cans of foods. The items of non-perishable foods collected created a typical Puerto Rican Thanksgiving
meal were: rice, gandules, canned hams, brown sugar/maple syrup, cloves, canned sliced pineapples, canned yams,
canned vegetables (corn, green beans mixed), 5lb bag of potatoes. The food boxes were prepared and distributed
by ASPIRANTES and volunteers the Tuesday before Thanksgiving to needy families as well as to the families that
showed up to the UPACA Senior Center the day of the drive. And yes those 50 families on the list received 10lb
turkeys from Comité Noviembre. CN has also worked with local supermarkets and business leaders to provide
turkeys to each family. CN wants to specifically thank Carlos D. Nazario, former Chairmen of PROMESA for his
generous donation of turkeys and Rafael Toro of GOYA Foods, Inc. for the company’s donation.
In these tough economic times it is very difficult to provide for our own families however community service and
social responsibility are the strongholds of the Puerto Rican community. Throughout the years our experience has
shown us that when we dedicate ourselves to improving the quality of life of those around us, we build a more
unified and stronger society. CN urges each and every one of you to conduct your own food drives in your schools,
colleges/universities, work place, churches, hospitals and supermarkets and help us feed the needy and hungry in
our community. It just takes one person to ask the question – the only thing they can do is say No the best thing that
can happen is that we make a solid difference.
For more information please contact Hector R. Artiles Jr., Leadership Development Program
ASPIRA of New York, Inc., (212) 564 - 6880 Ext 115 or (646) 360 - 0413 (Cell)
or Teresa A. Santiago at (914) 263-6599
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COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE
SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS PROGRAM

Fourteen Years of Success


For the past twenty-three years, CN, has created and developed programs all geared to the support and
enhancement of educational opportunities and leadership development for Puerto Rican youth with a
cultural twist. These programs are firmly rooted in the belief, that in order to succeed in life, you must
pursue a higher education, give back to your community through volunteer efforts and know your cultural
ancestral history. Focusing on educational excellence and leadership development is the key to the future
of the Puerto Rican community.

In celebration of its tenth anniversary, the CN Scholarship Awards Program (CNSAP) was established. To
date, CNSAP has awarded 170 scholarships boasting a 90% college graduation rate since the inception in
1996. The scholarships are for $1,000. The selection process is competitive and documented community
service is, key to be selected.

To be eligible for the CN scholarship award, applicants must be of Puerto Rican descent; have a minimum
of one full year of community service experience; be enrolled in an accredited college or university by the
Fall of the applying year and have a B average or better. The application process includes an application
form, an essay, two letters of recommendation, academic transcripts, a short biographical sketch, and a
personal interview for finalists.

In 2006, to commemorate its 20th anniversary, CN enhanced the Scholarship Program to continue to
award the top two scholars $1,000 scholarships each year until graduation. These scholars must maintain a
3.5 grade point average and documented community work within the Puerto Rican community to continue
to receive the $1,000 scholarship for the full four years.

Comité Noviembre selects leaders from various sectors of the community who have demonstrated genuine
interest in the educational excellence of our youth to serve on the selection committee. Currently, the com-
mittee members are: Co-Chairs: Deacon Jaime Bello, Holy Cross Church and Jane Arce-Bello, education
and youth advocate; Elba Cabrera, community leader, Lourdes R. Torres, Executive Assistant to the Pro-
vost and Director of Administration, Budget & Grants Management, Hostos Community College, CUNY,
Pedro Lugo - educator; and Teresa A. Santiago, Chairperson, Comité Noviembre.

The 2009 CNSAP process is underway. To receive an application please email the contact name and mail-
ing address to Jaime Bello at jaimebello@optonline.net, or visit our website at www.comitenoviembre.org
to download a copy of the application.
COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE
SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

Charles J. Barrios Mariliam Padilla


Freshman Freshman
St. John’s University University of Connecticut

Rafferty Rodriguez
Audrey Camejo Freshman
Freshman Rutgers University
Mercy College

Jaime Soto
Altagracia Fontanez Freshman
Sophomore College of Mt. St Vincent’s
Boricua College

Continuing Scholars
Janine Nazario The following scholars were one of the top two
Freshman in there year of selection. These scholars have
Long Island University maintained a 3.5 grade point average and docu-
mented community and volunteer work within
the Puerto Rican community. CN will continue to
award $1,000 scholarships.
Louis Sanchez, Junior, Fordham University
Nicholas Berrios, Junior, Farmingdale College
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2008 Buscando Nuestra Raíces


Third Annual Trip to Puerto Rico Highlights
Thursday, August 6, 2009 – Thursday, August 13, 2009
Embassy Suites Hotel and Casino, Isla Verde, Puerto Rico
This trip was billed as an adventure into a cultural and educational experience for Puerto Ricans and others who want to
explore the richness of Puerto Rico’s culture, ancestral roots and history. Making this trip a reality was a natural progres-
sion of CN’s mission and goals. As we planned this trip we took into account that many of us although we visit the island
frequently rarely visit the cultural and historical sites and landmarks unique to Puerto Rico and renowned throughout the
world. The itinerary planned took our participants on a journey you will remember for many years to come.

• Explored the fiesty town of Comerio


• Lo Lai Festival at la Plaza de la Dársena in San Juan
• Board la Agua Guagua for 20 minute tour of “la bahia de San Juan”
• Walking tour of Old San Juan will include visits to Plaza de Armas, City Hall, Cathedral and other historical land-
marks
• Tour of La Plaza del Mercado in Santurce, a public market boasting different kiosks around a square of renovated
buildings that showcase beautiful architecture.
• Noche Bohemia’ at Café de la Plaza, with dinner, music and dancing.
• Historical overview and tour of Mayagüez, La Porta del Sol, birthplace of abolitionist Ramón Emeterio Betances and
patriot Eugenio María de Hostos. The tour included visits to the impressive Spanish-style Plaza Colon, a tribute to
Christopher Columbus, whose stature stands in the middle of the square, surrounded by 16 bronze statues, the Yagüez
Theater, Mayagüez City Hall and Post Office, both historic landmarks, the Eugeio María de Hostos Museum the 19th-
century bakery Brazo Gitano Franco where the famous brazo gitano (gypsy’s arm; a jam sponge cake presented in the
style of a Swiss roll) was created
• Tour of La Fundación Luis Muñoz Marín in Trujillo Alto. The visit was a retrospect of the life and times of the late
Governor Luis Muñóz Marín, Puerto Rico’s first elected chief executive. This 4-acre private residence in rural San
Juan will come alive through photography, memorabilia and beautiful grounds.
• Tour of the newly opened Conservatorio de Música de Puerto Rico – Puerto Rico’s Conservatory of Music, an 18-cen-
tury architectural wonder and presentation on the classical music of Puerto Rico.
• Screening of the film, “El Cimarrón,” at El Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico/Puerto Rico’s Museum of Art followed by
a reception and Q&A with film’s producers, director and actors. El Cimarrón is an uplifting and historically accurate
love story about a young enslaved African couple, at the turn of the nineteen-century in Puerto Rico.
• Visit to La Universidad de Puerto Rico- University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras. The university is the premier state-of-
the-art higher education institution in Puerto Rico specializing in science, mathematics and engineering. Visit includ-
ed a tour of its museum where Francisco Oller’s El velorio / The Wake, 1893, is housed.
• Tour of La Fortaleza and Gardens, the official residence of the Governor of Puerto Rico. Reception hosted by First
Lady
• Fiesta de Despedida – Paying tribute to Paquito Cordero and Tommy Muñiz, the founding fathers, of Puerto Rican ra-
dio and televison and honoring Javier Santiago, Founder and President of Fundación Nacional Para la Cultura Popular
and Honorable William Miranda Marin, Mayor of Caguas.
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2009 Buscando Nuestras Raíces

Join us
next year!
Celebrating Over Four Decades
of Educational Excellence
Hostos Community College was created by an act of the Board of Higher Education on April 22, 1968, in response to the demands
of Puerto Rican and other Hispanic leaders who urged the establishment of a college to meet the needs of the South Bronx. In
September 1970, Hostos admitted a charter class of 623 students at the site of a former tire factory at 475 Grand Concourse.
Enrollment grew rapidly to more than 2,000 students by June 1974. In the same year, the state legislature acted to ease an
increasing space shortage by passing a special bill to acquire the “500 Building” across the Grand Concourse from the original
site. Today, the campus has six buildings, three of which have been specially designed to meet the institution’s needs. Hostos
takes pride in its well-equipped science, mathematics, writing, and computer labs, its excellent physical education facilities, and
its state-of-the-art theaters. We are also proud of our growth and our diversity. This semester, the student population exceeded
6,100, with first-time freshmen alone numbering 1,235, which is nearly twice the enrollment of the 623-member charter class
in 1970. And in terms of diversity, this class includes students from 66 different countries all over the world!

The mission of Hostos Community College is to offer access to higher education leading to intellectual growth and socioeconomic
mobility through the development of linguistic, mathematical, and critical thinking proficiencies needed for lifelong learning
and for success in a variety of programs including careers, liberal arts, transfer, and those professional programs leading to
licensure. The vision is to make Hostos Community College a “college of excellence” for students seeking a liberal arts or
career education in a dual language, multicultural learning environment.

On July 1, 2009, Eugenio María de Hostos Community College of CUNY welcomed Dr. Félix
V. Matos Rodriguez as its new president. Trained as a social scientist, Dr. Matos Rodríguez
previously held leadership positions in foundations, universities, policy centers, and branches of
government in which he combined his scholarship with social policy, advocacy, and change.

While at Hostos, Dr. Matos Rodríguez is on leave from his tenured position as an Associate
Professor of Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Studies at Hunter College of CUNY, where he
teaches courses on Caribbean, Latin American, and Latino history. He has also served as director
of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter, which is one of the largest and most important
Latino research centers in the United States. In addition, Dr. Matos Rodríguez is part of the
History Department at CUNY’s Graduate Center.

Dr. Matos Rodríguez has an extensive publication record in the fields of Women’s, Puerto Rican,
Caribbean, and Latino Studies and Migration. He has also served as Secretary of the Department
of the Family for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

Expressing his commitment to the mission and vision of Hostos, Dr. Matos Rodríguez has said: “For over four decades, Hostos
has been a gateway to educational advancement and professional opportunity. It is also an economic and cultural anchor for
the communities it serves. We must never forget that Hostos was created, fought for, and nurtured by the people of the Bronx.
As its president, I hope to continue building on the achievements in student life and support, academic offerings, faculty
innovation, and community involvement that have characterized this institution over the years.”

HOSTOS IS PROUD TO BE A MEMBER AGENCY OF COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE.


Dr. Felix V. Matos Rodriguez, President
Lourdes R. Torres, Comité Noviembre Representative
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College
500 Grand Concourse Bronx, NY 10451
www.hostos.cuny.edu
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Fourth Annual Artisans Fair & Exhibit


For the past three years, CN has invited artisans from
throughout the US and Puerto Rico to participate in
this Fair. The number of participating artisans has
increased from 40 to over 60. Over the years, CN has
transformed, Hunter College West Building and the
Church of St. Paul the Apostle into a typical Puerto
Rican plaza with a fountain, palm trees, piragua and
coquito carts and artists, sculptors, vejigante mask
makers promoting and selling their wares while
musical and cultural acts entertained throughout the
day. Additionally each year, CN conducts workshops
for children and adults, like mask making, the history
of the three kings’ celebration, Taíno storytelling in
order to make sure that our youth learn about our
culture.

The year CN will conduct its First Annual Health


Fair that will run concurrently with its Fourth Annual
Artisans Fair & Exhibit on Saturday, November
21, 2009 at Eugenio María de Hostos Community
College in the Bronx, from 10AM – 7PM. The Health
component of the Fair was added because of the great
number of residents concentrated in the Bronx and
neighboring boroughs with chronic diseases such
as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and
obesity. CN board member and health professional
Henry Cruz will Chair the Health Fair Committee and
was instrumental in the decision to create this Health
component.

Since its inception in 2006, the Artisans Fair has


boasted an attendance of over 5000 people from the
tri-state area with numbers growing steady from year
to year. With this proven track record of attracting
substantial community participation CN believes that
it will be saving lives by adding this Health segment
to the Fair. So come and take advantage of an
opportunity to kick off your holiday shopping season
and at the same time kick-off the New Year healthy.

Photos by Robert Figueroa


Fourth Annual Artisans Fair & Exhibit

Photos by
Robert Figueroa
Puerto Rican
Legal Defense and
Education Fund
Founded in 1972 as the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, LatinoJustice PRLDEF has played a critical role in
improving the lives and well-being of the now 8 million Puerto Ricans and more than 30 million other Latinos in the United
States. LatinoJustice PRLDEF has worked to secure, promote and protect the civil rights of the Puerto Rican and wider Latino
community, making it a leading civil rights organization and one of the premiere Latino organizations in the country.

EDUCATION RIGHTS: The Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund’s first lawsuit, ASPIRA v. NYC Board of Edu-
cation, resulted in the groundbreaking ASPIRA Consent Decree which forced the school system to implement bilingual educa-
tion techniques to effectively instruct students who spoke mostly Spanish. Since then, LatinoJustice PRLDEF has combated
the forced segregation of Latino children in many parts of the country. The group has successfully intervened in desegrega-
tion cases in Wilmington, DE; Waterbury, CT; Buffalo, NY, and Boston, MA. LatinoJustice PRLDEF also brought a lawsuit
challenging a decision to the double the tuition rates for undocumented students at CUNY. A political victory ensued, which
allowed students graduating from NYS high schools to be eligible for State tuition rates.

EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS: In 1972, in two class action suits against the NYC Police Department, LatinoJustice PRLDEF was
able to get the courts to force the department to institute fair hiring and promotional practices which increased the number of
Latino officers and sergeants. Additionally, the group filed an unfair labor practice charge with the National Labor Relations
Board resulting in a $1.075 million settlement on behalf of Latino immigrant employees at a food processing plant. In 2002,
LatinoJustice PRLDEF intervened in an EEOC suit against a Connecticut beauty supply company, for its imposition of an il-
legal English-only policy against its Latino employees.

VOTING RIGHTS: In 1973, as a result of a LatinoJustice PRLDEF court victory, for the first time in NYC history bilingual
ballots and interpreters, in English, Spanish and Chinese, were provided to parents to vote in the school board elections. The
same legal arguments were applied in the landmark voting rights case, Torres v. Sachs, which required the use of bilingual bal-
lots for all NYC elections. In 1975 the federal Voting Rights Act was amended which secured the voting rights of all linguistic
minorities throughout the country. In 1981, LatinoJustice PRLDEF successfully challenged the redistricting plan passed by the
City Council and signed into law by the Mayor, which had been drawn to preclude additional minority representation on the
City Council.

HOUSING RIGHTS: More than 30 years ago, LatinoJustice PRLDEF sued the NYC Housing Authority proving discrimina-
tion against Latin and African-American applicants for apartments in three housing projects in Williamsburg. After years of
litigation, the parties agreed to a far-reaching settlement in 2002. In 1977, the group filed a class action suit against a Lower
East Side co-operative which would not make apartments available to Latinos. Since then, LatinoJustice PRLDEF has fought
for the rights of tenants in Brooklyn, against housing discrimination in city-owned apartments and for access rights to housing
in Newark and Hartford.

FROM MIGRANTS’ TO IMMIGRANTS’ RIGHTS: In 1972, the group challenged the State of New Jersey and the Common-
wealth of Puerto Rico for deliberately failing to protect the rights of migrant farm laborers throughout the state. Recently, in
Hazleton, PA, LatinoJustice PRLDEF challenged a virulently anti-immigrant ordinance that fined employers or landlords who
hired or rented to undocumented immigrants and limited all government business to English only. This ordinance had tremen-
dous impact nationally; since it was introduced in June 2006, at least 80 localities have proposed or passed laws modeled on
it. LatinoJustice PRLDEF was successful in blocking the ordinance’s implementation after a federal judge granted permanent
injunctive relief which enjoined Hazleton from putting the challenged ordinance into place.

DIVERSIFYING AMERICA’S LEGAL SYSTEM: Since its inception, the organization’s Education Division has been com-
mitted to increasing the diversity of the legal profession. LatinoJustice PRLDEF offers preparatory courses for students who
wish to pursue a law degree, along with other education programs.

LatinoJustice PRLDEF, 99 Hudson Street 14th Floor, New York, NY 10013


Cesar Perales, Esq., President and General Counsel, (212) 219-3360, info@prldef.org
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor
“Extraordinary Journey: From modest beginnings to the
highest court in the United States”
Sonia Sotomayor made history on August 6, 2009 when the United States Senate
confirmed her nomination as the nation’s first Latina Supreme Court Justice. She is
the court’s 111th Justice and only the third woman to serve on the high court.

Sotomayor has often publicly attributed much of her success in life with her
upbringing in a close-knit Puerto Rican family and she has been a source of great
pride for members of the Puerto Rican community across the mainland United States
and on the island.

Sonia Sotomayor has served as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for
the Second Circuit since October 1998. She has been hailed as “one of the ablest
federal judges currently sitting” for her thoughtful opinions, and as “a role model of
aspiration, discipline, commitment, intellectual prowess and integrity” for her ascent
to the federal bench from an upbringing in a South Bronx housing project.

Her American story and three decade career in nearly every aspect of the law provided
Judge Sotomayor with unique qualifications to be the next Supreme Court Justice.
She is a distinguished graduate of two of America’s leading universities. She has
been a big-city prosecutor and a corporate litigator. Before she was promoted to the
Second Circuit by President Clinton, she was appointed to the District Court for the
Southern District of New York by President George H.W. Bush. She replaces Justice Souter as the only Justice with
experience as a trial judge.

Judge Sotomayor served 11 years on the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, one of the most demanding
circuits in the country, and handed down decisions on a range of complex legal and constitutional issues. Sotomayor
brings more federal judicial experience to the Supreme Court than any justice in 100 years, and more overall judicial
experience than anyone confirmed for the Court in the past 70 years. Judge Richard C. Wesley, a George W. Bush
appointee to the Second Circuit, said “Sonia is an outstanding colleague with a keen legal mind. She brings a wealth
of knowledge and hard work to all her endeavors on our court. It is both a pleasure and an honor to serve with
her.”

In addition to her distinguished judicial service, Judge Sotomayor is a


Lecturer at Columbia University Law School and was also an adjunct
professor at New York University Law School until 2007.

An American Story
Judge Sonia Sotomayor has lived the American dream. Born to a Puerto
Rican family, she grew up in a public housing project in the South Bronx.
Her parents moved to New York during World War II – her mother served
in the Women’s Auxiliary Corps during the war. Her father, a factory
worker with a third-grade education, died when Sotomayor was nine years
old. Her mother, a nurse, then raised Sotomayor and her younger brother,
Juan, now a physician in Syracuse. After her father’s death, Sotomayor
turned to books for solace, and it was her new found love of Nancy Drew
that inspired a love of reading and learning, a path that ultimately led her President Obama meets with Judge Sotomayor
to the law. and Vice President Biden prior to an an-
nouncement in the East Room, May 26, 2009
Most importantly, at an early age, her mother instilled in Sotomayor and
her brother a belief in the power of education. Driven by an indefatigable
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor
continued
work ethic, and rising to the challenge of managing a diagnosis of juvenile
diabetes, Sotomayor excelled in school. Sotomayor graduated as valedictorian
of her class at Blessed Sacrament and at Cardinal Spellman High School in
New York. She first heard about the Ivy League from her high school debate
coach, Ken Moy, who attended Princeton University, and she soon followed
in his footsteps after winning a scholarship.

At Princeton, she continued to excel, graduating summa cum laude, and Phi
Beta Kappa. She was a co-recipient of the M. Taylor Pyne Prize, the highest
honor Princeton awards to an undergraduate. At Yale Law School, Judge
Sotomayor served as an editor of the Yale Law Journal and as managing editor of the Yale Studies in World Public
Order. One of Sotomayor’s former Yale Law School classmates, Robert Klonoff (now Dean of Lewis & Clark
Law School), remembers her intellectual toughness from law school: “She would stand up for herself and not be
intimidated by anyone.”

A Fearless and Effective Prosecutor


Fresh out of Yale Law School, Judge Sotomayor became an Assistant District Attorney
in Manhattan in 1979, where she tried dozens of criminal cases over five years. Spending
nearly every day in the court room, her prosecutorial work typically involved “street
crimes,” such as murders and robberies, as well as child abuse, police misconduct, and
fraud cases. Robert Morgenthau, the person who hired Judge Sotomayor, has described
her as a “fearless and effective prosecutor.” [Wall Street Journal, 5/9/09] She was co-
counsel in the “Tarzan Murderer” case, which convicted a murderer to 67 and ½ years to
life in prison, and was sole counsel in a multiple-defendant case involving a Manhattan
housing project shooting between rival family groups.

A Corporate Litigator
She entered private practice in 1984, becoming a partner in 1988 at the firm Pavia and Harcourt. She was a general
civil litigator involved in all facets of commercial work including, real estate, employment, banking, contracts,
and agency law. In addition, her practice had a significant concentration in intellectual property law, including
trademark, copyright and unfair competition issues. Her typical clients were significant corporations doing
international business.

A Sharp and Fearless Trial Judge


Her judicial service began in October 1992 with her appointment to the
United States District Court for the Southern District of New York by
President George H.W. Bush. Still in her 30s, she was the youngest member
of the court. From 1992 to 1998, she presided over roughly 450 cases. As
a trial judge, she earned a reputation as a sharp and fearless jurist who
does not let powerful interests bully her into departing from the rule of
law. In 1995, for example, she issued an injunction against Major League
Baseball owners, effectively ending a baseball strike that had become
the longest work stoppage in professional sports history and had caused
the cancellation of the World Series the previous fall. She was widely
lauded for saving baseball. Claude Lewis of the Philadelphia Inquirer
Sotomayor, an avid fan of the Yankees with her wrote that by saving the season, Judge Sotomayor joined “the ranks of
nephews at Yankee Stadium in 2007
Joe DiMaggio, Willie Mays, Jackie Robinson and Ted Williams.”

A Tough, Fair and Thoughtful Jurist


President Clinton appointed Judge Sotomayor to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in 1998. She
is the first Latina to serve on that court, and has participated in over 3000 panel decisions, authoring roughly
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor
continued
400 published opinions. Sitting on the Second Circuit, Judge Sotomayor has tackled a range of questions: from
difficult issues of constitutional law, to complex procedural matters, to lawsuits involving complicated business
organizations. In this context, Sotomayor is widely admired as a judge with a sophisticated grasp of legal doctrine.
“’She appreciates the complexity of issues,’ said Stephen L. Carter, a Yale professor who teaches some of her
opinions in his classes. Confronted with a tough case, Carter said, ‘she doesn’t leap at its throat but reasons to get to
the bottom of issues.’” For example, in United States v. Quattrone, Judge Sotomayor concluded that the trial judge
had erred by forbidding the release of jurors’ names to the press, concluding after carefully weighing the competing
concerns that the trial judge’s concerns for a speedy and orderly trial must give way to the constitutional freedoms
of speech and the press.

Sotomayor also has keen awareness of the law’s impact on everyday life. Active in oral arguments, she works
tirelessly to probe both the factual details and the legal doctrines in the cases before her and to arrive at decisions
that are faithful to both. She understands that upholding the rule of law means going beyond legal theory to ensure
consistent, fair, common-sense application of the law to real-world facts. For example, In United States v. Reimer,
Judge Sotomayor wrote an opinion revoking the US citizenship for a man charged with working for the Nazis in
World War II Poland, guarding concentration camps and helping empty the Jewish ghettos. And in Lin v. Gonzales
and a series of similar cases, she ordered renewed consideration of the asylum claims of Chinese women who
experienced or were threatened with forced birth control, evincing in her opinions a keen awareness of those
women’s plights.

Judge Sotomayor’s appreciation of the real-world implications of judicial rulings is paralleled by her sensible
practicality in evaluating the actions of law enforcement officers. For example, in United States v. Falso, the
defendant was convicted of possessing child pornography after FBI agents searched his home with a warrant. The
warrant should not have been issued, but the agents did not know that, and Judge Sotomayor wrote for the court
that the officers’ good faith justified using the evidence they found. Similarly in United States v. Santa, Judge
Sotomayor ruled that when police search a suspect based on a mistaken belief that there is a valid arrest warrant out
on him, evidence found during the search should not be suppressed. Ten years later, in Herring v. United States, the
Supreme Court reached the same conclusion. In her 1997 confirmation hearing, Sotomayor spoke of her judicial
philosophy, saying” I don’t believe we should bend the Constitution under any circumstance. It says what it says.
We should do honor to it.” Her record on the Second Circuit holds true to that statement. For example, in Hankins v.
Lyght, she argued in dissent that the federal government risks “an unconstitutional trespass” if it attempts to dictate
to religious organizations who they can or cannot hire or dismiss as spiritual leaders. Since joining the Second
Circuit, Sotomayor has honored the Constitution, the rule of law, and justice, often forging consensus and winning
conservative colleagues to her point of view.

A Commitment to Community
Judge Sotomayor is deeply committed to her family, to her co-workers, and to her community. Judge Sotomayor
is a doting aunt to her brother Juan’s three children and an attentive godmother to five more. She still speaks to her
mother, who now lives in Florida, every day. At the courthouse, Judge Sotomayor helped found the collegiality
committee to foster stronger personal relationships among members of the court. Seizing an opportunity to lead
others on the path to success, she recruited judges to join her in inviting young women to the courthouse on Take
Your Daughter to Work Day, and mentors young students from troubled neighborhoods

Her favorite project, however, is the Development School for Youth program, which sponsors workshops for inner
city high school students. Every semester, approximately 70 students attend 16 weekly workshops that are designed
to teach them how to function in a work setting. The workshop leaders include investment bankers, corporate
executives and Judge Sotomayor, who conducts a workshop on the law for 25 to 35 students. In addition to the
workshop experience, each student is offered a summer job by one of the corporate sponsors. The experience is
rewarding for the lawyers and exciting for the students, commented Judge Sotomayor, as “it opens up possibilities
that the students never dreamed of before.” [Federal Bar Council News, Sept./Oct./Nov. 2005, p.20]

She has served as a member of the Second Circuit Task Force on Gender, Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Courts
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor
continued

and was formerly on the Boards of Directors of the New York Mortgage Agency, the New York City Campaign
Finance Board, and the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, now known as LatinoJustice PRLDEF.

Uniquely Puerto Rican & Wise Latina


Judge Sotomayor has often spoken fondly about the uniquely Puerto Rican experiences she has had throughout
her life. In a 2001 speech, she talked about the “platos de arroz, gandules y pernil” that she has eaten “at countless
family holidays and special events,” as well as “the sound of merengue at family
parties.”

“My Latina soul was nourished,” she went on, “as I visited and played at my
grandmother’s house with my cousins and extended family. They were my friends
as I grew up.”

In 2009, while her nomination to the court was pending, conservative politicians
criticized another part of the same speech, which she gave as the annual Judge
Mario G. Olmos Law and Cultural Diversity Lecture at the University of California,
Berkeley. In it, she paraphrased a saying that both Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and
Sandra Day O’Connor have quoted, that a “wise old woman’’ and a “wise old man’’
would come to the same conclusions. “I would hope that a wise Latina woman with
the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion
than a white male who hasn’t lived that life,” Justice Sotomayor said.

Many members of the Puerto Rican/Latino community supported her for making the statement, and many women
embraced the phrase and wore t-shirts and buttons saying “Wise Latina” to show their support for Sotomayor’s
nomination.

Judge Sotomayor’s nomination in May 2009 was due to a strong lobbying campaign led by Puerto Rican and Latino
members of the legal profession, as well as Members of Congress which led President Barack Obama to officially
nominate her for the United States Supreme Court. As Puerto Ricans we must show our pride in this incredible
achievement and teach our children specifically our daughters that no journey is impossible – just dare to dream
and you will achieve greatness.
RICHIE VIVE, LA LUCHA SIGUE -
THE JUSTICE COMMITTEE
“The arc of history is that every generation has to fight the liberation struggle. Every generation, it
doesn’t matter what the generation before you did or didn’t do. You’re going to have to deal with
it. It helps if there is a connection between the previous generation and the new generation. It helps
it doesn’t prevent you from making mistakes. Every generation will make their own mistakes, will
create its own organizations, will create its own cultural forms, its own expression, everything. And
every generation will have its own rhythm.”

“See that’s what I want to be for this generation. At this point, I figure that’s what my role is. I mean
I’m a great organizer and I’m an activist and I still like to kick ass, but how I can make my
greatest contribution is I got to be part of that transmission of history. Because the time that
you’re on the historical stage is short, man.”
Richie Perez

THE JUSTICE COMMITTEE


Richie’s resolve to end the systemic police brutality and murder of young people of color in New York City continues through
the work of the Justice Committee, an all volunteer watch- dog and activist organization co- founded by Richie and whose
members he developed, mentored and struggled side by side with in some of the most despicable and defining cases of police
brutality and racist attacks in the history of our community. The Justice Committee serves our community through direct ac-
tion, political education and its mainstay, the support and guidance of families forever maimed by the victimization or killing
of their loved ones.

RACIAL JUSTICE DAY


The Justice Committee is responsible for Racial Justice Day, an action originally organized in March 1993 to seek justice for
Manny Mayi Jr., an 18-year-old Dominican youth and Queens College honor student who on the night of March 29, 1991,
was chased for 16 blocks and beaten to death by a gang of 10 white youths in his neighborhood of Corona, Queens, NYC. In
a crime believed to have involved as many as 10 attackers, authorities arrested three, tried one, and ultimately failed to secure
a single conviction. Through the unrelenting organizing work and pressure from the Justice Committee the NYPD directed its
Cold Case Squad to reopen the case.

During the last fifteen years Racial Justice Day has evolved into a yearly day of outrage during which a rally and march led by
the families and victims of police brutality and racial attacks is used to give those affected a platform to share their experience,
educate the public about these events and voice their demands for justice.

PEOPLES’ JUSTICE FOR COMMUNITY CONTROL & POLICE ACCOUNTABILITY


In January 2007, the Justice Committee initiated the formation of Peoples’ Justice for Community Control & Police Account-
ability a city-wide coalition that came together in the aftermath of the November 2006 NYPD killing of Sean Bell and shooting
of Trent Benefield and Joseph Guzman. Some of the coalition’s work centered on mobilizing actions and education forums for
the community to discuss how police violence is currently impacting varying communities of color and develop organizing
strategies to address the issue.

GOING FORWARD
The Justice Committee is participating in the restructuring of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, a national Puerto
Rican civil/human rights advocacy movement positioned to give a national voice to the Puerto Rican community.

Although unimaginable this March will mark the fifth year since our brother and comrade, Richie Perez, passed on to the spirit
world. Since his passing The Justice Committee honors Richie and secures his legacy as it continues to effect change and make
history in the movement for social justice and the quest to eliminate police brutality and racism in all of its forms.

JUSTICE COMMITTEE, INC.


P.O. Box 1885, New York, NY 10159-1885, (212) 614-5343
E-MAIL: justicecommittee@gmail.com MYSPACE: www.myspace/justicecommittee
THE RICHIE PÉREZ SCHOLARSHIP FOR
PEACE & JUSTICE AWARD
PURPOSE
In 2004, the Puerto Rican community lost an ally, advocate, community leader and urban warrior. Richie Pérez was a be-
loved activist and leader in the fight for social justice and human rights. He brought integrity, zeal and unity to many causes
to which he was committed. These included the struggle for racial justice and against police brutality, Puerto Rican inde-
pendence and universal human rights. As a former Young Lord and founding member of
the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, Richie was our inspiration and conscience.
Richie wrote and lectured extensively on the Puerto Rican urban experience and as a profes-
sor in the CUNY system taught classes in mass media, US social policy and the history of
the labor and civil rights movements. Richie believed greatly in the power and potential of
young people to create social change. He personally mentored many youth and believed that
the torch of the movement for justice had to be passed on to the next generation.

In his memory, Comité Noviembre has established the Richie Pérez Scholarship for Peace
and Justice. The award will recognize Puerto Rican young people for their commitment,
activism and achievements in any of the areas of human rights and social justice. This an-
nual award will both promote the advancement of new leaders in the movement for peace
and justice, and also invest in their continued growth by providing support for their ongoing
education and political development The scholarship winner will receive a $1,000 scholar-
ship. The application form will be ready for distribution and posted on Comité Noviembre’s
website, www.comitenoviembre.org, in early December.

ELIGIBILTY
• Applicants must Be of Puerto Rican descent
• Document a minimum of one-year active participation and organizing work in a social
justice or human rights issue.
• Be enrolled in an accredited college or university by the fall of each year or at the time
of the scholarship award.
• Be between the ages of 17 and 25.

GUIDELINES
• A completed application package must include an application form, essay, two letters of recommendation and a short
biographical sketch. All items must be submitted in one package.
• Letters of recommendation must be from community members who personally know their work, leadership and com-
mitment to social justice and human rights causes.
• Application package must be received or post marked by the deadline dated indicated.
• Application package received or post marked after the deadline date will be disqualified.
• Finalist will be notified in a timely manner.
• A mandatory personal interview will be conducted by the scholarship committee. Finalist will be notified of the inter-
view at least one week in advance. Finalist will not be considered if he/she does not show-up for interview. Other ar-
rangements will be made for finalist away at college.
• Recipients of the Richie Perez Scholarship Award will be disqualified should any of the following conditions occur: (1)
recipient provides false information on application (2) recipients is not en rolled in an accredited college or university
by the fall or at the time of the award (3) recipient is not of Puerto Rican descent
• Scholarship payment will be made by Comité Noviembre upon recipient of official documentation from college Regis-
trar or Bursar’s Office.

Please contact Martha Laureano, (718) 387-0404, mlaureano@elpuente.us, if you have any questions or to receive
an application form. You can also visit our website at www.comitenoviembre.org
RICHIE PEREZ SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

Alisia Victoria Cordero


ALISIA VICTORIA CORDERO was born in Harlem, New York and raised by her father, grandparents,
and aunts. Her mother died when she was a year old of HIV. Her mother’s absence has impacted her life more
than any other event, and it is from her that Alisia feels she received her passion for community work and
activism. Growing up she learned about the severity of HIV and knew that she would become a part of the
fight to find a cure and to foster awareness. She has donated money to HIV organizations around the world
and has participated in the New York AIDS Walk faithfully for the past five years, supporting the Gay Men’s
Health Crisis (GHMC). This has become a yearly tradition and she invites friends and family, co-workers and
peers to share her cause.

As a member of the Lehman College Community Service, Service Learning and New Student Programs, she
has participated in many community service projects on campus such as Crafts for Caring, creating surgi dolls for hospitalized children, holiday
cards for war veterans, and Treats For Troops. Her greatest volunteer service project and one that has impacted greatly on her life has been
going down to New Orleans with Lehman L.I.F.E. (Leaders Involved For Everyone) to help build homes for victims of Hurricane Katrina. She
has volunteered two years straight and is planning a third trip this January. She is a Senior at Lehman College, Majoring in Business Admin-
istration with a concentration in Business Law with a minor in Political Science.

“Advocating for social justice is being able to foster awareness for an issue affecting humanity and then proceed to aid the situation. All over
the world there are injustices being made, but closer to home, we have issues such as poverty, homelessness, and people being deprived of
basic human rights. I chose to be intensely active in relieving the New Orleans area of the effects caused by Hurricane Katrina. I found that
the only way I can truly help a cause is by throwing myself into it head on. I jumped at the opportunity to go down to New Orleans and join the
hundreds of volunteers making the greatest impact in the relief effort.”

“The experiences that I have gained in doing community service, and being in the epicenter of cultural revival, where keeping your identity as
a Latina becomes a revolutionary fight against Integration, will propel me to be a strong Puerto Rican woman standing up for herself and her
community.”

Pedro Valdez Rivera


PEDRO VALDEZ RIVERA was born in Williamsburg, Brooklyn 1991 to Puerto Rican and Dominican
parents. He graduated valedictorian from the High School for Legal Studies. He is a freshman at Brooklyn
College where Richie Perez once taught in the Puerto Rican studies department. His major is Mathematics
and Environmental studies.

For the past four years, he has been a member of El Puente, a community human rights institution that
promotes leadership for peace and justice through the engagement of members (youth and adult) in the
arts, education, scientific research, wellness and environmental action. Last summer he interned as a
member of the Justice Committee and most recently joined NYPIRG, the New York Public Interest Group
on campus.

Influenced by stories of Richie Perez as young Lord and founder of the National Congress for Puerto Ri-
can Rights – Justice Committee, he got involved with participating in cop-watch: a community tactic or
strategy in which the community people use video cameras and equipment to capture police brutality and
participated in an outreach program that educated the community about human or individual rights.

El Puente Leadership Center is his foundation. Since the summer of 2006, he has been involved in a lot of community service activities in the
community of Williamsburg including a garden beautification projects, tutors students in math and is a percussionist performing in many con-
certs for the community. He has been inspired by NCPRR – Justice Committee and El Puente and is committed to continuing his community
and social justice work.

“It was only a year ago; I was remembering first learning about the young lord hero, Richie Perez. Participating in a social justice event, a
former Young Lord named Panama spoke about the Young Lords and Richie Perez, founder of the Justice Committee. What particularity stood
out to me about Richie Perez was he involved himself in many aspects of the community, from environmental justice, police brutality, and health
issues. As a member of a Social Justice organization and the Justice Committee, the issue of police brutality affecting the community was what
stood out to me the most.”
National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights

Puerto Ricans in the


21st Century
Reafirmación de un Pueblo

In 1981, Puerto Rican activists from around the country including the late Richie Perez, a longtime activist and
leader in the struggle for global human rights, founded the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights (NCPRR).
For more than 20 years the NCPRR engaged in grassroots campaigns in many cities, including a march on Washington
D.C.

The NCPRR is a power resource that was created by the Puerto Rican people’s grassroots struggle - it has
history, legitimacy and weight. Hundreds of thousands of volunteer hours, the rejecting of government funding,
the rejecting of the single, charismatic male leadership model; the promotion of women and young leadership
(women must be at least half of all leadership bodies within the organization), the successful uniting of previously
disconnected community forces; the emphasis on learning to use all tactics and avoid marginalization (community
education, working the media, voter mobilization, coalition building, lobbying, litigation, and direct/action); the
groundbreaking work around bilingual education, environmental justice, the right to representation, holding elected
officials accountable, racial justice, against police brutality and Puerto Rico’s right to self-determination are part of
our legacy.

A reaffirmation of the NCPRR is needed at this point in our history because there is a lack of significant Puerto Rican
voices or representation on the national agenda on issues like bilingual education, the national immigration debate,
Puerto Rico Self-Determination, Post-Vieques, No Child Left Behind, Voting Rights & Political Education, social
discrimination, Police Brutality, Health Care Reform and the release of the remaining PR Political Prisoners.

During the weekend of October 9th – 11, 2009 the NCPRR held its eighth national convention in Philadelphia. The
convention was attended by over 300 people representing Puerto Rico and ten states including Ohio, Illinois and
Florida. This historical conference represents a historical turning point for NCPRR. The panels, workshops and
plenary sessions addressed how to:

• Help NCPRR determine what works in 2009 and beyond in order to address the many challenges facing the
Puerto Rican people.
• Learn from and build on the experiences of different cities as well as towns across the country where Puerto
Ricans live.
• Effectively utilize the history, name, recognition and credibility of the NCPRR to affect social change.
• Address the issue of organizational life-support and financial stability to make the NCPRR viable in the new
century.

The intergenerational reflection, interaction and a sharing of experiences during the convention will help determine
how NCPRR will identify itself as the continuation of a proud organizational tradition while simultaneously serving
as an effective organizational tool and asset for the next generation of leadership in our communities across the
country. Additionally it will provide a platform to follow as well as methods for the direct engagement of the next
generation of community leaders and unified efforts for making positive social change into the future.

For more information about the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights or to become a member contact:
www.ncprr.us
THE YOUNG LORDS PARTY
A CELEBRATION OF 40
YEARS IN STRUGGLE
“We didn’t drop from the sky:
Our people’s struggles created the Young Lords.”

Richie Perez

The Young Lords, a Puerto Rican civil rights and Nationalist organization formed in the 1960’s, fought for
equality, the human and Civil rights of Puerto Ricans as well as for the right of self determination for the
People of Puerto Rico.

Forty years ago in the summer of 1969 The Young Lords, made up of first generation college and high
school students, community activists and neighborhood residents, entered the consciousness of New York-
ers through a series of actions taken in an effort to respond to the basic needs of the sorely underserved
Puerto Rican Community in New York City. One such action was the December 1969 Young Lords take-
over of the First Spanish Methodist Church on Lexington Avenue and East 111th Street in East Harlem’s,
“El Barrio” to protest of the church’s refusal to allow the Lords to feed hungry children before school.

During the 11-day occupation of the “People’s Church” the Young Lords provided free breakfast and
clothing programs, health services, a day care center, and a liberation school. The occupation ended when
the NYC police entered the church and arrested 105 young Lords and community supporters.
On Sunday August 23rd, 2009, a standing-room-only crowd of nearly 400 gathered on East 111th Street
in El Barrio to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Young Lords Party. Many YLP members from all over
the country attended the event. They marched into the First Spanish Methodist Church, formerly known
as the People’s Church the very church seized 40 years ago to the cheers and applause of the people in the
church.
The program included prayers, a moment of silence for Lords who have passed and talks about the histori-
cal social significance of the YLP today.

The Young Lords Party is no longer in existence but the members’ short burst of activity ignited Puerto
Rican pride and political and cultural activism. Its power and legacy lives on through those that continue
to struggle for global social justice and human rights.
El Museo del Barrio, New York’s leading Latino cultural institution, welcomes visitors of all backgrounds
to discover the artistic landscape of the Latino, Caribbean and Latin American cultures. Their richness is
represented in El Museo’s wide-ranging collections and exhibitions, complemented by performing arts,
music concerts, cultural celebrations, and educational programs. A dynamic artistic, cultural, and com-
munity gathering place, El Museo is a center of cultural pride on New York’s Museum Mile.

Located at 1230 Fifth Avenue and 104th Street, El Museo closed its galleries last May in order to undergo
extensive renovations to its City-owned facility. Central to the planning of the renovation was the desire
to enhance its role in the community, render El Museo even more welcoming to its fast-growing audience,
position the surrounding East Harlem community of El Barrio as an important destination, and gener-
ate more jobs for New York. Its refurbished facility features a new glass façade, a redesigned courtyard,
entirely renovated and modernized galleries, a new café that also serves as programming space, and an
expanded museum shop.

El Museo was founded 40 years ago by artist and educator Raphael Montañez Ortiz and a coalition of
Puerto Rican parents, educators, artists, and activists who noted that mainstream museums largely ignored
Latino artists. Since its inception, El Museo has been committed to celebrating and promoting Latino
culture, thus becoming a cornerstone of El Barrio, and a valuable resource for New York City. El Museo’s
varied permanent collection of over 6,500 objects spanning more than 800 years of Latin American, Carib-
bean, and Latino art includes pre-Columbian Taíno artifacts, traditional arts, twentieth-century drawings,
paintings, sculptures and installations, as well as prints, photography, documentary films, and video.

From its founding, the museum has been a place of cultural pride and self-discovery for the Puerto Ri-
can community that founded it, and for the many cultures and communities of the Caribbean and Latin
America in New York. El Museo’s reopening on Saturday, October 17, 2009, marked the launch of its 40th
Anniversary celebrations, which will continue all year with a rich array of exhibitions, public program-
ming, events, and performances. Come join us!

Julián Zugazagoitia, Director


Susan Delvalle, External Affairs Director
Eileen Reyes, Community and Government Affairs Manager
Mariana Salem, Rentals Manager

1230 Fifth Avenue (at 104th Street)


New York, NY 10029
www.elmuseo.org
ANNUAL THREE KINGS CELEBRATION
El Museo del Barrio will mark its 33rd Anniversary of
the Annual Three Kings Parade on Wednesday, Janu-
ary 6, 2010, with this its renowned procession through-
out the streets of El Barrio. This time-honored tradition
will once again fill up the neighborhood’s streets with
lively music, colorful dancing and parrandas.

Thirty-four years ago, Puerto Rican leaders of East Har-


lem’s El Barrio—educators, artists, social and political
activists—founded El Museo del Barrio, an institution
that would preserve and reflect their cultural heritage.
In 1977, under the leadership of the then-director of El
Museo, Jack Agueros and community volunteers from
El Barrio, the Three Kings Day Parade was born in order to celebrate Día de Reyes or Three Kings Day,
a holiday sacred to many Caribbean and Latin American communities. Día de Reyes celebrates the spirit
of giving through the Biblical story of the Magi, the three wise men from the east, who followed the star
to honor the newborn baby Jesus with gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh. Three Kings Day is the tra-
ditional way of celebrating Christmas in Puerto Rico and other Latin American countries. Traditionally,
children collect grass and place a container of water in a box under the bed on the eve of the arrival of the
Three Kings on January 6th. According to tradition, the weary camels eat the grass and drink the water
after their long journey, and in return, the Kings leave gifts as a gesture of thanks for the children. On the
morning of January 6th, children look under their beds to see what gifts the Three Kings have left them.
Until recent years, this holiday was the traditional time of exchanging gifts, while December 25th was a
time to spend with the family. Recently, Santa Claus has begun to replace the Three Kings as the bringer
of gifts. Many families who want to keep the tradition of the Three Kings alive and not disappoint their
children on December 25th will give some of their gifts on Christmas and a special one on January 6th. El
Museo del Barrio’s mission is to provide a broad cultural forum to understand the culture of Puerto Rico,
the Caribbean, and Latin America. In this context, festivals such as the Three Kings Day Parade are as
important as exhibitions in preserving and disseminating our cultural traditions. This parade reminds us to
come together through hope and the spirit of giving—what the Three Kings represent—and is one of El
Museo’s most joyous annual events.

Today, El Museo del Barrio continues to organize its Three Kings Day Parade, a much-loved tradition
in East Harlem, which for the last 32 years has preserved the generosity of the spirit that this important
holiday has passed from generation to generation. Every year on January 6th (The Feast of the Epiphany
or Three Kings Day), over fifteen hundred school children accompanied by teachers, parents, community
volunteers, and residents of El Barrio brave the cold and join the Three Kings with their retinue of live
camels, donkeys and sheep. The sight of the parade, juxtaposing camels and sheep with the urban land-
scape, is surreal while puppets and volunteers in medieval garb contribute to the pageantry of the event.
The costumes, which are worn by the Three Kings at El Museo, were designed by art historian Mario
César Romero after extensive research in order to create authentic costumes.

Volunteers are needed as well as community groups to march and/or perform. Please email to ereyes@
elmuseo.org if you are interested in marching as a group or performing or wish to volunteer.

For more information, please visit our website at www.elmuseo.org.


The National Institute for Latino Policy (NiLP) is a 5019C)(3) nonprofit and nonpartisan
policy center established in 1982 in New York City originally as the Institute for Puerto Rican
Policy (IPR). The National Institute for Latino Policy provides a unique approach and voice
to the policy analysis and advocacy needs of the Latino community. Originally focused on the
Puerto Rican community, our work has increasingly included all Latinos and has gone from a
local to a national scope.

The Institute’s approach includes:

• Focusing on the intersectionality of Latino policy issues


• The use of action-research that is used as an organizing tool for advocacy
• A strategy that focuses on the development of local and state level strategies for policy analysis and organizing
• The creative and aggressive use of the internet and the media as community education and organizing tools
• An emphasis on working in critical policy areas that are underdeveloped or not addressed in the Latino community

In the past year, NiLP’s accomplishments include:

• Leading a major educational campaign to raise awareness of the 2010 Census and its importance to the Latino community. NiLP
has created and coordinated the Latino Census Network, an informational network with 28 of the leading national and regional Latino
organizations in the United States and the leading clearinghouse on Census issues affecting Latinos in the country.. In recognition of
this work, NiLP President has been appointed by the U.S. Commerce Secretary to the Census Advisory Committee on the Hispanic
Population, and he has been elected to the National Steering Committee of the Census Bureau’s Census Information Centers (CIC)
Program.

• Being a founder of the Defend the Honor Campaign that put community pressure on PBS and filmmaker Ken Burn to include the
Latino experience in their 7-part documentary series, The War. NiLP is also part of a group of national Latino organization that have
been meeting with the leadership of PBS to promote greater Latino representation in their programming, staff and governance.

• Providing an independent and nonpartisan voice analyzing the role of the Latino vote in such media as the New York Times,
Washington Post, El Diario-La Prensa, Shimbun Yumiori Newspaper (Japan), CNN, CNN en Español, O Estado de S. Paulo (Brazil),
Univision, Telemundo, Radio Bilingue, Politico, Hispanic Link, Spanglish Magazine, El Nuevo Dia (Puerto Rico), Hofstra Univer-
sity Radio, National Public Radio (NPR), Hispanic Market Weekly, XM Radio, the New Jersey Network and even Comedy Central’s
Colbert Report, among others.

• Working with national Latino coalitions like the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda, the National Latino Media Council, the
Defend the Honor Campaign, the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights and others to develop Latino agenda for change.

• Developing one of the most effective national informational networks on the Internet on Latino policy issues through our Latino
Policy eNewsletter, Email Bulletins and National Latino Opinion Leaders’ Surveys.

• Efforts to increase the accountability of philanthropy to Latino and other communities of color through being part of the estab-
lishment of the NYC Collaborative for Fairness and Equity in Philanthropy, being part of the Diversity in Philanthropy Project at the
New York Regional Association of Grantmakers and the Foundation Center, and related activities.

• Putting pressure on CNN to remove a fundraising appeal by Lou Dobbs from their website for the Town of Hazelton to fight
support their anti-immigrant policies. Upon receiving NiLP’s objections, CNN took down the biased ad within a day from the Lou
Dobbs Tonight section of their website.

• Presentations on Latino policy issues throughout the United States. Including at Brandies University, Cornell University, the
Dominican-American National Roundtable Conference in Providence, Rhode Island, the New York Chapter of the Labor Council
for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), the Latino Policy Forum in Chicago, LULAC Annual Conference in Washington, DC,
Northern Illinois University, the Puerto Rican Studies Association 8th Conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Proskauer Rose LLP,
Smith College, UBS, the United States Hispanic Leadership Institute Annual Conference in Chicago,the University of Puerto Rico,
and the University of Texas at Austin. Among others.

Angelo Falcón, President


National Institute for Latino Policy (NiLP)
101 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013
212-334-5722 Fax: 917-677-8593
info@latinopolicy.org www.latinopolicy.org
Puerto Ricans and the 2010 Census:
Si Quieres Frutos, Sacude el Árbol
By Angelo Falcón

The 2010 Census is a major event in the Latino com-


munity. One of the main reasons is that the Census
raises the profile of the Latino community in the Unit-
ed States every ten year. Remember when the 2000
Census figures were released? People rediscovered
Latinos after they saw that there were 35 million of us
and that we had outnumbered for the first time the Af-
rican-American population. That generated a debate
about the role of Latinos in America that examined the
economic, political and cultural impact of our com-
munity on this society.

The 2010 Census is important because the numbers it


generates influence the amount of the over $400 bil-
lion federal monies coming into different communi-
ties. They also influence Congressional reapportion-
ment and political redistricting from the local to the
federal level. For Latinos the 2010 Census will impact
positively or negatively if there is a signifi8cant un-
dercount, the economic and political resources com-
ing into our communities, such as our level of political
representation.

For Puerto Ricans, the Census plays the same role


of course, but with some differences. Puerto Ricans,
along with Mexicans and Cubans, are among the three
Latino subgroups to be directly identified on the His-
panic question of the Census with a check-off box,
while others, like Dominicans and Salvadorans, have
to write in their nationalities. So this presents Puerto
Ricans with the recognition as one of the major Latino groups in the country.

On the other hand, did you know that when the Census Bureau issues a report on Hispanics in the United States and
report that there are 4 million Puerto Ricans that represent 9 percent of the total Latino population, they exclude
the other 4 million Puerto Ricans in Puerto Rico and the other U.S. territories? Although those Puerto Ricans in
the territories are all U.S. citizens, they don’t make it into the official Census reports on Hispanics! The answer is
statistical colonialism.

What would happen if you include social statistics about Puerto Rico within the official U.S. reports? Well, first you
would see that in comparison to the 10 percent poverty rate for the United States in 2008 that the poverty rate for
Puerto Rico was distressing 45 percent. And you would also find that this figure is more than double the stateside
Latino poverty rate of 22 percent and almost double that of stateside Puerto Ricans of 25 percent.

So the 2010 Census will count Puerto Ricans living stateside, but not those in Puerto Rico. This means that the Cen-
sus will continue a policy of understating the Puerto Rican presence in the United States by close to half. In 2008,
Puerto Ricans and the 2010 Census (continued)
the Census estimated that there were 3,954,037 living in Puerto Rico (96 percent of who identify as Puerto Rican)
and 4,216,533 Puerto Ricans living stateside. Those living in Puerto Rico are simply erased in Census reports, you
have to read about them in “special” report and such.

There are other examples of ways that this second class treatment of Puerto Rico affects Puerto Ricans there and
stateside. We found that the federal Centers for Disease Control (CDC) didn’t include Puerto Rico in their reports
on Latino AIDS rate because the way they calculated population estimates in Puerto Rico was different than they
did it in the states. Because the AIDS rate is extremely high, excluding Puerto Rico decreases the Latinos AIDS
rate from 22 to 17 percent. In collaboration with the Latino Commission on AIDS, NiLP helped bring together staff
from the CDC and the Census Bureau, who are currently working to correct this problem.

For another example, at one point, the Census Bureau was going to have its Census in the Schools program cover
grades K-8 in Puerto Rico while covering K-12 in the states. The explanations given were budget limitations and
the fact that younger children were more effec-
tive transmitters of information to their parents!
Well after NiLP and others protested, the Census
Bureau found the resources to cover grades K-12
in Puerto Rico.

The challenges facing stateside Puerto Ricans in


participating in the 2010 Census get lost because
of the overwhelming focus on the Latino undocu-
mented. But it is critical for Puerto Rican com-
munity leaders to raise the issues of the Puerto
Rican undercount to Census officials. For Puerto
Ricans, the main obstacles are those of high pov-
erty, language and fear of government by those
involved with the underground economy. This is
also a population very much in flux, especially given the current economic crisis in Puerto Rico that will result in
greater migration to the states.

There is an urgent need for Puerto Rican communities around the country to meet with the regional Census directors
to discuss how they plan to promote the participation of Puerto Ricans in the 2010 Census. There are 12 regional
offices across the country (Puerto Rico is the responsibility of the Boston office) and they are the ones hiring enu-
merators, supporting community outreach efforts and dealing with the day-to-day operations of the 2010 Census at
the local level. The Census Bureau also has a number of advisory committees that include Latinos like Arturo Var-
gas of the National Association of Latino Appointed and Elected Officials (NALEO) on the Census 2010 Advisory
Committee and me and other Latinos on the Census Advisory Committee on the Hispanic Population. Make sure
that Puerto Rican concerns are brought to our attention.

Angelo Falcón is President of the National Institute for Latino Policy (NiLP) and is Chair of the Latino Census
Network. He was appointed by the US Commerce Secretary to serve on the Census Advisory Committee on the
Hispanic Population and also serves on the Steering Committee of the Census Bureau’s Census Information Centers
(CIC) Program.

Resources
Census Bureau Regional Offices
http://www.census.gov/field/www/
Census 2010 Advisory Committee
http://www.census.gov/cac/2010_census_advisory_committee
Census Advisory Committee on the Hispanic Population
http://www.census.gov/cac/race_ethnic_advisory_committees/hispanic_advisory_committee/
Boricuas in New York City:
An Historical Inventory of the Past Year
By Angelo Falcón

This Puerto Rican Heritage Month finds a Puerto Rican community with much to celebrate and much to be concerned about. But
as we look at the arc from the 40th anniversary of the Young Lords this year to the naming of Judge Sonia Sotomayor to the US
Supreme Court this year, as they say in Puerto Rico, “Poco poco, se anda legos.”

In the United States, the more than four million Boricuas living here continue to struggle and to say ¡presente!
The Puerto Rican presence in New York City goes back to the 1860s, so we are certainly not newcomers to this country. Today
there are more Puerto Ricans living stateside than in Puerto Rico and the current growth of the stateside Puerto Rican population
appears to be greater than that of the Island. And, since 1917, we also didn’t come here are immigrants but rather as US citizens
more appropriately referred to as migrants. So as the immigration debate continues in this country, with its anti-Latino overtones,
Puerto Ricans certainly don’t fill the profile, but we find ourselves in the thick (and sometimes at the leadership as is the case with
Chicago Congressman Luis Gutierrez)) of that battle too. This is because, after all is said and done, we are part of a larger Latino
world and most people in this country simply don’t make the distinction.

As we review this past year since last November’s Puerto Rican Heritage Month celebrations, much has occurred of both a posi-
tive and negative nature. As you read this review, you will no doubt see much that I have missed, but this overview is only meant
to be suggestive of the many good and bad things that we experienced as a community from November 2008 to October 2009. It
is, at most, kind of the beginning of an historical inventory.

2008: The Historic Election of Obama


and Statehood Party Victories in Puerto Rico

Statistics on stateside Puerto Ricans at the national level released by the Census Bureau from their Current Population Survey for
2008 reveal some troubling indicators. The most disturbing was that among Latinos, Puerto Ricans had the highest poverty rate,
25 percent. In addition, we also had the highest unemployment rate, 10 percent. The Puerto Rican poverty rate, in fact, was more
than double that of non-Latino Whites. And I don’t even want to get into the poverty and unemployment rates in Puerto Rico,
which are much worse, and, remember, these statistics are for the period before the current economic crisis.

The Census Bureau, in their American Community Survey (ACS), estimated that there may have been as many as 809,675 Puerto
Ricans living in New York City in 2008, making up 35 percent of the city’s 2.3 million Latinos. While still the largest Latino group
in the city, in 2009 the Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center projected that by
2024 Mexicans would become the largest Latino group in the city.

There was the historic election of Barack Obama to the Presidency of the United States and, as 14 percent of the Latino vote,
Puerto Ricans helped in significant ways in that great victory, especially those Puerto Ricans in Florida. At the end of 2008, with
the elected of President Obama, Latinos began to push for Latino appointments to his Cabinet and Administration. Although get-
ting off to a slow start on Latino appointments, by the mid-2009 Obama had accumulated a record of Latino appointments that was
higher than that of any past President, Republican or Democrat. But Puerto Ricans remained concerned because the only major
appointment they saw was that of former Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrion to organize and
head a new Office of Urban Policy in the White House.

Of course, this concern was overshadowed by the historic nomination and confirmation of Sonia
Sotomayor as an Associate Justice in the United States Supreme Court the following year. This was
a major event for Puerto Ricans that also brought widespread attention to our community, both here
and in Puerto Rico. Her ascension to the high court catapulted her to near rock star status in the La-
tino community and with the general public. This was definitely the high point for Puerto Ricans in
2009.

Along with Obama, Puerto Rico elected a new party to office: Luis Fortuño as Governor and Pedro
Perluisi as Resident Commissioner, both from the statehood New Progressive Party (PNP). Anibal
Boricuas in New York City: continued
Acevedo Vila, the Governor of the pro-Commonwealth Popular Democratic Party (PPD) lost big, being under a federal indictment
during his reelection bid for campaign finance fraud and other charges. In 2009, he was, ironically, acquitted of the charges.

On November 19, 2008, New York Congresswoman Nydia Velazquez was elected Chair of the
Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHC), a historic moment for the Puerto Rican community. Also,
during the 2008 election, history was made when another Puerto Rican woman, Rosa Clemente, ran
for Vice President of the United States under the Green Party, although this was little noticed.

One of the major highlights in 2008, was when Lin-Manuel Miranda’s play “In the Heights” won
the Tony Award for Best Play and in many other categories in mid-June. Also, in November of that
year, the Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre, led by legendary actress Miram Colon, celebrated their
40th anniversary. News also arrived that West Side Story was returning to Broadway after 51 years.
Also, after a long hiatus, efforts began in 2008 to bring back the National Congress for Puerto Rican
Rights (NCPRR), focusing on a national convention in October 2009.

On the local political front, NYS Assemblyman Ruben Diaz, Jr. was elected to be the Borough President of The Bronx. However,
other news on the local political front for Puerto Ricans was not as positive. Legendary South Bronx political player, Ramon
Velez, passed away in November 2008. In that same month, NYS Assemblyman José Rivera
lost the powerful Chairmanship of the Bronx Democratic Committee, ending Puerto Rican
leadership of that body.

2009: The Year of Sotomayor and the Young Lords

The beginning of 2009 saw the deaths of many prominent Puerto Ricans. They included leg-
endary boxer and writer José Chequi Torres, former NYC Councilmember Antonio Pagan, and
founding member of Comité Noviembre, musician Joe Cuba, music promoter Ralph Mercado
and Eddie Gonzalez longtime community activist and friend of the labor movement.

While in 2009 the highlight at the national level was definitely the appointment of Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court, there
was also the appointment of Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrion in February to head up the new White House Office of
Urban Policy. The only problem with his appointment is that he has seemed to disappear since then, so we all eagerly await his
full return to public life.

Locally, the highlight has been the fresh and energetic leadership that the newly-elected Ruben
Diaz, Jr, is providing as Bronx Borough President. And, staying in The Bronx, there was also the
appointment of Dr. Felix Matos Rodríguez to be President of Hostos Community College, one
of the major institutions in the Puerto Rican community. Dr. Frances Negron-Muntaner also had
the distinction of being appointed Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at
Columbia University. This was also the year when NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg first started
to speak Spanish in his news conferences, which I am not sure is a good or bad thing. South
Bronx Congressman José Enrique Serrano celebrated 35 years in elective office, making him the
most senior Puerto Rican elected official in the United States. He was elected to the New York
State Assembly in 1974 and to the United States Congress in 1990.

This past summer, the talk of the state was the revolt of a coalition of Democratic and Republican State Senators against the NYS
Senate’s Democratic leadership. What was most fascinating about it was that it was led in part by two Puerto Ricans who had just
gotten elected to the body: Bronxite Pedro Espada and Queensite Hiram Monserrate. In the end, to the surprise of many, Espada
wound up as President of the NYS Senate in what was a major controversial move.

Part of the problem with the state is that the Democratic Party is seen as unsupportive of Puerto Rican and other Latino elected
officials. For example, when Governor David Paterson had the opportunity to appoint a Latino to the US Senate to replace Hillary
Clinton, such as seasoned Congresspersons Velazquez or Serrano, he chose a relative newcomer, Kirsten Gillibrand who, up to
that point, held very conservative positions on social and economic issues. There is also the problem that Governor Paterson has
also neglected important Puerto Rican and Latino issues, such as our extreme underrepresentation in the state government: today
Boricuas in New York City: continued
Latinos are only 4 percent of state government workers, despite being over 13 percent of state’s labor force.

In 2009, The Natural Resources Committee of the US House of Representatives approved the Puerto Rico Democracy Act (HR
2499), introduced by Puerto Rico’s Resident Commissioner Pe-
dro Perluisi, calling for a series of plebiscites on the political
status of Puerto Rico. While it hasn’t been reported to the full
House for a vote, this bill will no doubt generate much discus-
sion in the Puerto Rican community, both stateside and on the
Island, about Puerto Rico’s future. Meanwhile, the economic
crisis in Puerto Rico by October 2009 has resulted in the whole-
sale laying off of thousand of government workers, creating a
reaction of major demonstrations and a call for a general strike.
Under the leadership of Puerto Rican labor leaders, such as Sonia Ivany, many New York unions have
rallied in support of the workers of Puerto Rico.

The 52nd annual National Puerto Rican Day Parade marched down Fifth Avenue this year with the
theme, “Our Music.” The Grand Marshall this year was singer Victor Manuel. The year also saw the pre-
miere of the Lillian Jimenez film on the life of the legendary Puerto Rican educator and founder of ASPIRA, Dr. Antonia Pantoja,
at the New York Latino Film Festival called “Antonia Pantoja: ¡Presente!” Puerto Ricans won a victory at the beginning of 2009
when WABC-TV Channel 7 finally agreed to move their long-running Latino public affairs show, Tiempo, hosted by reporter Joe
Torres, from the 5:00am graveyard slot to a more appropriate 11:30am on Sundays. But the year also saw protests against MTV
for the “Nuyoricans” segment on one of their series that the Puerto Rican community found stereotypical and offensive. MTV
since met with Puerto Rican community leaders and is constructively working on correcting the problem.

In late August there was a unique and historic gathering in El Barrio for the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Young Lords.
This was a major event that highlighted the long history of struggle of Puerto Ricans in New York for social justice. One of their
first lawyers in the struggle, FOX News’ Geraldo Rivera, demonstrated the influential trajectory of the influence of the Young
Lords when he was inducted this year to the Hall of Fame of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists in a moving cer-
emony in San Juan, Puerto Rico. And also as part of this trajectory, especially influenced by the work of the late Richie Perez, in
October 2009, over 300 gathered in a convention in Philadelphia to support the rebirth of the National Congress for Puerto Rican
Rights (NCPRR).

The Meaning of It All?

It’s a little difficult to find the meaning in all of these recent developments, since it is usually with time that we get a real sense
of their implications for our community. However, it is clear that they reflect a passing of the baby boomer generation and the
ascendancy of a new one, which is always a good thing. The rise of creative individuals like Lin-Manuel Miranda and Ruben Diaz,
Jr., along the achievements of those like Sonia Sotomayor, Nydia Velazquez, José E. Serrano, Sr. and others bodes well for the
future of the Puerto Rican community.

However, the general disrepute that our local political class is undergoing indicates the fragility of that future. We always talk
about holding our elected officials accountable, so maybe we need to make this a firm resolution during this Puerto Rican Heritage
Month. If we don’t do it as a community, who will? And if we don’t do it now, then when? As we boricuas like to say, “Buena
fama se pierde fácilmente; mala, casi nunca.”

Angelo Falcón, a political scientist, is President of the National Institute for Latino Policy (NiLP) and is Chair of the Latino Cen-
sus Network. He is the author of the “Atlas of Stateside Puerto Ricans” and co-editor of “Boricuas in Gotham: Puerto Ricans in the
Making of Modern New York City.” He is a resident of the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn. He can be contacted at afalcon@
latinopolicy.org. Anyone interested in joining The NiLP Network can sign on at www.latinopolicy.org.
The Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration represents the Government
of Puerto Rico before federal, state, and local governments, promotes Gov-
ernor Fortuño’s economic and public policy initiatives to achieve a better
quality of life for the four million U.S. citizens of Puerto Rico, and advises
local government agencies and municipalities on issues of interest to Puerto
Rico before the federal government.

As such, the Washington office is the primary liaison between Puerto Rico’s
officials, the White House, Congress, and the federal agencies. Additionally,
the office interacts with national organizations representing Governors from
other states, including the National Governors Association (NGA) and the Southern Governors’ Association to
advance Puerto Rico’s interests. Like many other states, Puerto Rico’s focus areas include economic stimulus and
development, transportation funding, energy, health care including Medicare and Medicaid, as well as issues that
affect veterans and our national defense.
PRFAA Washington Roles and Responsibilities
• Articulating and advocating gubernatorial and Puerto Rico-related policy positions to Members of Congress and
their staff, the White House, federal agencies, state offices and national organizations.
• Collaborating with the Resident Commissioner to assist him in his duties as representative in Congress of the 4
million U.S. citizens of Puerto Rico, a constituency more than six times greater in size than that of any other U.S.
Congressman.
• Serving as a primary focal point in the nation’s capital for the Governor, the Governor’s staff, and senior state
officials.
• Providing guidance and support to individuals, businesses, municipalities and other organizations in successfully
navigating the federal grants process.
• Providing status reports on federal initiatives and representing the island’s priorities in Washington, D.C.
• Communicating with national, regional and specialty media on issues of importance to the Governor and Puerto
Rico.
• Serving as a point of contact for state citizens and businesses in their contacts with the Washington, D.C. com-
munity.
During the first four months of 2009 alone, PRFAA has provided critical support in advancing the Federal agenda of
more than a dozen Puerto Rico Government Cabinet members and agency heads, as well as Puerto Rico legislative
leaders and mayors. The agency has played – and continues to play - a critical role in helping to secure hundreds
of millions of dollars in federal funding for vital infrastructure, public security, health, and education programs,
among others. As part of these efforts, the agency also embarked this year on an intensive round of workshops held
throughout the island, aimed at helping agency and municipal government staff - as well as staff from non-profit
organizations- compete successfully for available federal grant and funding opportunities.
PRFAA REGIONAL OFFICES
In addition to the Washington office which serves as the government’s primary liaison in the nation’s capital, PR-
FAA also has regional offices that are responsible for forging close relationships with our stateside communities.
Over the last 70-plus years, the regional offices have evolved from providing guidance to Puerto Rican migrants, to
promoting cultural awareness, to helping the community get involved in the political process. Today, the empha-
sis of the regional offices is on three main areas: economic development through promotion of business ventures
between the Island and U.S.-based Puerto Rican communities; education and empowerment to bridge the stateside
Puerto Rican youth’s educational gap through a partnership with the University of Puerto Rico; and leadership
development through partnerships with local community organizations. All the regional offices’ operations are
consolidated in two geographical hubs and the central office in Washington, D.C.
PRFAA - NEW YORK OFFICE: This office covers the Northeastern Corridor: New York, New Jersey, Con-
necticut, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire. It provides services to over
two million Puerto Ricans. Established in 1930, this office is the oldest office of the Government of Puerto Rico
in the United States.
Luis Balzac, Regional Director; Reyes Rodríguez, Senior Community Officer
135 West 50th Street, 22nd Floor, New York, NY 10020; (212) 252-7300; Fax: (202) 726-9957
PRFAA - MIDWEST OFFICE: This office, first established in 1948, covers the Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Ohio,
Kentucky, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North & South Dakota, and Iowa. It serves ap-
proximately 500,000 Puerto Ricans. 2511 West Division, Chicago, Illinois 60622, (773) 365-0071; Fax: (773)
365-0072
Statehood, A Civil Rights Issue.
A Matter of Equality
By: Rafael Rodriguez, President
Center for Puerto Rico Equality and Advancement (CPREA)

As we celebrate Puerto Rican Heritage Month this year, let us chart a new journey
for Puerto Rico. After 111 years of political uncertainty, 182 members of the U.S.
House of Representatives led by Puerto Rico’s Resident Commissioner Pierluisi
-- and representing 77 percent of all Puerto Ricans in the States as well as in the
territory -- have introduced the Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2009, H.R. 2499,
to enable the status preference of the people of Puerto Rico to be determined. H.R.
2499 would authorize Puerto Rico to hold plebiscites in which the islands’ vot-
ers and other citizens born in Puerto Rico would vote on whether they want the
current status to continue or want one of the alternatives: independence; national
sovereignty in association with the United States; or U.S. statehood.

CPREA supports this status choice bill, which was an issue in the last elections in Puerto Rico and is supported by
Governor Luis A. Fortuño and two-thirds of the members of each house of the territory’s Legislative Assembly.

The bill does not favor any of the islands’ status options but we believe that the end of the current disenfranchised,
dysfunctional territory status is in the best interests of both the people of Puerto Rico and our fellow citizens in the
States. Through policy analysis, education, and advocacy, the Center and its members seek to help Puerto Rico and
its four million U.S. citizens to realize the full promise and potential of their beautiful islands, not as second-class
stepchildren, but as full and equal brothers and sisters in the family that is America.

After the U.S. took the territory in 1898, many distinguished Puerto Rican patriots such as Jose Celso Barbosa, Luis
Munoz Rivera, Jose de Diego, Federico Degetau, and Santiago Iglesias advocated for U.S. citizenship. Among them
was Eugenio Maria de Hostos, Advocate of the First Plebiscite between statehood and Independence, who stated,
“We want to be brothers of the Americans, not servants. The deep discontent of Puerto Rico with the Spanish re-
gime was because that nation considered us second-class Spaniards. We have the right to be first-class Americans.”
Jose de Diego said, “What Puerto Rico wants is self-government in any form. We prefer to be a state of the union,
but if it is impossible, we would like to be an independent nation under the protection of the United States.” Here
we see great leaders joining Dr. Jose Celso Barbosa, the father of the Puerto Rico statehood movement, to obtain
full and equal U.S. Citizenship, although they supported the full democracy of independence if statehood was not
to be achieved.

CPREA is also committed to supporting Governor Fortuño in his efforts to build a better and prosperous Puerto
Rico. Despite of facing many tough and difficult challenges, he continues to work to improve the quality of life
of Puerto Ricans. CPREA was founded in 2006 on the premise that there was a dire need of a collective effort to
seek equality for Puerto Ricans and Puerto Rico. To that end, CPREA has developed a unique approach that raises
awareness of the issues of equal rights. The Center is an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit public policy think
tank based in New York City. The Center promotes the vision of Dr. Barbosa of “Statehood, equal in rights and
responsibility.”

As the people of Puerto Rico themselves declared in the preamble to the territory’s Constitution, “We consider as
determining factors in our life our citizenship of the United States of America and our aspiration to continually
enrich our democratic heritage in the individual and collective enjoyment of its rights and privileges; our loyalty
to the principles of the Federal Constitution; and the coexistence in Puerto Rico of the two great cultures of the
American hemisphere.”
Mission
The Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueños/Center for Puerto Rican Studies is a university-based research
institute whose mission consists of two components. One is to collect, preserve and provide access to ar-
chival and library resources documenting the history and culture of Puerto Ricans. The other is to produce,
facilitate, and disseminate interdisciplinary research about the diasporic experiences of Puerto Ricans and
to link this scholarly inquiry to social action and policy debates.

History and Institutional Capacity


Founded in 1973 by a coalition of faculty, students and community leaders, Centro seeks to achieve its
mission by working closely with its network of education, research, archival, advocacy and community
based partners. Centro has been housed at Hunter College since 1983; however, it is a CUNY-wide re-
search center. Centro staff guide and mentor Latino and other students, assist and advise community
organizations and other research institutions, and serve on local, national and international committees
concerned with issues of social, economic, educational and cultural policy. In addition, CUNY faculty
and staff with interests in Puerto Rican and Latino studies are invited to affiliate with Centro, where they
utilize its extensive resources. Centro also has been a founding member of the Inter-University Program
for Latino Research (IUPLR) since 1989.

The library and archival collection at the Centro is a national and international treasure. Students from the
tri-state area take advantage of the thousands of books and journals housed at the Centro. Researchers con-
tinue to use over 3000 cubic feet of the Centro’s archival materials and the Centro’s 40,000 photographic
images. Genealogists have ventured into the Centro library to find “lost” relatives. The Centro is making
steady progress in processing the materials from the Migration Division collection – containing materials
from Boston, Cleveland, Hartford, Miami, Camden, New York City, Rochester and Puerto Rico.

Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueños/Center for Puerto Rican Studies


Hunter College/ City University of NY
695 Park Avenue, East Building – Room E1429
New York, NY 10021
212-772-5688, 212-650-3673 (fax)
www.centropr.org
Dr. Edwin Melendez, Director
PROMESA
Celebrating thirty-three Years of Community Service
Promesa is a Community Development Corporation whose mission is to en-
able residents in urban settings, utilizing their programs and services, to become
self-sufficient citizens who contribute to the quality of life of their communities.
Promesa works towards achieving its mission by assuming a leadership role in
serving the under-served in health, education, employment, economic & com-
munity development and housing.

Promesa provides a continuum of services, geared toward improving the quality


of life of the individual and communities we serve. The continuum, comprised
of a spectrum of services that is seamless in delivery is offered to Promesa’s cli-
entele, to the fullest extent necessary, irrespective of their point of entry into the
system. Quality, cost, need, accessibility and ease of delivery are parameters that shape all services provided. These
parameters are constantly evaluated, using defined and measurable outcomes, to ensure the quality of life and the
level of satisfaction continue to improve with the individuals and communities serviced by Promesa.

PROMESA believes that all values should have outcomes that are beneficial to consumers utilizing our services.
These values are as follows:
• All services and communications between the clientele and the organization must be delivered in a dignified,
honest, timely ethical and easy to understand manner.
• The clientele must be able to access easily the full level of services, regardless of race, color, creed, religion,
national origin, culture, language, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, or impairment.
• The clientele must be provided the benefit of appropriate practice and comprehensive treatment planning, in
order to assure the achievement of his/her maximum potential.

Promesa Systems Subsidiaries


Promesa, Inc. was founded in 1977, as a substance abuse treatment center and is the oldest of all of Promesa’s
operating subsidiaries. Today the organization provides Residential and Ambulatory Substance Abuse Treatment
Services, Educational and Vocational Training, GED Preparation and Career Resource Advice. In addition, it oper-
ates a Multicultural Day Care Center.
East Harlem Council For Community Improvement, Inc. (EHCCI). Since its inception in 1979, EHCCI has
evolved into one of New York City’s major social service providers, meeting the needs of thousands of individuals
and families each year. EHCCI utilizes public and private resources for the planning and implementation of pro-
grams which deliver quality human services to the residents of East Harlem and the adjacent communities.
Promesa Foundation, Inc. Since its founding in 1985, Promesa Foundation has served as the development arm
of the organization. Through the Foundation, Promesa works to raise funds for its menu of programs. The goal of
the Foundation is to develop streams of funding and partnerships with the corporate sector to support and expand
its operations.
Promesa Housing Development Fund Corporation, Inc. (PHDFC) was established in 1992 to own, manage, and
develop affordable housing. It currently maintains 150 units of housing in the community.
Promesa Residential Health Care Facility, Inc. (CASA Promesa) was incorporated in 1995, CASA PROME-
SA is a 108-bed long term care facility operated by skilled nursing professionals for people living with HIV and
AIDS.
Promesa Enterprises, LTD. was incorporated in 1996 to facilitate for-profit business ventures in the community.
Promesa Systems, Inc. was incorporated in 1998 to support its affiliated organizations in policymaking and strategic
planning.
Promesa Administrative Services Organization, Inc. (PASO). In 2000, PASO was incorporated to provide day
to day support services to each of Promesa’s operating subsidiaries. Services include administration, finance, human
resources, purchasing, facility management, quality management and management information systems.

Hector Diaz, Chairperson, Promesa Systems, Inc.


Raul Russi, Chief Executive Officer, Promesa Systems, Inc
Central Office: 1776 Clay Avenue, Bronx, NY 10457; (718) 299-1100; (718) 294-6237
Calendar of Events
NYS GOVERNOR, DAVID A. PATERSON ISSUANCE OF PROCLAMATION OF PUERTO RICAN HERITAGE MONTH
NYC MAYOR, MICHAEL BLOOMBERG ISSUANCE OF PROCLAMATION OF PUERTO RICAN HERITAGE MONTH

MONTH LONG EVENTS


El Museo del Barrio presents NEXUS NEW YORK: Latin/American Artists in the Modern Metropolis. Curated by Deborah Cullen, this
landmark exhibition examines pioneering Caribbean and Latin American artists who lived in New York City before World War II and shaped the American avant-garde.
Between 1900 and 1942, New York City was the site of extraordinary creative exchange where artists could share ideas in a global context. The swiftly-changing
urban landscape before and between the World Wars inspired the erosion of artistic boundaries and fostered a new climate of modernist experimentation. Nexus New
York focuses on key artists from the Caribbean and Latin America who entered into dynamic cultural and social dialogues with the American-based avant-garde and
participated in the development of a new modern discourse. On View: Voces y Visiones. Curated by Elvis Fuentes, this premiere exhibition in the new Carmen Ana
Unanue Permanent Collection Galleries celebrates El Museo’s 40th anniversary. Over 100 works created by a cross-section of Latino, Caribbean, and Latin American
artists trace the museum’s history and the artistic contributions and milestones that have been part of El Museo’s four decades. Highlighting the strengths of the
collections, this installation ranges from artifacts of the ancient Taíno people and their legacy to traditional objects, postwar and contemporary art, including graphics,
photography and mixed media installations. Exhibition ends February 2010. El Museo del Barrio: 1230 5th Avenue at 104th Street, NYC. Museums hours: Wednesday
to Sundays, 11AM to 6PM. Suggested admission: adults: $9, students: $5; members and children under 12: Free; Seniors free on Wednesdays. For more information
call (212) 831-7272 or visit the website www.elmuseo.org.

Taller Boricua Gallery presents Crossing Bridges / Cruzando Puentes. Exhibit ends November 7, 2009, Julia de Burgos Cultural Center, 1680
Lexington Avenue & 106 St., NYC. Gallery Hours: Tuesday - Saturday 12PM – 6PM, Thursday 1PM- 7PM. For information call (212) 831-4333 or visit www.tallerboricua.
com.

Taller Boricua Gallery presents (In)tangible. A group exhibition of artists whose work juxtaposes the ephemeral and the concrete in quotidian life. Exhibit
opens November 20, 2009 and closes January 9th, 2010. Julia de Burgos Cultural Center, 1680 Lexington Avenue & 106 St., NYC. Gallery Hours: Tuesday - Saturday
12PM – 6PM, Thursday 1PM – 7PM. For information call (212) 831-4333 or visit www.tallerboricua.com.

Hostos Center for the Arts and Culture presents Samaná: Images of the Dominican Republic. An exhibition of photographs by José Bermúdez,
Marino Corniel, Wallace Edgecombe, Elaine Eversley, Ryan Mann-Hamilton, Carlos Sanabria, and Sterling Wadsworth. Exhibit ends November 7, 2009. Gallery hours
Mon-Fri 10AM-6PM and Saturday 10AM-2PM. Free Admission. The Longwood Art Gallery is located at Hostos Community College, 450 Grand Concourse at 149th
Street in the Bronx. For information call (718) 518-4455.

Center Gallery of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College presents Asserting their Rights: Puerto Ricans and African
Americans in their Quest for Social Justice. Curated by Milagros Denis, Hunter College and Pedro Juan Hernández, Centro Archives. Exhibition opens
November 5th, 6PM. El Centro Gallery at El Centro Library located on the East Bldg. 3rd Floor, NYC. For more information call (212) 772-5714 or go to www.centropr.
org.

Consulate General of Argentina in New York presents Ana Morán :Vigila al Norte. Photographic exhibition runs from November 5th through 25th.
Consulate General of Argentina, 12 W 56th St., NYC. Open daily from 10AM to 6PM. For more information call (212) 603-0400.

Lehman College Art Gallery presents Beyond Appearances. A sampling of contemporary portraiture, bringing together a group of artists whose works
explore the individual beyond the exterior visage. Among the works there are a number of self-portraits – these include Orlan, Andres Serrano, Rigoberto Torres,
Yasamasa Morimura, Chitra Ganesh, Teun Hocks, Lucia Pizzani, Robert and Shana Parke Harrison, and others. Co-curated by Patricia Cazorla and Susan Hoeltzel.
The exhibition includes a broad range of approaches and media - painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, video, and installation. Exhibition runs through December
1st. Lehman College Art Gallery, Bedford Park Blvd West, Bronx.
Gallery hours: Tuesday to Saturday from 10AM – 4PM. For more information, call (718) 960-8731.

The Americas Society presents Fernell Franco: Amarrados. Fernell Franco: Amarrados [Bound] features 20 vintage prints and a number of preparatory
studies that Franco produced in order to create the series. Franco conceived the series in street markets in Colombia and other countries of Latin America from 1980s
onwards, featuring wrapped up devices and isolated inanimate objects typically used by informal vendors to protect their merchandise. Franco’s images are devoid of
human presence conveying death, solitude, violence, abandonment, and mystery.
Exhibition runs through January 23, 2010. The gallery is free and open to the public Wednesday through Saturday, 12Noon – 6PM. The Americas Society, 680 Park
Avenue, NYC. For more information visit www.americas-society.org.

Hebrew Union College Museum presents Mirta Kupferminc ‘Wanderings’ - Retrospective Exhibition. A retrospective of the work of Argentine
artist Mirta Kupferminc, including prints, artist books, sculpture, video and mural installation. Fast gaining recognition as a major Latin American exponent of visual arts,
she explores the link between the culture of European immigrants and their newly found home in the Americas. Exhibition runs through July 2, 2010. Union College,
One West 4th Street, NYC, between Broadway and Mercer street, east of Washington Square. Free admission/Photo ID required. Mondays – Thursdays, 9AM to 6PM.;
Fridays, 9AM – 3PM. Visit www.gitterarts.net.

Passaic County Community College presents AMBOS MUNDOS: An Exhibition of Paintings by Raul Villarreal. The works of this Cuban-
born artist are inspired by his Afro-Cuban, Taino and Spanish heritage. Villarreal’s paintings address the issues of identity and his assimilation into American culture.
Admission: Free Exhibition runs through Nov 5, 2009. Broadway & LRC Galleries at Passaic County Community College, Broadway at Memorial Drive, Paterson, NJ.
Mondays – Fridays, 9AM–9PM; Saturdays 9AM – 5 PM. Contact (973) 684-5448 or www.pccc.edu/art/gallery.

83
Thursday, October 29, 2009 The Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & Third
presents ROCKIN’ SOUL: Music to Shake Avenue), NYC. 2:30PM and 6:30 PM. Admission:
Comité Noviembre Annual Puerto Rican and Soothe Your Spirit. From rock to cool $25-$50 with discounts available for Seniors,
Heritage Month Kick-Off Event, honoring funk to edgy soul, these musical acts take the stage Students, and Groups. For reservations, call (212)
the unsung heroes of our community through “Lo for a rollercoaster evening with the funky, poetic hip 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org.
Mejor de Nuestra Comunidad” Awards, the recipients hop sounds of Sean360x and the Universoul SpiRitual
of the CN Scholarship Program, announcement of Ankhestra and the Ganessa James Trio with its Broadwayworld.com presents
the Richie Perez Scholars as well as the unveiling of soulful sound with a rock edge. BAAD! The Bronx STANDING OVATIONS V. The annual benefit,
the 2009 poster and calendar journal. El Museo del Academy of Arts and Dance, 841 Barretto Street, this year titled—The Bronx Is Up And The Battery’s
Barrio, 1230 5th Avenue at 104th Street, NYC. 6PM. Bronx, NY. 8PM. Admission: $15. For information Down features an eclectic mix of performers.
By invitation only. For more information call (212) or tickets please call (718) 842 – 5223 or visit www. Currently scheduled to appear: Cortes Alexander,
677-4181 or www.comiténoviembre.org. BronxAcademyofArtsandDance.org. Joey Arias, Michael Arden, Gary Beach, Justin Bond,
Laura Bell Bundy, Liz Callaway, Mario Cantone, John
Saturday, October 31, 2009 Cudia, Melissa Errico, Ellen Greene, Melora Hardin,
Friday, October 30, 2009 Greg Jbara, Robert Marien, Will & Anthony Nunziata,
The Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance Rosie O’Donnell, Nicholas Rodriguez, Jennifer Hallie
The Institute for The Puerto Rican / presents CAPOERIA DANCE CLASSES Rosen and Jared Spector. Additional stars and
Hispanic Elderly Senior Action Council presents WITH “BRONX” of GINGA MUNDO. Bronx featured performers will be announced shortly and
32nd Annual Empowerment Conference native Moses McCarter will lead a class for dancers you can expect plenty of surprises and last minute
for Hispanic & Minority Seniors: THE of all levels in this amazing folk dance that ritualizes ‘entries’ to shake up what is already shaping up to be
IMPACT OF CHANGE. All day conference movement from martial arts, African dance and an exciting show. All the proceeds from this special
touching the key issues impacting seniors such as acrobatics. Guaranteed to get your blood pumping evening go to Broadway Cares / Equity Fights AIDS.
Health Care Reform ,the 2010 Census , the Stimulus and your body moving. The Bronx Academy of Town Hall, 123 W 43rd St, NYC. 7:30PM. Admission:
Package, Recession, Unemployment & Cutbacks Arts and Dance, 841 Barretto Street, Bronx, NY. $100, $50, $20. Call (212) 307-4100 or www.
, Social Security / SSI , and Affordable Housing. 9:30AM. Admission: $7. For information visit www. ticketmaster.com.
Columbia University - Alfred Lerner Hall, West 115th BronxAcademyofArtsandDance.org.
Street and Broadway, NYC (Train: #1 to 116th Street Monday, November 2, 2009
or buses: M4, M60, M104, M11). 8AM – 4:30PM. El Museo del Barrio presents Día de los
Admission: Free. For more information, please call Muertos. Celebrate with El Museo, Mexico’s Repertorio Español Presents: La Gringa, by
(212) 677-4181. beloved 3,000 year-old tradition that pays homage to Carmen Rivera and directed by Rene Buch. María
friends and relatives who have passed away. Join El arrives in Puerto Rico and is very excited about seeing
Latino Flavored Productions presents Yo Museo for free fun-filled day of activities! El Museo “her homeland.” As she visits her uncle in Puerto Rico,
Soy Latina (College Version). Wearing the del Barrio: 1230 5th Avenue at 104th Street, NYC. 11 she is faced with many questions about being Puerto
many hats of accomplished theater writer, producer, AM to 10PM. Admission: Free to all events. Details Rican. La Gringa is a story about cultural identity and
and film director, Linda Nieves Powell tells all about on www.elmuseo.org. family. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East 27th
the controversies of being Latina in today’s society. Street (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC.
Inspired by others and her own personal experiences, Bronx Zoo presents Boo at the Zoo, all day 11AM. Admission: $25-$50 with discounts available
she brings attention to stereotypes within our own Halloween activities. 11AM– 4:30PM. Admission: for Seniors, Students, and Groups. For reservations,
Latino sisters. Should we all be categorized in one $19-$25. Special: A child dressed in an animal call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org
word when we come from different backgrounds and costume can go free with a full priced paying adult.
countries? Are Cubanas stuck up? Are all Puerto Only one offer per family. For more information or El Instituto Cervantes and Casa
Ricans on government assistance or on drugs? directions to the Zoo visit www.bronxzoo.com. Arabe presents Expulsados 1609. Film
Are all Dominicans dark skinned or lazy? Are all by Miguel E. López Lorca (2009), 80 minutes.
Colombians and Mexicans drug dealers? “Yo Soy Sunday, November 1, 2009 New film commissioned by Casa Arabe in Spain
Latina” tackles these sterotypes while taking you commemorating the 400th anniversary of the tragic
through an emotional discovery. Nuyorican Poets Bronx Zoo presents Boo at the Zoo, all day exile of Arab families from their Spanish homeland
Cafe 236 East 3rd Street (Between B & C), NYC. Halloween activities. 11AM – 4:30PM. Admission: in 1609. In Spanish with English subtitles. Instituto
7PM. Admission: $15 advance/$20 at door. For $19-$25. Special: A child dressed in an animal Cervantes in New York, 211-215 East 49th Street,
more information, visit www.nuyorican.org. Advanced costume can go free with a full priced paying adult. NYC. Free admission. 6PM. For reservations call
tickets can be purchased at www.brownpapertickets. Only one offer per family. For more information or (212) 308-7720.
com/event/80939. directions to the Zoo visit www.bronxzoo.com.
Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón
Repertorio Español presents La Casa de Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón y y las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and
Los Espiritus. A new play by Caridad Svich las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and The Special The Special Service,). From novelist Vargas
based on Isabel Allende’s novel. Charting the rise Service,). From novelist Vargas Llosa, this comic Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian
and fall of the Trueba family in an un-named Latin tale unfolds when the Peruvian Army recruits Captain Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model
American country (reminiscent of Chile), the piece Pantaleón Pantoja, a model soldier, a man of integrity soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an
spans the 1920s through the 1970s, as the country and a good husband, for an outlandish mission: to outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special
moves through enormous sociopolitical changes that create and manage a Special Service of “visitors” Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities.
culminate in a devastating dictatorship. The play is to fulfill the troop’s necessities. Even though it is Even though it is everything against his moral code,
told from the point of view of, Alba, the youngest everything against his moral code, Captain Pantoja Captain Pantoja is a consummate soldier and the
of three generation of women. The Gramercy Art is a consummate soldier and the visiting service visiting service quickly becomes the most efficient
Theatre, 138 East 27th Street, (between Lexington & quickly becomes the most efficient branch of the branch of the armed forces. Captain Pantoja’s official
Third Avenue), NYC. 8PM. Admission: $25-$50 with armed forces. Captain Pantoja’s official progress progress reports are filled with military statistics
discounts available for seniors, students, children reports are filled with military statistics and jargon and jargon which often become the story’s funniest
and groups. For reservations call (212) 889-2850 or which often become the story’s funniest moments. moments. Recommended for adults. The Gramercy
www.repertorio.org. Recommended for adults. The Gramercy Art Theatre, Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington
84
& Third Avenue), NYC. 7PM. Admission: $25-$50 11AM. Admission: $25-$50 with discounts available Thursday, November 5, 2009
with discounts available for Seniors, Students, and for Seniors, Students, and Groups. For reservations,
Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org Hostos Center for the Arts and Culture and Mass
www.repertorio.org. Transit Street Theatre presents AIN’T EASY. A
El Instituto Cervantes and Casa Arabe multi-media, storytelling play by Lyn Pyle with Karen
Nuyorican Poets Café presents presents What a Wonderful World. Film by Wilson & Aisha Norris performed with live rap & film.
BROWNSVILLE BRED... Growing Up Faouzi Bensaidi (2006), 99 minutes. Moroccan actor Post-performance discussion with actors & director.
Elaine. This multiple award- and festival-winning director Faouzi Bensaïdi’s promiscuously stylish Especially appropriate for groups & classes, middle
one-woman show, written, performed and lived by film is a new vision of an old culture, unveiling an school & up. Repertory Theater at Hostos Community
(Nuyorican) Elaine Del Valle. Brownsville Bred is the uncommon Casablanca caught in a world wide web College, 450 Grand Concourse at 149th Street in the
true story of a Latina’s coming-of-age in the 1980’s of associations and consequences. English subtitles. Bronx. 10AM & 12PM. Admission: $6. For tickets
projects of Brownsville, Brooklyn, NY. Crime, drugs Instituto Cervantes in New York, 211-215 East 49th call Mass Transit Street Theater at (718) 512-8519
and poverty mix with the joys of family, hope, salsa Street, NYC. Free admission. 6PM. For reservations or email: ainteasytheplay@gmail.com. Info: www.
and the birth of rap! “A Rollercoaster of emotion, call (212) 308-7720. mtstv.org.
tough and tender and guaranteed to make you
laugh through your tears.” Nuyorican Poets Cafe Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón Repertorio Español presents: La Casa de
236 East 3rd Street (Between B & C), NYC. 7:30PM. y las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and Bernarda Alba by García Lorca, directed by
Admission $15/$10. For more information, please The Special Service,). From novelist Vargas René Buch. Bernarda Alba attempts to dominate and
call (212) 505-8183 or visit www.nuyorican.org. Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian control her five unmarried daughters. In this repressed
Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model environment, Lorca creates an explosion of hatred,
Tuesday, November 3, 2009 soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an jealousy, despair and passion. The Gramercy Arts
outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special Theatre, 138 East 27th Street, between Lexington &
Repertorio Español Presents: La Gringa, by Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities. Third Avenues, NYC. 11AM.Tickets begin at $30, with
Carmen Rivera and directed by Rene Buch. María Even though it is everything against his moral code, discounts available for seniors, students, children
arrives in Puerto Rico and is very excited about seeing Captain Pantoja is a consummate soldier and the and groups. Performances presented in Spanish with
“her homeland.” As she visits her uncle in Puerto Rico visiting service quickly becomes the most efficient simultaneous English translation via headphones for
she is faced with many questions about being Puerto branch of the armed forces. Captain Pantoja’s official an additional $3. For reservations, call (212) 889-
Rican. La Gringa is a story about cultural identity and progress reports are filled with military statistics 2850 or www.repertorio.org.
family. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East 27th and jargon which often become the story’s funniest
Street (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. moments. Recommended for adults. The Gramercy Center Gallery of the Center for Puerto
11AM. Admission: $25-$50 with discounts available Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington Rican Studies, Hunter College presents
for Seniors, Students, and Groups. For reservations, & Third Avenue), NYC. 7PM. Admission: $25-$50 the opening reception of the exhibition: Asserting
call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org. with discounts available for Seniors, Students, and their Rights: Puerto Ricans and African Americans in
Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or their Quest for Social Justice. Curated by Milagros
Nuyorican Poets Café and Ecuadorian www.repertorio.org. Denis, Hunter College and Pedro Juan Hernández,
Mission to the United Nations presents Centro Archives. El Centro Gallery at El Centro
Gino Castillo “YA LLEGE” CD Release Party. Gino Pregones Theater presents the world premiere Library located on the East Bldg. 3rd Fl, NYC. 6PM.
Castillo is a percussionist, composer, singer and of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional Admission: Free. For more information call (212)
educator. His musical studies began in Ecuador Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in 772-5714 or go to www.centropr.org.
which then led him on to Cuba, were he evolved this song-driven rendition of the historic migration
further for several years. Gaining experience as of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del Society of the Educational Arts, Inc.
a professional musician, he spends most of his cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel (SEA) and Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural
time studying with master teacher Oscar Valdez Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices & Educational Center presents Special K:
Moreno. He has collaborated with many Ecuadorian of multiple generations, including the sugar cane Opening Reception & Awards Ceremony
musicians, as well as some other international artists, workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip for BORIMIX: Puerto Rico Fest 2009. The
such as: Horacio el Negro Hernández, John Benítez, in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s art exhibition for BORIMIX 2009, SPECIAL K, invites
Frank Rubio, Ymelda Marie-Louisa, Oscarito Valdés, street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009. artists to consider the literature, life and legacy of
Paulo Moura, Pascoal Meirelles, André Neiva, Rafael Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non- Clemente Soto Vélez along any one (or a combination)
Paceiro, Emilio Morales, Cruks en Karnak, Juan stop live music composed and arranged by Merced, of various distinct elements that characterized his
Fernando Velasco, Pamela Cortés, Chaucha Kings, Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music work as well as his storied biography. LES & Abrazo
Sergio Sacoto, Fausto Miño. Alex Alvear, Guerrilla and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish Interno Gallery at Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural &
Clika, Pueblo Nuevo, Carmen Gonzalez and Tito & English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575 Educational Center, 107 Suffolk Street, 1st & 2nd
Junco. Nuyorican Poets Cafe 236 East 3rd Street Walton Avenue, Bronx, NY. 1:30PM. Admission: floor, NYC. 6:30PM. Admission: Free. For more
(Between B & C), NYC. 9PM. Admission: $10. For $15-$22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 information call 212-529-1545 or visit www.sea-
more information call (212) 505-8183 or visit www. or visit http://www.pregones.org. online.info.
nuyorican.org.
El Taller Boricua presents Salsa The Americas Society presents The Whole
Wednesday, November 4, 2009 Wednesdays After Work Party, With Island: Six Decades of Cuban Poetry.
Grupo Latin Vibe, Comida Criolla & DJ Spinning Editor Mark Weiss will read with Christopher Winks,
Repertorio Español Presents: La Gringa, by Salsa Dress in Good taste – No sneakers. Taller Margaret Carson, and Iraida Iturralde from his new
Carmen Rivera and directed by Rene Buch. María Boricua, 1680 Lexington Avenue 105th & 106th anthology, the first comprehensive bilingual overview
arrives in Puerto Rico and is very excited about seeing Streets, NYC. The #6 train to 103rd St, Doors open of Cuban poetry to be published during the past
“her homeland.” As she visits her uncle in Puerto Rico at 5:30PM, Ladies $5 from 5:30PM– 6:30PM; After sixty years, compiling a breadth of iconic authors
she is faced with many questions about being Puerto 6:30PM, Ladies $10; Gentlemen $10 all night. For including Nicolás Guillén, José Lezama Lima, and
Rican. La Gringa is a story about cultural identity and info: www.tallerboricua.org Nancy Morejón, as well as poets who remain almost
family. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East 27th unknown to the English-speaking world, such as Fina
Street (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. García Marruz, José Kozer, and Raúl Hernández
85
Novas. The anthology is an essential source for in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington and Third
understanding the literature and culture of Cuba, its street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009. Avenue) NYC. 3PM. $20 - $55. Performances
diaspora, and the Caribbean at large. The Americas Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non- presented in Spanish with simultaneous English
Society, 680 Park Avenue, NYC. 7PM. Admission: stop live music composed and arranged by Merced, translation via headphones for an additional $3. For
Free. For more information visit www.americas- Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.
society.org. and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish org.
& English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575
Pregones Theater presents the world premiere Walton Avenue, Bronx, NYC. 8PM. Admission: $15- Teatro Latea presents “TANGO, POR ELLOS”-
of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional $22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 or Passion of the Tango and the conflicts between
Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in visit http://www.pregones.org. the sexes on the dance floor. Limited Engagement
this song-driven rendition of the historic migration . Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center, Inc., 107
of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del Teatro Latea presents “TANGO, POR Suffolk Street-2nd Fl, NYC. 8PM Admission $30/
cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel ELLOS”- Passion of the Tango and the conflicts $20 Student & Senior, Students /Senior Citizens $20.
Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices between the sexes on the dance floor. Limited Tickets at: www.smarttix.com or call (212) 529-1948.
of multiple generations, including the sugar cane Engagement. Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center,
workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip Inc., 107 Suffolk Street-2nd Floor, New York, NYC. The Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance
in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s 8PM. Admission $30/ $20 Student & Senior. Students presents ON THE REEL: ALL THE LADIES
street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009. /Senior Citizens $ 20. Tickets at www.smarttix.com or SAY. Kwikstep and Rokafella, the dynamic duo of
Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non- call (212) 529-1948. Hip Hop dance, present a special evening of music,
stop live music composed and arranged by Merced, jamming, art and a sneak peek screening of ALL THE
Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music Repertorio Español presents: La Casa de LADIES SAY, Rokafella’s a fresh new documentary that
and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish Bernarda Alba by García Lorca,directed by highlights the lives of six iconic female street dancers
& English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575 René Buch. Bernarda Alba attempts to dominate and who’ve carved a niche in the physically challenging,
Walton Avenue, Bronx, NY. 8PM. Admission: $15- control her five unmarried daughters. In this repressed male dominated breakdance world. The event
$22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 or environment, Lorca creates an explosion of hatred, includes performances by guest artists and photos
visit http://www.pregones.org. jealousy, despair and passion. The Gramercy Arts by Vanessa Bahmani and Emily Lady Caprice. This
Theatre, 138 East 27th Street, between Lexington & event is a fundraiser to support the completion of the
Friday, November 6, 2009 Third Avenues, NYC. 8PM. Tickets begin at $30, with film and will be followed by an after party with an open
discounts available for seniors, students, children jam. BAAD! The Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance,
The Honorable Helen M. Marshall, and groups. Performances presented in Spanish with 841 Barretto Street, Bronx, NY. 8PM. Admission: $5-
Queens Borough President, and the simultaneous English translation via headphones for $25 suggested donation. For information visit www.
Puerto Rican Heritage Month Organizing an additional $3. For reservations, call (212) 889- BronxAcademyofArtsandDance.org.
Committee Annual Proclamation & 2850 or www.repertorio.org.
Awards Ceremony, co-sponsored by The Pregones Theater presents the world premiere
Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional
Elderly, Inc., is a festive reception and cultural OF THE BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/ Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in
program that will be held at the IPR/HE-Elmhurst/ dance spectacular from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration this song-driven rendition of the historic migration
Jackson Heights Senior Center located at 75-01 of the exhilarating music and dance of Colombia. A of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del
Broadway, Elmhurst, NY 11373, 3rd floor. Reception mix of sizzling new numbers and reimagined favorites cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel
will start at 6pm and the program will follow at 7PM. from past hit shows. Thalia Spanish Theatre, 41–17 Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices
Please RSVP to (718) 286-6915. Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. 8PM; Admission: of multiple generations, including the sugar cane
$25. For information call (718) 729-3880 or visit www. workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip
The Sierra Club’s Building Bridges to thaliatheatre.org. in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s
the Outdoors presents: The National premiere street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009.
of the film A Bridge to Puerto Rico. In April Saturday, November 7, 2009 Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non-
2009, Building Bridges to the Outdoors, Sierra Club’s stop live music composed and arranged by Merced,
national youth program, coordinated an alternative Queens Theatre in the Park presents Ballet Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music
spring break for New York City students to Puerto Hispánico. With theatricality and passion propelling and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish
Rico. A Bridge to Puerto Rico follows these seven every move, the dancers of Ballet Hispanico bring a & English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575
students on an environmental journey through the dramatic sensibility and contagious delight to each Walton Avenue, Bronx, NY. 8PM. Admission: $15-
natural wonders of Puerto Rico and their fight to performance. New versatile programs demonstrate $22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 or
save the leatherback turtle. Come hear from the NYC the high-energy pulse of Latino rhythms. Claire visit http://www.pregones.org.
students and from the Puerto Rico chapter about how Shulman Playhouse at Queens Theater in the Park,
a week outdoors inspired environmental leadership. Queens, NY. 2PM & 8PM. Tickets $21-$44; for group Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón y
El Museo del Barrio, 1230 Fifth Avenue (at 104th sales, seniors and students call (718) 760-0064 or las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and The
Street), New York NY. 6:30PM. Admission: Free with visit www.queenstheatre.org. Special Service,). From novelist Mario Vargas
RSVP to david.veliz@sierraclub.org. Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian
Repertorio Español presents Mario Vargas Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model
Pregones Theater presents the world premiere Llosas’ critically-acclaimed La Fiesta Del Chivo soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an
of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional (The Feast of the Goat). The story of General outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special
Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in Rafael Leonidas Trujillo, who subdued the Dominican Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities.
this song-driven rendition of the historic migration Republic in a cruel dictatorship from 1930 – 1961, as Even though it is everything against his moral code,
of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del told by Urania, a New York lawyer whose father was Captain Pantoja is a consummate soldier and the
cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel part of Trujillo’s Ministry, who returns to the Dominican visiting service quickly becomes the most efficient
Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices Republic after 35 years; by the band of conspirators branch of the armed forces. Captain Pantoja’s official
of multiple generations, including the sugar cane who plan his assassination, and through the thoughts progress reports are filled with military statistics
workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip of the dictator himself. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, and jargon which often become the story’s funniest
86
moments. Recommended for adults. The Gramercy Even though it is everything against his moral code, develop their artistic potential. Prince George
Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington Captain Pantoja is a consummate soldier and the Ballroom, 15 East 27th Street, between Fifth &
& Third Avenue), NYC. 8PM. Admission: $25-$50 visiting service quickly becomes the most efficient Madison, NYC; 6PM - 10PM. Tickets: $125 & $225
with discounts available for Seniors, Students, and branch of the armed forces. Captain Pantoja’s official couple. For more information call (917)968-4191 or
Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or progress reports are filled with military statistics visit www.ayudaforthearts.org.
www.repertorio.org. and jargon which often become the story’s funniest
moments. Recommended for adults. The Gramercy Repertorio Español presents La Casa de
Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington Los Espiritus. A new play by Caridad Svich
OF THE BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/dance & Third Avenue), NYC. 2:30PM & 6:30PM. Admission: based on Isabel Allende’s novel. Charting the rise
spectacular from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration of the $25-$50 with discounts available for Seniors, and fall of the Trueba family in an un-named Latin
exhilarating music and dance of Colombia. A mix Students, and Groups. For reservations, call (212) American country (reminiscent of Chile), the piece
of sizzling new numbers and reimagined favorites 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org. spans the 1920s through the 1970s, as the country
from past hit shows. Thalia Spanish Theatre, 41–17 moves through enormous sociopolitical changes that
Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. 8PM. Admission: Queens Theatre in the Park presents Ballet culminate in a devastating dictatorship. The play is
$27-$30. For information call (718) 729-3880 or visit Hispánico. With theatricality and passion propelling told from the point of view of, Alba, the youngest of
www.thaliatheatre.org. every move, the dancers of Ballet Hispanico bring a three generation of women.11AM. Admission: $25-
dramatic sensibility and contagious delight to each 50 with discounts available for seniors, students,
Society of the Educational Arts, Inc. performance. New versatile programs demonstrate children and groups. The Gramercy Art Theatre,
(SEA) presents El Encuentro de Juan Bobo the high-energy pulse of Latino rhythms. Claire 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & Third
y Pedro Animal/The Encounter. Children Shulman Playhouse at Queens Theater in the Park, Avenue), NYC. Performances presented in Spanish
participate in a circus-style play and in turn see how Queens, NY. 3PM. Tickets $21-$41; for group sales, with simultaneous English translation via headphones
these two charming characters from Puerto Rico and seniors and students call (718) 760-0064 or visit for an additional $3. For reservations, call (212) 889-
Dominican Republic find friendship, self-esteem and www.queenstheatre.org. 2850 or www.repertorio.org.
confidence. Teatro SEA at Los Kabayitos, 107 Suffolk
St., 2nd Fl., NYC. 3PM. Admission: children $10, Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST Society of the Educational Arts, Inc.
adults $12. For more information call (212) 529-1545 OF THE BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/ (SEA) and Caballero Films presents From
or visit www.sea-online.info. dance spectacular from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration the Script to the Screen. A workshop in which
of the exhilarating music and dance of Colombia. A Puerto Rican filmmaker Luis Caballero will speak
Herencia De Mi Tambo Productions mix of sizzling new numbers and reimagined favorites about the creative process of film screenwriting and
Presents Bombas De Mi Batey, With the from past hit shows. Thalia Spanish Theatre, 41–17 how during the production process, filmmaking and
collaboration of Marcos Peñaloza Pica & friends Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. 4PM. Admission: editing can result in changes that will either benefit
directly from Puerto Rico Bruckner Bar & Grill 1 $27-$30. For information call (718) 729-3880 or visit or compromise the cinematographic purpose. 107
Bruckner Blvd, Bronx, NY. Bomba percussion and www.thaliatheatre.org. Suffolk St., 2nd Fl., NYC. 7PM. Admission: $10. For
Dance Workshop: 2:30PM – 6:30PM; Admission: more information call 212-529-1545 or visit www.sea-
$35; Bombazo: 8:30PM – 12:30AM. Admission: $10. North / South Consonance presents Villa-Lobos: online.info.
Contact: Nelson or Vivian @646-894-6693 Modinhas & Canções with Stela Brandao, soprano
and Max Lifchitz, pianist. Complete cycle of art songs Nuyorican Poets Café presents
Sunday, November 8, 2009 by the Brazilian master marking the 50th anniversary BROWNSVILLE BRED... Growing Up
of the composer’s passing. Christ & St Stephen’s Elaine. This multiple award- and festival-winning
Pregones Theater presents the world premiere Church, 120 West 69th St (bet Bway & Columbus), one-woman show, written, performed and lived
of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional NY. 3PM. Admission: Free. For more information: by (Nuyorican) Elaine Del Valle. The true story of
Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in (212) 663-7566 or www.northsouthmusic.org. a Latina’s coming-of-age in the 1980’s projects of
this song-driven rendition of the historic migration Brownsville, Brooklyn, NY. Crime, drugs and poverty
of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del Teatro Latea presents “TANGO, POR ELLOS”- mix with the joys of family, hope, salsa and the birth
cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel Passion of the Tango and the conflicts between of rap! “A Rollercoaster of emotion, tough and tender
Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices the sexes on the dance floor. Limited Engagement. and guaranteed to make you laugh through your
of multiple generations, including the sugar cane Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center, Inc., 107 tears.” Nuyorican Poets Cafe 236 East 3rd Street
workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip Suffolk Street-2nd Floor, NYC. 4PM. Admission: (Between B & C), NYC. 7:30PM. Admission: $15/$10.
in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s $30/$20 Student & Senior. Students /Senior Citizens For more information, please call (212) 505-8183 or
street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009. $20. Tickets at: www.smarttix.com or call (212) 529- visit www.nuyorican.org.
Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non- 1948.
stop live music composed and arranged by Merced, PAMAR and the World Financial Center
Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music Monday, November 9, 2009 present Latin American Piano Festival.
and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish Participating artists include Argentina’s Carlos
& English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575 The Alliance for Young Urban Design Franzet, American Allison Brewster Franzetti,
Walton Avenue, Bronx, NYC. 3PM. Admission: $15- and the Arts (AYUDA for the Arts) presents Mexican Max Lifchitz, Argentina’s Octavio Brunetti,
$22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 or “A Fashionable Taste of New York” with an and Uruguay’s Polly Ferman. The pianists,
visit http://www.pregones.org. exciting line up of celebrity chefs such as Douglas representing a wide range of piano styles and genres
Rodriguez, Aaron Sanchez, Alex Garcia and Roberto of Latin music, will perform solos, pieces for 2 pianos,
Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón Treviño, of Budatai in Puerto Rico, featured recently as well as 4 and 8 hand pieces. Also participating are
y las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and in ‘Next Iron Chef.’ Chef Art Smith, of numerous tango dancers Karina Romero and Dardo Galletto.
The Special Service). From novelist Vargas Food Network shows and Top Chef Masters, will be The World Financial Center Winter Garden, Lower
Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian honored, as well as Tina Ramirez, founder of Ballet Manhattan in the Heart of Battery Park, NYC 12Noon-
Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model Hispanico. Event features 15 of New York Area’s 2PM. Admission: Free. For more information, visit:
soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an top restaurants and some celebrity chefs. Proceeds www.WorldFinancialCenter.com or www.pamar.org.
outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special go toward scholarships and programs to help the
Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities. creative young students from urban neighborhoods The Americas Society presents a
87
panel discussion and concert of Cuarteto Admission: Free with registration; members priority. Sofia Rei Koutsovitis is an active vocalist and
Latinoamericano. Cuarteto Latinoamericano, For more information visit www.americas-society. composer. Her music is grounded in traditional South
formed in 1982, is renowned worldwide as the leading org. American rhythms such as chacarera and zamba from
proponent of Latin American music for string quartet. Argentina, Afro-peruvian festejo and lando, along
This award-winning ensemble has recorded most of Wednesday, November 11, 2009 with some Brazilian genres that merge involving jazz
the Latin American repertoire for string quartet, and harmonies and rich improvisations. ELLA Lounge, 9
the sixth volume of their Villa-Lobos quartet cycle El Museo del Barrio presents VIVA Avenue A (between First and Second Street), NYC.
was nominated for a Grammy and Latin Grammy in FUTURISM! Revolution, Vanguardia, and 7:30PM- 9:30PM. $10. For more information visit
2002. This panel discussion precedes their concert the Modern Metropolis. As part of Performa www.sofiamusic.com.
at Miller Theatre, which will include pieces by Villa- 09, El Museo presents a lively evening of bilingual
Lobos, Revueltas, Piazzolla, Alvarez, and Ginastera. spoken word, swirling images, and shocking sounds El Taller Boricua presents Salsa
Miller Theatre at Columbia University, 2960 Broadway that illuminate links between Futurism and Latin Wednesdays After Work Party With
@ 116th, NYC. 7PM. Admission: $7-$22. For more American art of the early 20th century. El Museo del Manny Oquendo’s Libre Comida Criolla & DJ
information visit www.americas-society.org. Barrio, 1230 5th Avenue, NYC. 6:30PM. Admission: Spinning Salsa, Dress in Good taste – No sneakers,
Free with RSVP at www.elmuseo.org. Taller Boricua, 1680 Lexington Avenue 105th & 106th
Tuesday, November 10, 2009 Streets. The #6 train to 103rd St, NYC. Doors open
Ramón Jimenez in collaboration with Hostos at 5:30PM. Ladies $5 from 5:30PM – 6:30PM; After
Repertorio Español presents Mario Vargas Culture & Arts Center presents Celebrating 6:30PM, Ladies $10; Gentlemen $10 all night. For
Llosas’ critically-acclaimed La Fiesta Del Chivo Evelina López Antonetty’s Life. Puerto info:www.tallerboricua.org
(The Feast of the Goat). The story of General Rican Discovery Day marks the 25th anniversary of
Rafael Leonidas Trujillo, who subdued the Dominican one of our most treasured leaders. A tribute to Evelina Thursday, November 12, 2009
Republic in a cruel dictatorship from 1930 – 1961, as by family, friend and the community will remember
told by Urania, a New York lawyer whose father was her. Hostos Community College Theatre, 450 Grand Hostos Center for the Arts and Culture
part of Trujillo’s Ministry, who returns to the Dominican Concourse at 149th Street in the Bronx, NY. 7PM and Mass Transit Street Theatre presents
Republic after 35 years; by the band of conspirators – 9PM. Admission: Free. Contact for Information: AIN’T EASY. A multi-media, storytelling play by
who plan his assassination, and through the thoughts Joe Conzo, Jr. ( 646) 662-8958. Lyn Pyle with Karen Wilson & Aisha Norris performed
of the dictator himself. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, with live rap & film. Post-performance discussion
138 East 27th Street (between Lexington and Third Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón y with actors & director. Especially appropriate for
Avenue) NYC. 11AM. $20 - $55. Performances las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and The groups & classes, middle school & up. 10AM &
presented in Spanish with simultaneous English Special Service,). From novelist Mario Vargas 12PM. Admission: $6, Repertory Theater at Hostos
translation via headphones for an additional $3. For Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian Community College, 450 Grand Concourse at
reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio. Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model 149th Street in the Bronx, NY. For tickets call Mass
org. soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an Transit Street Theater at (718) 512-8519 or email:
outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special ainteasytheplay@gmail.com. Info: www.mtstv.org.
Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón y Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities.
las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and The Even though it is everything against his moral code, Repertorio Español presents La Casa de
Special Service). From novelist Mario Vargas Captain Pantoja is a consummate soldier and the Los Espiritus. A new play by Caridad Svich
Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian visiting service quickly becomes the most efficient based on Isabel Allende’s novel. Charting the rise
Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model branch of the armed forces. Captain Pantoja’s official and fall of the Trueba family in an un-named Latin
soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an progress reports are filled with military statistics American country (reminiscent of Chile), the piece
outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special and jargon which often become the story’s funniest spans the 1920s through the 1970s, as the country
Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities. moments. Recommended for adults. The Gramercy moves through enormous sociopolitical changes that
Even though it is everything against his moral code, Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington culminate in a devastating dictatorship. The play is
Captain Pantoja is a consummate soldier and the & Third Avenue), NYC. 7PM. Admission: $25-$50 told from the point of view of, Alba, the youngest of
visiting service quickly becomes the most efficient with discounts available for Seniors, Students, and three generation of women.11AM. Admission: $25-
branch of the armed forces. Captain Pantoja’s official Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or 50 with discounts available for seniors, students,
progress reports are filled with military statistics www.repertorio.org. children and groups. The Gramercy Art Theatre,
and jargon which often become the story’s funniest 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & Third
moments. Recommended for adults. The Gramercy El Instituto Cervantes and Casa Arabe Avenue), NYC. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850
Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington presents Falafel. First feature film by Michel or www.repertorio.org.
& Third Avenue), NYC. 7PM. Admission: $25-$50 Kammoun (2006), 83 minutes. A summer evening
with discounts available for Seniors, Students, and in Beirut. The life of Toufic, a young Lebanese man, Center for Puerto Rican Studies at
Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or and his nightly strolls. Between his family, friends Hunter College presents The 2010 Census
www.repertorio.org. and love affairs, he tries to seize every day of his and Puerto Ricans: Statistical Policy
life, through pleasures and entertainment. Soon he Issues and Politics. Presenter: Angelo Falcón,
The Americas Society with PAMAR presents discovers that having a normal life, in this country, President, National Institute for Latino Policy. Hunter
Heitor Villa-Lobos Celebration II. Heitor is a luxury. 15 years after the war had ended, a College: Centro Conference Room 1437 East Bldg.,
Villa-Lobos’ presence in the international concert volcano is lying dormant on every street corner, like a NYC. 6PM. Admission: Free. For more information,
repertoire rests on a handful of ever-popular pieces. time-ticking bomb that is ready explode… This night visit www.centropr.org or call (212) 772-5714.
The second concert of this celebration of Villa- will be pivotal in the life of the young man. English
Lobos’ music will explore a lesser-known side of his subtitles. Instituto Cervantes in New York, 211-215 The Americas Society with The City
productions with performances of rarely heard, early East 49th Street, NYC. Admission: Free. 6PM. For College of New York, CUNY; Colonial
chamber works for voices and instruments, including reservations call (212) 308-7720. Latin American Review, the Latin
the Suite for violin and voice; the Sextuor Mystique; American Writers Institute, CUNY;
the Quatuor for harp, celesta, flute, and sax with Ella Lounge presents Latin Jazz Session with Sofia and Hofstra University presents Review 79
voices; and the Poêma da criança e sua mamâ. The Koutsovitis. Originally from Buenos Aires, Argentina, Launch (Inca Garcilaso de la Vega and His Legacy).
Americas Society, 680 Park Avenue, NYC. 7PM. Celebrating Review’s special “Inca Garcilaso” issue,
88
featuring guest academic editor Raquel Chang- Friday, November 13, 2009 Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices
Rodríguez (CUNY) and guest creative editors Isaac of multiple generations, including the sugar cane
Goldemberg (Hostos Community College/CUNY) Comité Noviembre Fourteenth Annual workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip
and Miguel-Angel Zapata (Hofstra). The editors will Benefit Celebrating Twenty Three Years in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s
discuss the significance of the topic as well as their of Puerto Rican Heritage Month. For street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009.
respective sections. Authors Odi Gonzales (Tunupa/ the past twenty-three years, CN, has created and Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non-
el libro de las sirenas), Tulio Mora (Simulación de la developed programs all geared to the support and stop live music composed and arranged by Merced,
máscara), and Edgardo Rivera Martínez (Danzantes enhancement of educational opportunities and Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music
de la noche y de la muerte y otros cuentos), will leadership development for Puerto Rican youth with and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish
read their Spanish-language texts from Review 79. a cultural twist. These programs are firmly rooted & English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575
Translator Jason Weiss will read English-language in the belief, that in order to succeed in life, you Walton Avenue, Bronx, NY. 8PM. Admission: $15-
versions of the authors’ work. The Americas Society, must pursue a higher education, give back to your $22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 or
680 Park Avenue, NYC. 7PM. Admission: Free with community through volunteer efforts and know your visit http://www.pregones.org.
registration; members priority. For more information cultural ancestral history. CN would like to invite you
visit www.americas-society.org. to be part of our success story with over 170 scholars La Kueva presents URBANSONORA. A New
boasting a 90% college graduation rate since the York based Latin alternative band, Urbansonora is an
Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter inception of the CN Scholarship Program in 1996. eclectic group of musicians, inspired by a vast and
College and Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural Please join us and continue to ensure our mission rich source of musical traditions underscored by the
& Educational Center presents Clemente of providing educational and leadership opportunities brilliant repertoire of Gustavo Moncada. La Kueva,
Soto Vélez: The Poet, the Activist and to exceptional youth who are making a difference 39-31 Queens Blvd. Queens, (7 train to 40th Street
the revolutionary. An exhibition of primary and in their community by volunteering and becoming Station stop). 12AM (Midnight). Admission, $10. Visit
secondary sources from the Clemente y Amanda involved in the social, civic and global issues of their www.myspace.com/urbansonora.
Soto Vélez. Papers are kept at the Center for Puerto time. Proceeds from this annual event will benefit all
Rican Studies. LES & Abrazo Interno Gallery at of CN annual programs. The NY Hilton, 1335 Avenue Saturday, November 14, 2009
Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural & Educational Center, of the Americas (between W 53rd Street and W 54th
107 Suffolk Street, 1st floor, NYC. 6PM. Admission: Street), NYC. Black Tie. Reception 6PM, Dinner COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE & HOSTOS
Free. For more information call: (212) 772-5686 or 7PM. Live Entertainment. For more information call CENTER FOR THE ARTS & CULTURE are
email: alberto.hernandez@hunter.cuny.edu. (914) 263-6599 or (212) 677-4181 or visit www. thrilled to present for the first time in New York Jesus
comitenoviembre.org. Omar Rivera, El Boricuazo, historian & author, in his
Pregones Theater presents the world premiere acclaimed sold out show, “Puertorriqueñidad…
of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional Repertorio Español Presents: La Gringa, Defendiendo nuestra imagen.” Experience
Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in by Carmen Rivera and directed by Rene Buch. María a “Boricuazo” moment that you will remember for
this song-driven rendition of the historic migration arrives in Puerto Rico and is very excited about seeing the rest of your life! Growing up in Puerto Rico all
of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del “her homeland.” As she visits her uncle in Puerto Rico he heard was that Puerto Rico was a tiny island that
cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel she is faced with many questions about being Puerto produced nothing. So, he became determined to
Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices Rican. La Gringa is a story about cultural identity and prove this statement wrong and armed himself with
of multiple generations, including the sugar cane family. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East 27th knowledge and information. The more he researched
workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip Street (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. the more he realized the significant impact this tiny
in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s 11AM. $25 - $55. For reservations, call (212) 889- island and Puerto Ricans have had on the world. His
street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009. 2850 or www.repertorio.org. enthusiasm, energy and love for all things Puerto
Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non- Rican is contagious. He will leave you dizzy with the
stop live music composed and arranged by Merced, Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar “tidbits” he expounds, some funny, trivial and others
Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish extremely profound, but most of all he will leave you
and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish Dance. Rioja performs to live music with flamenco with a renewed sense of self, pride, determination
& English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575 guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Art and a challenge to go forth and teach others. Hostos
Walton Avenue, Bronx, NY. 8PM. Admission: $15- Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & Center for the Arts & Culture Theatre, 450 Grand
$22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 or Third Avenue), NYC. 8PM. Admission: $25-$50 with Concourse at 149th Street, Bronx, NY. 7:30PM.
visit http://www.pregones.org. discounts available for Seniors, Students, Children Space is limited. Performance will done in Spanish.
and Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or For ticket information call (718) 518-4455.
Villa Della Pace presents Samba! with the www.repertorio.org.
Mariela Pacchioli Trio. Mariela Pacchioli takes Los Bomberos de Brooklyn and EL
you into a tour of Samba – an exciting, fun, rhythmic Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST PUENTE celebrate Afro Puerto Rican culture
and sometimes melancholic music born in the heart OF THE BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/dance with a series of afternoon events: Loiza style Bomba
of Brazil. Via Della Pace, 48 East 7th Street and 2nd spectacular from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration of the dance class (3pm-4:30pm), a hands on workshop on
Ave, East Village, NYC. 8PM. $10, plus $10 food/drink exhilarating music and dance of Colombia. A mix African based medicinal herbs and vegetables with
minimum. Visit www.myspace.com/marielapacchioli. of sizzling new numbers and reimagined favorites Grupo Motivos, a Puerto Rican women’s collective
from past hit shows. Thalia Spanish Theatre, 41–17 of gardeners and elders from Philadelphia (4:30pm-
Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. 8PM. Admission: 6pm), followed by a bombazo, community bomba
Pilar Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of $25. For information call (718) 729-3880 or visit www. celebration (6pm-8:30pm). El Puente, 211 South 4th
Spanish Dance. Rioja performs to live music with thaliatheatre.org. St., corner of Roebling St., Brooklyn NY (Los Sures,
flamenco guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Williamsburg). 3PM-8:30PM. Admission: Donation
Gramercy Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Pregones Theater presents the world premiere appreciated. For more information, please contact:
Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. 7PM. Admission: of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional www.elpuente.us or (718) 387-0404.
$25-$50 with discounts available for Seniors, Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in
Students, Children and Groups. For reservations, call this song-driven rendition of the historic migration North/South Consonance presents Carlos
(212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org. of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del Chavez: A Celebration! Soprano Rachel
cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel Rosales and members of the acclaimed North/
89
South Consonance Ensemble celebrate the music BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/dance spectacular including pieces from Mexico, Colombia, Peru,
of the illustrious Mexican master Carlos Chávez. from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration of the exhilarating Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, and Cuba. 1PM.
Bruno Walter Auditorium at the NY Public Library music and dance of Colombia. A mix of sizzling new Admission: Free. Community Mediation Services,
for the Performing Arts, 40 Lincoln Center Plaza numbers and reimagined favorites from past hit Inc., 89-64 163rd St. Jamaica, NY. For more
(111 Amsterdam Avenue at 65th St), NYC. 3PM. shows. Thalia Spanish Theatre, 41–17 Greenpoint information, visit www.quintet.org.
Admission: Free. For more information: (212) 870- Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. 4PM; Admission: $27-30.
1630 or http://www.nypl.org. For information call (718) 729-3880 or visit www. Center for Puerto Rican Studies at
thaliatheatre.org. Hunter College and Clemente Soto Vélez
Pregones Theater presents the world premiere Cultural & Educational Center presents
of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón y The Life & Times of Clemente Soto Vélez.
Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and The Special A panel discussion with professors Gerald Meyer,
this song-driven rendition of the historic migration Service). From novelist Vargas Llosa, this comic author of a book on political leader Vito Marcantonio;
of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del tale unfolds when the Peruvian Army recruits Captain Orlando José Hernández poet and historian from
cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel Pantaleón Pantoja, a model soldier, a man of integrity Hostos Community College; and Alberto Hernández-
Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices and a good husband, for an outlandish mission: to Banuchi, chief librarian & archivist for the Center for
of multiple generations, including the sugar cane create and manage a Special Service of “visitors” Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College. Clemente
workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip to fulfill the troop’s necessities. Even though it is Soto Vélez Cultural & Educational Center, 107
in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s everything against his moral code, Captain Pantoja is Suffolk Street, NYC. 6PM. Admission: Free. For more
street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009. a consummate soldier and the visiting service quickly information call (212) 772-3803 or email: pmata@
Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non- becomes the most efficient branch of the armed hunter.cuny.edu.
stop live music composed and arranged by Merced, forces. Captain Pantoja’s official progress reports are
Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music filled with military statistics and jargon which often The Americas Society and PAMAR presents
and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish become the story’s funniest moments. Recommended El Instituto Superior de Arte del Teatro
& English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575 for adults. The Gramercy Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Colón in concert. The ISATC is the training institute
Walton Avenue, Bronx, NY. 8PM. Admission: $15- Street (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. of Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, one of the leading
$22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 or 6:30PM. Admission: $25-$50 with discounts available opera houses in the Americas. It has been training
visit http://www.pregones.org. for Seniors, Students,and Groups. For reservations, artists for the world’s opera and ballet stages for
call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org. decades. These young musicians will perform an
Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST evening of opera favorites from Mozart’s The Magic
OF THE BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/ Monday, November 16, 2009 Flute to Verdi’s Othello, and from Donizetti’s Elisir
dance spectacular from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration d’amore to Berg’s Wozzeck. The Americas Society,
of the exhilarating music and dance of Colombia. A The Institute for Puerto Rican /Hispanic Elderly 680 Park Avenue, NYC. 7PM. Admission: Free with
mix of sizzling new numbers and reimagined favorites (IPR/HE) presents Celebrando Nuestra Cultura registration; members priority. For more information
from past hit shows. Thalia Spanish Theatre, 41–17 Puertorriqueña. Annual Conference on issues visit www.americas-society.org.
Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. 8PM. Admission: affecting the elderly. IPR/HE, 105 East 22 Street at
$27-30. For information call (718) 729-3880 or visit Park Avenue- 4th Fl. NYC. Event starts at 10AM. Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar
www.thaliatheatre.org. Free Admission. For more information call (212) 677- Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish
4181. Dance. Rioja perform to live music with flamenco
Nuyorican Poets Café presents guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Art
Yerbabuena: Bomba & Plena, Puerto Catholic Charities Bayside Senior Center and PAMAR Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington &
Rican Roots Music. Nuyorican Poets Cafe presents Celebrating Music from Latin America. A Third Avenue), NYC. 7PM. Admission: $25-$40 with
236 East 3rd Street (Between B & C), NYC. 10PM. concert by Quintet of the Americas (woodwind quintet) discounts available for Seniors, Students, Children
Admission: $10. For more information, please call with guest artist, tango singer Chris Vasquez in music and Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or
(212) 505-8183 or visit www.nuyorican.org. from Latin America including pieces from Mexico, www.repertorio.org.
Colombia, Peru, Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, and
Carribean Cultural Center African Cuba. Catholic Charities Bayside Senior Center 221- Nuyorican Poets Café presents
Diaspora Institute in Collaboration with 15 Horace Harding Boulevard, Queens, NY. 10AM. BROWNSVILLE BRED... Growing Up
Taino Towers Admission: Free For more information, visit www. Elaine. This multiple award- and festival-winning
Presents 6th Annual International Latin/ quintet.org. one-woman show, written, performed and lived by
Tropical Music Collectors Festival DE (Nuyorican) Elaine Del Valle. Brownsville Bred is the
LA CHARANGA AL CHARANGON. Taino Towers Repertorio Español presents Nobel Prize Winner true story of a Latina’s coming-of-age in the 1980’s
Cultural Building, 240 East 123rd St & 2nd Ave., El Gabriel García Márquez’ Cronica de una Muerte projects of Brownsville, Brooklyn, NY. Crime, drugs
Barrio, NYC, 1PM – 10PM, Admission: $10. Anunciada (Chronicle of a Death Foretold). Directed and poverty mix with the joys of family, hope, salsa
by Jorge Alí Triana. A spectacular wedding, a savage and the birth of rap! “A Rollercoaster of emotion,
Sunday, November 15, 2009 scandal, and a murder to which an entire Latin tough and tender and guaranteed to make you
American town appears to be an accessory to the laugh through your tears.” Poets Cafe 236 East 3rd
Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar fact. The Gramercy Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street Street (Between B & C), NYC. 7:30 PM. Admission:
Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM. $15/$10. For more information, please call (212) 505-
Dance. Rioja performs to live music with flamenco Admission: $25-$50 with discounts available for 8183 or visit www.nuyorican.org.
guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Arts Seniors, Students, and Groups. For reservations, call
Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org. Tuesday, November 17, 2009
Third Avenue), NYC. 2:30PM. Admission: $25-50 with
discounts available for Seniors, Students, Children Community Mediation Services and El Museo del Barrio presents IN OUR
and Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or PAMAR presents Celebrating Music from LINGO: Jamel Shabazz on DJ Disco Wiz.
www.repertorio.org. Latin America. A concert by Quintet of the A multi-media dialogue, “cipher” style, featuring the
Americas (woodwind quintet) with guest artist, tango first ‘mixed plate’ beats to those styles rocked in the
Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST OF THE singer Chris Vasquez in music from Latin America 80’s. Wiz’s recent biography It’s Just Begun (co-
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authored with Ivan Sanchez) will serve as a point of is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish Dance. Thursday, November 19, 2009
departure to discuss the life of the first Latino hip hop Rioja performs to live music with flamenco guitarists
DJ. El Café at Museo del Barrio: 1230 5th Avenue at and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, American Diabetes Association
104th Street, NYC. 6:30PM. Admission: Free. RSVP 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & Third presents 3RD ANNUAL DISPARITIES
required at www.elmuseo.org. For more information, Avenue), NYC. 11AM. Admission: $25-$50 with PARTNERSHIP FORUM: Overcoming
call (212) 831-7272. discounts available for Seniors, Students, Children Disparities and Building Successful Diabetes and
and Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or Obesity Programs. National Conference on Type
Wednesday, November 18, 2009 www.repertorio.org. 2 Diabetes and Obesity in High-Risk Populations
for clinicians, community health educators,
Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. Center for Puerto Rican Studies at academicians, allied health professionals, community
presents Puerto Rican Heritage Month Celebration: Hunter College and Clemente Soto Vélez leaders, public health practitioners and officials,
Celebrando La Herencia Y Cultura Puertorriqueña. Cultural & Educational Center presents Re- policy makers, government agencies, program
Pregones Theater, 575 Walton Avenue, the Bronx, Membering Loisaida/Archiving Loisaida administrators, employers and human resource
NY. 6PM. Admission: Free. For more information Archivists and Cultural Critics reinterpret Loisaida managers. Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, VA.
call (718) 590-3522 or email: lroldan@bronxbp.nyc. with Urayoan Noel- SUNY Albany, Mario Ramírez- 7:15AM-4:15PM. Registration Fees: $150 - Early Bird
gov. Centro at Hunter College, Gregory Sholette-Queens Registration through October 15; $200 thereafter. For
College. The overall panel will touch on the forms more information, please contact Monique Lindsy at
American Diabetes Association and contents of institutional politics, material culture, AskCI@diabetes.org or (703) 549-1500 ext. 2253.
presents 3RD ANNUAL DISPARITIES affiliating as artist communities vs. other types of
PARTNERSHIP FORUM: Overcoming cultural belongings, and the shadow and situational Repertorio Español presents: La Casa de
Disparities and Building Successful Diabetes and world of peripheral players. Clemente Soto Vélez Bernarda Alba by García Lorca, directed by
Obesity Programs. National Conference on Type Cultural & Educational Center, 107 Suffolk Street, René Buch. Bernarda Alba attempts to dominate and
2 Diabetes and Obesity in High-Risk Populations NYC. 6PM. Admission: Free. For more information, control her five unmarried daughters. In this repressed
for clinicians, community health educators, call (212) 396-6336 or email: lacra@optonline.net. environment, Lorca creates an explosion of hatred,
academicians, allied health professionals, community jealousy, despair and passion. The Gramercy Arts
leaders, public health practitioners and officials, El Instituto Cervantes and Casa Arabe Theatre, 138 East 27th Street, between Lexington
policy makers, government agencies, program presents Viva Laldjerie Film by Nadir Mokneché & Third Avenues, NYC. 11AM; Tickets begin at $30,
administrators, employers and human resource (2003), 113 minutes. In the heart of Algiers during the with discounts available for seniors, students, children
managers. Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, winter of 2003, three women (a mother, her daughter and groups. Performances presented in Spanish with
VA. 12PM-8PM. Registration Fees: $150 - Early Bird and a prostitute) have been living in a hotel in the center simultaneous English translation via headphones for
Registration through October 15; $200 thereafter. For of town amid creeping fundamentalism. Goucem, the an additional $3. For reservations, call (212) 889-
more information, please contact Monique Lindsay at daughter, has chosen a modern, emancipated life for 2850 or www.repertorio.org.
AskCI@diabetes.org or (703) 549-1500 ext. 2253. herself by working for a photographer and spending
steamy weekends in nightclubs. Fifi, her faithful The Carlos L. González Counseling
The Americas Society presents PINTA Art friend, prostitutes herself under the thumb of a local Center of Hostos Community College
Fair Launch. The launch event for PINTA Modern protector. Papicha, the mother, eats pizzas in front of presents Embracing “Ay Bendito” in a
and Contemporary Latin American Art Fair 2009 will the television, torn between fear and nostalgia. With College Setting. A workshop with Dr. Sonia
feature Darío Escobar, a visual artist born and based VIVA LALDJERIE, director Nadir Moknèche, known Maldonado and Prof. Lizette Colón. Hostos
in Guatemala City. Escobar will discuss his work and in Europe as the ‘Algerian Almodovar,’ weaves a Community College, 460 Grand Concourse, Bronx
recent projects with Sara Reisman (Director, Percent richly drawn portrait of women exiled within their own New York. (Take train # 2, 4 0r 5 to 149th St. Grand
for Art New York City Department of Cultural Affairs). country. English subtitles. Instituto Cervantes in New Concourse). 12:30PM. Admission: Free. For more
The Americas Society, 680 Park Avenue, NYC. York, 211-215 East 49th Street, NYC. Admission: information contact (718) 518-4462 or 4261.
6:30PM. Admission: Free with registration; members Free. 6PM. For reservations call (212) 308-7720.
priority. For more information visit www.americas- The 2nd Annual Latin American Piano
society.org. The Latin American Piano and Song and Song Festival of NYC presents Latin
Festival of NYC presents the Second American Songs of Revolution, as part
Pregones Theater presents the world premiere Annual Festival Piano Recital. The of “Encuentro 2009”. A musical journey from
of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional first festival in the United States dedicated to the South America to the Caribbean of the most powerful
Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in exploration of classical, folk and popular traditions of composers and troubadours of Latin America. Pianist
this song-driven rendition of the historic migration Latin American piano and song repertoire. Founder, and Musicologist César Reyes will be joined by some
of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del Pianist and Musicologist César Reyes will be joined of the most gifted Latin American singers. Woody
cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel by some of the most important specialists on Latin Tanger Auditorium, Brooklyn College Library, 2900
Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices American piano music. Renee Weiler Concert Hall Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY. 4PM. Admission:
of multiple generations, including the sugar cane at Greenwich House Music School, 46 Barrow Free. Visit www.myspace.com/LatinoPianoFest.
workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip Street. 8PM. Admission: $10/$5 Students. Visit www.
in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s myspace.com/LatinoPianoFest. Pregones Theater presents the world premiere
street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009. of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional
Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non- El Taller Boricua presents Salsa Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in
stop live music composed and arranged by Merced, Wednesdays After Work Party Ralphy this song-driven rendition of the historic migration
Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music Sabater & Su Charanga. Comida Criolla & DJ of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del
and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish Spinning Salsa Dress in Good taste – No sneakers. cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel
& English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575 Taller Boricua, 1680 Lexington Avenue 105th & Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices
Walton Avenue, Bronx, NY. 1:30PM. Admission: $15- 106th Streets. The #6 train to 103rd St. Doors open of multiple generations, including the sugar cane
$22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 or at 5:30PM. Ladies $5 from 5:30PM – 6:30PM. After workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip
visit http://www.pregones.org. 6:30PM Ladies $10; Gentlemen $10 all night. For in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s
info: www.tallerboricua.org street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009.
Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar Rioja Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non-
91
stop live music composed and arranged by Merced, and Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or and musicologist Cesar Reyes and performed by
Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music www.repertorio.org. some of the most gifted Latin American singers living
and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish in the United States. Renee Weiler Concert Hall at
& English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575 SEA, Center for Puerto Rican Studies Greenwich House Music School, 46 Barrow Street,
Walton Avenue, Bronx, NY. 8PM. Admission: $15- at Hunter College, and Clemente Soto NYC. 8PM. Admission: $10. Visit www.myspace.
$22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 or Vélez Cultural & Educational Center presents Re- com/LatinoPianoFest.
visit http://www.pregones.org. Membering Loisaida/Visioning Loisaida A discussion
of everyday life, music, poetry, performance and art Saturday, November 21, 2009
Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar collectives with Alan Moore-CUNY Graduate Center,
Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish Ed Morales-cultural critic, Edwin Torres-performance COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE PRESENTS THE
Dance. Rioja perform to live music with flamenco poet. The panel will render and compare in a visual, FOURTH ANNUAL ARTISANS FAIR
guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Arts performative and analytical manner instances of local & EXHIBIT AND THE FIRST ANNUAL
Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & cultural practices with the phenomena of cultural HEALTH FAIR. For the past three years, CN
Third Avenue), NYC. 7PM. Admission: $25-$40 with appropriation leading to the re-invention of place has invited artisans from throughout the US and
discounts available for Seniors, Students, Children identity. Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural & Educational Puerto Rico to participate in this Fair. The number
and Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or Center, 107 Suffolk Street, NYC. 6PM. Admission: of participating artisans has increased from 40 to
www.repertorio.org. Free. For more information call (212) 396-6336 or over 60. Over the years, CN has transformed the
email: lacra@optonline.net. location into a typical Puerto Rican plaza with a
Via Della Pace presents Piazzolla Always fountain, palm trees, piragua and coquito carts and
Piazzolla with Argentine singer Maria Cangiano. Taller Boricua Gallery presents the opening artists, sculptors, vejigante mask makers promoting
Cangiano “seemingly born to sing the Piazzolla of the exhibition (In)tangible. A group exhibition of and selling their wares while musical and cultural
songbook” presents her coming up CD Piazzolla artists whose work juxtaposes the ephemeral and the acts entertained throughout the day. Additionally
Inedito- a collection of unknown and never recorded concrete in quotidian life. Julia de Burgos Cultural each year, CN conducts workshops for children and
songs, as well as his most famous ones. With Juan Center, 1680 Lexington Avenue & 106 St., NYC. 6PM adults, like mask making, the history of the three
Pablo Jofre-Romarion (bandoneon), Martin Balik – 9 PM. For information call (212) 831-4333 or visit kings’ celebration, Taíno storytelling in order to make
(acoustic bass) and special surprise guest pianist. www.tallerboricua.com. sure that our youth learn about our culture. This year
Via Della Pace 48 East 7th Street, NYC. 8PM. $10 CN will conduct its First Annual Health Fair that will
at door plus minimum drink, $8 in advance at www. Pregones Theater presents Benefit Gala run concurrently with its Fourth Annual Artisans Fair
lalalaproducciones.com, (212) 253-5803. Visit www. Performance and Reception of the world & Exhibit. The Health component of the Fair was
myspace.com/mariacangiano. premiere of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of added because of the great number of residents
traditional Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón concentrated in the Bronx and neighboring boroughs
Friday, November 20, 2009 collide in this song-driven rendition of the historic with chronic diseases such as diabetes, high blood
migration of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from pressure, heart disease and obesity. CN board
Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Vivir del cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon member and health professional Henry Cruz will Chair
Hunter College presents FORUM: Teaching Manuel Ramos Otero, the production weaves the the Health Fair Committee and was instrumental in
Puerto Rican History in the 21st Century. voices of multiple generations, including the sugar the decision to create this Health component. So
A discussion of various educational topics in this all cane workers who first embarked on a transoceanic come and take advantage of an opportunity to kick off
day forum. (9:30 a.m. Panel: What have we learned?; trip in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s your holiday shopping season and at the same time
1:00 p.m. Lunch Panel: Challenges and Stratergies; street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009. kick-off the New Year healthy. Hostos Community
2:15 p.m. Afternoon Panel: Teaching with Technology Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non- College, Hostos Center for the Arts & Culture,450
Reception to follow.) Panelists: Félix Rodríguez- stop live music composed and arranged by Merced, Grand Concourse at 149th Street, Bronx, NY. 10AM
Matos-President Hostos Community College, Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music – 7PM. For more information call or Luis Cordero,
Virginia Sánchez-Korrol-Professor Emerita Brooklyn and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish & (914) 505-5482/ lcordero@galeriacemi.com, Wally
College, Arcadio Díaz-Quinones-Professor Emeritus English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575 Walton Edgecombe, (718) 518-6700/edgecombe@hostos.
Princeton University. Hunter College: Chanin Center, Avenue, Bronx, NY. 8PM. Donation of $125 includes cuny.edu, Teresa A. Santiago, (914) 263-6599/
West Bldg., B Level, NYC. 9:30AM. Admission: Free. catered event. For more information call (718) 585- teresasantiago@comitenoviembre.org.
For more information, visit www.centropr.org or call 1202 or visit http://www.pregones.org.
(212) 772-5714. El Museo del Barrio presents SUPER
Repertorio Español presents La Casa de SABADO! Eclectic New York. The program
PINTA presents Art Fair 09. PINTA is a unique Los Espiritus. A new play by Caridad Svich kicks off in November with art making workshops;
event exhibiting annually – for sale through the based on Isabel Allende’s novel. Charting the rise storytelling with poet and playwright Frank Pérez;
participating galleries – the best of Latin American and fall of the Trueba family in an un-named Latin New York, Nueva York, a music concert by Face the
art, coinciding with Christie’s and Sotheby’s Latin American country (reminiscent of Chile), the piece Music; and much more! El Museo del Barrio, 1230
American art auctions and with important exhibitions spans the 1920s through the 1970s, as the country 5th Avenue, NYC. 11AM-6PM. Admission: Free. Visit
in museums and cultural institutions in New York City. moves through enormous sociopolitical changes that www.elmuseo.org for details!
The Metropolitan Pavillion, 125W 18th St. (6th & culminate in a devastating dictatorship. The play is
7th Ave) and The Altman Bldg, 135W 18th St., NYC. told from the point of view of, Alba, the youngest PINTA presents Art Fair 09. PINTA is a unique
Students $10, groups of 8+ $10 each. 12PM-8PM. of three generation of women. The Gramercy Art event exhibiting annually – for sale through the
For more information, visit www.pintaart.com. Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & participating galleries – the best of Latin American
Third Avenue), NYC. 8PM. Admission: $25–$50 with art, coinciding with Christie’s and Sotheby’s Latin
Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar discounts available for seniors, students, children American art auctions and with important exhibitions
Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish and groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or in museums and cultural institutions in New York City.
Dance. Rioja perform to live music with flamenco www.repertorio.org. The Metropolitan Pavillion, 125W 18th St. (6th &
guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Arts 7th Ave) and The Altman Bldg, 135W 18th St., NYC.
Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & The 2nd Annual Latin American Piano Students $10, groups of 8+ $10 each. 12PM-8PM.
Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM. Admission: $25-$40 with and Song Festival of NYC presents Mexico For more information, visit www.pintaart.com.
discounts available for Seniors, Students, Children 2010: 200 Years of Music. Curated by the pianist
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Repertorio Español presents La Vida es and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish in museums and cultural institutions in New York City.
Sueño by Calderón de la Barca. Directed by Rene & English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575 The Metropolitan Pavillion, 125W 18th St. (6th &
Buch. Segismundo, a prince, is imprisoned after Walton Avenue, Bronx, NY. 8PM. Admission: $15- 7th Ave) and The Altman Bldg, 135W 18th St., NYC.
his horoscope revealed that he will bring disaster $22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 or Students $10, groups of 8+ $10 each. 12PM-7PM.
to the country. After almost a lifetime in prison, he is visit http://www.pregones.org. For more information, visit www.pintaart.com.
released to reign over the country. However, he turns
rebellious and commits rape and murder. Drugged Lehman College presents STREET BEAT: Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar
and re-imprisoned, he is told that the previous events The Rhythms! The Moves! The Energy! Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish
were a dream, which brings him to question what A high-energy explosion of urban rhythm, hip hop Dance. Rioja perform to live music with flamenco
parts of his life are reality and which are dreams. The moves, astonishing break dance acrobatics and a guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Arts
Gramercy Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between full evening of original entertainment for all ages. Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington
Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. 3PM. Admission: Street Beat creator, Ben Hansen and his 10-member & Third Avenue), NYC. 2:30PM. Admission: $25-
$30-$50 with discounts available for Seniors, company of drummers, musicians and dancers $40 with discounts available for Seniors, Students,
Students, and Groups. For reservations, call (212) perform what critics have called”… an urbanized Children and Groups. For reservations, call (212)
889-2850 or www.repertorio.org. journey through percussion,” which brings the raw 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org.
rhythmic originality of many popular street-style
The Mexican Cultural Institute, the performances together in a dynamic and thrilling Pregones Theater presents the world premiere
Mexico Tourism Board and Y Gallery stage production. Lehman Center for the Performing of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional
presents Artist talk by Artemio. The work Arts, Bedford Park Blvd West, Bronx, NY. 8PM. Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in
of Artemio (Mexico, 1977) explores the ideas of Admission: $10-$25. For more information or to this song-driven rendition of the historic migration
piracy, appropriation and mass media through video, purchase tickets, visit www.lehmancenter.org. of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del
installation and sculpture. He belongs to a generation cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel
of artists whose aesthetics echoes on the mid-90´s Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices
Mexican social and political circumstances. Artemio The Queen of Spanish Dance performs to live music of multiple generations, including the sugar cane
will discuss his latest project that include his solo with flamenco guitarists and Spanish cantaores. workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip
shows in Lima and Bogotá. PINTA Art fair. VIP The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East 27th Street in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s
lounge. Metropolitan Pavillion. 125 W 18 St. NYC. (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. 8PM. street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009.
6PM. Admission: Free. For more information, visit Admission: $25-$50 with discounts available for Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non-
www.ygallerynewyork.com or www.lavitrina.com. Seniors, Students, Children and Groups. For stop live music composed and arranged by Merced,
reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio. Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music
Hostos Center for the Arts and Culture org. and lyrics by Rosalba Rolón. Presented in Spanish
presents Los Pleneros de la 21 : 25 Years of & English with titles. Pregones Theatre, 571-575
BOMBA & PLENA ¡Para Todos Ustedes! Sunday, November 22, 2009 Walton Avenue, Bronx, NY. 3PM. Admission: $15-
Commemorative Concert celebrating 25 years $22. For more information call (718) 585-1202 or
of music, expression and community. Main Theatre, COMITE NOVIEMBRE FIFTEENTH visit http://www.pregones.org.
Hostos Center for the Arts and Culture 450 Grand ANNUAL DAY OF COMMUNITY SERVICE
Concourse at 149th Street in the Bronx, NY. 7:30PM. AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY. For the Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón
Admission: $20, $15. Box office: (718) 518-4455. past fourteen years, Comité Noviembre has set y las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and
Tickets online:www.hostos.cuny.edu/culturearts. aside the Sunday before Thanksgiving as a day The Special Service). From novelist Vargas
Join los Pleneros for a special VIP reception after of community service and social responsibility in Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian
the concert! For reception tickets and information call commemoration of November 19th, traditionally Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model
(212) 427-5221 or Julia@losplenerosdela21.org. known as Puerto Rican discovery day or as we like soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an
to call it Puerto Rican “encounter” day. The purpose outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special
El Museo del Barrio presents SPIC UP/ of the day is to show the spirit of commitment and Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities.
SPEAK OUT!: Emanuel Xavier Spics Up! Spoken the power of action. Community service and social Even though it is everything against his moral code,
word with poet and author Emanuel Xavier and a responsibility are the strongholds of the Puerto Rican Captain Pantoja is a consummate soldier and the
lineup of renowned voices, including Caridad De community. Throughout the years our experience visiting service quickly becomes the most efficient
la Luz aka La Bruja, Mahina Movement and Edwin has shown us that when we dedicate ourselves to branch of the armed forces. Captain Pantoja’s official
Torres. After the performance, visitors are encouraged improving the quality of life of those around us, we progress reports are filled with military statistics
to grab the mic and speak up! El Café at El Museo build a more unified and stronger society. Comite and jargon which often become the story’s funniest
del Barrio, 1230 5th Avenue, NYC. 7PM. Admission: Noviembre urges you to conduct your own food moments. Recommended for adults. The Gramercy
Free. RSVP required at www.elmuseo.org. drive at your work place, church, school, college Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington
and deliver proceeds on this day to IPRHE UPACA & Third Avenue), NYC. 6:30PM. Admission: $25-$50
Pregones Theater presents the world premiere SENIOR CENTER, 1940 Lexington Avenue (between with discounts available for Seniors, Students,and
of ALOHA BORICUA. The rhythms of traditional 119th and 120th Street), NYC. 11AM - 4PM or simply Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or
Puerto Rican music and urban reggaetón collide in participate in this day as a volunteer. . Volunteers are www.repertorio.org.
this song-driven rendition of the historic migration needed before and after this date for food collection
of Puerto Ricans to Hawaii. Adapted from Vivir del and distribution! For more information please contact Monday, November 23, 2009
cuento, by legendary writer and gay icon Manuel Hector Artiles at ASPIRA (212) 564-6880 or Teresa A.
Ramos Otero, the production weaves the voices Santiago at (914) 263-6599 or Angel Santini at (212) Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar
of multiple generations, including the sugar cane 677-4181. Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish
workers who first embarked on a transoceanic trip Dance. Rioja perform to live music with flamenco
in 1900 to Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani to today’s PINTA presents Art Fair 09. PINTA is a unique guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Arts
street-wise poets, and makes sense of it all in 2009. event exhibiting annually – for sale through the Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington &
Conceived and directed by Jorge B. Merced, with non- participating galleries – the best of Latin American Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM. Admission: $25-$40 with
stop live music composed and arranged by Merced, art, coinciding with Christie’s and Sotheby’s Latin discounts available for Seniors, Students, Children
Desmar Guevara and the ensemble. Additional music American art auctions and with important exhibitions and Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or
93
www.repertorio.org. and Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or Friday, November 27, 2009
www.repertorio.org.
NYC Chapter National Congress for Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja.
Puerto Rican Rights & MTV Networks Wednesday, November 25, 2009 The Queen of Spanish Dance performs to live music
presents Puerto Rican Youth Forum. Forum will with flamenco guitarists and Spanish cantaores.
bring together Puerto Rican Youth from around the Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East 27th Street
city to talk about Puerto Rican and Latino images in Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. 8
the media. 1515 Broadway in MTVN’s Times Square Dance. Rioja perform to live music with flamenco PM. Admission: $25-$50 with discounts available
Headquarters, NYC. 5PM-7PM. Admission: Free. guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Arts for Seniors, Students, Children and Groups. For
For more information, call (347) 254-2413 or email Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.
juan4thepeople@gmail.com. Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM. Admission: $25-$40 with org.
discounts available for Seniors, Students, Children
Nuyorican Poets Café presents and Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST
BROWNSVILLE BRED... Growing Up www.repertorio.org. OF THE BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/
Elaine. This multiple award- and festival-winning dance spectacular from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration
one-woman show, written, performed and lived by El Instituto Cervantes and Casa Arabe of the exhilarating music and dance of Colombia. A
(Nuyorican) Elaine Del Valle. Brownsville Bred is the presents Esperando la felicidad. Film mix of sizzling new numbers and reimagined favorites
true story of a Latina’s coming-of-age in the 1980’s by Abderrahmane Sissako (2002), 95 minutes. from past hit shows. Thalia Spanish Theatre, 41–17
projects of Brownsville, Brooklyn, NY. Crime, drugs Abderrahmane Sissako is one of the few filmmakers Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. 8PM. Admission:
and poverty mix with the joys of family, hope, salsa from Sub-Saharan Africa to reach a measure $25. For information call (718) 729-3880 or visit www.
and the birth of rap! “A Rollercoaster of emotion, of international influence. This film Waiting for thaliatheatre.org.
tough and tender and guaranteed to make you Happiness (Heremakono) was screened in the
laugh through your tears.” Nuyorican Poets Cafe Cannes Film Festival official selection, winning Saturday, November 28, 2009
236 East 3rd Street (Between B & C), NYC. 7:30PM. the FIPRESCI Prize. Sissako’s themes include
Admission: $15/$10. For more information, please globalization, exile and the displacement of people. Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja.
call (212) 505-8183 or visit www.nuyorican.org. English subtitles. Admission: Free. 6PM. Instituto The Queen of Spanish Dance performs to live music
Cervantes in New York, 211-215 East 49th Street, with flamenco guitarists and Spanish cantaores.
PAMAR AND TeatroStageFest present NYC. For reservations call (212) 308-7720. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East 27th Street
GlamourTango. This event takes the audience (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. 3PM.
on a musical journey through the 20th century with Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón Admission: $25-$50 with discounts available for
a singular and renewed vision of the role of women y las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and Seniors, Students, Children and Groups. For
in Tango. Both elegant and bold, GlamourTango was The Special Service). From novelist Vargas reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.
conceived by Polly Ferman, renowned Uruguayan Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian org.
pianist and Music Director, as a homage to the Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model
women who have not been fully recognized for their soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an Queens Theatre in the Park presents NÉLIDA
many contributions to Tango. GlamourTango is an outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special TIRADO FLAMENCO: TOMAAA!!!! Known
unforgettable tribute that celebrates the artistry Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities. for her intense grace and commanding style, and
and passion of the great. The Highline Ballroom, Even though it is everything against his moral code, hailed as “magnificent” by The New York Times,
431 West. 16th Street, NYC. 8PM. Tickets: $22 in Captain Pantoja is a consummate soldier and the Nélida Tirado has earned a worldwide reputation as a
advance/$25 at door. For information and tickets, call visiting service quickly becomes the most efficient force to be reckoned with in flamenco. Tirado formerly
(866) 468-7619 or visit www.GlamourTango.com. branch of the armed forces. Captain Pantoja’s official trained with Ballet Hispanico and Spain has worked
progress reports are filled with military statistics with Compania Maria Pages, Noche Flamenca, and
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 and jargon which often become the story’s funniest featured in “Riverdance” on Broadway and Dance
moments. Recommended for adults. The Gramercy Magazine’s “25 to Watch” 2007. Claire Shulman
Repertorio Español presents El Quijote. A Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington Playhouse/Main Stage at Queens Theatre in the
carnivalesque adaptation of Cervantes’ masterpiece. & Third Avenue), NYC. 7PM. Admission: $25-$50 Park, Flushing Meadows Corona Park - Corona, NY.
Through Don Quijote’s adventures, the production with discounts available for Seniors, Students, and 8PM. Admission: $33/$20 students. For tickets, call
presents the illusion of an utopian world with a festive Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or (718) 760-0064 or visit www.queenstheatre.org.
and colorful spirit. El Quijote is a polyphonic play www.repertorio.org.
in which many different genres such as comedy, Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST
tragedy and farce collide to form a carnival-like and El Taller Boricua presents Salsa OF THE BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/
vibrant Don Quijote that is rich in its musicality.” The Wednesdays After Work Party Jimmy dance spectacular from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration
play is a collection of 12 scenes that present different Delgado & Orchestra Comida Criolla & DJ of the exhilarating music and dance of Colombia. A
stories based on the original text of Cervantes. Spinning Salsa Dress in Good taste – No sneakers. mix of sizzling new numbers and reimagined favorites
The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East 27th Street Taller Boricua, 1680 Lexington Avenue 105th & 106th from past hit shows. Thalia Spanish Theatre, 41–17
(between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM. Streets. The #6 train to 103rd St.Doors open at Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. 8PM. Admission:
Admission: $25-$50 with discounts available for 5:30PM. Special Event $10 all night. For info: www. $27-$30. For information call (718) 729-3880 or visit
Seniors, Students, and Groups. For reservations, call tallerboricua.org www.thaliatheatre.org.
(212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org.
Thursday, November 26, 2009 Sunday, November 29, 2009
Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar
Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish ¡Feliz Día de Acción de Gracias! – Happy Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón
Dance. Rioja perform to live music with flamenco Thanksgiving! y las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and
guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Arts The Special Service). From novelist Vargas
Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian
Third Avenue), NYC. 7PM. Admission: $25-$40 with Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model
discounts available for Seniors, Students, Children soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an
94
outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special and poverty mix with the joys of family, hope, salsa Hostos Center for the Arts and Culture
Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities. and the birth of rap! “A Rollercoaster of emotion, and Mass Transit Street Theatre presents
Even though it is everything against his moral code, tough and tender and guaranteed to make you AIN’T EASY. A multi-media, storytelling play by
Captain Pantoja is a consummate soldier and the laugh through your tears.” Nuyorican Poets Cafe Lyn Pyle with Karen Wilson & Aisha Norris performed
visiting service quickly becomes the most efficient 236 East 3rd Street (Between B & C), NYC. 7:30PM. with live rap & film. Post-performance discussion with
branch of the armed forces. Captain Pantoja’s official Admission: $15/$10. For more information, please actors & director. Especially appropriate for groups
progress reports are filled with military statistics call (212) 505-8183 or visit www.nuyorican.org. & classes, middle school & up. Repertory Theater at
and jargon which often become the story’s funniest Hostos Community College, 450 Grand Concourse
moments. Recommended for adults. The Gramercy Tuesday, December 1, 2009 at 149th Street in the Bronx, NY. 4:30PM & 7PM.
Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington Admission: $6. For tickets call Mass Transit Street
& Third Avenue), NYC. 2:30PM. Admission: $25-$50 Repertorio Español presents: La Casa de Theater at (718) 512-8519 or email: ainteasytheplay@
with discounts available for Seniors, Students, and Bernarda Alba by García Lorca, directed by gmail.com. Info: www.mtstv.org.
Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or René Buch. Bernarda Alba attempts to dominate
www.repertorio.org. and control her five unmarried daughters. In Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter
this repressed environment, Lorca creates an College presents FORUM: The Young
Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST explosion of hatred, jealousy, despair and passion. Lords Party:40 Years Later. Panelists:
OF THE BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/dance Performances presented in Spanish simultaneous Augustín Lao-Montes, Marta Moreno-Vega, Johanna
spectacular from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration of the English translation via headphones available for Fernández, Darnell Enck-Wanzer. Moderator: Andrés
exhilarating music and dance of Colombia. A mix an additional $3.00. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, Torres, Centro Research Associate. Reception to
of sizzling new numbers and reimagined favorites 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & Third follow. Hunter College: Faculty Dining Room 8th
from past hit shows. Thalia Spanish Theatre, 41–17 Avenue), NYC. 11AM. Admission: $25-$50 with Floor West Bldg., NYC. 6PM. Admission: Free. For
Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. 4PM. Admission: discounts available for seniors, students, children more information, visit www.centropr.org or call (212)
$27-$30. For information call (718) 729-3880 or visit and groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or 772-5714.
www.thaliatheatre.org. www.repertorio.org.
El Museo del Barrio presents NUEVO
Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico: CINE: El Círculo. This film focuses on former
Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish Naci, a new work by Ron DeJesus, Locked Up ‘Tupamaro’ leader Dr. Engler, who was held hostage
Dance. Rioja perform to live music with flamenco Laura, and Batucada Fantastica. Ballet Hispanico for thirteen years during the Uruguayan dictatorship.
guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Arts explores the essence of Latino cultures with a season Today, a renowned Swedish citizen and scientist,
Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington of new voices and bold dance. Under the new artistic he revisits the places of his painful past, painting an
& Third Avenue), NYC. 6:30PM. Admission: $25- leadership of Eduardo Vilaro, the program reflects the intimate and disturbing portrait of life in prison during
$40 with discounts available for Seniors, Students, dynamic range of Ballet Hispanico’s repertoire with a dictatorship. Dirs. Jose Pedro Charlo and Aldo
Children and Groups. For reservations, call (212) exciting premiers by Andrea Miller, Annabelle Lopez Garay. (Documentary, Uruguay, 2008, 96min, Spanish
889-2850 or www.repertorio.org. Ochoa and a live music collaboration featuring Oscar with English subtitles). El Café at El Museo del Barrio,
Hernandez. Those pieces, alongside works by dance 1230 5th Avenue, NYC. 6:30PM. Admission: Free.
Nuyorican Poets Café presents Bobby masters Ramon Oller and Vicente Nebrada, create RSVP required at www.elmuseo.org.
Sanabria and his New School Afro-Cuban an engaging evening of Latino-infused dance! Joyce
Jazz Band. Bobby Sanabria is a professor of Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, NYC, The Americas Society presents Piraí Vaca.
music at the New School, and the students that make 7:30PM. Tickets $10-$59, for group sales, seniors Bolivian guitarist Piraí Vaca has been called “one of
up the band are the next generation in the music and students call (212) 242-0800 or www.joyce.org. the outstanding guitarists in the world” by the Rhein
scene. Sanabria helps them keep the traditions of Zeitung. He was awarded the Fellowship of the
Afro-Cuban music alive, and they play the classic Wednesday, December 2, 2009 Americas from the John F. Kennedy Center for the
compositions of Chano Pozo, Tito Puente, Dizzy Performing Arts and has won top prizes at prestigious
Gillespie and Mario Bauza. Nuyorican Poets Cafe SEA and Pregones Theater presents ¡Viva Pinocho! A international guitar festivals in Latin America and
236 East 3rd Street (Between B & C), NYC. 8PM. Mexican Pinocchio! A re-telling of the classic folktale, Europe. He is a member of the FENIX International
Admission: $10. For more information, please call Pinocchio, from the perspective of a young Mexican Guitar Quartet. His Americas Society debut will
(212) 505-8183 or visit www.nuyorican.org. immigrant, Pinocho. Audiences follow the puppet feature Bolivian music and works by Baroque
boy’s journey to understanding his sense of self while composers. The Americas Society, 680 Park Avenue,
Monday, November 30, 2009 struggling to maintain his Latino heritage and find his NYC. 7 PM. Admission: Free with registration;
new home in a new land, the United States. Pregones members priority. For more information visit: www.
Repertorio Español presents Pilar Rioja. Pilar Theater, 575 Walton Avenue (between 149th Street americas-society.org
Rioja is known worldwide as the Queen of Spanish and 150th Street), Bronx, NY. 10:30AM. Admission: .
Dance. Rioja perform to live music with flamenco $12.50 children and $15 adults. For more information Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico:
guitarists and Spanish cantaores. The Gramercy Arts visit www.pregones.org or call (718) 585–1202. Naci, a new work by Ron DeJesus, Locked Up
Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & Laura, and Batucada Fantastica. Ballet Hispanico
Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM. Admission: $25-$40 with Repertorio Español presents Carmen Rivera’s explores the essence of Latino cultures with a season
discounts available for Seniors, Students, Children La Gringa. Directed by René Buch, a young of new voices and bold dance. Under the new artistic
and Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or woman travels from NYC to Puerto Rico to meet her leadership of Eduardo Vilaro, the program reflects
www.repertorio.org. family and discovers her roots. Her misconceptions the dynamic range of Ballet Hispanico’s repertoire
are transformed as she learns that being Puerto Rican with exciting premiers by Andrea Miller, Annabelle
Nuyorican Poets Café presents is a matter of the heart and spirit. The Gramercy Arts Lopez Ochoa and a live music collaboration featuring
BROWNSVILLE BRED... Growing Up Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington Oscar Hernandez. Those pieces, alongside works by
Elaine. This multiple award- and festival-winning & Third Avenue), NYC. Performance 11AM & dance masters Ramon Oller and Vicente Nebrada,
one-woman show, written, performed and lived by 1PM. Admission: $25-$50 with discounts available create an engaging evening of Latino-infused dance!
(Nuyorican) Elaine Del Valle. Brownsville Bred is the for seniors, students, children and groups. For 7:30 PM. Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th
true story of a Latina’s coming-of-age in the 1980’s reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio. Street, NYC. Tickets $10-$59, for group sales, seniors
projects of Brownsville, Brooklyn, NY. Crime, drugs org. and students call 212-242-0800 or www.joyce.org.
95
Thursday, December 3, 2009 Batucada Fantastica. Ballet Hispanico explores 41–17 Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. 8PM.
the essence of Latino cultures with a season of Admission: $25. For information call (718) 729-3880
Hostos Center for the Arts and Culture new voices and bold dance. Under the new artistic or visit www.thaliatheatre.org.
and Mass Transit Street Theatre presents leadership of Eduardo Vilaro, the program reflects
AIN’T EASY. A multi-media, storytelling play by the dynamic range of Ballet Hispanico’s repertoire Saturday, December 5, 2009
Lyn Pyle with Karen Wilson & Aisha Norris performed with exciting premiers by Andrea Miller, Annabelle
with live rap & film. Post-performance discussion Lopez Ochoa and a live music collaboration featuring SEA and Pregones Theater presents ¡Viva
with actors & director. Especially appropriate for Oscar Hernandez. Those pieces, alongside works by Pinocho! A Mexican Pinocchio! A re-telling
groups & classes, middle school & up. 10AM & dance masters Ramon Oller and Vicente Nebrada, of the classic folktale, Pinocchio, from the perspective
12PM. Admission: $6, Repertory Theater at Hostos create an engaging evening of Latino-infused dance! of a young Mexican immigrant, Pinocho. Audiences
Community College, 450 Grand Concourse at Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, follow the puppet boy’s journey to understanding his
149th Street in the Bronx, NY. For tickets call Mass NYC. 8PM. Tickets $10-$59, for group sales, seniors sense of self while struggling to maintain his Latino
Transit Street Theater at 718-512-8519 or email: and students call (212) 242-0800 or www.joyce.org. heritage and find his new home in a new land, the
ainteasytheplay@gmail.com. Info: www.mtstv.org. United States. Pregones Theater, 575 Walton Avenue
Friday, December 4, 2009 (between 149th Street and 150th Street), Bronx, NY.
SEA and Pregones Theater presents ¡Viva 3PM. Admission: $12.50 children and $15 adults.
Pinocho! A Mexican Pinocchio! A re-telling SEA and Pregones Theater presents ¡Viva For more information visit www.pregones.org or call
of the classic folktale, Pinocchio, from the perspective Pinocho! A Mexican Pinocchio! A re-telling (718) 585–1202.
of a young Mexican immigrant, Pinocho. Audiences of the classic folktale, Pinocchio, from the perspective
follow the puppet boy’s journey to understanding his of a young Mexican immigrant, Pinocho. Audiences Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico:
sense of self while struggling to maintain his Latino follow the puppet boy’s journey to understanding his Batucada Fantastica, A new work by Ron
heritage and find his new home in a new land, the sense of self while struggling to maintain his Latino DeJesus, and Club Havana. Ballet Hispanico
United States. Pregones Theater, 575 Walton Avenue heritage and find his new home in a new land, the explores the essence of Latino cultures with a season
(between 149th Street and 150th Street), Bronx, NY. United States. Pregones Theater, 575 Walton Avenue of new voices and bold dance. Under the new artistic
10:30AM. Admission: $12.50 children and $15 adults. (between 149th Street and 150th Street), Bronx, leadership of Eduardo Vilaro, the program reflects
For more information visit www.pregones.org or call NY. 10:30 AM. Admission: $12.49 children and $15 the dynamic range of Ballet Hispanico’s repertoire
(718) 585–1202. adults. For more information visit www.pregones.org with exciting premiers by Andrea Miller, Annabelle
or call (718) 585–1202. Lopez Ochoa and a live music collaboration featuring
Repertorio Español presents El Quijote. A Oscar Hernandez. Those pieces, alongside works by
carnivalesque adaptation of Cervantes’ masterpiece. Repertorio Español presents La Vida es dance masters Ramon Oller and Vicente Nebrada,
Through Don Quijote’s adventures, the production Sueño by Calderón de la Barca. Directed by Rene create an engaging evening of Latino-infused dance!
presents the illusion of an utopian world with a festive Buch. Segismundo, a prince, is imprisoned after Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street,
and colorful spirit. El Quijote is a polyphonic play his horoscope reveals that he will bring disaster to NYC. 2PM. Tickets $10-$59, for group sales, seniors
in which many different genres such as comedy, the country. After almost a lifetime in prison, he is and students call (212) 242-0800 or www.joyce.org.
tragedy and farce collide to form a carnival-like and released to reign over the country. However, he turns
vibrant Don Quijote that is rich in its musicality.” The rebellious and commits rape and murder. Drugged Repertorio Español presents: La Casa de
play is a collection of 12 scenes that present different and re-imprisoned, he is told that the previous events Bernarda Alba by García Lorca, directed by
stories based on the original text of Cervantes. were a dream, which brings him to question what René Buch. Bernarda Alba attempts to dominate
The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East 27th Street parts of his life are reality and which are dreams. and control her five unmarried daughters. In
(between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM. The Gramercy Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street this repressed environment, Lorca creates an
Admission: $25-$50 with discounts available for (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM & explosion of hatred, jealousy, despair and passion.
Seniors, Students, and Groups. For reservations, call 8PM. Admission: $30-$50 with discounts available for Performances presented in Spanish simultaneous
(212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org. Seniors, Students, and Groups. For reservations, call English translation via headphones available for an
(212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org. additional $3. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East
Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón y 27th Street (between Lexington & Third Avenue),
las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and The Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico: NYC. 3PM. Admission: $25-$50 with discounts
Special Service,). From novelist Mario Vargas Naci, a new work by Ron DeJesus, Locked Up available for seniors, students, children and groups.
Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian Laura, and Batucada Fantastica. Ballet Hispanico For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or www.
Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model explores the essence of Latino cultures with a season repertorio.org.
soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an of new voices and bold dance. Under the new artistic
outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special leadership of Eduardo Vilaro, the program reflects Repertorio Español presents La Casa
Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities. the dynamic range of Ballet Hispanico’s repertoire de Los Espiritus. A new play by Caridad Svich
Even though it is everything against his moral code, with exciting premiers by Andrea Miller, Annabelle based on Isabel Allende’s novel. Charting the rise
Captain Pantoja is a consummate soldier and the Lopez Ochoa and a live music collaboration featuring and fall of the Trueba family in an un-named Latin
visiting service quickly becomes the most efficient Oscar Hernandez. Those pieces, alongside works by American country (reminiscent of Chile), the piece
branch of the armed forces. Captain Pantoja’s official dance masters Ramon Oller and Vicente Nebrada, spans the 1920s through the 1970s, as the country
progress reports are filled with military statistics create an engaging evening of Latino-infused dance! moves through enormous sociopolitical changes that
and jargon which often become the story’s funniest Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, culminate in a devastating dictatorship. The play is
moments. Recommended for adults. The Gramercy NYC. 8PM. Tickets $10-$59, for group sales, seniors told from the point of view of, Alba, the youngest
Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington and students call (212) 242-0800 or www.joyce.org. of three generation of women. The Gramercy Art
& Third Avenue), NYC. 7PM. Admission: $25-$50 Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington &
with discounts available for Seniors, Students, and Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST Third Avenue), NYC. 8PM. Admission: $25-$50 with
Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or OF THE BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/ discounts available for seniors, students, children
www.repertorio.org. dance spectacular from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration and groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or
of the exhilarating music and dance of Colombia. www.repertorio.org.
Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico: Naci, a A mix of sizzling new numbers and reimagined
new work by Ron DeJesus, Locked Up Laura, and favorites from past hit shows. Thalia Spanish Theatre, Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico: Naci, A
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new work by Ron DeJesus, Locked Up Laura, and “2010 Census: Making Latinos Count”. Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico:
Batucada Fantastica. Ballet Hispanico explores Annual fundraiser to support the work of the National Goodnight Paradise, a new work by Ron
the essence of Latino cultures with a season of Institute for Latino Policy. Sazón Restaurant, NYC. DeJesus, Locked Up Laura, and Club Havana.
new voices and bold dance. Under the new artistic 6:30PM-9PM.Admission: $150 per person. For Ballet Hispanico explores the essence of Latino
leadership of Eduardo Vilaro, the program reflects information or tickets, contact gala@latinopolicy.org. cultures with a season of new voices and bold dance.
the dynamic range of Ballet Hispanico’s repertoire Under the new artistic leadership of Eduardo Vilaro,
with exciting premiers by Andrea Miller, Annabelle Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico: the program reflects the dynamic range of Ballet
Lopez Ochoa and a live music collaboration featuring Batucada Fantastica, A new work by Ron DeJesus, Hispanico’s repertoire with exciting premiers by
Oscar Hernandez. Those pieces, alongside works by Locked Up Laura, and Club Havana. Ballet Hispanico Andrea Miller, Annabelle Lopez Ochoa and a live
dance masters Ramon Oller and Vicente Nebrada, explores the essence of Latino cultures with a season music collaboration featuring Oscar Hernandez.
create an engaging evening of Latino-infused dance! of new voices and bold dance. Under the new artistic Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street,
Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, leadership of Eduardo Vilaro, the program reflects the NYC. 7:30PM. Tickets $10-$59, for group sales,
NYC. 8PM. Tickets $10-$59, for group sales, seniors dynamic range of Ballet Hispanico’s repertoire with seniors and students call (212) 242-0800 or www.
and students call (212) 242-0800 or www.joyce.org. exciting premiers by Andrea Miller, Annabelle Lopez joyce.org.
Ochoa and a live music collaboration featuring Oscar
Lehman College with Aurora Hernandez. Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at Wednesday, December 9, 2009
Communications, Inc. presents NAVIDAD 19th Street, NYC. 2PM. Tickets $10-$59, for group
PARA EL PUEBLO: Celebrating the sales, seniors and students call (212) 242-0800 or El Museo del Barrio presents Alice + Carlos
Holiday Season, Jíbaro Style! Featuring www.joyce.org. (heart) Havana-New York. Explore the life and
“El Topo” Antonio Caban Vale, Yomo work of Alice Neel and Carlos Enriquez and catch a
Toro and Zon del Barrio. Choreographed by Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico: special screening of Andrew Neel’s’ documentary on
Danza Fiesta. Hosted by Luis Jimenez of Univision. Naci, A new work by Ron DeJesus, Locked Up Alice Neel. Moderated by Elvis Fuentes, Curator,
Lehman Center for the Performing Arts, Bedford Park Laura, and Batucada Fantastica. Ballet Hispanico El Museo del Barrio El Café at El Museo del Barrio,
Blvd West, Bronx, NY. 8PM. Admission: $30-$45. explores the essence of Latino cultures with a season 1230 5th Avenue, NYC. 6:30PM. Admission: Free.
For more information or to purchase tickets, visit of new voices and bold dance. Under the new artistic RSVP required at www.elmuseo.org.
www.lehmancenter.org. leadership of Eduardo Vilaro, the program reflects the
dynamic range of Ballet Hispanico’s repertoire with Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico:
Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST exciting premiers by Andrea Miller, Annabelle Lopez Goodnight Paradise, a new work by Ron
OF THE BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/ Ochoa and a live music collaboration featuring Oscar DeJesus, Locked Up Laura, and Club Havana.
dance spectacular from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration Hernandez. Those pieces, alongside works by dance Ballet Hispanico explores the essence of Latino
of the exhilarating music and dance of Colombia. A masters Ramon Oller and Vicente Nebrada, create cultures with a season of new voices and bold dance.
mix of sizzling new numbers and reimagined favorites an engaging evening of Latino-infused dance! Joyce Under the new artistic leadership of Eduardo Vilaro,
from past hit shows. Thalia Spanish Theatre, 41–17 Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, NYC. the program reflects the dynamic range of Ballet
Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. 8PM; Admission: 7:30PM. Tickets $10-$59, for group sales, seniors Hispanico’s repertoire with exciting premiers by
$25-$30. For information call (718) 729-3880 or visit and students call (212) 242-0800 or www.joyce.org. Andrea Miller, Annabelle Lopez Ochoa and a live
www.thaliatheatre.org. music collaboration featuring Oscar Hernandez.
Monday, December 7, 2009 Those pieces, alongside works by dance masters
Sunday, December 6, 2009 Ramon Oller and Vicente Nebrada, create an
Repertorio Español presents Carmen Rivera’s engaging evening of Latino-infused dance! Joyce
NYU Skirball Center for the Performing La Gringa, directed by René Buch. A young Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, NYC.
Arts presents Fiesta Hanukkah. Celebrate woman travels from NYC to Puerto Rico to meet her 7:30PM. Tickets $10-59, for group sales, seniors and
Hanukkah with a Latin flair! This year, as part of the family and discovers her roots. Her misconceptions students call 212-242-0800 or www.joyce.org.
Skirball’s ongoing initiative to commemorate Jewish are transformed as she learns that being Puerto Rican
life in Latin America, the annual Hanukkah family is a matter of the heart and spirit. The Gramercy Art Repertorio Español presents Nobel Prize
festival invites families of all backgrounds to enjoy Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington Winner Gabriel García Márquez’ Cronica
Latin Jewish music, art-making, and storytelling, as & Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM. $20 - $35. For de una Muerte Anunciada (Chronicle
well as tasty variations on holiday food favorites. NYU reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio. of a Death Foretold). Directed by Jorge Alí
Skirball Center, 566 LaGuardia Place at Washington org. Triana. A spectacular wedding, a savage scandal,
Sq. South, NYC. Activities from 10:45AM-4PM. and a murder to which an entire Latin American town
Admission: $10 General; $7 Seniors and Full-Time Tuesday, December 8, 2009 appears to be an accessory to the fact. The Gramercy
Students; Free to Members and Children under 12. Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington
For more information, visit www.skirballcenter.nyu. Repertorio Español presents Carmen Rivera’s & Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM. Admission: $25-$50
edu. La Gringa, directed by René Buch. A young woman with discounts available for Seniors, Students, and
travels from NYC to Puerto Rico to meet her family Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or
Thalia Spanish Theatre presents THE BEST and discovers her roots. The Gramercy Art Theatre, www.repertorio.org.
OF THE BEST of COLOMBIA. A new music/ 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & Third
dance spectacular from Ballet Mestizo. A celebration Avenue), NYC. 11AM. $20 - $35. For reservations, Thursday, December 10, 2009
of the exhilarating music and dance of Colombia. call (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org.
A mix of sizzling new numbers and reimagined Hostos Center for the Arts and Culture
favorites from past hit shows. Thalia Spanish Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College and Mass Transit Street Theatre presents
Theatre, 41–17 Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, NY. presents Barrio Professors Tales of Naturalistic AIN’T EASY. A multi-media, storytelling play by
4PM. Admission: $27-$30. For information call (718) Research by Lloyd H. Rogler. Meet the author, Lyn Pyle with Karen Wilson & Aisha Norris performed
729-3880 or visit www.thaliatheatre.org. discussion and reception. Hunter College: Centro with live rap & film. Post-performance discussion with
Library East Bldg. 3rd Floor. 6PM. Admission: Free. actors & director. Especially appropriate for groups
National Institute for Latino Policy (NiLP) 6PM. For more information, visit www.centropr.org or & classes, middle school & up. Repertory Theater at
presents the 27th Anniversary ¡Orgullo call (212) 772-5714. Hostos Community College, 450 Grand Concourse
Latino! Awards and Benefit Reception at 149th Street in the Bronx, NY. 10AM & 12PM.
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Admission: $6. For tickets call Mass Transit Street Repertorio Español presents: La Casa de www.repertorio.org.
Theater at (718) 512-8519 or email: ainteasytheplay@ Bernarda Alba by García Lorca, directed by
gmail.com. Info: www.mtstv.org. René Buch. Bernarda Alba attempts to dominate Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico:
and control her five unmarried daughters. In Batucada Fantastica, A new work by Ron
Repertorio Español presents: La Casa de this repressed environment, Lorca creates an DeJesus, Locked Up Laura, and Club Havana.
Bernarda Alba by García Lorca, directed by explosion of hatred, jealousy, despair and passion. Ballet Hispanico explores the essence of Latino
René Buch. Bernarda Alba attempts to dominate Performances presented in Spanish simultaneous cultures with a season of new voices and bold dance.
and control her five unmarried daughters. In English translation via headphones available for an Under the new artistic leadership of Eduardo Vilaro,
this repressed environment, Lorca creates an additional $3. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East the program reflects the dynamic range of Ballet
explosion of hatred, jealousy, despair and passion. 27th Street (between Lexington & Third Avenue), Hispanico’s repertoire with exciting premiers by
Performances presented in Spanish simultaneous NYC. 11AM. Admission: $25-$50 with discounts Andrea Miller, Annabelle Lopez Ochoa and a live
English translation via headphones available for available for seniors, students, children and groups. music collaboration featuring Oscar Hernandez.
an additional $3.00. The Gramercy Arts Theatre, For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or www. Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street,
138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & Third repertorio.org. NYC. 2PM. Tickets $10-59, for group sales, seniors
Avenue), NYC. 11AM. Admission: $25-$50 with and students call (212) 242-0800 or www.joyce.org.
discounts available for seniors, students, children Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico:
and groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or Goodnight Paradise, a new work by Ron Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico:
www.repertorio.org. DeJesus, Locked Up Laura, and Club Havana. Goodnight Paradise, a new work by Ron
Ballet Hispanico explores the essence of Latino DeJesus, Locked Up Laura, and Club Havana.
Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter cultures with a season of new voices and bold dance. Ballet Hispanico explores the essence of Latino
College and Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural Under the new artistic leadership of Eduardo Vilaro, cultures with a season of new voices and bold dance.
& Educational Center presents Collegiate the program reflects the dynamic range of Ballet Under the new artistic leadership of Eduardo Vilaro,
Research-Based Essay Competition Hispanico’s repertoire with exciting premiers by the program reflects the dynamic range of Ballet
& Award Ceremony: Life & Times of Andrea Miller, Annabelle Lopez Ochoa and a live Hispanico’s repertoire with exciting premiers by
Clemente Soto Vélez. CUNY student prize music collaboration featuring Oscar Hernandez. Andrea Miller, Annabelle Lopez Ochoa and a live
winners will present their particular topics and share Those pieces, alongside works by dance masters music collaboration featuring Oscar Hernandez.
their research experiences. Clemente Soto Vélez Ramon Oller and Vicente Nebrada, create an Those pieces, alongside works by dance masters
Cultural & Educational Center, 107 Suffolk Street, engaging evening of Latino-infused dance! Joyce Ramon Oller and Vicente Nebrada, create an
NYC. 6PM. Admission: Free. For more information Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, NY. engaging evening of Latino-infused dance! Joyce
call (212) 396-6318 or email: arodr@hunter.cuny. 8PM. Tickets: $10-$59, for group sales, seniors and Theatre,175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, NYC.
edu . students call (212) 242-0800 or www.joyce.org. 8PM. Tickets $10-59, for group sales, seniors and
students call (212) 242-0800 or www.joyce.org.
Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter Saturday, December 12, 2009
College presents Urban Jíbaro Poetry: Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón y
Open Mic Night Poetry Readings. Hunter Honorable Assemblyman Rivera and las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and The
College: Thomas Hunter Hall, Room 105. 7PM. Hostos Community College presents Special Service,). From novelist Mario Vargas
Admission: Free. For more information, visit www. Celebrando la Hermandad Antillana. Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian
centropr.org or call (212) 772-5714. A Gala Concert with Son de la Loma, Excelencia Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model
& José Alberto “El Canario”. Hostos Community soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an
Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico: College, Main Theater, 450 Grand Concourse, outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special
Goodnight Paradise, a new work by Ron Bronx, NY. 7PM. Admission: $15, or free from the Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities.
DeJesus, Locked Up Laura, and Club Havana. Assemblyman’s office. For more information, call Recommended for adults. The Gramercy Art
Ballet Hispanico explores the essence of Latino (718) 518-4455. Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington
cultures with a season of new voices and bold dance. & Third Avenue), NYC. 8PM. Admission: $25-$50
Under the new artistic leadership of Eduardo Vilaro, Society of the Educational Arts, Inc. with discounts available for Seniors, Students, and
the program reflects the dynamic range of Ballet (SEA) presents Little Red Riding Hood / La Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or
Hispanico’s repertoire with exciting premiers by Caperucita Roja. This bilingual musical play www.repertorio.org.
Andrea Miller, Annabelle Lopez Ochoa and a live retells the classic fable of a very courageous Little
music collaboration featuring Oscar Hernandez. Red through an exciting journey full of song, dance Sunday, December 13, 2009
Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, and original music. Teatro SEA at Los Kabayitos, 107
NYC. 8PM. Tickets $10-59, for group sales, seniors Suffolk St., 2nd Fl., NYC. 3PM. Admission: children Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico:
and students call (212) 242-0800 or www.joyce.org. $12.50, adults $15. For more information call 212- Batucada Fantastica, A new work by Ron
529-1545 or visit www.sea-online.info. DeJesus, Locked Up Laura, and Club Havana.
Friday, December 11, 2009 Ballet Hispanico explores the essence of Latino
Repertorio Español presents El Quijote. A cultures with a season of new voices and bold dance.
Center for Puerto Rican Studies at carnivalesque adaptation of Cervantes’ masterpiece. Under the new artistic leadership of Eduardo Vilaro,
Hunter College presents Pathways to Through Don Quijote’s adventures, the production the program reflects the dynamic range of Ballet
Economic Opportunity: Improving the presents the illusion of an utopian world with a festive Hispanico’s repertoire with exciting premiers by
Prospects for Puerto Ricans in Low and colorful spirit. El Quijote is a polyphonic play Andrea Miller, Annabelle Lopez Ochoa and a live
Wage Jobs. Discussions on trends of Puerto in which many different genres such as comedy, music collaboration featuring Oscar Hernandez.
Ricans in low wage labor markets, barriers impeding tragedy and farce collide to form a carnival-like and Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street,
economic opportunities, the role of local workforce vibrant Don Quijote that is rich in its musicality.” The NYC. 2PM. Tickets $10-$59, for group sales, seniors
development systems and community-based play is a collection of 12 scenes that present different and students call (212) 242-0800 or www.joyce.org.
strategies. Hunter College: Location TBD. All day stories based on the original text of Cervantes.
conference. Admission: Free. For more information, The Gramercy Arts Theatre, 138 East 27th Street Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón y
visit www.centropr.org or call (212) 772-5714. (between Lexington and Third Avenue), NYC. 3PM. las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and The
$25-$50. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or Special Service). From novelist Mario Vargas
98
Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian with discounts available for seniors, students, children magical realism allows her to live (and sleep) with her
Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model and groups. Performances presented in Spanish with two husbands. The Gramercy Art Theatre, 138 East
soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an simultaneous English translation via headphones for 27th Street (between Lexington & Third Avenue),
outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special an additional $3. For reservations, call (212) 889- NYC. 2:30PM. $25 - $55. For reservations, call (212)
Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities. 2850 or www.repertorio.org. 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org.
Recommended for adults. The Gramercy Art
Theatre, 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington Wednesday, December 16, 2009 Friday, December 25, 2009
& Third Avenue), NYC. 2:30PM. Admission: $25-$50
with discounts available for Seniors, Students, and Repertorio Español presents La Vida es ¡FELIZ NAVIDAD!
Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or Sueño by Calderón de la Barca. Directed
www.repertorio.org. by Rene Buch. Segismundo, a prince, is imprisoned Saturday, December 26, 2009
after his horoscope reveals that he will bring disaster
Lehman College in association with The to the country. After almost a lifetime in prison, he is Repertorio Español presents Pantaleón
Bronx Tourism Council and the NYC & released to reign over the country. However, he turns y las visitadoras (Captain Pantoja and
Company Foundation presents A Bronx rebellious and commits rape and murder. Drugged The Special Service,). From novelist Vargas
MESSIAH with Michael Spierman, Conductor. and re-imprisoned, he is told that the previous events Llosa, this comic tale unfolds when the Peruvian
Enjoy Handel’s timeless holiday concert performed were a dream, which brings him to question what Army recruits Captain Pantaleón Pantoja, a model
by the Bronx Opera Chorus, then delight in sampling parts of his life are reality and which are dreams. soldier, a man of integrity and a good husband, for an
the cuisine of the Bronx’s top restaurants at a great, The Gramercy Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Street outlandish mission: to create and manage a Special
on-site food show immediately following the concert. (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM. Service of “visitors” to fulfill the troop’s necessities.
Lehman Center for the Performing Arts, Bedford Admission: $30-$50 with discounts available for Recommended for adults. The Gramercy Art Theatre,
Park Blvd West, Bronx, NY. 3PM. Admission: $10- Seniors, Students,and Groups. For reservations, call 138 East 27th Street (between Lexington & Third
$25. For more information, contact Maritza Suarez (212) 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org. Avenue), NYC. 2:30PM & 6:30PM. Admission: $25-
at (718) 590-2502. Purchase tickets online at www. $50 with discounts available for Seniors, Students,
lehmancenter.org. Thursday, December 17, 2009 and Groups. For reservations, call (212) 889-2850 or
www.repertorio.org.
Joyce Theater presents Ballet Hispánico: Repertorio Español presents Carmen Rivera’s
Goodnight Paradise, a new work by Ron La Gringa, directed by René Buch. The play Friday, January 1, 2010
DeJesus, Locked Up Laura, and Club Havana. is about a young woman who travels from NYC to
Ballet Hispanico explores the essence of Latino Puerto Rico to meet her family and discovers her ¡FELIZ AÑO NUEVO!
cultures with a season of new voices and bold dance. roots. The Gramercy Art Theatre, 138 East 27th
Under the new artistic leadership of Eduardo Vilaro, Street (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. Wednesday, January 6, 2010
the program reflects the dynamic range of Ballet 11AM. $20 - $35. For reservations, call (212) 889-
Hispanico’s repertoire with exciting premiers by 2850 or www.repertorio.org. El Museo de Barrio presents Día de los Tres
Andrea Miller, Annabelle Lopez Ochoa and a live Reyes/Three Kings’ Day Celebration
music collaboration featuring Oscar Hernandez. Friday, December 18, 2009 Parade. Celebrate the joy of the holiday season
Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, with El Museo’s 33rd Three Kings’ Day Parade.
NYC. 7:30PM. Tickets $10-$59, for group sales, Repertorio Español presents Carmen Rivera’s Learn about the tradition of this festive holiday
seniors and students call (212) 242-0800 or www. La Gringa, directed by René Buch. The play celebrated throughout the Caribbean and Latin
joyce.org. is about a young woman who travels from NYC to America. El Museo’s Parade, led by the Three Kings,
Puerto Rico to meet her family and discovers her winds throughout the streets of El Barrio. Admission:
Monday, December 14, 2009 roots. The Gramercy Art Theatre, 138 East 27th Free. Registration 8:30AM; Parade begins at
Street (between Lexington & Third Avenue), NYC. 11AM. Advance registration is required for group
Repertorio Español presents: La Casa de 11AM. $20 - $35. For reservations, call (212) 889- participation in the parade and theater program. For
Bernarda Alba by García Lorca, directed by 2850 or www.repertorio.org. more information call (212) 831-7272 or visit www.
René Buch. Bernarda Alba attempts to dominate and elmuseo.org.
control her five unmarried daughters. In this repressed Saturday, December 19, 2009
environment, Lorca creates an explosion of hatred,
jealousy, despair and passion. The Gramercy Arts El Museo presents SUPER SABADO! Three The Society of the Educational Arts/La
Theatre, 138 East 27th Street, between Lexington Kings-all day activities. El Museo del Barrio, 1230 Sociedad Educativa de las Artes, (SEA)
& Third Avenues, NYC. 11AM.Tickets: Begin at $30, 5th Avenue, NYC. 11AM-6PM. Admission: Free. Visit presents Los Tres Reyes Magos/The Three
with discounts available for seniors, students, children www.elmuseo.org for details! Kings. On January 6th 2010, the light from a star
and groups. Performances presented in Spanish with will lead the Three Kings to Teatro Sea to celebrate
simultaneous English translation via headphones for Repertorio Español presents Doña Flor y one of the most important Latin American Holidays
an additional $3. For reservations, call (212) 889- sus dos maridos. Doña Flor misses her late for children, El Día de Los Tres Reyes Magos/Three
2850 or www.repertorio.org. husband’s passionate intimacy. She re-marries and Kings Day. On this day, the first thousand kids to
magical realism allows her to live (and sleep) with her arrive at Teatro Sea will personally meet The Three
Tuesday, December 15, 2009 two husbands. The Gramercy Art Theatre, 138 East Kings as well as receive a free gift/toy. SEA at
27th Street (between Lexington & Third Avenue), Los Kabayitos Puppet Theater, 107 Suffolk Street
Repertorio Español presents: La Casa de NYC. 8PM. $25 - $55. For reservations, call (212) (between Rivington Street and Delancy Street) NYC.
Bernarda Alba by García Lorca, directed by 889-2850 or www.repertorio.org. 3PM – 6PM. Free. For more information visit www.
René Buch. Bernarda Alba attempts to dominate and sea-online.info or call (212) 529 – 1545.
control her five unmarried daughters. In this repressed Sunday, December 20, 2009
environment, Lorca creates an explosion of hatred,
jealousy, despair and passion. The Gramercy Arts Repertorio Español presents Doña Flor y
Theatre, 138 East 27th Street, between Lexington sus dos maridos. Doña Flor misses her late
& Third Avenues, NYC. 11AM. Tickets begin at $30, husband’s passionate intimacy. She re-marries and
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C o m i t é N o v i e m b r e

23rd Anniversary
m e s d e l a h e r e n c i a p u e r t o r r i q u e ñ a

Fourteenth Annual
Benefit Gala

Friday, November 13, 2009


New York Hilton
NYC
23rd Anniversary
c o m i t é

m e s d e l a h e r e n c i a
n o v i e m b r e

p u e r t o r r i q u e ñ a
November 13, 2009

Dear Friends:

On behalf of Comité Noviembre, CN, I would like to welcome you to our fourteenth annual benefit
gala celebrating twenty-three years of Puerto Rican culture and history in this country. I would like to
thank and recognize our Gala Vice-Chairs: Carmen Gomez Goldberg President of Gomez, Goldberg
& Partners, Jay Hershenson, Executive Vice Chancellor of the City University of New York, Don
Lowery, Vice President of Nielson Media Research and Jose Nicot, Director, Food and Beverage
Global Procurement - AMER Hotels Intercontinental Hotels Group for their leadership, commitment
and support of Comité Novimebre and its programs.

I want to acknowledge and thank each of the members – the Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, ASPIRA of New York,
Inc., El Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueños, El Museo del Barrio, Eugenio María de Hostos Community College, National Institute
for Latino Policy, National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights – Justice Committee, LatinoJustice: PRLDEF, PROMESA, the Puerto
Rico Federal Affairs Administration and our members at large for their dedication and commitment to keeping our mission alive.

For the past twenty-three years, CN, has created and developed programs all geared to the support and enhancement of educational
opportunities and leadership development for Puerto Rican youth with a cultural twist. These programs are firmly rooted in the
belief, that in order to succeed in life, you must pursue a higher education, give back to your community through volunteer efforts and
know your cultural history. CN is thrilled that all of you here today are now part of our success story that boasts over 170 scholars
with a 90% college graduation rate since the inception of the CN Scholarship Program in 1996, an average of 12 scholarships a year.
An additional $7,000 has been awarded in the Richie Pérez Scholarship for Peace and Justice since 2006. The proceeds of this gala
dinner support both scholarship programs as well as other CN annual programs. It is our sincerest hope that all of you here tonight
will continue to support this effort.

I would like to thank Jaime and Jane Bello co-chairs of the Scholarship Selection Committee and its members and Martha Laureano,
co-chair of the Richie Perez Scholarship for Peace and Justice for their commitment to the educational and leadership development of
our youth. I congratulate our honorees: Carlos A. Picón, Katilia Velez and Jesús Omar Rivera, for the role that each of you, play, in
leaving our mark as Puerto Ricans on this country by developing and strengthening our history.

To all of the corporations and individuals that are in attendance tonight thank you for participating in this great event and for your
continued and generous support. I want to especially acknowledge the City University of New York, CUNY and Vice Chancellor for
Budget and Finance Ernesto Malave for his steadfast commitment to this organization and the employees of Bristol Meyers Squibb
who took it upon themselves to raise funds for Comité Noviembre and getting the company to matched their contribution dollar for
dollar.

This year more than ever your support was crucial and each one of you here today said presente! Your help tonight will enable
CN to continue to ensure our mission of providing educational and leadership opportunities to exceptional youth who are making a
difference in their community by volunteering and becoming involved in the social, civic and global issues of their time.

This year the Puerto Rican community made historic accomplishments from the first Puerto Rican in space Astronaut Joseph Acaba
to the confirmation of Justice Sonia Sotomayor to the highest court of this nation to the unprecedented national Latino voter turnout
for the historic Presidential election of Barack Obama, with Puerto Ricans leading the way. We have a lot to be proud of let us take
ownership of the contributions we make to the very fabric of this nation of this world and let always remember that no matter where
we are in this world de nuestra raíces nace un solo pueblo.

Sincerely,

Teresa A. Santiago
Chairperson
Vice Chairs
Carmen Gomez Goldberg
Carmen Gomez Goldberg is an entrepreneur, political advisor, community leader and Puerto Rican woman.
She is the President of Gomez Goldberg and Partners, C&E Affiliates, LLC an investment company for women
and Hayley’s Comet a school bus transportation company. She was president of AVET Coach Corp. for over
20 years. Prior to AVET, Ms. Gomez Goldberg supervised five dialysis centers that administered to, many
underserved and minority communities. Her compassionate, multi-cultural and bilingual services greatly im-
proved the quality of life and health of the many individuals that have crossed her path and would normally
not receive these services.

Carmen Gomez Goldberg is also a dedicated community and civic leader as well as a great public servant. Through her steadfast
commitment to her community she has made a difference in the lives of many people especially women. Ms. Gomez Goldberg is
a founding member of the 100 Hispanic Women of Westchester, a member of the Hispanic Advisory Board for the Board of Elec-
tions and President of the Yonkers Federation of Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. She has served as a Director of the National
Conference of Puerto Rican Women, empowering young Latinas to stay in school and as President of the Yonkers Puerto Rican/
Hispanic Day Parade Foundation Inc. and has been a board member for nine years. She has served on the prestigious Westchester
County Business Association Board and is a past member of the Workforce Investment Board. She is currently on the Board of
the Somos el Futuro Foundation.

Carmen has received numerous awards for her dedication to the Latino community including: the National Hispanic Magazine
Latina Excellence Award in 2004, the Comité Noviembre Puerto Rican Heritage Award, the Entre Nosotras Award and El Diario
La Prensa Top Latina Award for 2006. In 2004, The New York Post ranked Ms. Gomez Goldberg as the most influential Latina
in New York State. Carmen is the recipient of the Advancement of Women Award from Westchester County, the Griffon Award
from Untermeyer Performing Arts Council, and the Westchester Fund for Women and Girls Leadership Award. In 2007, she was
the first Puerto Rican woman to receive the Martin Luther King Award for her hard work and dedication to the African American
community of Westchester County.

Jay Hershenson
Jay Hershenson is Senior Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Secretary of the Board of Trustees
of The City University of New York — the leading public urban university system in the nation. He over-
sees the development and implementation of CUNY’s external relations program, including governmental,
media and community relations, marketing, communications and CUNY-TV and the administration of the
Board of Trustees’ agenda, meetings and records. Mr. Hershenson has served as a leader in many non-profit
organizations and held many national and state-wide public service appointments including: Executive Director of the Committee
for Public Higher Education; appointment by former President Jimmy Carter to the National Advisory Committee on Education;
appointment by former Governor Hugh L. Carey as one of five Commissioners on the Temporary State Commission on the Future
of Postsecondary Education; and the Task Force on State Aid to Education. He currently serves on the New York State Board
of Regents/ University of the State of New York Technology Policy and Practices Council and the Ogilvy and Mather Advisory
Committee on Diversity.

Mr. Hershenson’s leadership has been instrumental in the establishment of major CUNY academic exchange and outreach agree-
ments established with the governments of Mexico and the Dominican Republic. He helped secure critical funding for the CUNY
Dominican Studies Institute at City College and the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College. Together with Allan
Wernick, he established the CUNY Citizenship and Immigration Project. He is the co-founder of the Model Senate Session, a
mainstay of the annual New York State Legislature Hispanic Task Force’s Somos El Futuro Conference, and initiated CUNY’s
co-sponsorship for ASPIRA’s annual youth conferences. He organized support to establish “CUNY in the Heights” and “CUNY
Express” in Washington Heights to assure greater access to CUNY for immigrants. He worked closely with 100 Hispanic Women,
Inc. to help establish the Young Latinas Leadership Institute. Together with Trustee Hugo Morales and Robert Isaacson, he helped
create “Nueva York” on CUNY-TV.

He has been involved with and recognized by many cultural groups and institutions including: the United Negro College Fund
Scholarship Committee; the Board of Directors of the Council of Churches; Casa Cultural Dominicana; receipt of the National
Education Award from the National Hispanic Corporate Achievers; presented with the “Man for All Seasons Award” from The
NYC Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; honored by One Hundred Hispanic Women, Inc.; awarded the Dr. Antonia Pantoja Lead-
ership Award by ASPIRA, Inc.; honored by the CUNY Committee for Disabled Students at their 30th Anniversary of Recognition
Ceremony; and awarded the Community Partner Award by Alianza Dominicana, Inc.
Vice Chairs
Don Lowery
Don Lowery is Vice President of Communications and Public Affairs for Nielsen Media Research, the
world’s leading provider of television audience measurement and related services. In his role, he supports
Nielsen’s on going programs that provide information about its various activities to local and national
media organizations including the trade, general and specialty press. In addition, he plays a key manage-
ment role in Nielsen’s outreach efforts to community, civic and special interest groups and local, state and
federal governmental bodies.

Lowery has worked in newspapers, television and public relations positions for more than two decades.
He began his career as a general assignment reporter for the Roanoke (VA) Times & World News followed by reporting jobs
for the Norfolk (VA) Ledger Star and the Arizona Republic in Phoenix. In 1980, Lowery joined the Boston Globe as a busi-
ness reporter specializing in coverage of the financial and credit markets and economic news. Three years later, he was hired
as editorial director of WNEV-TV (later to become WHDH-TV) and subsequently added the role of director of public affairs
to his responsibilities. From 1991 thorough 1993, he worked as a pubic finance investment banker for Lazard Freres and First
Albany Corporation.

In 1994, Lowery joined the New England Patriots Football Club first as vice president of pubic relations and community affairs
and later vice president of player development and community affairs until March 2002. Lowery spent two years as executive
director of communications for Viacom Boston’s WBZ-TV, WSBK-TV and WLWC-TV in Providence, RI. He joined Nielsen
in July 2004. Lowery has received several journalism awards during his career including those from the Associated Press,
United Press International and Lincoln (MO) University for editorial writing. A native of Chicago, Lowery received a Bach-
elors of Arts Degrees in economics from Wesleyan University.

Jose Nicot
Jose Nicot has built a solid career with over 25 years experience as a management and procurement ex-
ecutive in both the public and private sectors. As Director of Food and Beverage Purchasing for the In-
tercontinental Hotel Group’s Global Procurement-Americas Division, Jose works with a global sourcing
team to purchase over $90 million in good and services for over 3,800 owned, managed and franchised
hotels in the United States. He served at the highest levels of New York City and New York State govern-
ment and has worked extensively within the pharmaceutical, medical care and wholesale food industries.
He has directed a comprehensive procurement sourcing management program focusing on operations, medical equipment,
pharmacy services and food supplies for a major national health care company focused on senior services.

Jose served as President of SERVISA Las Americas, the first wholesale buying cooperative dedicated to supplying the fresh
produce needs of the $2 billion+ Hispanic Supermarket owners market in the New York Metro Area. He led the effort to at-
tract investors and leading industry firms to deliver savings worth over $10 million to participating firms over the next several
years. Prior to founding SERVISA, Jose served as Chief of Staff to the Hon. Efrain Gonzalez Jr. (NYS Senate – 31st District).
He managed all of the Senator’s economic development initiatives, particularly those surrounding the investment of over $10
million in state and federal funds towards new commercial real estate development specifically targeting the wholesale food
industry located at the Hunts Point Terminal Market. Jose also held senior level management positions at the NYC Housing
Authority and NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation where he administered construction, human and institutional food distri-
bution services spending worth over $150 million and achieved cost savings of over 20% per annum.

Jose also served as Associate Chief of Staff to the Hon. Rudolph W. Giuliani, Mayor of the City of New York. In this capac-
ity, he worked with Deputy Mayor for Operations Randy Mastro and Deputy Mayor for Education and Human Services Ninfa
Segarra to oversee implementation of Mayoral initiatives in Education, Human Services, Housing and Disaster Relief Opera-
tions, representing some 35% of the City’s overall $40 billion+ annual budget. Jose also holds a Bachelor’s Degree from Princ-
eton University and a Master’s Degree from the Milano Graduate School at the New School University in New York City.
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Comité Noviembre Gala Honorees
Su voz no es una voz cualquiera y su dominio de la actuación, el
baile y el repique de las congas hacen de Choco Orta una artista de
completa.

Nacida en Santurce, Puerto Rico, Choco Orta se graduó con honores


del Departamento de Pedagogía, con concentración en Teatro, de la
Universidad de Puerto Rico. Ser artista siempre fue su norte y enfo-
cada en ese objetivo la joven perfeccionó su talento bajo la tutela de
importantes profesores en su natal Puerto Rico.

En el año 1979, sobresale como uno de los personajes de la obra mu-


sical “La verdadera historia de Pedro Navaja”, donde su personaje
de “Piola”arrancaba aplausos de la audiencia cada noche. Posterior-
mente se integró al proyecto músicoteatral “Las bohemias” donde
actuó, cantó y tocó percusión.

En 1989 presenta su primer espectáculo “Choco, mambo y algo


más...”, en esta producción la cantante recreó musicalmente la época
dorada de los años 40 y 50. Tiempo después trasciende fronteras y
junto a tres músicos boricuas parte a Francia donde por varios meses
participa en un espectáculo musical en el Club Hamou en la Riviera
Francesa como cantante y percusionista. Su desarrollo musical en
el genero de la salsa fue variado como parte de las orquestas de
Nacho Sanabria, Roberto Angleró, Waldo Borres y Julio “Gunda”
Merced junto a quien grabo su primer álbum titulado “Sentimiento
y sabor” y en el 2001 grabó su segundo álbum “La reina del sabor”
con el sello Musical Productions. Este disco, termina de posicionar
a Choco Orta como una destacada voz femenina que había llegado
para quedarse.

Su fuerza interpretativa y su sabor, así como su energía en la ejecución de las congas, le ganaron un espacio en la
cultura salsera y su interpretación del tema “La nueva reina del sabor” corte compuesto por la artista en honor al
Choco Orta

inmortal Tito Puente, se convirtió en un éxito. En 2004 la artista se radicó en los Estados Unidos. Pero en el verano
volvió a suelo boricua para laborar en el musical “El bombón de Elena” que se presentó en la Sala de Drama René
Marqués del Centro de Bellas Artes de San Juan.

Nuevas posibilidades se dibujaban en el horizonte de la carrera artística de la cantante, percusionista y actriz puer-
torriqueña Choco Orta quien regreso a los Estados Unidos con el objetivo de consolidar su música en un mercado
importante para todo intérprete de música tropical.

Integrando de manera brillante su voz en la interpretación de preciosos boleros, vibrantes soneos y una gran
confianza en su carrera, la cantante motiva al fenecido maestro Tito Puente a invitarla a cantar compartiendo con
conciertos junto a La Reina Celia Cruz, Oscar de León y otras reconocidas estrellas en una histórica presentación
en el Madison Square Garden.

Hoy Choco Orta es una de las mejores exponentes del género de la salsa emulando las voces de otras grandes
como, Celia Cruz, Celeste Mendoza, Graciela y La Lupe. Su nueva producción discográfica “Ahora Mismo” sale
al mercado a través del sello Camínalo Discos de Gilberto Santa Rosa y es prueba irrefutable de que la intérprete
es la voz femenina de la salsa de hoy, del mañana, como que es La Salsera del Milenio.
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Carlos A. Picón, an authority on Greek and Roman sculpture,
was elected Curator-in-Charge of the Department of Greek and
Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1990. His
principal responsibilities since that time have been the realiza-
tion of a four-phase master plan for the complete renovation and
reinstallation of the galleries for the Museum’s extensive col-
lection of Greek and Roman Art. The plan’s initial phase was
completed with the 1996 opening of the Robert and Renée Belfer
Court for prehistoric and early Greek art; the April 20, 1999,
opening of seven newly refurbished and reinstalled galleries for
archaic and classical Greek art marks the conclusion of the sec-
ond phase. Most recently on April 11, 2001, the new Cypriot
galleries opened, which was the inauguration of phase three. The
culmination of the 15-year-long project includes the installation
of a sculpture court and exhibition spaces for Roman art as well
as new galleries for the display of Hellenistic, South Italian, and
Etruscan art.

Carlos A. Picón
Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Mr. Picón received a B.A. in
Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology from Haverford Col-
lege and Bryn Mawr College, and both a master’s and doctoral
degrees in Classical Archaeology from the University of Oxford.
Prior to his appointment at the Metropolitan Museum, he served
as a Curator of Ancient Art at the San Antonio Museum of Art in
Texas, where he not only established the Department of Antiqui-
ties but also built a new wing to house the Museum’s growing
collection of ancient art. While in England, he also held for five
years the position of Junior Research Fellow at Christ Church,
Oxford, and Assistant Curator of the Ashmole Archive at King’s
College, London.

Among the exhibition organized by Mr. Picón at the Metropoli-


tan Museum are The Greek Miracle (1993), a landmark exhibition of original sculpture from fifth-century B.C.
Greece co-organized with the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. in collaboration with the Ministry of
Culture of the Government of Greece; Greek Gold: Jewelry of the Classical World (1994), which brought to-
gether for the first time nearly 200 of the finest pieces of Greek jewelry of the Classical period from all parts of
the Mediterranean world; and Master Plan for the Greek and Roman Galleries (1995), which displayed five large
architectural models representing the separate phases of the gallery renovations.

Mr. Picón is a widely published authority on ancient and classical art whose publications include the 1986 exhibi-
tion catalogue Ancient Art from Private Collections in Great Britain. Most recently, he co-edited the Catalogue of
Greek Vases in the San Antonio Museum of Art, which appeared in 1995. Dr. Picón is a Trustee of the Corning
Museum of Glass and a corresponding member of the German Archaeological Institute.
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Katilia Y. Vélez Quiñones was raised in Newark and Kearny, NJ and
currently resides in San Germán, Puerto Rico. She attended St. Michael’s
Elementary School in Newark, where she developed a strong foundation
in speech communications and writing. As a student in Queen of Peace
High School in North Arlington, NJ she participated in array of activities
including theater, power-lifting and running a Hurricane Georges Relief
Drive graduating in 1999.
Katilia then went on to Kean University where in her first semester she
landed the role of Rosaura in Pedro Calderon de la Barca’s “La Vida es
Sueño”. Unsure of what field to delve into she changed majors various
times, exploring the English, Theater, Psychology and Communications
departments. Throughout this time she began participating in Slam Po-
etry competitions and other Spoken Word events throughout New York
and New Jersey, and produced original cabaret nights with Urban The-
ater Company in Union, NJ.
Ms. Vélez left Kean University in her third year with the intent to dis-
cover the world around her and find her footing. For the next five years
she went to various trade schools and worked in diverse fields. Her expe-
riences include working as a bilingual account manager for a credit card
company, to working as a youth mentor and domestic violence counselor
at La Casa de Don Pedro in Newark, NJ. Throughout this time she con-
Katilia Y. Vélez Quiñones

tinued to focus on the arts attending Ward Actors Studio in New York,
NY.
In 2007 she decided she was ready to continue her education and was
accepted in Inter American University of Puerto Rico, San Germán cam-
pus. Majoring in Sociology, she is a recipient of the Leadership Award
from the Social Sciences department. Throughout her time in Puerto
Rico she has co-founded Areyto Lunar, which is an informal artists’ co-
alition on the islands’ west side that produces open-mic nights with art
exhibitions and live visual art being done on-site. She is set to graduate
in December 2009 with honors, and will pursue her Master’s Degree in
January 2010 majoring in Art History and Education.
In January of 2009 while watching an episode of MTV’s docu-series True Life, entitled “I’m Nuyorican” she
started a facebook group page calling for the cancellation of the episode as it was socially and historically inac-
curate as well as racist and exploitative. Shortly thereafter she drafted an on-line petition demanding the show
be pulled off the air and calling for the production of a new program based on accuracy and integrity in its
presentation on behalf of MTV. Appealing to the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights she found support
and together with the NCPRR, the Hispanic Media Coalition, the National Puerto Rican Coalition, the National
Institute for Latino Policy, author Linda Nieves-Powell and a representative from the government of Puerto Rico,
a meeting was held with MTV in May. There was also written endorsement and encouragement from Women of
El Barrio as well as a variety of community organizations, leaders, politicians and academia from different areas
of the country.
The interaction with MTV prompted the cancellation of the episode as well as a production of a youth forum
highlighting the Nuyorican experience which will be filmed in November of this year. Additionally, MTV has
promised to support the community directly in a financial capacity and is revising their protocol with respect to
the production of their docu-series.
Katilia is convinced that the issues brought up by these occurrences are of the utmost importance and relevance
to the future of Puerto Ricans both in the states and on the island. The cultural schism between Puerto Ricans
and Nuyoricans, the controversial nature of the word Nuyorican, the historical processes of both which are so
intertwined and simultaneously disconnected are themes that must be explored, discussed and shared, within our
own community and with the world. This must be done in the interest of progress and growth, in the interest of
awareness, to go beyond what is omitted from the schoolbooks and not allow the media’s sensationalism of our
image to overpower our reality. Her grandfather’s favorite saying rings loudly throughout this process, “El que
persevera, triunfa…. He who perseveres, triumphs.”
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Ramon Zayas
ANCHOR “EL INFORMADOR”,
WNJU
Ramon Zayas, a native of Puerto Rico, is the anchor of WNJU’s
weekend news magazine program “El Informador” that airs on Sat-
urday and Sunday at 11 p.m. In addition, he is an award winning
reporter, and files investigative and community reports for the sta-
tion’s various newscasts.

Zayas joined Telemundo in December of 2002 from WXTV/Univi-


sion 41 where he anchored “Al Despertar”, the early morning news
edition since 1999. Most recently he anchored he station’s weekend
newscasts at 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. Throughout his career, Mr. Zayas
has demonstrated a valuable versatility both in Sports and News.
Prior to his arrival in New York, Zayas was a Sports Anchor for “Telenoticias”, a CBS owned and oper-
ated 24 hour news channel with coverage to all Latin America. He has been a Boxing Analyst/Commenta-
tor, and has done live coverage of major sporting events, such as Championship Boxing, The World Cup
and the Olympics.

His broadcasting career was launched in 1986 as a Radio Producer and later Announcer for various Span-
ish radio stations in Northern California. He was only 17 years of age, and was pursuing a degree in Jour-
nalism and Radio/Television Production at San Jose Sate University. He later concluded his education at
San Francisco State University.

His professional introduction to Television started as a Sports Anchor for Telemundo’s KSTS in San
Jose, California in 1989. Two years later, he accepted a position as News Bureau Chief for Univision’s
KDTV in San Francisco where he remained until Telemundo hired him as a Producer and Reporter for the
Network’s News Magazine “Ocurrió Así” in Miami.

Awarded with a prestigious Emmy for the production and report of an investigative series on youth gangs
in San Antonio, Mr. Zayas has since earned several other nominations for this award. He is also an ac-
complished Classical Guitarist, and is the proud father of Nicole and Andres Zayas.
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SILENT AUCTION
For the past four years at the annual gala, CN has conducted a Silent Auction. Many companies have supported the Silent
Auction by donating items that promote their company at the same time raise additional funds for CN’s annual programs.
CN has received items ranging from Couture Gowns by Puerto Rican Designers Lisa Thon, Carlos Alberto and Luis An-
tonio; one of a kind Artwork by Puerto Rican Artist Gregory Torres entitled: “Escudo de Puerto Rico,” Grammy Award
winning Artist Dave Valentin’s Autograph Bamboo Flute & Case from his Japanese Collection, Certificates for stays at the
Five Star Hotel Gran Melia, Puerto Rico Golf Resort for 2. Three Night stay at the Embassy Suites San Juan Hotel & Ca-
sino, 2 certificates for a 2night at the Embassy Suites Dorado del Mar Beach & Golf, Resort,Ricky Martin Autograph book
and CD collection, CD Collections of Lissette, Victor Manulle, Jennifer Lopez, and Marc Anthony, Tickets to Tony Award
winning musical, In the Heights, Tickets to the Jose Feliciano concert, to 2 VIP Tickets to the 30th Anniversary Concert
of “el Pavarotti de la Salsa” Tito Nieves at Carnegie Hall, Moet/Hennessey champagne and cognac, two $250 Macy’s Gift
Certificates, a criollo meal for 10 from Salsa Caterers, dinners at La Fonda Boricua and Havana Central to Salsa Sensation
Frankie Negron’s Complete Autograph CD Collection, Shape Magazine Fitness Basket, Scholastic Maya and Miguel Fun
Basket, Framed CN Posters by Ray Rosario, Colgate Palmolive Product Basket, Season Tickets for Pregones, Tickets to the
Conan O’Brien Show, Celia, Marc Anthony concert and items from the Puerto Rico Convention Bureau, PRIDCO, Latino
Sports Ventures, Banco Popular. The proceeds from the Silent Auction go towards the CN Scholarship Awards Programs
as well as other educational, cultural and youth leadership development programs of the organization. Last year the Silent
Auction raised an additional $8,000.00 for these scholarships and programs.
YONKERS PUERTO RICAN/HISPANIC PARADE & FESTIVAL, INC.

SALUTES
COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE
MES DE LA HERENCIA PUERTORRIQUEÑA

ON ITS TWENTY-THIRD ANNIVERSARY


&
CONGRATULATES ITS HONOREES

CHOCO ORTA

CARLOS A. PICÓN

KATILIA VELEZ

&

JESÚS OMAR RIVERA


2009 SPOKESPERSON

P.O. Box 467, Yonkers, New York 10705, (914) 885-4969, (914) 376-6829 www.yonkersprhparade.com
IPRO Congratulates Comite Noviembre on its
23rd Anniversary & its
2009 Honorees
Choco Orta
Carlos A. Picón
Katilia Velez
&
Jesús Omar Rivera
2009 Spokesperson
BRONX-LEBANON HOSPITAL CENTER
THE MAJOR VOLUNTARY PROVIDER OF INPATIENT AND OUTPATIENT SERVICES
TO THE RESIDENTS OF THE SOUTH AND CENTRAL BRONX

CONGRATULATES

COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE

and the Honorees

BOARD OF TRUSTEES OFFICERS

RITA DIMARTINO, CHAIRMAN


CRISTINA TOOSIE, VICE CHAIRMAN/SECRETARY
SHIRLEY RODRIGUEZ REMENESKI/ VICE CHAIRMAN/ASSISTANT SECRETARY

BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEMBERS

ROSE ROBLES BIRTLEY


JOHN R. COLON
RICARDO R. FERNANDEZ, PhD
ANDRES V. GIL, ESQ.
MATTHEW GOLDSTEIN, PhD
BARBARA A. LOWE, RN, MPH
JOSEPH NEDLIN
HARVEY NEWMAN
JESUS RANGEL
ELI SEIFMAN, PhD
JOSEPH SEMIDEI
ANTONIO SIRVENT
MINTO L. SOARES

MIGUEL A. FUENTES, JR., PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


INSTITUTE FOR PUERTO RICAN/HISPANIC ELDERLY

SALUTES COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE


On its 23rd Anniversary &
CONGRATULATES
Its 2009 Gala Honorees

IPR/HE Celebrating 30 years of Dedicated Service


HOSTOS CENTER FOR THE ARTS & CULTURE
&
COMITÉ NOVIEMBRE
Mes de la herencia puertorriqueña

are thrilled to present for the first time in New York

Jesus Omar Rivera, El Boricuazo


Historian & Author

Puertorriqueñidad…
defendiendo nuestra imagen
Saturday, November 14, 2009 - 7:30PM
Hostos Center for the Arts & Culture Theatre
450 Grand Concourse at 149th Street
Bronx, NY 10451

For ticket information call 718.518.4455


Space is limited
Performance will be done in Spanish

Experience a “Boricuazo” moment that you will remember for the rest of your life!

Growing up in Puerto Rico all he heard was that Puerto Rico was a tiny island that produced noth-
ing. So, he became determined to prove this statement wrong and armed himself with knowledge and
information. The more he researched the more he realized the significant impact this tiny island and
Puerto Ricans have had on the world.
His enthusiasm, energy and love for all things Puerto Rican is contagious.
He will leave you dizzy with the “tidbits” he expounds, some funny, trivial and others extremely
profound, but most of all he will leave you with a renewed sense of self, pride, determination and a
challenge to go forth and teach others.

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