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PAKISTAN FLOOD KILLS HUNDREDS WORLD PAGE 27 GIANTSSWEEP CAIN STRONG IN WIN OVER DODGERS SPORTS

PAKISTAN FLOOD KILLS HUNDREDS

WORLD PAGE 27

GIANTSSWEEP CAIN STRONG IN WIN OVER DODGERS SPORTS PAGE 13
GIANTSSWEEP
CAIN STRONG IN WIN OVER
DODGERS
SPORTS PAGE 13
CAIN STRONG IN WIN OVER DODGERS SPORTS PAGE 13 BLACKBERRY APPS BANNED BUSINESS PAGE 10 Monday

BLACKBERRY APPS BANNED

BUSINESS PAGE 10

SPORTS PAGE 13 BLACKBERRY APPS BANNED BUSINESS PAGE 10 Monday • Aug. 2, 2010 • Vol

Monday Aug. 2, 2010 Vol X, Edition 300

www.smdailyjournal.com

District shortens school year

Millbrae pulls the trigger on new budget-friendly schedule

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Classes will start as planned Aug. 30 for Millbrae students, but the kids and teachers will have a school year shortened by ve days. In June, the Millbrae Elementary School District passed a budget banking on five furlough days.

Employees, at the time, had yet to agree to the concession. On Thursday, the two sides nalized the details for fewer school days. For teachers and students, the ve fewer days should come at the end of the school year, said Superintendent Linda Luna. Other employee fur- lough days will be scheduled differ- ently since many of the employees

work only a portion of the year, she added. “I’m looking forward to working with [employees] collaboratively so we can focus on the children,” said Luna. Five furlough days for all employees will mean an estimated $340,000 savings for the district, said Chief Business Official

Cynthia Shieh. “We really appreciate the com- promise,” said Shieh, who added everyone is committed to maintain- ing a balanced budget. The district is working with a $14.62 million general fund budget for the current school year. Reducing the school year by ve days, eliminating staff development

days and the impacts of eliminating physical education programs for the fourth and fth grade students are changes within the approved budget that need to be approved by teach- ers. For most employees, the ve fur- lough days will come at the end of

See YEAR, Page 19

lough days will come at the end of See YEAR , Page 19 DIANA CLOCK/DAILY JOURNAL

DIANA CLOCK/DAILY JOURNAL

Children line up for lunch at the King Community Center in San Mateo.The summer lunch program is provided for students involved in the King Center's summer recreational programs, and for students who receive subsidized lunches during the school year.

Feeding a community

King Center program fills summer lunch gap

By Theresa Seiger

DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

In a sunny courtyard in San Mateo sits a modest feast spread over a foldout table. Muffins and pastries from Safeway sit next to Lipton bottles of white tea, disposable cups filled with orange juice and a long con-

tainer full of strawberries. Next to the table is a hot food container with enough portions of stir-fry and rice to serve anywhere from 60 to 100 people. The line for food moves swiftly, with children ranging from the very young — probably no older than 6 — to the nearly adult. People who have already been served crowd the three picnic tables provid-

ed or find refuge in the indoor lounge. For an hour Monday through Friday, this is the scene at the King Community Center in San Mateo, where anywhere from 40 to 120 young people come to take part in the summer lunch program.

See LUNCH, Page 19

Students may freely transfer from 16 schools

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Is your child signed up to attend school in the fall at Fair Oaks or Horrall elementary schools? Under a new law, students could soon freely transfer out of 16 San Mateo County schools which made it on the state’s open enrollment list — a grouping of 1,000 schools put together as a result of California’s efforts to gain access to federal Race to the Top dollars. Over the past year, California law- makers have worked quickly to align the state in a race for federal education reform dollars. Many bills were passed quickly to aid the effort; among those bills is Senate

Bill x54 which allows students in the lowest performing 1,000 schools the option to transfer to another campus. The problem, many school of-

cials say, is the formula to create the list limits the number of schools from any one district. Doing so means a number of low-performing schools do not make the list, but the 1,000 slots must still be lled push- ing other schools onto the list. In San Mateo County, districts are

ghting the designation due to the

process. At the same time, districts need to start preparing to allow mid- year transfers. “It’s interesting methodology.

See OPEN, Page 19

Dollars for decor

City could pay businesses to spruce up

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The city of San Carlos wants busi- nesses on the El Camino Real corri- dor and Holly Street to spruce up their exteriors and might be willing to cough up half the cost for new paint, awnings, signs and landscap- ing. The Economic Development Advisory Commission wants the

city to resurrect the Facade Improvement Program with a $100,000 pool from the Redevelopment Agency to shine up the redevelopment project area on El Camino Real and Holly Street. Concentrating on one localized space benefits the city because changes are more easily recognized than when they are spread out, said

See DECOR, Page 19

benefits the city because changes are more easily recognized than when they are spread out, said
benefits the city because changes are more easily recognized than when they are spread out, said
benefits the city because changes are more easily recognized than when they are spread out, said
benefits the city because changes are more easily recognized than when they are spread out, said

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

2 Monday Aug. 2, 2010

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Quote of the Day

“I see the Hamas as directly responsible for any attack that comes from the Gaza Strip toward the state of Israel and the international community should see it this way as well.”

Benjamin Netanyahu,Israel’s prime minister

“Israel warns Hamas after rocket re,” page 8

Local Weather Forecast

Monday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming mostly sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the upper 50s to mid 70s. West winds 5 to 15 mph. Monday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the 40s to upper 50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph. Tuesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming mostly sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the upper 50s to lower 70s. West winds 5 to 15 mph. Tuesday night:

Mostly clear in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy.

Mostly clear in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy. Lotto July 31 Super Lotto Plus 6

Lotto

July 31 Super Lotto Plus 6 13 37 43 47 15 Mega number
July 31 Super Lotto Plus
6
13
37 43
47 15
Mega number
July 30 Mega Millions 11 30 40 48 52 42 Mega number Fantasy Five 4
July 30 Mega Millions
11 30
40 48
52
42
Mega number
Fantasy Five
4
6
12
33
36

Daily Four

2
2
5
5
6
6
1
1

Daily three midday

 
5
5
9
9
5
5

Daily three evening

 
5
5
8
8
2
2

The Daily Derby race winners are No.8 Gorgeous George in first place; No. 6 Whirl Win in second place; and No. 2 Lucky Star in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:49:25. race time was clocked at 1:49:25.

Star in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:49:25. Local . . . .

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Publisher Jerry Lee jerry@smdailyjournal.com

Editor in Chief Jon Mays jon@smdailyjournal.com

Phone:

(650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290

To

ads@smdailyjournal.com

Classieds:

ads@smdailyjournal.com

Events:

calendar@smdailyjournal.com

News:

news@smdailyjournal.com

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circulation@smdailyjournal.com

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800 S. Claremont St., Ste. 210, San Mateo, Ca. 94402

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. ANCKK
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ANCKK
©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
PYDET
LUMEFF
YIPLOC
YIPLOC

Answer here:

“ HE
HE

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek Now arrange the circled letters to

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon. ” Saturday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers tomorrow)

Saturday’s

Jumbles:

Answer:

(Answers tomorrow) GUEST NOTCH PELVIS LACKEY The college football player gave up the pigskin when it was time for this — THE SHEEPSKIN

GUEST NOTCH PELVIS LACKEY The college football player gave up the pigskin when it was time
up the pigskin when it was time for this — THE SHEEPSKIN Snapshot REUTERS Two instructors

Snapshot

pigskin when it was time for this — THE SHEEPSKIN Snapshot REUTERS Two instructors arrive for

REUTERS

Two instructors arrive for a parade marking the end of their week-long Arab Youth Resistance training camp, organized by the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine General Command near Damascus Sunday.

Inside

of Palestine General Command near Damascus Sunday. Inside Internet rules Watchdog group eyes new rules for
of Palestine General Command near Damascus Sunday. Inside Internet rules Watchdog group eyes new rules for

Internet

rules

Watchdog group eyes new rules for campaigns

See page 6

Russian

wildfires

Hundreds of wildres break out in Russia

See page 8

This Day in History

During his fourth voyage to the Western Hemisphere, English explorer Henry Hudson sailed into what is now

known as Hudson Bay. In 1776, members of the Continental Congress began attach- ing their signatures to the Declaration of Independence. In 1876, frontiersman “Wild Bill” Hickok was shot and killed while playing poker at a saloon in Deadwood, Dakota Territory by Jack McCall, who was later hanged.

In 1909, the original Lincoln “wheat” penny rst went into circulation, replacing the “Indian Head” cent. In 1923, the 29th president of the United States, Warren G. Harding, died in San Francisco; Vice President Calvin Coolidge became president. In 1934, German President Paul von Hindenburg died, paving the way for Adolf Hitler’s complete takeover. In 1943, during World War II, Navy boat PT-109, command- ed by Lt. John F. Kennedy, sank after being rammed by the Japanese destroyer Amagiri off the Solomon Islands. In 1974, former White House counsel John W. Dean III was sentenced to one to four years in prison for obstruction of jus- tice in the Watergate coverup. (Dean ended up serving four months.) In 1980, 85 people were killed when a bomb exploded at the train station in Bologna, Italy. In 1985, 135 people were killed when a Delta Air Lines jet- liner crashed while attempting to land at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.

1610

Thought for the Day

“A beautiful soul has no other merit than its own existence.” — Friedrich von Schiller, German author (1759-1805).

— Friedrich von Schiller, German author (1759-1805). Actor Peter O’Toole is 78. Birthdays Director Kevin Smith

Actor Peter O’Toole is 78.

Birthdays

author (1759-1805). Actor Peter O’Toole is 78. Birthdays Director Kevin Smith is 40. Actress Hallie Eisenberg

Director Kevin Smith is 40.

O’Toole is 78. Birthdays Director Kevin Smith is 40. Actress Hallie Eisenberg is 18. Former Sen.

Actress Hallie Eisenberg is 18.

Former Sen. Paul Laxalt (R-Nev.) is 88. Country singer Hank Cochran is 75. Rock musician Garth Hudson (The Band) is 73. Movie director Wes Craven is 71. Singer Kathy Lennon (The Lennon Sisters) is 67. Actor Max Wright is 67. Actress Joanna Cassidy is 65. Actress Kathryn Harrold is 60. Singer Andrew Gold is 59. Actor Butch Patrick (“The Munsters”) is 57. Singer Mojo Nixon is 53. Actress Victoria Jackson is 51. Actress Apollonia is 51. Actress Cynthia Stevenson is 48. Actress Mary-Louise Parker is 46. Rock musician John Stanier is 42. Actor Sam Worthington is 34. Figure skater Michael Weiss is 34. Actor Edward Furlong is 33. Rock musician Devon Glenn is 30.

Jury questioning next in Anna Nicole Smith case

LOS ANGELES — Questionnaires

lled out by prospective jurors in the

trial of Anna Nicole Smith’s doctors and her lawyer-boyfriend show most of them know something about the model’s life and death, a judge said. But how much the prospective jurors know and what they think about the drug conspiracy charges will be probed dur- ing jury questioning in open court. “I was a little disappointed with the responses to the question, ’What have you learned about the case?”’ Superior Court Judge Robert Perry said. “The answers were, ’Only what I saw on TV.”’ The judge indicated more needs to be discovered before a jury is selected for the trial of Dr. Sandeep Kapoor, Dr. Khristine Eroshevich and Howard K. Stern. Jury questioning begins Monday, with Perry hoping to have a panel seated in two days. Opening statements are scheduled for Wednesday. The defendants have pleaded not guilty to conspiring to illegally provide the former Playboy model with massive

amounts of opiates and sedatives. They are not charged in the overdose death of Smith in 2007 in Florida. The judge said he won’t allow testi- mony about the cause of Smith’s death because it is not part of the charges. “Most of the jurors have heard there was an overdose in Ms. Smith’s case,” he said. “Another case I’m aware of where a celebrity died, a doctor is charged with involuntary manslaughter in the death. You don’t have that here.“ The reference was to the case of Dr.

People in the news

The reference was to the case of Dr. People in the news Anna Nicole Smith Conrad

Anna Nicole

Smith

Conrad Murray, charged in the death of Michael Jackson. Perry said it was clear the prosecutor would like to try the three defendants on a similar theory, but he said there is no juris- diction for that in Los Angeles.

“I don’t know why it wasn’t tried in Florida,” the judge said. The case took a new twist Friday when Deputy District Attorney Renee Rose made the surprise announcement that she will allege Smith was a co-con- spirator in the actions that brought the

defendants to trial after Smith’s death. It was unclear how the claim could affect the case. The judge said he found the new turn of events “remarkable.” Rose also said she would claim Stern’s sister, Bonnie Stern, was another uncharged co-conspirator, helping to arrange deliveries of drugs to Smith in the Bahamas. A phone listing for Bonnie Stern could not be found. The judge barred several items from evidence including a famous video of Smith in clown makeup which prosecu- tors said showed she was drugged. He also said the death of Smith’s son, Daniel, from a drug overdose is irrele- vant and would not be explored.

New ABC head says he won’t change fall schedule

BEVERLY HILLS — The ABC fall schedule is “locked and loaded” and won’t be changed despite a management

shake-up, the network’s new chief said Sunday. Paul Lee, noting he’d logged just 36 hours so far as ABC Entertainment Group president, said “you can do more damage than good” by making last- minute changes. Lee, 50, was put in charge Saturday of the ratings-challenged ABC broadcast network and ABC Studios after last week’s abrupt resignation of Stephen McPherson. During a Q-and-A session with the Television Critics Association, Lee was guarded about his predecessor’s departure but willing to praise the sched- ule he left behind. “I felt honored to be offered the job” by Anne Sweeney, the president of the Disney/ABC Television Group, Lee said. “But I don’t want to talk about Steve.” ABC has a “very strong lineup coming in” to the season next month, Lee said. Lee, who as head of ABC Family invigorated the once-flagging cable channel, is in charge of development, programming, marketing and scheduling operations for ABC Entertainment. The London-born Lee called the net- work “one of the premiere iconic American storytelling brands” that he grew up watching from abroad. He made one particular favorite on the schedule clear. “One thing I know, ‘Modern Family’ should win the Emmy for best comedy this year,” Lee said, lobbying for ABC’s freshman hit series at the Aug. 29 Emmy Awards. Lee spent more than a decade at the BBC as an executive, news documentary maker and entertainment producer.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Monday Aug. 1, 2010

3

The 1894 Midwinter Expo in Golden Gate Park

Aug. 1, 2010 3 The 1894 Midwinter Expo in Golden Gate Park I n 1893, San

I n 1893, San Francisco was in a bit of an economic slump. The city and its mer- chants were casting about for some kind

of stimulus plan to put some life back into the lethargic business community. The city fathers and mothers also wanted to upgrade from the rough-and-tumble 49er Gold Rush image to that of a more sophisticated nan- cial, social and cultural metropolis which had grown to some 300,000 people. What to do to address both these problems? Michael H. de Young, publisher of the San Francisco Chronicle Newspaper, had an idea:

“Let’s put on a show and invite the whole world!” Visitors would come from far and wide, bring spending money, and see for themselves how really wonderful San Francisco was. He had noted the success Chicago was having with its World’s Columbian Exposition which had opened on May 1, 1893. It was to close in October of that same year, ahead of the expected severe win- ter weather. Maybe San Francisco could acquire some of Chicago’s exhibits, transport them here, and save big bucks by recycling them. By mid-June the project was OK’d by the city. It would be the rst international exhibit held west of the Mississippi.

fi rst international exhibit held west of the Mississippi. PHOTO COURTESY OF SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM

The Electric Tower was the tallest structure at the Expo and stood at the very center of it all.

There was the problem of just where to build such an exposition. Well, what about Golden Gate Park? William Hammond Hall, park superintendent, and John McLaren, park horticulturist, co-creators of the 1,017 acre

park, had already worked their miracles on the 270 acres on the eastern-most section. Maybe the Expo could take on the 200 acres just west of that area. Hall and McLaren approved of the 1894 Expo, just not in their backyard (i.e.,

Golden Gate Park). McLaren, especially, was outraged. The Park was supposed to be a refuge from the world’s woe. No structures, no statues, no nonsense. And no crowds tram- pling down his beloved park. Just green and peaceful. But de Young’s people prevailed. They promised McLaren they would remove and restore everything after the Expo closed. It was a promise they would not keep. John McLaren would nd a way to get even. Ground was broken on August 24, 1893, with 60,000 people attending the ceremonies. Michael de Young was declared Director- General of the Exposition. The pace of con- struction was incredible. The re-use of some of Chicago’s exhibits saved both time and money. The target date for the opening of the fair was to be January 1, 1894. However, they missed their mark by 26 days due to major snowstorms that delayed the trains hauling the exhibits from Chicago. The fair opened on January 27, 1894, with over 77,000 people attending on the rst day. The Exposition site (called Sunset City) had 180 structures, repre- senting all of California’s counties. Eighteen foreign countries were also represented. Almost all of the structures were meant to be temporary, although they looked “nished”. The grounds, designed and laid out by chief engineer Michael O’Shaughnessy, consisted of two concentric circles. The primary exhibits were built around the inner circle, with the midway attractions on the outer cir- cle. The one structure that was meant to be permanent was the ne arts building. It would become San Francisco’s rst city-gallery and

See HISTORY, Page 4

was the fi ne arts building. It would become San Francisco’s fi rst city-gallery and See
was the fi ne arts building. It would become San Francisco’s fi rst city-gallery and See

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Monday Aug. 2, 2010

3

The 1894 Midwinter Expo in Golden Gate Park

Aug. 2, 2010 3 The 1894 Midwinter Expo in Golden Gate Park I n 1893, San

I n 1893, San Francisco was in a bit of an economic slump. The city and its mer- chants were casting about for some kind

of stimulus plan to put some life back into the lethargic business community. The city fathers and mothers also wanted to upgrade from the rough-and-tumble 49er Gold Rush image to that of a more sophisticated nan- cial, social and cultural metropolis which had grown to some 300,000 people. What to do to address both these problems? Michael H. de Young, publisher of the San Francisco Chronicle Newspaper, had an idea:

“Let’s put on a show and invite the whole world!” Visitors would come from far and wide, bring spending money, and see for themselves how really wonderful San Francisco was. He had noted the success Chicago was having with its World’s Columbian Exposition which had opened on May 1, 1893. It was to close in October of that same year, ahead of the expected severe win- ter weather. Maybe San Francisco could acquire some of Chicago’s exhibits, transport them here, and save big bucks by recycling them. By mid-June the project was OK’d by the city. It would be the rst international exhibit held west of the Mississippi.

fi rst international exhibit held west of the Mississippi. PHOTO COURTESY OF SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM

The Electric Tower was the tallest structure at the Expo and stood at the very center of it all.

There was the problem of just where to build such an exposition. Well, what about Golden Gate Park? William Hammond Hall, park superintendent, and John McLaren, park horticulturist, co-creators of the 1,017 acre

park, had already worked their miracles on the 270 acres on the eastern-most section. Maybe the Expo could take on the 200 acres just west of that area. Hall and McLaren approved of the 1894 Expo, just not in their backyard (i.e.,

Golden Gate Park). McLaren, especially, was outraged. The Park was supposed to be a refuge from the world’s woe. No structures, no statues, no nonsense. And no crowds tram- pling down his beloved park. Just green and peaceful. But de Young’s people prevailed. They promised McLaren they would remove and restore everything after the Expo closed. It was a promise they would not keep. John McLaren would nd a way to get even. Ground was broken on August 24, 1893, with 60,000 people attending the ceremonies. Michael de Young was declared Director- General of the Exposition. The pace of con- struction was incredible. The re-use of some of Chicago’s exhibits saved both time and money. The target date for the opening of the fair was to be January 1, 1894. However, they missed their mark by 26 days due to major snowstorms that delayed the trains hauling the exhibits from Chicago. The fair opened on January 27, 1894, with over 77,000 people attending on the rst day. The Exposition site (called Sunset City) had 180 structures, repre- senting all of California’s counties. Eighteen foreign countries were also represented. Almost all of the structures were meant to be temporary, although they looked “nished”. The grounds, designed and laid out by chief engineer Michael O’Shaughnessy, consisted of two concentric circles. The primary exhibits were built around the inner circle, with the midway attractions on the outer cir- cle. The one structure that was meant to be permanent was the ne arts building. It would become San Francisco’s rst city-gallery and

See HISTORY, Page 4

was the fi ne arts building. It would become San Francisco’s fi rst city-gallery and See
was the fi ne arts building. It would become San Francisco’s fi rst city-gallery and See

4 Monday Aug. 2, 2010

LOCAL/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

As spending by wealthy weakens, so does economy

By Jeannine Aversa

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Wealthy Americans aren’t spending so freely anymore. And the rest of us are feel- ing the squeeze. The question is whether the rich will cut back so much as to tip the economy back into recession — or if they will spend at least enough to sustain the recovery. The answer may not be clear for months. But their cutbacks help explain why the rebound could be stalling. The economy grew at just a 2.4 percent rate in the April-June quarter, the government said Friday, much slower than the 3.7 percent rate for the rst quarter. Economists say overall consumer spending has slowed mainly because the richest 5 percent of

spending has slowed mainly because the richest 5 percent of Americans — those earning at least

Americans — those earning at least $207,000 — are buying less. They account for about 14 percent of total spending. These shoppers have retrenched as their investment val- ues have sunk and home values have languished. In addition, the most sweeping tax cuts in a generation are due to expire in January, and lawmakers are divided over whether the gov- ernment can afford to make any of them permanent as the federal budget decit continues to balloon. President Barack Obama wants to allow the top rates to increase next

year for individuals making more than $200,000 and couples making more than $250,000. The wealthy may be keeping some money on the sidelines due to uncertainty over whether or not they will soon face higher taxes. The Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index has tumbled 9.5 percent since its high-water mark in late April. Home values fell 3.2 percent in the first quarter, according to the Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller 20- city home price index. Think of the wealthy as the main engine of the economy: When they buy more, the economy hums. When they cut back, it sputters. The rest of us mainly go along for the ride. Earlier this year, gains in stock portfolios had boosted household wealth. And the rich responded by

spending freely. That raised hopes the recovery would strengthen. No longer. The dizzying plunge on Wall Street in May and June and lingering stock market turbulence have shrunk Americans’ wealth. The Dow fell 10 percent for the April-June quarter. The broader Standard & Poor’s 500 index dropped 11.9 percent. And the rich are once again more cautious about spending, economists say. The afuent went back to tighten- ing their belts in June after months of vigorous showing. Data from MasterCard Advisors’ SpendingPulse showed luxury spending fell in June for the rst time since November. The decline followed a solid rise in sales rev- enue earlier in the spring. “It isn’t a good omen for the con- sumer recovery, which cannot exist

without the luxury spender,” said Mike Niemira, chief economist at the International Council of Shopping Centers. At the same time, government reports show shoppers as a whole cut back on their spending in both May and June. Companies have responded by refusing to step up hiring. The hous- ing market is stalling. And Americans are seeing little or no pay raises. It adds up to a recipe for a grind- ing recovery to slow further. And it helps explain why econo- mists expect the rebound to lose momentum in the second half of the year. Especially if the rich don’t resume bigger spending. “They are the bellwether for the economy,” says Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics.

HISTORY

Continued from page 3

take the name of de Young. Some of the other exhibit halls were the Manufacturers Building, Mechanical Arts, and Horticulture. There was a Ferris Wheel (called a Firth Wheel here), a Cyclorama, an Esquimaux (Eskimo) Village, an Oriental Village, Boone’s Animal Arena and the Santa Barbara Amphibia. The Court of Honor was at the very center of the Expo. It was located in Concert Valley, where musical entertainment still occurs, and where the newest incarnation of the de Young Art Museum on one side looks across the courtyard to the present-day Academy of Sciences.

In the very center of the Court of Honor was Bonet’s Electric Tower, looking like a California version of the Eiffel Tower. It was the tallest structure at the fair, standing 272 feet, and had its own self-contained generator. An electric elevator whisked thrill-seeking passengers up in a quick three-minute ride. At night, a searchlight at the very top of the tower could be seen for miles. While San Francisco had access to electric lights, many visitors from rural areas had never seen them. To be successful, the Expo had to attract large numbers of people, both new and repeat visitors. Special days were set aside to cele- brate individual counties or nations, or to honor organizations, in the hope that people would re-visit often. The San Francisco Examiner newspaper sponsored a Children’s Day on February 23, handing out 30,000 free admission tickets to public school kids. That brought in more than 55,000 free-kids and

school kids. That brought in more than 55,000 free-kids and paying-parents. In a case of dueling

paying-parents. In a case of dueling newspa- pers, the San Francisco Chronicle offered free admission to every school kid in the state for their Children’s Day on March 31. San Francisco saved its special day for July 4. It was also the closing day of the Expo. More than 79,000 attended the ceremonies. Between January and July, more than 2 mil- lion visitors had come to the fair. And now they were gone. What was left? Adolph Sutro bought the Camera Obscura, the Firth Wheel and other midway attractions and moved them to his Sutro Baths. The de Young Art Museum and some statues remained. John McLaren had been so impressed with the Japanese Village, designed by Makoto Hagiwara, that he asked Hagiwara to convert the temporary exhibit into a permanent Japanese Tea Garden. Hagiwara and his family lived there, caring for the garden until 1942 when they and other

Japanese were ordered into relocation camps for the duration of World War II. What John McLaren did not want left in his park was the rest of the stuff. When the fair’s producers didn’t play fair by removing and restoring as they had promised, McLaren and his men tore down the buildings and sold the lumber. He dynamited the Electric Tower and sold the metal scrap. The proceeds went into the Park Improvement Fund. And then all that remained were the memories. The 1894 Midwinter Expo was like a dress- rehearsal for the larger 1915 Pan-Pacic Expo to come. But rst San Francisco would have to get through the Great Quake of 1906. There would be no dress-rehearsal for that event.

Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks appears in the MOnday edtiion of the Daily Journal.

for that event. Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks appears in the MOnday edtiion of the

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE

Monday Aug. 2, 2010

5

Party’s over for crashers under new state bill

By Robin Hindery

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. (AP) — As the electronic scanner passed back and forth over his forged access badge, Scott Weiss gured he was sunk. The 50-year-old West Los Angeles real-estate appraiser had bluffed his way down the red carpet at the 2008 Screen Actors Guild Awards, but he hit a snag at the entrance to the Shrine Exposition Center: his badge lacked the authentic electronic chip that was designed to keep party crashers like Weiss out of A-list Hollywood events. But to Weiss’s amazement, after several unsuccessful tries with the scanner, the security guard stopped and simply said, “OK, you’re good.” Weiss’s unauthorized entry into ve major awards shows in 2007 and 2008 was lmed for the docu- mentary “Crasher.” He is Exhibit A for supporters of a bill awaiting California lawmakers as they return from summer recess on Monday. The measure, AB451, would expand the current definition of trespassing to include the intention- al, unapproved entry into an event clearly advertised as off-limits to the general public. First-time viola- tors could face up to six months in jail or a $1,000 ne. “Under AB451, if you’re there an at event where you don’t have a ticket, and you’re asked to leave and you don’t want to leave, you’re tres- passing,” said its author, Anthony Portantino, a Pasadena Democrat. The Screen Actors Guild, which sponsored the bill, described party crashing as a safety issue. “Trespassing by its very nature puts people at risk,” the labor union

said in a statement to The Associated Press. “Illegal entry poses a threat to security and we feel that all event sponsors should have the full force of the law behind them in providing for the safety of their guests.” Weiss said harmless thrill-seekers like himself actually keep security personnel on their toes for real threats. After completing their work on “Crasher” in 2009, he and his fel- low filmmakers set up meetings with representatives from the vari- ous award shows to show them the lm and point out the aws in their respective security systems. “None of the producers were happy we did it, but they were real- ly happy to see how we did it,” Weiss said. Portantino said he has heard con- cerns the measure would infringe on free speech by hampering media coverage of events or making peaceful protesters vulnerable to charges of trespassing. He said he will continue to ne-tune the bill language to make sure that doesn’t happen. “Our goal is to make it narrow enough to be about one-day sport- ing and entertainment events, and not have it be about political, free speech-type issues,” he said. “We want to make sure there are no unintended consequences.” The bill is scheduled to come up for a Senate oor vote this month, but the date has not yet been set. Weiss, who is retired from party crashing, said he’ll be watching with interest. “The whole concept of the law is designed to keep little people out of the events where they big shots are,” he said. “And I frankly think some of the most interesting people at a party are the party crashers.”

SPECIAL DELIVERY

SPECIAL DELIVERY ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL Backpacks as well as other much needed school supplies were loaded

ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL

Backpacks as well as other much needed school supplies were loaded up by a group of Harley Davidson riders in Redwood City Saturday. The supplies were being bused to San Mateo where they were to be delivered to school children by the San Mateo Medical Center.

Man hospitalized after park attack

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — A San Francisco man was hospitalized after he was robbed and stabbed by as many as a dozen people in San Francisco’s Dolores Park early Saturday. The 40-year-old man, who has not been named, suffered life- threatening wounds after being stabbed multiple times and beaten during the attack in the park around 1:30 a.m. Saturday, Ofcer Samson Chan said. Television video showed a trail of blood in the park. Three suspects were being held on suspicion of attempted mur- der and robbery. Their names have not been released, but police said they were 20, 18 and 17 years old. Police were looking for additional suspects. In a separate incident, police said a 33-year-old Oakland man was hospitalized with life-threatening wounds after being shot multiple times around 3:15 a.m. Saturday in San Francisco’s Tenderloin district. The man, who has not been named, was wearing a bulletproof vest at the time of the attack, Capt. Joe Garrity said. It’s unclear how many bullets hit the man, but the gunman red at the victim 16 times, according to Garrity.

Police reports

Bad roommate

A woman reported that she could see her

stolen purse in the car of an ex-roommate

in a garage on the 1000 block of Carolan

Avenue in Burlingame before 9:20 a.m. Thursday, July 29.

BURLINGAME

Suspicious circumstances. A woman com- plained that a man was exposing himself to her children at the corner of Edgehill Drive and Paloma Avenue before 12:08 p.m. Thursday, July 29. Vehicular vandalism. A man kicked a side mirror off a car and then urinated on it at the corner of Bloomfield Road and Howard Avenue before 3:51 p.m. Thursday, July 29. Unwanted subject. A woman refused to leave and was attempting to take items that didn't belong to her on the 300 block of California Avenue before 5:49 p.m. Thursday, July 29. Suspicious vehicle. A semi-truck knocked down a phone line at the corner of California Drive and Juanita Avenue before 11:15 p.m. Thursday, July 29.

knocked down a phone line at the corner of California Drive and Juanita Avenue before 11:15
knocked down a phone line at the corner of California Drive and Juanita Avenue before 11:15

6 Monday Aug. 2, 2010

STATE/BAY AREA

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Campaign watchdog eyes new Internet rules

By Don Thompson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — Politicians’ tweets and status updates should be held to the same standards as paid advertising that voters see on televi- sion, hear on radio or nd in their mailboxes, California’s campaign watchdog agency says in a report being released Monday. The Fair Political Practices Commission is considering how to regulate new forms of political activity such as appeals on a voter’s Facebook page or in a text message. It’s become necessary as politi- cians in California and elsewhere announce their candidacies and major campaign policies through Twitter, YouTube and a host of social networking sites, said FPPC Chairman Dan Schnur. He said California’s 36-year-old Political Reform Act needs rewrit-

36-year-old Political Reform Act needs rewrit- ing to keep up with the times. “Our goal here

ing to keep up with the times. “Our goal here is to meet the new chal- lenges of 21st Century tech- nology,” Schnur said. “There’s no way that the authors of the act could have anticipated that these of types of communicating a campaign mes- sage would ever exist.” The report, compiled by a com- mission subcommittee, outlines possible hurdles to regulating online content, such as how to include full disclosure of who is behind a mes- sage in a 140-character tweet or a text. Any changes the commission makes to state law should give reg- ulators the exibility to respond to swiftly evolving technologies, the report says.

The commission will consider the

report at its Aug. 12 meeting. If the

ve-member commission orders its

staff to propose regulations or legal changes it could be months before they take effect, potentially pushing new rules past this political season. Campaigns would face the same disclosure rules they do now, such as saying who is behind an ad and who paid for it, but for the rst time they would apply to communica- tions on the Internet and other forums. The subcommittee’s recommen- dations draw a line between paid political activity and unpaid, grass- roots volunteer efforts. Political commentary by individuals uncon- nected to a campaign would not be affected. Nor would sending or for-

warding e-mails, linking to websites or creating independent websites. “People tweeting about someone is typically not something you

would regulate,” said Barbara O’Connor, professor emeritus of

communications and the former director of the Institute for the Study of Politics and Media at California State University, Sacramento. “When it becomes an ad, it’s a different story. When it becomes an ad it really is a replace- ment for a 30-second spot for a new generation.” The recommendations include requiring tweets and texts to link to a website that includes the full dis- closures, although some people feel the disclosure should be in the text itself no matter how brief, O’Connor said. She testied before the subcommittee but hadn’t seen

its report.

California Republican Party Vice Chairman Jon Fleischman, who writes the conservative FlashReport blog, told the subcommittee that

requiring even one character in a

tweet be used for disclosure would be a burden on free speech, accord- ing to the report. Bloggers who accept payment to present their opinion in favor of or against a candidate but do not dis- close their ties to a campaign are becoming increasingly common in California, but the report does not recommend regulating them — for now. The subcommittee urged blog- gers to voluntarily disclose on their websites if they are being paid. If that doesn’t work, it said regu- lators or lawmakers may need to step in. Like California’s current regula- tions, federal campaign watchdogs regulate only paid political advertis- ing, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Other states also are just beginning to consider whether their disclosure laws are sufcient to cover modern communications.

San Francisco OKs giant redevelopment project

By Robin Hindery

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — After more than 20 years of environmental cleanup efforts, San Francisco’s largest swath of undeveloped land

will someday be home to thousands

of families, as well as parks, busi-

nesses and perhaps even a new foot- ball stadium. The county Board of Supervisors last week overwhelmingly approved

a project to turn the abandoned

Hunters Point Naval Shipyard into a bustling 700-acre residential and commercial center on the southeast shoreline of San Francisco Bay. The Miami-based developer, Lennar Corp., is in the process of negotiat- ing with lenders to nance the ini- tial home construction, which could begin later this year. Supporters say the development, which will stretch west to Candlestick Park, will breath new life into the rough-edged Bayview- Hunters Point neighborhood by bringing jobs, affordable housing and recreation options into an area plagued by gang crime and poverty.

options into an area plagued by gang crime and poverty. David Chiu “This is a part

David Chiu

“This is a part of San Francisco desperately in need of revital- ization,” said

of

Supervisors

President David

Chiu. “This area

last

remaining plot of land to help develop the future of what San Francisco is going to be.”

But critics have raised concerns that portions of the federal Superfund site are a long way from being environmentally sound. They also fear the disappearance of the city’s last predominantly black community, citing the displacement of poor black residents during the earlier redevelopment of San Francisco’s Western Addition neighborhood. “Part of San Francisco died yes- terday,” Supervisor Chris Daly, the board’s lone dissenting vote on the current proposal, said Wednesday. “The city is essentially green-light- ing gentrication.” Daly had lobbied unsuccessfully

Board

is

the

for an amendment requiring 50 per- cent of the new residences to be set aside as affordable housing. The current plan reserves 32 percent of the units for low and moderate income residents. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which oversees the cleanup of the shipyard along with the Navy, is approaching the development plan with cautious optimism, stressing that there is still work to be done. “It’s getting really close to where we feel the site can be safely trans- ferred and development can occur, and we’re trying to clean things up as fast as we can,” said John Chesnutt, a manager in the EPA’s Superfund Division. The 936-acre base, which was closed in 1974, is one of 20 former military sites in California whose high levels of pollution have earned them a spot on the EPA’s National Priorities List. The shipyard received its Superfund designation in 1989, and the Navy has since spent $700 mil- lion addressing hazards such as toxic metals and chemicals and low-

level radiation contamination. Only one 88-acre parcel of land has been fully transferred to the city, while the rest is still undergoing deconta- mination work. Now that the Board of Supervisors has acted, the EPA will enter into a formal legal agreement with Lennar Corp. to ensure the developer takes certain environmen- tal safety precautions during the construction phase, Chesnutt said. Those include applying a cover layer of soil or pavement over “hot spots” where the original soil was contaminated. As a symbol of the shipyard’s evolution from environmental blight to eco-friendly urban model, the development plan includes space for

a green technology research hub

within the 2.65 million square feet

of commercial space.

The new community also will include about 10,500 new homes, 885,000 square feet of retail space and more than 300 acres of open space. Additional land has been set aside for a new stadium if the 49ers decide to stay in San Francisco rather than move to Santa Clara.

Crews gain ground on wildfire north of Los Angeles

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PALMDALE — Higher humidity and lower temperatures helped re- ghters nearly contain a wildre smoldering Sunday in the high desert north of Los Angeles. The re charred nearly 22 square miles of brush in the Antelope Valley. It was 87 percent contained Sunday, and crews hoped to have it fully surrounded by Monday evening, Los Angeles County Inspector Don Kunitomi said. All roads were reopened at sunrise Sunday. The re was believed to

have been sparked Thursday after- noon in the Agua Dulce area by

someone working on a car wheel. Four homes and ve outbuildings were destroyed. Los Angeles County Fire crews aided by a pair of water-dropping helicopters quickly knocked down a smoky wildre that burned Sunday along the north edge of the 101 Freeway in Calabasas.

quickly knocked down a smoky wild fi re that burned Sunday along the north edge of
quickly knocked down a smoky wild fi re that burned Sunday along the north edge of
quickly knocked down a smoky wild fi re that burned Sunday along the north edge of

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Monday Aug. 2, 2010

7

Gulf crews prepare to start plugging well for good

By Greg Bluestein

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW ORLEANS — The only thing keeping millions more gallons of oil out of the Gulf of Mexico right now is a rush job: an experi- mental cap that has held for more than two weeks but was never meant to be permanent. As soon as this week, crews will be pumping in some insurance. Engineers are preparing to launch

a so-called static kill as early as

Monday evening, shoving mud and perhaps cement into the blown-out well to make it easier to plug the gusher up forever and end the Summer of the Spill. The effort carries no certainty, and BP PLC engineers still plan to follow it up days later by sending a stream of mud and cement into the

bottom of the mile-deep under- ground reservoir through a relief well they’ve been digging for months. But the oil giant’s engineers and petroleum experts say it’s the clear- est path yet to choke the blown-out well and make it even easier for the crews drilling the relief well to ensure oil can never again erupt from the deep-sea well, which has spewed as much as 184 million gal- lons since the rig connected to it

blew up in April and killed 11 work- ers. The developments have the mak- ings for an interesting week. “It could be the beginning of the end,” said Darryl Bourgoyne, direc- tor of Petroleum Engineering Research Lab at Louisiana State University. When it begins, crews will slowly

pump heavy mud through lines installed last month straight down the throat of the leaky well. If the mud forces the oil back into the massive underground reservoir and scientists are condent the pressure remains stable, then engineers can pump in fresh cement to seal it. “The only thing that separates the oil from the sea now is the valve. This puts thousands of feet of mud and cement in between,” said Eric Smith, associate director of the Tulane Energy Institute. “The idea is to have as many barriers as possi- ble between the ocean and the reser- voir. We’re adding an extra level of safety.” Officials may then begin the process of choking the underground reservoir feeding the well by pump- ing mud and then cement down an 18,000-foot relief well.

ing mud and then cement down an 18,000-foot relief well. REUTERS BP’s worker Randy Murry holds

REUTERS

BP’s worker Randy Murry holds up a sample of water taken from the Gulf of Mexico to be tested, while working on the Swamp Queen III skimmer near Venice,La.,Sunday.

Nation briefs

Chelsea Clinton weds at exclusive New York estate

RHINEBECK, N.Y. — It was high society inside and high security outside as Chelsea Clinton wed her longtime boyfriend at an elegant estate in a Hudson River village where several prominent guests were spotted beforehand, but the husband- and-wife-to-be stayed out of sight. The wedding site, a Beaux Arts riverside estate called Astor Courts, was sealed off from the general pub- lic. Bill Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton issued a statement announc- ing that their daughter exchanged vows Saturday evening with invest- ment banker Marc Mezvinsky, and a few photographs were later released

to media outlets.

“Today, we watched with great pride and overwhelming emotion as Chelsea and Marc wed in a beautiful ceremony at Astor Courts, surrounded by family and their close friends,” the Clintons

said. “We could not have asked for a more perfect day to celebrate the beginning of their life together, and we are so happy to welcome Marc into our family. On behalf of the newly- weds, we want to give special thanks

to the people of Rhinebeck for wel-

coming us and to everyone for their well-wishes on this special day.”

Grizzly cubs from deadly mauling were malnourished

BILLINGS, Mont. — Three griz- zly bear cubs whose mother killed one person and mauled two others in a late-night attack at a Montana campground were malnourished and still in their winter coats. The cubs have arrived at their new home at ZooMontana in Billings. Zoo executive director Jackie Worstell said Sunday the two female cubs and one male cub were under- weight, possibly explaining their mother’s unusually aggressive behavior. “It may be an indication of what happened,” Worstell said. “There’s obvious signs of stress and malnour- ishment. Maybe (the sow) was des- perate.”

Space station cooling system suddenly shuts down

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Half of the International Space Station’s cooling system suddenly shut down during the weekend, forc- ing the astronauts to power down equipment and face the likelihood of urgent spacewalking repairs. After huddling Sunday, NASA managers gave preliminary approval

for a pair of spacewalks, the rst of which would take place later this week.

U.S. has Iran strike plan

By Anne Gearan

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The U.S. military has a plan to attack Iran, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said Sunday, although he thinks a military strike is probably a bad idea. Not long after Adm. Mike Mullen’s aired on a Sunday talk show, the deputy chief of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard was quoted as saying there would be a strong Iranian response should the U.S. take military action against his country. Mullen, the highest ranking U.S.

military ofcer, often has warned that a strike on Iran would have seri- ous and unpredictable ripple effects around the Middle East. At the same time, Mullen said the risk of Iran’s developing a nuclear weapon is unacceptable, although he would not say which risk he thinks is worse. “I think the military options have been on the table and remain on the table,” Mullen said on “Meet the Press” on NBC. “It’s one of the options that the president has. Again, I hope we don’t get to that, but it’s an important option and it’s one that’s well understood.” The ofcial Iranian news agency

IRNA quoted Revolutionary Guard deputy chief Yadollah Javani as say- ing Sunday that security in the Persian Gulf would be jeopardized “if Americans commit the slightest mistake.” “The Persian Gulf is a strategic

region. If the security of this region is endangered, they will suffer loss- es too and our response will be

rm,” Javani said. Iran repeatedly has threatened to target the heart of Tel Aviv, the sec- ond-largest city in Israel, should the U.S. or Israel take military action against it. The U.S. and Iran are at odds over the goals of Iran’s nuclear program.

After 378 years, family farm goes up for sale

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DOVER, N.H. — In 1632, John Tuttle arrived from England to a set- tlement near the Maine-New Hampshire border, using a small land grant from King Charles I to start a farm. Eleven generations and 378 years later, his eld-weary descendants —

arthritic from picking fruits and veg- etables and battered by competition from supermarkets and pick-it-your- self farms — are selling their spread, which is among the oldest continuously operated family farms in America. “We’ve been here for 40 years, doing what we love to do,” said Lucy Tuttle, 65, who runs the 134-

acre farm with brother Will. “But we’re not able to work to our full capacity any longer, unfortunately.” Tuttle added that she and her brother and their sister have done their best “to lovingly discourage” their children from becoming gener- ation No. 12. “We would be sad- dling them with a considerable amount of debt,” she said.

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8 Monday Aug. 2, 2010

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Hundreds of wildfires break out in Russia

By Mikhail Metzel

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

VORONEZH, Russia — Hundreds of new res broke out

Sunday in Russian forests and elds that have been dried to a crisp by drought and record heat, but re-

ghters claimed success in bringing

some of the wildres raging around cities under control. The reghters got much-needed help from residents desperate to save their homes, who shoveled sand onto the ames and carted water in large plastic bottles. The wildres that began threaten- ing much of western Russia last

res that began threaten- ing much of western Russia last REUTERS Russia's Prime Minister Vladimir Putin

REUTERS

Russia's Prime Minister Vladimir Putin (L,front) visits the village of Verkhnaya Vereya,which was destroyed by fire,in Nizhny Novgorod Region.

week have killed 28 people and destroyed or damaged 77 towns or villages, the Emergencies Ministry said. Thousands of people have been evacuated from areas in the path of ames, but no deaths have been recorded since late Wednesday. Troops and volunteers have joined tens of thousands of reght- ers in combating the res, which blazed just outside Moscow and in several provinces east and south of the capital. The region around Voronezh, a city of 850,000 people about 300 miles (475 kilometers) south of Moscow, has been one of the worst

hit. Half of the 300 homes in the vil- lage of Maslovka were reduced to cinders. Emergencies Ministry spokes- woman Yelena Chernova said res in the Voronezh region were under control Sunday and no longer threatened any population centers. But woodlands on the edge of the city, about a mile (1.5 kilometers) from some houses, continued to burn. Firefighters sprayed water from hoses and dumped it from the air onto the blaze, while local resi- dents pitched in on the ground. Some 320 new res broke out Sunday, but 210 were extinguished, the Emergencies Ministry said.

Israel warns Hamas after rocket fire

By Aron Heller

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JERUSALEM — Israel’s prime minister issued a stern warning Sunday to Gaza’s Hamas rulers after a weekend of rocket attacks from the Palestinian territory on Israeli communities. Benjamin Netanyahu told his Cabinet that Israel holds the Islamic militant group responsible for the rare are-up in violence and would retaliate for any attack against its people. “I see the Hamas as directly responsible for any attack that comes from the Gaza Strip toward the state of Israel and the interna-

tional community should see it this way as well,” Netanyahu said. “Israel reserves the right to defend its citizens and we will continue to use all means to protect the people of Israel and the children of Israel.” The attacks, including a rocket red Friday at an Israeli city six miles (10 kilometers) from Gaza, caused damage but no injuries. No Palestinian group took responsibili- ty for the attacks. Israel responded with a series of airstrikes on militant targets in Gaza, including one that killed a senior commander of the Hamas military wing. Early Monday, a huge blast lev- eled the house of a Hamas com-

mander in the Deir el-Balah refugee camp in southern Gaza, wounding at least 32 people, according to Palestinian security ofcials. They said the blast was the result of an Israeli airstrike, but Israel’s military denied that, saying there was no Israeli activity in the area. The regional Hamas commander, Ala Adnaf, was missing along with another person, and rescue workers were digging through the rubble. The explosion badly damaged 12 nearby houses in the refugee camp, the ofcials said, speaking on cus- tomary condition of anonymity. Adnaf was known as a bomb maker. Often there are accidental explosions in bomb factories.

July deadliest month for Iraqis since 2008

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAGHDAD — New government gures in Iraq show July was the deadliest month in more than two years, pointing to a resilient insur- gency and a tenuous security situation as a monthslong deadlock over form-

ing a new government dragged on. The gures released late Saturday show that 535 people were killed last month, the highest since May 2008 when 563 were killed. The gures heighten concerns about Iraq’s precarious security as the U.S. is drawing down its forces in Iraq.

Iraq has been mired in a political deadlock for nearly five months since a March parliamentary elec- tion that failed to produce a clear winner. Insurgents are thought to be taking advantage of the impasse by stepping up attacks to try to destabi- lize the country.

World briefs

UNESCO adds 5 sites to the World Heritage List

SAO PAULO — UNESCO added five cultural sites to its World Heritage List on Sunday, including the Imperial Citadel of Thang Long- Hanoi in Vietnam. The citadel, built in the 11th cen- tury by the Viet Dynasty, became the 900th site listed as a World Heritage Property. With the other four sites added, the total increased to 904. The new sites are the historic monuments of Dengfeng in China, the archaeological site Sarazm in Tajikistan, the Episcopal city of Albi in France and a 17th-century canal ring in Amsterdam. On Saturday, UNESCO added nine sites to the list, including Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands, home to nuclear bomb testing in the 1940s and 1950s. UNESCO said the tests had “major consequences” on the geology and environment of the atoll and symbolized “the dawn of nuclear age. Also added to the list Saturday were the Turaif District in Saudi Arabia; Australia’s penal colony

sites; the Jantar Mantar astronomi- cal observation site in India; a shrine in Ardabil, Iran; the Tabriz historic bazaar complex, also in Iran; and the historic villages of Hahoe and Yangdong in South Korea.

Eight more protesters killed in Indian Kashmir

SRINAGAR, India — Four people were gunned down Sunday by secu- rity forces who opened re on thou- sands of protesters and another four civilians were killed in a blast at a police station, bringing the death toll from weeks of clashes in increasing- ly violent Indian Kashmir to 31.

Turkish military could promote charged officers

ANKARA, Turkey — Turkey’s military has decided that 11 gener- als and admirals charged with con- spiring to overthrow the government are eligible for promotion, several newspapers reported Sunday, citing unidentied military ofcials. Promotions for the ofcers, all of who still remain free despite arrest warrants for them, could worsen tensions between the historically secular military and Turkey’s Islamic-rooted government.

for them, could worsen tensions between the historically secular military and Turkey’s Islamic-rooted government.
for them, could worsen tensions between the historically secular military and Turkey’s Islamic-rooted government.
for them, could worsen tensions between the historically secular military and Turkey’s Islamic-rooted government.
for them, could worsen tensions between the historically secular military and Turkey’s Islamic-rooted government.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Monday Aug. 2, 2010

9

Locals lead the way

T his is a discouraging time for those who want to address climate change in

a meaningful way on the interna-

tional, national and state level. Failure to reach an international agreement in Copenhagen last year, followed by the recent decision of the U.S. Senate to delay a Democrat-sponsored cap-and-trade bill are steps in the wrong direc- tion. Meanwhile, this November, Californians will decide whether to adopt a Texas oil company-spon- sored initiative to halt the state’s groundbreaking law to cut emis- sions. Assembly Bill 32 requires the state to cut emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases 25 percent by 2020. Valero Energy Corporation and Tesoro are funding Proposition 23 which puts AB32 on hold until the state’s unemployment rate drops to a xed level which may not be achievable. The meas- ure would also kill competition and jobs from California’s clean-tech- nology companies. Opponents say the sponsors are among the top 10 polluters in our state. The governor and former U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz are against the ini- tiative, as are most Democrats and environmentalists. Even so, other oil company sponsored initiatives have recently been successful because of expensive and deceptive television and radio commercials. *** So it was a pleasant surprise to be part of a well-attended meeting at the San Mateo City Hall last week to see what we as individuals could do to help. The city of San Mateo, according to Councilman David Lim, is leading the way with its climate action plan for fall 2010. There is a build it green rat- ing system where points are award- ed for eco-friendly building ele- ments such as low-ow toilets and high-efciency shower heads. There are residential loans to assist single family homeowners to repair deteriorated private sewer laterals. The California First program pro-

Meanwhile, the city of Burlingame is considering a

car share program for its undesignated fleet (city cars which aren’t for a specific purpose such as police, fire, public works) to save money and energy.

vides low-interest funding for envi- ronmental improvements. Residents can obtain loans with a payback over 20 years for such energy savers as solar panels and water efciency. PG&E offers rebates on energy efcient products. The audi- ence was told that every minute you shorten your shower you can save up to 75 gallons of water per month. And you can save more by not letting the faucet run when you brush your teeth or clean dishes before loading the dishwasher. Raphael Reyes, director of the Bay Area Climate Collective, sounded upbeat when he said we were now moving from the impossible to the inevitable. More and more auto manufacturers are planning or are already offering electric cars. *** Meanwhile, the city of Burlingame is considering a car share program for its undesignated eet (city cars which aren’t for a specic purpose such as police, re, public works) to save money and energy. Enterprise, the car rental company, offers energy-ef- cient cars to be housed at designat- ed pods. Employees would have access to the cars as needed. The city would no longer have to buy and maintain a large eet. Burlingame Vice Mayor Terry Nagel invited Enterprise to explain its program to interested communi- ty leaders. Attendees included Burlingame Councilman Jerry Deal; Kari Brinley, executive direc- tor, Sustainable San Mateo County; Crispin Delgado, San Mateo County Health System; Supervisor Carole Groom; Linda Koelling, vice mayor of Foster City and Chair of the Peninsula Congestion Relief Alliance; Heyward

Robinson, Menlo Park councilman, and Christine Grubl, executive director of the Alliance. The group discussed the role of car sharing in housing near transit as a way to lessen trafc by offering a conven- ient substitute for driving your own automobile to work. *** A drive or bike ride along San Mateo’s Saratoga Drive which bor- ders Fiesta Gardens on one side

and the county fairground on the other, shows how new development can, if done right, improve the city. Saratoga Drive is a beautiful street lined with trees and landscaping. And it has no potholes. What’s it like on the other side of the wall? How is the older neighborhood being maintained by its residents? Saratoga Drive connects to Delaware Street and as you head north, you pass another attractive stretch of landscaping and fencing (developer funded public benet) surrounding the 19th Avenue/Park neighborhood. Again, I wonder what is happening on the other side of the fence. How is another old neighborhood holding up? There are new developments planned on land across the street on Delaware Street. Both are in the city’s rail corridor plan and are located next to the Caltrain Hayward Park sta- tion. The Hines project was recent- ly approved by the council. Five people spoke, all in support. What

a change from previous meetings

where neighbors were concerned about the size and impact. Where Kmart sits, another development, this one expected to be LEED cer- tied, is also heading for approval. My guess is that these two projects will transform the area into one of the city’s cleanest and best places

Confessions of a bibliophile

“W hen I get a little money, I buy books. If any is

left, I buy food and clothes.” — Erasmus. Amazon.com, one of the nation’s largest booksellers, announced Monday that for the last three months, sales of books for its e- reader, the Kindle, outnumbered sales of hardcover books, accord- ing to the July 19 New York Times. I hadn’t paid attention to any- thing like an e-book until one of my sons got an iPad when it rst

came out. The next day, he brought

it to a family gathering where, of

course, it was the center of atten- tion — especially for those who are very impressed by anything technological. All of the things it can do are amazing, but what caught my eye was how you can read a book on it. Being the biblio- phile that I am, I watched carefully as they turned the pages and espe- cially noted that improvised curl as you swipe the glass and it reveals the next page. Interesting, but I decided, for many reasons that zipped through my mind as I was watching, that it is not for me. For one, after all these years of the company of a book in my hands while I read, the feel of the cover, and the exibility of the pages and writing in the margins or highlighting passages that I may want to refer to again

and even writing page numbers and related subjects on the last blank page to make it easy to nd them,

I were to change to an iPad, I’d

feel like a traitor. I go along with Nicholas Carr, author of “The Shallows — What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains,” who wrote:

“The experience of reading tends to be better with a book. Words stamped on a page in black ink are easier to read than words formed of pixels on a backlit screen. You can read a dozen or a hundred printed pages without suffering the eye fatigue that often results from even

a brief stretch of online reading.

Navigating a book is simpler, and, as software programmers say, more intuitive.”

I build a relationship with a good

book. As I listen to what the author is telling me, I feel I am learning a lot about him/her and that I have added to my education. A book is an entity — something I can hold and rife through and add to the collection on the shelf for future reference. Once I’ve read it, it’s like a friend that will always be there on the shelf when needed.

When the words are on a screen, they seem to have little substance — almost ethereal — gone with the blink of an eye. As Carr wrote: “… the world of the screen, as we’re already coming to understand, is a very different place from the world of the page. A

if

new intellectual ethic is taking hold. The pathways in our brains are once again being rerouted.”

“Once again” meaning like during the 15th century when the Gutenberg printing press eventually made books available to ordinary people, some who thought the process “sufciently remarkable to suggest supernatural intervention.” “The words in books didn’t just strengthen people’s ability to think abstractly, they enriched people’s experiences of the physical world, the world outside the book.” — Carr. It started a cultural revolu-

tions that has tremendously shaped the future of mankind. Books have always been a big part of my life — especially since I

began writing columns over 25 years ago. It’s very satisfying when

I come across a particularly rivet-

ing book that is hard to put down and may be fodder for a column (Yes, there are non-ction books that qualify). So I have a large col- lection (My husband buys wine. I

buy books. Hard to say who bene-

ts more). Those books I do not

wish to add to my shelves are donated to the library. When it comes to electronic books, I doubt if I’ll ever get used to the idea. I’ve always had a hard time adjusting to newfangled gadg-

ets. Hard to believe, but it took me

a while to convince myself to use

Word on the computer instead of

to convince myself to use Word on the computer instead of to live. Some of the

to live. Some of the neighborhoods members resent the new and want to maintain the old. But how is the old doing?

*** Thanks to Anna Kuhre, chair of San Mateo United Homeowners Association, neighborhoods now have a way to monitor their own with a little help from others. The Neighborhood Courtesy Notices Program trains residents how to “inspect” their own turf as well as other city neighborhoods. Central Neighborhood was the rst Walk About. Residents in Baywood, North Central and 19th Avenue/Park showed up to issue courtesy notices ( if your house and front yard were looking unkept). The next neighborhood to host the citizen inspection will be 19th Avenue/Park. The training meeting will be held on Sept. 9. In conjunc- tion with the Walk About, code enforcement does a bilingual mass mailing of the Ten Do’s and Don’ts. “The Outstanding Home Maintenance Awards sponsored by SMUHA aligns itself with the Neighborhood Courtesy Notices

Program. We want to recognize and commend people for keeping the standards high,” said Kuhre.

Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjournal.com.

Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjournal.com. pounding on my electric typewriter. And the Internet was

pounding on my electric typewriter. And the Internet was something else again. Like Gutenberg’s printing press, the computer has spawned a new, but in nitely more prodigious, rev- olution. The way we look for infor- mation and communicate (just to

name a few of its marvelous attrib- utes that are “sufciently remark- able to suggest supernatural inter- vention”), is truly magical. But when it comes to turning pages of a book, I’ll let my son keep his lat- est electronic wonder. I tend to go

along with Cicero who said, “If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”

Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written close to 500 columns for various local newspapers. Her e-

mail address is

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10 Monday Aug. 2, 2010

business

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Business brief

Ruling expected today in AC Transit labor dispute

OAKLAND — A judge is expected to issue a ruling Monday in a contract dispute involving drivers and manage- ment for Oakland-based AC Transit. The union representing drivers asked Alameda County Superior Court Judge Judith Ford on Friday for an injunction that would stop manage- ment from continuing to impose a new contract until an arbitrator can weigh in on the dispute. Transit district of- cials imposed the new contract last month after three months of talks failed to reach a new labor deal.

three months of talks failed to reach a new labor deal. More bailouts for banks? Daniel

More bailouts for banks?

Daniel Wagner

That’s what happens when banks run out of capital — the money they must keep in case of unexpected losses. Banks with too little capital can be

banks in the hardest-hit areas, it can be nearly impossible to recover once too many loans sour. Yet the bill would require that banks be protected against “discrimination based on geography.” It says the money must be available to lenders in areas with high unemployment. Such banks are “only as strong as the loans they make in their communities,” said Williams, now a finance professor at Boston University. Also, the government knows far less about these lenders than about Wall

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — People are fed

up

with bank bailouts that risk taxpay-

shuttered to protect the taxpayer-

er

billions. The government’s apparent

insured deposits they hold. Or, under this proposal, many could get bailouts. The new money would be available to banks that are short on cash. It’s supposedly reserved for banks deemed “viable.” But regulators won’t consider whether banks are viable now. They’ll envision how

strong a bank would be after receiving

solution: call them something else. Congress is at work on a new pro- gram that would send $30 billion to struggling community banks, in a process similar to the huge federal bailouts of big banks during the finan- cial crisis. This time, money is more likely to disappear as a result of bank failures or fraud. Two weeks ago, President Barack Obama declared an end to taxpayer bailouts when he signed a sweeping overhaul of financial rules. In his weekly radio and Internet address on

Saturday, he described the new bailout program as “a common-sense” plan that would give badly needed lending help to small-business owners to expand and hire. At its core, the program is another bank rescue. Some lenders need the bailouts to survive. Others could take the bailouts and crumble anyway.

a

fresh infusion cash from taxpayers

Street megabanks. Many community banks are overseen by state regulators struggling under budget cuts and limit- ed expertise. Many are ill-equipped to monitor banks during a crisis, Williams said. The administration says the bill is not a bailout, but a way to spur lend- ing to small businesses and bolster the shaky economic recovery. The idea is that businesses want bank loans, but banks don’t have enough money to lend. And they say the pro- gram has to include riskier banks in order to work.

and private investors. If the bank would become viable because of the bailout, the government can make it happen. “This is a below-the-radar bailout for community banks,” said Mark Williams, formerly a bank examiner with the Federal Reserve. “What we lack here is oversight and true account- ability.” He said the potential costs are far greater than the program’s impact on small businesses. The change for them would barely be noticed, he said. Small banks are struggling partly because the economy is so weak. For

BlackBerry services banned

By Adam Schreck

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — The United Arab Emirates outlined plans Sunday to block BlackBerry e-mail,

messaging and Web browsing services in

a crackdown that could jeopardize

efforts to establish the country as an international business hub. The government cited a potential security threat because encrypted data sent on the devices is moved abroad, where it cannot be monitored for illegal activity. But the decision — quickly followed by a similar move in Saudi Arabia — raises questions about whether the con- servative Gulf nations are trying to fur-

ther control content they deem political-

ly or morally objectionable.

BlackBerry phones have a strong fol- lowing in the region, not only among foreign professionals in commercial centers such as Dubai and Abu Dhabi,

but also among youth who see their rel-

atively secure communication channels

as a way to avoid unwanted government

attention. “The authorities have used a variety of arguments, like it can be used by terror- ists” to justify the crackdown, said Christopher Davidson, a professor at the University of Durham in Britain, who has written extensively about the region. “Yes that’s true, but it can also be used by civil society campaigners and activists.”

The UAE’s decision will prevent hun-

dreds of thousands of BlackBerry users from accessing e-mail and the Web on their handsets starting in October. It’s unclear whether the ban will extend to foreign visitors with roaming services, including the roughly 100,000 passen- gers who pass through the region’s

busiest airport in Dubai each day. The ban risks further damaging the UAE’s reputation as a relatively easy place to do business. Dubai, one of seven hereditary sheik- doms in the federation, in particular has sought to turn itself into a global nance, trade and tourism hub. But its reputation has been tarnished by a credit crisis that has left the emirate more than $100 bil- lion in debt.

that has left the emirate more than $100 bil- lion in debt. Junk bonds start to

Junk bonds start to look like gems

By Dave Carpenter

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — A sideways stock market has investors searching for other places to make a decent return on their money. And junk bonds, for better or worse, are starting to look like gems to many. The appeal is easy to understand. Junk bonds, known more politely as high-yield bonds, are bonds with very low credit ratings that corporations pay more interest on so they can attract investors. As of last week, they were yielding 8.34 percent, down from 9 percent earlier in July. That number is mighty enticing at a time when the Standard & Poor’s 500 index is up just 1 percent for 2010 and down 22 percent from a decade ago. And a murky economic outlook hampers prospects of a strong rebound any time soon. Virtually nowhere else can you get 8 percent back on your money these days. The going rate for a 10-year U.S. Treasury note last week was 3.05 percent, low by historical standards. It’s not much better for investment-grade, or more highly rated, corporate bonds: 3.8 percent, as measured by the Barclay’s Capital U.S. Credit Bond Index. Return-starved investors have noticed. High-yield mutual funds have seen nearly $3 billion in inows over the past three weeks, according to Lipper FMI, a unit of Thomson Reuters. But investor beware: They’re called junk for a reason. Bonds below investment grade, or those with S&P ratings below BBB and Moody’s ratings below Baa, are much likelier to default. Not only that, junk bonds act more like stocks than other bonds do. That’s because their prices are closely tied to the cor- porations that issue them and their ability to service debts. So if you are considering adding them to your portfolio to diversify it, think again.

GIANTS SWEEP: CAIN STRONG AS GIANTS TAKE THREE FROM DODGERS >> PAGE 13 Monday, Aug.
GIANTS SWEEP: CAIN STRONG AS GIANTS TAKE THREE FROM DODGERS >> PAGE 13
Monday, Aug. 2, 2010
<< Biffle wins at Pocono, page 12
• Tseng wins Women’s British Open, page 16

Sleepy against Seattle

Earthquakes fall to the Sounders 1-0

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Seldom will a team play a “must- win” game in the middle of their season. But often there are games that a team will look back on at season’s end as a turning point — good or bad. The San Jose Earthquakes had such a game Saturday night, and looked flat against the Seattle Sounders, this after playing some inspired soccer against the western

conference leading L.A Galaxy a little more than a week before, dropping a 1-0 decision to the visi- tors. The loss keeps the Quakes at 23 points with 14 games left to play — Seattle jumps their west rivals in the points standings with 25. “I thought it was our worst per- formance this season, denitely,” said Earthquakes head coach Frank Yallop. “From the opening whistle we didn’t seem to have a real idea and some scrappiness. And it was, really disappointing.”

The Sounders, who came in hav- ing played three more games than the Quakes, looked like the team in need of the three points. From the on-set of play they came out and attacked the Quakes, leaving San Jose to react and counter an aggres- sive Seattle team — it’s a style that Yallop acknowledged does not suit the Earthquakes well, especially at home. “We just didn’t move the ball quickly,” Yallop said. “We were

See QUAKES, Page 12

quickly,” Yallop said. “We were See QUAKES , Page 12 PHOTO COURTESY OF SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES

San Jose lost to Seattle over the weekend.

Azarenka beats Sharapova

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

STANFORD — Victoria Azarenka looks forward to some cake and ice cream and a quick visit with friends and family in Arizona. She nally has some time to enjoy her 21st birthday. No. 8 seed Azarenka beat No. 5 Maria Sharapova 6-4, 6-1 on Sunday to win the Bank of the West Classic, her rst title of the season. “This is one of the best, denite- ly,” said the young Belarusian. “I’m really excited to compete with so many great players. It’s exciting to go out and show my spirit.” After the nal point, Azarenka dropped her racket, covered her eyes and walked slowly to the net to shake hands with Sharapova. She went over to hug her coach and returned to the court to acknowledge the crowd. It was a subdued reaction, although she smiled all the way through the awards ceremony and her press conference. “I try to dig myself into the court,” he said. “I’m changing my game so as not to have the same patterns all the time. The most important thing is to be thinking on the court.” In the doubles final, Lindsay Davenport and fellow American Liezel Huber beat Chan Yung-jan of Taiwan and Zheng Jie of China 7-5, 6-7 (8), 10-8. It was Davenport’s rst WTA vic- tory since winning singles and dou-

See TENNIS, Page 12

tory since winning singles and dou- See TENNIS , Page 12 REUTERS Victoria Azarenka of Belarus

REUTERS

Victoria Azarenka of Belarus returns the ball to Russia's Maria Sharapova during their Stanford Classic women’s singles final match in Stanford Sunday.

A’s lose to White Sox

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Gavin Floyd is turning into a sure thing for White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen. Floyd carried a perfect game into the sixth inning before settling for another outstanding outing, leading Chicago to a 4-1 victory over the Oakland Athletics on Sunday. Brent Lillibridge hit a three-run triple for Chicago, which has won six of seven. The White Sox also improved to 20-2 in their last 22 games at U.S. Cellular Field. Floyd (7-8) allowed one run and four hits in seven-plus innings, improving to 5-2 with a 1.06 ERA in his last 11 starts. The 6-foot-6 right- hander hasn’t allowed more than two earned runs in a game since a loss to Texas on June 2. “This kid, like we all know, every time he’s on, he’s tough,” Guillen said. “He was facing a pretty good one, too.” Oakland starter Gio Gonzalez (9- 7), who was drafted by the White Sox in the rst round of the 2004 draft, pitched eight innings for his rst career complete game. He had a career-high 11 strikeouts without a walk, and yielded six hits. “You look at it bittersweet,” Gonzalez said. “I threw a complete game, we battled all the way through and kept the team in the game. The team fought all the way to the end.

See A’S, Page 13

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12 Monday Aug. 2, 2010

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Biffle wins for injured Roush at Pocono

By Dan Gelston

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONG POND, Pa. — As he closed in on the nish line, Greg Bife knew the only person worthy of dedicating this victory to at Pocono Raceway. “This one’s for Jack!” he said over the radio. Was it ever. With Jack Roush recovering in the Mayo Clinic, Bife raced to vic- tory in an often-delayed Sprint Cup race at Pocono Raceway on Sunday to snap a 64-race winless streak and take the checkered flag for his injured team owner. “I have to tell you, when it got to be ve to go, I started thinking about,” Bife said. “I started think- ing, this race is meant to be.” Bife never doubted he would win a Cup race again even as his oh- fer reached nearly two years. He hadn’t won since the rst two races in the 2008 Chase for the Cup championship. But with Roush in the Mayo Clinic for injuries sus- tained in a plane crash in Wisconsin,

for injuries sus- tained in a plane crash in Wisconsin, Greg Biffle Biffle found Victory Lane.

Greg Biffle

Biffle found Victory Lane. “We know he’s watching,” Bife said. “It’s been really tough. We worked so hard.” It was also the

rst win of the

season for both a Ford and Roush Fenway Racing. Tony Stewart was second and Roush driver Carl Edwards was third. Kevin Harvick and Denny Hamlin, who won the last two Pocono races, rounded out the top

ve. Edwards spoke with Roush on Sunday morning and said his boss sounded in good spirits. “He was Jack,” Edwards said. “Don’t mess anything up. Don’t wreck. He’s been through a lot this last week. He really needed that vic- tory. That’s pretty cool. I’m sure he’s really hard to handle for all those nurses in the hospital.” Roush released a statement call- ing it a “proud day” for the entire

organization. “They’ve done a wonderful job and this is just the beginning of the rewards that have resulted from all of their hard work,” he said. Bife said Roush called him in Victory Lane and the owner said, “he never met somebody that had the will to win like I do.”

“I’m glad he thinks of me like that,” Bife said. “No matter how grim the outcome can be, I’ll still be digging.” Bife’s crew kept the same car after driving the No. 16 Ford to a season-high third-place nish last week at Indianapolis. That nish put

Bife in 11th place in the points standings and now he’s strongly positioned himself with ve races for a spot in the 12-driver eld for the championship chase. He won Chase races at New Hampshire and Dover in 2008 before falling into this winless drought. Biffle was winless last year for the rst full season of his career. He won’t be shut out in back-to- back seasons. “The whole company needed it,”

Bife crew chief Greg Erwin said. “I can’t really explain what this means. I know (Roush) is with us. This is a brand new car at Indianapolis and we brought it here because we liked it so much.” The start of the 500-mile race was delayed by rain, then had two lengthy red ag stops that totaled nearly 50 minutes. Elliott Sadler and Kurt Busch both walked away from scary wrecks that knocked them out of the race. Sadler and Bush were the bene- ciaries of NASCAR’s safer Car of Tomorrow after two violent wrecks. Sadler was forced to lay down on the triangle track and suffered a sore chest and stomach after smacking the inside wall. The engine on his No. 19 Ford was ripped from the body and smoldered nearby. He called it his hardest hit ever in a race car. It came a day after he was the Trucks Series race winner here. Busch’s No. 2 Dodge was hit from behind on a bump drafting attempt by four-time defending series champion Jimmie Johnson.

Busch slammed into the wall, skid- ded along the grass, and smashed into an ineld barrier. That brought out the rst red ag, for 28 minutes, 46 seconds. The second one was for rain and lasted 17:20. The start of the race was delayed 36 minutes by rain. Bife was one of the harshest crit- ics of the track in a recent Sports Illustrated story, saying “they’re going to kill somebody there.” Track officials have promised changes — like adding more SAFER barriers along the inside wall — in time for next year’s races. The track was deemed by some unsafe after an accident in the June race involving Kasey Kahne Jeff Gordon, who was sixth, slammed the track and said improvements can’t come soon enough. “I think there’s a time when we’ve got to step up the technology safety at certain facilities,” Gordon said. “We’ve seen two incidences here this year, and I think it’s going to be a wake-up call for some improve- ment.”

TENNIS

Continued from page 11

bles at Memphis in 2008. As for Azarenka, her birthday was Saturday and she wanted to delay any celebration until after the tournament. She’s not holding back now. “I want to see my friends and family if I have time,” said Azarenka, who opens with American teenager Melanie Oudin in the San Diego tournament that begins Monday. “I want a cake. I want some ice cream, some- thing beside cinnamon.” Azarenka, who earned $107,000 for her win, beat Sharapova for the rst time in three years and the rst time on hard court. They have split four career meetings. “I tried to start aggressive right away and not let her come in,” Azarenka said. “When she gets on a roll it’s hard to keep up. I had to be on top of her every moment and not give her the chance to come back.” She won 6 of 11 break points and was again effective with her return game, winning 57

percent of her total return points, including 12 of 15 on second return points. “She’s one of the most consistent,” Sharapova said of Azarenka’s return game. “She gets a lot of balls back and every ball is heavy.” Azarenka said it’s more out of necessity. “I have to go for my return,” she said. “I cannot step back; I have to attack, attack the serve. I keep pushing myself forward on every point.” Azarenka, who won her fourth career title, will be No. 12 in the world when the rankings are released Monday. Sharapova, who was looking to become the rst woman with three titles this year, rises to No. 13. “She’s been in the top 10 and has had some great wins in her career already,” Sharapova said. “I started making unforced errors off her returns and she stepped it up, took advantage and started to get on a roll.” Sharapova is taking the week off and returns to make her debut in Cincinnati. “I don’t think I served that smart,” she said. “I need a higher percentage of rst serves, in general and particularly against her. I’m sure I’ll be playing here many more times.”

QUAKES

Continued from page 11

reacting to everything rather than anticipating. There’s a big difference there. You got to anticipate and be on the move and read plays rather than wait then react to wherever the ball goes. It’s too late. We were very static and on our heels most of the game.” Seattle pressured the Quakes from the start of the match but maybe the moment of the game came early for San Jose when Cornell Glen was one-on-one against Seattle keeper Kasey Keller on the left side of the 18 but came up short on a shot hit right at him. San Jose didn’t know it at the time, but it would turn out to be their best chance to score. The Sounders looked like the superior side throughout and their frequent knocking of the San Jose goal netted them the lead in the 26th minute when Fredy Montero smoothly headed in a Sanna Nyassi cross for the only score of the match. Earthquakes keeper Jon Busch was no match for Montero’s header as the mid-

elder made a run down the heart of the San

Jose defense and struck the ball with no oppo- sition. It was one of those goals that looked too easy. To Busch’s credit the San Jose keeper was the man of the match for his team. Seattle had seven shots on goal for the game — many of which Busch had to fantastically push to the side to prevent the match from getting out of reach. Still, it was like Yallop said — San Jose had no answer for the Seattle defense or mideld in the rst half. Substitutions in the second half looked to solidify San Jose a bit. Up top Ryan Johnson replaced an absent Scott Sealy and in the mid- eld Arturo Alvarez came and netted the Earthquakes with a couple of opportunities. Chris Wondolowski, who came into the match leading San Jose with six goals, was brought on in the 74th minute as well. But it was to no avail. The Quakes did have some chances late, most noticeably on a right- footed shot by Bobby Convey that sailed a lit- tle high. “Tonight we didn’t do anything well really,” Yallop said. “It’s a massive game for us (and) we just laid down and died to be honest,” he said.

well really,” Yallop said. “It’s a massive game for us (and) we just laid down and
well really,” Yallop said. “It’s a massive game for us (and) we just laid down and
well really,” Yallop said. “It’s a massive game for us (and) we just laid down and

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday Aug. 2, 2010

13

Giants complete sweep of Dodgers

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Matt Cain pitched four-hit ball into the eighth inning for the surging San Francisco Giants, earning his rst career win against the Los Angeles Dodgers in a 2-0 victory Sunday night that completed a three-game sweep. Edgar Renteria hit a two-run triple in the sixth for San Francisco, which moved to 8-2 in its last 10 games. Cain (9-8) allowed four hits in 7 2-3 innings, improving to 3-0 with a 1.52 ERA in his last four starts. The right-hander also raised his career record against San Francisco’s longtime rival to 1-8 with a 3.94 ERA in 15 games. Newly acquired Javier Lopez got the last out of the eighth and Brian Wilson nished the four-hitter for his 31st save. The Dodgers, who made three trades in the nal four days before Saturday’s deadline, were shut out for the 11th time this season. They scored two runs over the nal 18 innings of the series and dropped eight games behind rst-place San Diego in the NL West. It’s the Giants’ rst sweep of the Dodgers since April 24-26, 2007, and their rst at home since 2004. The timing couldn’t have been better. San Francisco maintained its two-game lead over Cincinnati in the wild-card race and stayed 1 1/2 games back of the Padres. Cain was the rst pitcher in San Francisco history to lose his rst eight decisions against the

history to lose his fi rst eight decisions against the ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL Matt Cain led

ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL

Matt Cain led the surging Giants to a sweep of the Dodgers in San Francisco Sunday.

Dodgers, including a 4-2 setback on June 29 when he allowed four runs in ve innings. Cain was much better this time around, facing four batters over the minimum before giving way to the

bullpen. He allowed just four sin- gles while throwing a season-high 124 pitches and the Dodgers only managed to get one runner to third base. Scott Podsednik led off the fourth

with an in eld single, stole second and took third on a groundout but was stranded when Cain retired Dodgers newcomer Ryan Theriot on a comebacker and got Rafael Furcal to y out.

Lopez, acquired from Pittsburgh on Saturday, got the ball to Wilson, who struck out two in his rst game since he was hampered by back spasms Wednesday. Clayton Kershaw (10-6) allowed six hits in seven innings for the Dodgers. His lone mistake came in the sixth after Pat Burrell hit a one-out double and Aaron Rowand was intentionally walked. Renteria hit a 1-0 pitch into the gap in left-center and center fielder Matt Kemp appeared to momentarily lose sight of ball in the early evening shad- ows, allowing it to roll to the fence as both runners scored. Kershaw had allowed only three runs in 13 previous innings against the Giants this season. The Dodgers nished 1-5 on their six-game road trip. NOTES: LHP Ted Lilly will make his Dodgers debut Tuesday in Los Angeles against San Diego. Lilly, who was drafted by the Dodgers in 1996, was acquired from the Chicago Cubs before the

SS

trade

Rafael Furcal batted third for the rst time this season after hitting in the leadoff spot most of the

Renteria’s triple was the 28th of his All three games of the series sold out and drew 128,651 fans total, the largest attendance for a three-game set at AT&T Park this Nine of the Giants’ 10 runs in the series came with two Theriot went hitless in four at-bats with two strikeouts in his rst game with Los Angeles.

Dodgers

A’S

Continued from page 11

We didn’t give up and we stayed swinging.” Floyd walked Cliff Pennington with none out in the sixth for Oakland’s rst baserunner. He then surrendered a one-out single to Matt Carson. Two more singles for Rajai

Davis and Daric Barton cut Chicago’s lead to 4-1 and left the bases loaded. But Floyd struck out Jack Cust and got Kevin Kouzmanoff to ground out, limiting the damage. “I kind of go out there and expect the pitcher’s going to bring their ’A’ game, no matter who it is,” Floyd said. “He pitched real well today. Fortunately we got the four runs off him. “You just try to think that they’re

throwing a no-hitter no matter what, you know? You’ve got to go out there and try to make the same pitches,” Floyd added. Carlos Quentin hit a one-out sin- gle in the fth for Chicago’s rst baserunner against Gonzalez. Ramon Castro then reached on an ineld hit and Gonzalez hit Andruw Jones with two out to load the bases. Lillibridge, playing second in place of Gordon Beckham, followed with a hard liner to right eld that

got by a diving Carson before rolling to the fence. Juan Pierre added a bunt single to make it 4-0. “A game like that was just a lot of fun,” Lillibridge said. Carson said he felt bad for Gonzalez. “He threw a great game,” he said. “That was the only hiccup and I was part of it. It doesn’t feel good but it was an aggressive play and if I would have caught it, it would have been great. That’s what happens.”

Floyd was backed by Chicago’s strong bullpen. Matt Thornton induced a double-play ball by Barton in the eighth and J.J. Putz struck out Kouzmanoff to end the inning. Bobby Jenks struck out two in a perfect ninth for his 22nd save in 24 opportunities. NOTES: Beckham Oakland C Kurt Suzuki had the day off after only missing two games in July. He nished the month hitting

.191.

Oakland C Kurt Suzuki had the day off after only missing two games in July. He
Oakland C Kurt Suzuki had the day off after only missing two games in July. He

14 Monday Aug. 2, 2010

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Raider rookie eager to start hitting

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NAPA — After four days of lim- ited contact drills, the Oakland Raiders will hit for the rst time Monday. Rookie Lamarr Houston can’t wait. Houston was one of the Raiders’ most noticeable players during off- season workouts, as much for his frequent are-ups with teammates as for his play. Don’t expect much change when the pads go on. “That’s just how I am,” Houston said Sunday, taking a break from the team’s two-a-day workouts. “I

taking a break from the team’s two-a-day workouts. “I love the game and I love to

love the game and I love to play. Until they tell me not to play, I’m going to go out there and play to the fullest.” That attitude — and a need to

plug one of the NFL’s weakest run defenses — is precisely why the Raiders made Houston the 44th overall pick in April’s draft. Since 2002, Oakland hasn’t n- ished higher than 22nd against the

Lamarr Houston

run. Over the past seven seasons, the Raiders are allowing a league- worst 143.7 yards per game along with 146 rushing touchdowns. Last season they were 29th in run defense, allowing 155.5 yards per game. That has been a big factor in the team’s run of seven consecutive seasons with at least 11 losses, a league record for futility. Coach Tom Cable and defensive coordinator John Marshall have wasted no time throwing the rookie into the mix. Houston opened train- ing camp as Oakland’s starting left defensive end, lining up alongside

ve-time Pro Bowl defensive line- man Richard Seymour. “I ask (him) everything I can ask,” Houston said. “He’s been in the league for a long time and he has so many Super Bowl rings. Anything I can ask, I ask him dur- ing meetings and after meeting. Sometimes I just sit down with him and ask him about techniques and stuff.” The Raiders focused on improv- ing their run defense during the off- season. The used their rst-round pick on middle linebacker Rolando McClain and immediately selected him to be a starter. They also added

veteran defensive tackle John Henderson and franchised Seymour. Cable didn’t rule out Houston playing as much as McClain, either. “I don’t see why not,” Cable said. “Certainly, we’ll nd out as we go. But that’s why we picked him, really.” Houston played primarily defen- sive tackle in college, though he was an end during his rst two years at Texas. Raiders scouts were impressed by his athleticism — Houston is a former high school running back — and it didn’t take long for his teammates to come to the same conclusion.

is a former high school running back — and it didn’t take long for his teammates
is a former high school running back — and it didn’t take long for his teammates
is a former high school running back — and it didn’t take long for his teammates
is a former high school running back — and it didn’t take long for his teammates
is a former high school running back — and it didn’t take long for his teammates
is a former high school running back — and it didn’t take long for his teammates

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday Aug. 2, 2010

15

Langer wins U.S.Senior Open title

By Tim Booth

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAMMAMISH, Wash. — Bernhard Langer was more than willing to be the villain if it meant winning the U.S. Senior Open. Playing in an atmosphere more suited for a Ryder Cup than the nal round of a major, Langer was undeterred by a partisan crowd that was rooting hard for hometown hero Fred Couples. The German shot a bogey-free 3- under 67 on Sunday, took advantage of Couples’ one critical mistake and com- pleted a daunting trans-Atlantic double by winning his second straight Champions Tour major. A week after winning the Senior

British Open title at Carnoustie, Langer

nished at 8 under for the tournament at

Sahalee Country Club. He fought off jet lag and had to tune out crowded gal- leries hoping Couples could pull out victory just 20 miles east of where he grew up.

“It’s never much fun, but I’ve had it before. When you play in the same group with Tiger Woods or Jack Nicklaus or Arnold Palmer or any of the big names in America, certainly the

Palmer or any of the big names in America, certainly the Bernhard Langer Ryder Cups, I’ve

Bernhard

Langer

Ryder Cups, I’ve played 10 Ryder Cups, five on American soil, you get a lot more of this,” Langer said. “So I knew what was coming, which doesn’t make it any easier.” Langer became

the rst German to win any U.S. Golf Association champi- onship and the rst Champions Tour player to win back-to-back majors since Tom Watson took the Senior British and JELD-WEN Tradition in 2003. But Watson didn’t travel eight time zones and win his titles on consecutive weekends like Langer, and with a mas-

sive audience rooting for his playing partner. “They were denitely against me and for Freddy,” Langer said. While Langer could take extra satis- faction in overcoming the towering trees of Sahalee and the partisan crowd, Couples was again left with a twinge of disappointment playing a major cham- pionship at home. At the 1998 PGA Championship at

Sahalee, Couples stumbled through the

rst round and nished tied for 13th.

This time, he put himself in prime posi- tion for his rst major title on the Champions Tour taking the lead with a birdie at No. 1 Sunday. Then came the second, and gone was any realistic chance of Couples winning the tournament. It was the easiest hole on the course all week, a par 5 at 503 yards. For the

rst time, Couples laid up with his sec-

ond after pushing his tee shot right and deciding not to chance a hybrid from the

rst cut of rough. The layup left him about 65 yards to the pin for his third. The next two sounds left Couples in shock: chunk and plop. “It was a pretty easy shot,” Couples said. His pitch landed in a greenside pond, well short of the green. The transgres- sion was magnied when Couples hit his fth shot over the green, then need- ed two putts to walk away with a triple bogey. Suddenly a one-shot lead for Couples became a three-shot decit. And Langer never opened the door to give Couples hope of rallying.

never opened the door to give Couples hope of rallying. Hairston’s big hit lifts Padres over
never opened the door to give Couples hope of rallying. Hairston’s big hit lifts Padres over
never opened the door to give Couples hope of rallying. Hairston’s big hit lifts Padres over

Hairston’s big hit lifts Padres over Marlins 5-4

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO — Ryan Ludwick’s rst game with the San Diego Padres couldn’t have gone much better. He got a big ovation from the crowd when he was introduced as a pinch-hitter in the sixth inning, singled off Josh Johnson to load the bases, then came sliding home on Jerry Hairston Jr.’s two-run double that helped the NL West leaders beat the Florida Marlins 5-4 and avoid a three-game sweep. “I’ll never forget, I slid across home plate and I had guys standing right there pumping their fists, fired up,” said Ludwick, acquired Saturday from St. Louis in a three-team deal that also included Cleveland. “There was a lot of excitement,” the former All-Star said. “It was a lot of fun to see these guys today, the way they acted on the bench, on the eld and the way they greeted me in the club- house.” The Padres kept San Francisco from creeping any closer in the division race. San Diego entered the day with a 1 1/2-game lead over the Giants, who played the Los Angeles Dodgers on Sunday night.

San Diego entered the day with a 1 1/2-game lead over the Giants, who played the
San Diego entered the day with a 1 1/2-game lead over the Giants, who played the
San Diego entered the day with a 1 1/2-game lead over the Giants, who played the
San Diego entered the day with a 1 1/2-game lead over the Giants, who played the
San Diego entered the day with a 1 1/2-game lead over the Giants, who played the

16 Monday Aug. 2, 2010

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Taiwan’s Tseng wins Women’s British Open

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOUTHPORT, England — Yani Tseng of Taiwan made a 6-foot putt on the 18th hole Sunday to win the Women’s British Open by one stroke over Katherine Hull of Australia. It was the 21-year-old Tseng’s third major title and second of the year to go along with the Kraft Nabisco. She has four LPGA vic- tories overall, having won 2008 LPGA Championship and 2009 Corning Classic. Hull came into the round trailing

and 2009 Corning Classic. Hull came into the round trailing Yani Tseng by four strokes but

Yani Tseng

by four strokes but trailed by just one heading into the 18th. But she missed a 20-foot birdie attempt and had to settle for a 70, and Tseng made her par

putt to shoot 73 and total 11-under 277 at Royal Birkdale. Tseng earned $408,000. She drove into a bunker on the last hole and was just off the green

in three. Hull chipped poorly before her birdie attempt went past the hole, and Tseng coolly stepped up to make the winning putt. “I was nervous and tired with all the pressure and attention out there today,” Tseng said. “Katherine played really well and put me under a lot of pressure. It was the toughest win I’ve had to date. I usually come from behind to win. I’ve never won from the front before.” Tseng said Annika Sorenstam sent her a message overnight. “She said, ’I’m very happy to

see you on top, that’s where you belong,’ and wished me good luck for today,” she said. On the first three holes, Hull had trimmed three strokes off Tseng’s lead — with birdies at the second and third — while Tseng dropped a stroke at the third. Hull hit a 5- wood to 12 feet at the second and made it, then an 8-iron to 40 feet at the fourth and holed that as well. Hull’s putt for birdie at the 17th lipped out. “I’ll probably be working on my short game after that finish,” Hull said with a smile. “I couldn’t

believe when that putt on 17 stayed out, but, never mind, I did the best I could. I felt pretty good

coming into the week, so there are lots of positives I can take from my performance.” Koreans Na Yeon Choi and In kyung Kim shared third at 7-under 281. American Cristie Kerr was tied for fifth at 6 under with two other Koreans, Heekyung Seo and Amy Yangon. Sweden’s Caroline Hedwall won the Smyth Salver, awarded to the leading amateur for her 3-over

291.

Mark Webber wins the Hungarian Grand Prix

By Pablo Gorondi

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BUDAPEST, Hungary — Mark Webber took advantage of a penalty against Red Bull teammate Sebastian Vettel to win the Formula One Hungarian Grand Prix on Sunday at the Hungaroring track. Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso was second, followed by Vettel and the other Ferrari driver, Felipe Massa. Webber’s fourth win of the season gave him the lead in the drivers’ championship with 161 points, four points better than Lewis Hamilton of McLaren, who dropped out on lap 24 with technical trouble. Hamilton is now second, followed by Vettel with 151 points, defending world champion Jenson Button with 147 points and Alonso with 141 points. “It was a bit of a gift today for me but I haven’t had many of them,” said Webber, who competed in his 150th race on the Formula One cir- cuit. Michael Schumacher, meanwhile, is facing a stewards’ inquiry for his actions on the 66th lap as he was being overtaken by Williams driver Rubens Barrichello. The seven-time world champion

appeared to try to force Barrichello into the concrete pit wall as the two fought for 10th place. Barrichello called the incident “horrible” over the team radio and said Schumacher should have been black-flagged, where a driver is ordered to the pits. Alonso said the winding track where overtaking is especially dif- cult helped him stay ahead of Vettel’s faster car and secure his runner-up nish. “In a normal circuit it would have been impossible to maintain sec- ond,” acknowledged Alonso, whose Ferrari team achieved its stated pur- pose of nishing ahead of McLaren, which was leading the constructors’ championship before the race. Red Bull has now taken over the lead with 312 points, with McLaren second at 304 and Ferrari third with

238.

Vettel, who started from pole position for the seventh time this season and fourth in a row, was given a drive through penalty on lap 32 for falling more than 10 car lengths behind the safety car, which had come on during lap 16. Webber took the lead when Vettel and Alonso pitted while the safety car was on the track.

 

SAT

SUN

MON

 

TUE

 

WED

THUR

FRI

31   1   2   3 4 5 6

31

 

1

 

2

 

3

4

5

6

 

OFF

@Colorado

@Colorado

@Atlanta

@Atlanta

 

5:40 p.m.

12:10 p.m.

4:10 p.m.

4:35 p.m.

CSN-BA HD

CSN-BA HD

CSN-BA HD

CSN-BA HD

    vs.Royals 7:05 p.m. vs.Royals 7:05 p.m. vs.Royals 12:35 p.m. OFF vs.Texas 6:05 p.m.
   

vs.Royals

7:05 p.m.

vs.Royals

7:05 p.m.

vs.Royals

12:35 p.m.

OFF

vs.Texas

6:05 p.m.

CSN-CAL

CSN-CAL

CSN-CAL

July 31 Aug. 7 Aug. 14 Aug. 21 Aug. 28 Sept. 5 Sept. 11

July 31

Aug. 7

Aug. 14

Aug. 21

Aug. 28

Sept. 5

Sept. 11

@ Colorado

vs.Kansas City

vs.LA Galaxy

@ N.Y.

@ Houston

vs. Dallas

6

p.m.

7

p.m.

1

p.m.

4:30 p.m.

5:30 p.m.

7 p.m.

 

CSN-CAL

CSN-CAL

CSN+

Aug. 1   Aug. 7 Aug. 14 Aug. 22 Aug. 28 Sept. 1 Sept. 5

Aug. 1

 

Aug. 7

Aug. 14

Aug. 22

Aug. 28

Sept. 1

Sept. 5

vs.Chicago

7

p.m.

vs.Washington

7

p.m.

@ Chicago

3

@ Atlanta

@Sky Blue FC

vs.Boston

 

p.m.

FSC

4 p.m.

4 p.m.

TBD

MLS STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

 

W

L

T

Pts GF

GA

Columbus

10

4

4

34

26

16

New York

8

6

3

27

20

21

Toronto FC

6

6

5

23

19

19

Chicago

5

5

5

20

21

21

Kansas City

5

8

4

19

14

20

Philadelphia

4

8

3

15

19

27

New England

4

9

3

15

16

27

D.C.

3

12

3

12

12

31

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

W

L

T

Pts

GF

GA

Los Angeles

12

3

4

40

31

13

Real Salt Lake

10

4

4

34

32

14

FC Dallas

6

2

9

27