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PROVINCE OFPAMPANGA

PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN


(2015 2042)

Contents
CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
1. Historical background of the province 1
2. Plan Objectives and Context 3
2.1 Plan Objectives 3
2.2 Context 3
2.3 Key policies and legal basis or mandates for the formulation of the PDPFP 6
and the integration of DRR-CCA into the plan
3. Coverage of the Plan 7
4. Outline of the Plan 8

CHAPTER 2. VISION
1. Development Vision 9
2. 12-Point Development Agenda 9
2.1. Good Governance 9
2.2. Poverty Alleviation 10
2.3. Social Amelioration 10
2.4. Sustainable quality health services 10
2.5. Equal access to quality education 10
2.6. Environmental sustainability and disaster resiliency 10
2.6.1. Natural Resources 10
2.6.2. Solid Waste Management 12
2.6.3. Disaster Resiliency 12
2.7. Attractive Investment Climate 13
2.8. Adequate Infrastructure Support 13
2.9. Peace and Order and Public Safety 13
2.10. Conservation and Promotion of Kapampangan Culture, Arts and Heritage 13
2.11. Tourism Promotion 13
2.12. Promotion of Public-Private Partnership 14
3. Mission Statement 14

CHAPTER 3. THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


1. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivision 15
1.1 Geographic Location 15
1.2 Land Area 15
1.3 Political Subdivision 17
2. Population and Settlements 18
2.1 Regional and National Context 18
2.2 Population Size, Density and Growth Rates 19
2.3 Existing Settlement Pattern 26
3. Physical Resources 27
3.1 Topography and Slope 27
3.2 Soil Characteristics 29
3.3 Ecosystems of the Province 28
3.3.1. Freshwater and Coastal Marine Ecosystem 28
3.3.2. Mineral, Forest and Geothermal Ecosystem 30
3.3.3. Urban Ecosystem 31

4. Local Economy 32

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PROVINCE OFPAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

4.1 Agriculture 36
4.2 Trade and Industry 39
4.3 Export 39
4.4 Tourism 42
5. Transportation and Access 49
5.1 External Linkages 49
5.2 Internal Circulation, Routes and Service 52
5.3 Road Condition and Level of Facilities 53
5.4 Transport System 53
6. Income, Employment, Poverty and Service Access 54
6.1 Family Income 54
6.2 Employment 56
6.3 Poverty 56
6.4 Service Access 58
6.4.1 Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) 58
6.4.2 Health Facilities and Manpower 59
6.4.2.1 Crude Birth Rate (CBR) & Crude Death Rate 65
6.4.2.2 Infants with Low Birth Weight 65
6.4.2.3 Morbidity and Mortality Rate 66
6.4.3 Nutrition Services 69
6.4.4 Education 72
6.4.5 Housing 79
6.4.6 Public Order and Safety 80
6.4.7 Other Service Utilities 83
6.4.7.1 Telecommunications 83
6.4.7.2 Power and Electrification Facilities 84
6.4.7.3 Irrigation 85
6.4.7.3 Flood Control and Drainage 86
7. Development Administration 88
7.1 Revenue Generation 88
7.2 Resource Allocation and Utilization 88
8. Disaster Risk Reduction and Vulnerability Assessment 89
8.1 Existing Policies, Laws, Regulations and Programs on Disaster Risk 89
Reduction Management and Climate Change Adaptation (DRRM/CCA)
8.2 Hazard Profile 92
8.2.1 Hydrometeorologic Hazards 93
1. Floods 93
2. Rain-Induced Landslide 95
3. Typhoons 96
4. Storm Surge 97
8.2.2 Geological Hazards 97
1. Ground Shaking 98
2. Liquefaction 99
3. Earthquake-Induced Landslide 99
4. Tsunami 100
8.2.3 Volcanic Hazards 100
8.3 Climate Profile 104
8.3.1 Climate Projections 119
8.3.2 Impacts of Climate Change 120

8.4 Hazard Assessment 122


8.4.1 Hazard Exposure of the Population 122
8.4.2 Hazard Exposure of Built-Up Areas 130
8.4.3 Hazard Exposure of Agricultural Lands 137
8.4.4 Hazard Exposure of Critical Facilties 144

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PROVINCE OFPAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

8.4.5 Hazard Exposure of Pampanga Roads 157

CHAPTER 4. LAND USE AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK


1. Spatial Strategy 167
1.1 Alternative Urban Forms or Spatial Development Strategies 167
1.1.1 Generation and Characterization of Alternative Urban Forms 167
1.1.2 Evaluation and Selection of the preferred Spatial Development 171
Strategy
1.2 Detailing the Preferred Spatial Development Strategies 173
2. Land Use Framework 178
a. Existing General Land Use 178
b. Land Use Potentials and Physical Development Constraints 180
i. Areas Highly Susceptible to Geologic and Hydro-Meteorologic Hazards 180
(GHHs)
ii. Areas Highly Restricted to Development 182
iii. Buildable Zones/ Constraint-free Areas 182
iv. Land Use Potentials and Development Constraints 182
c. Proposed General Land Use Plan 185
d. Policies on Settlement Areas 187
e. Policies on Production Area 191
f . Policies on Protection Areas 193
g. Policies on Infrastructures Areas 196

CHAPTER 5. DEVELOPMENTS ISSUES, GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS


1. Social Sector 200
1.1 Education 200
1.2 Peace and Order and Public Safety 200
1.3 Health 201
1.4 Housing and Basic Utilities 202
1.5 Social Amelioration 202
2. Economic Sector 203
2.1 Agriculture 203
2.2 Livestock and Poultry 203
2.3 Fisheries 203
2.4 Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry in the Urban Core Hub 204
2.5 Infrastructure 204
2.6 Culture, Arts and Heritage 205
2.7 Tourism 205
3. Environment 206
3.1 Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems 206
3.2 Urban Ecosystems 206
3.3 Mineral, Forest and Geothermal Ecosystem 206
3.4 Solid Waste Management 206
4. Disaster Risk Reduction Management and Climate Change Adaptation 207
5. Governance 208
5.1 Revenue Generation 208
5.2 Resource Allocation and Utilization 208
5.3 Local Legislation 208
5.4 Development Planning 209
5.5 Human Resource Development 209
5.6 Transparency 209
6. Private-Public Partnership 210

CONTENTS
PROVINCE OFPAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

CHAPTER 6. STRATEGIES, PROGRAMS, PROJECTS AND ACTIVITIES


1. Social Sector 211
1.1 Education 211
1.2 Peace and Order and Public Safety 212
1.3 Health 212
1.4 Housing and Basic Utilities 213
1.5 Social Amelioration 214
2. Economic Sector 217
2.1 Agriculture 217
2.2 Livestock and Poultry 218
2.3 Fisheries 219
2.4 Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry in the Urban Core Hub 220
2.5 Infrastructure 222
2.6 Culture, Arts and Heritage 224
2.7 Tourism 224
3. Environment 226
3.1 Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems 226
3.2 Urban Ecosystems 228
3.3 Mineral, Forest and Geothermal Ecosystem 229
3.4 Solid Waste Management 230
4. Disaster Risk Reduction Management and Climate Change Adaptation 230
5. Governance 231
5.1 Revenue Generation 231
5.2 Resource Allocation and Utilization 231
5.3 Local Legislation 232
5.4 Development Planning 232
5.5 Human Resource Development 232
5.6 Transparency 233
6. Private-Public Partnership 234

CONTENTS
PROVINCE OFPAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

List of Tables
Table 3 - 1 Total Barangays, Land Area, Type, and Income Class by City/ 17
Municipality/ District of Pampanga
Table 3 - 2 Area, Population, Annual Population Growth Rate and Density, 18
Central Luzon Provinces: 1990, 2000, 2010
Table 3 - 3 Area, Population, Annual Growth Rate, Density, Share by 22
Municipality, PAMPANGA: 1980, 1990, 2000, 2010
Table 3 - 4 Projected Population by Municipalities, Pampanga: 2011 - 2042 23
Table 3 - 5 Slope Classification 27
Table 3 - 6 Region III Central Luzon Gross Regional Domestic Product by 35
Industrial (2010 to 2012)
Table 3 - 7 Palay Production (in Metric Tons), Central Luzon Provinces, 2010 36
2014
Table 3 - 8 Corn Production (in Metric Tons), Central Luzon Provinces, 2010 37
2014
Table 3 - 9 Other Crop Production (in Metric Tons) Central Luzon Province, 2012 38
2014
Table 3 - 10 FISHERIES: Volume of Production (in Metric Tons), Central Luzon 38
Provinces, 2007-2012
Table 3 - 11 Central Luzon Investment Performance by Province, 2011 39
Table 3 - 12 Central Luzon Export Performance by Province, 2011 39
Table 3 - 13 Pampanga Top 10 Export Performers, 2011 40
Table 3 - 14 Number of Motor Vehicles Registered by Classification & by Mode of 53
Registration, Pampanga: 2013
Table 3 - 15 Average Annual Family Income, Expenditure, and Savings, Central 55
Luzon Provinces: 2009
Table 3 - 16 Labor Force Statistics, Pampanga: 2013 56
Table 3 - 17 Overseas Workers 10 Years Old and Over by Age Group and Sex: 56
Pampanga*, 2010
Table 3 - 18 Full Year Thresholds, Incidences and Magnitude of Poor Families, 57
Philippines, Central Luzon Provinces: 2012
Table 3 - 19 Income Gap, Poverty Gap, Severity of Poverty, Pampanga: 2006, 57
2009, 2012
Table 3 - 20 4Ps Beneficiaries by Cities/ Municipalities, Pampanga 58
Table 3 - 21 Number of Health Facilities, Pampanga by Municipality, 2013 61
Table 3 - 22 Bed Capacity of Government and Private Hospitals 62
Province of Pampanga, Year 2013
Table 3 - 23 Ratio of Public Health Workers to Population, Pampanga, Year 2013 63
Table 3 - 24 Number of Public Health Manpower, Pampanga by Municipality, 2013 64
Table 3 - 25 Infants with Low Birth Weight Seen, Pampanga 2013 66
Table 3 - 26 Ten (10) Leading Causes of Morbidity, Pampanga 2013 and 2009- 67
2012
Table 3 - 27 Ten (10) Leading Causes of Mortality, Pampanga 2013 and 2009- 68
2012
Table 3 - 28 Leading Causes of Infant Mortality, 2013, 2009-2012 68
Table 3 - 29 Leading Causes of Maternal Mortality, 2013, 2009-2012 69
Table 3 - 30 Nutritional Status of Pre-School Children, Ranking By Municipality, 69
2013
Table 3 - 31 Nutritional Status of School Children, Ranking By Municipality Based 70
From Operation Timbang 2013
Table 3 - 32 Comparative Nutritional Situation, Central Luzon , Philippines 2011 71
Table 3 - 33 Number of Kindergarten By Division/Municipality, Pampanga Sy 73
2013-2014

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PROVINCE OFPAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 34 Number of Schools by Level of Education by Sector by Municipality, 74


SY 2013-2014
Table 3 - 35 Performance Indicators in Public Elementary by Gender, Pampanga: 75
SY 2010 2011, SY 2011 2012 & SY 2012 - 2013
Table 3 - 36 Cohort Survival Rate in Public Elementary by Gender, Central Luzon: 76
SY 2009-2011 to SY 2012-2013
Table 3 - 37 Cohort Survival Rate in Public Secondary by Gender, Central Luzon: 77
SY 2009-2011 to SY 2012-2013
Table 3 - 38 Pupil-Teacher & Pupil-Classroom Ratio in Public Elementary & 78
Secondary by Municipality, SY 2013-2014
Table 3 - 39 Occupied Housing Units by Construction Materials of the Roof and 79
Outer Walls: Pampanga* 2010
Table 3 - 40 Number of Households by Tenure Status of the Lot: Pampanga*, 80
2010
Table 3 - 41 Comparative Statistics of Crime Incidents in Pampanga: 2012-2013 81
Table 3 - 42 Daily Consolidated Strength Report, 2014 82
Table 3 - 43 Percent of Level 3 Water System Served, Price, NRW, Number of 85
Spring Source by Municipalities, 2013
Table 3 - 44 Major Structural Flood Mitigation Projects 87
Table 3 - 45 Matrix for Past Flood Events and their Impacts, Pampanga: 2000 - 94
2011
Table 3 - 46 1991 Mount Pinatubo Volcanic Activity 101
Table 3 - 47 Recorded Maximum Annual Rainfall Intensity within the Four Rainfall 104
Stations in Pampanga: 1990-2006
Table 3 - 48 Summary Matrix for Flood Hazard, Province of Pampanga 105
Table 3 - 49 Summary Matrix for Storm Surge Hazard, Province of Pampanga 108
Table 3 - 50 Summary Matrix for Ground Shaking, Province of Pampanga 109
Table 3 - 51 Summary Matrix for Liquefaction Hazard, Province of Pampanga 110
Table 3 - 52 Summary Matrix for Earthquake Induced Landslide Hazard, Province 113
of Pampanga
Table 3 - 53 Summary Matrix for Tsunami Hazard, Province of Pampanga 114
Table 3 - 54 Summary Matrix for Volcanic Hazard, Province of Pampanga 115
Table 3 - 55 Projected Values of Seasonal Mean Temperature, Pampanga: 2020 118
and 2050
Table 3 - 56 Projected Values of Seasonal Mean Temperature (in mm), 119
Pampanga: 2020 and 2050
Table 3 - 57 Frequency of Extreme Events in 2020 and 2050 119
Table 3 - 58 Possible Impact of Climate Change due to extreme weather and 121
climate events
Table 3 - 59 Extreme Climatic Events Identified by Community Residents in 122
Guagua Pampanga (1966-2008)
Table 3 - 60 Flood Hazard Exposure: Population, Pampanga 124
Table 3 - 61 Liquefaction Hazard Exposure: Population, Pampanga 126
Table 3 - 62 Volcanic Hazard Exposure: Population, Pampanga 128
Table 3 - 63 Flood Hazard Exposure: Built-Up Areas (in Hectares), Pampanga 131
Table 3 - 64 Liquefaction Hazard Exposure: Built-Up Areas, Pampanga 133
Table 3 - 65 Volcanic Hazard Exposure: Built-Up Areas, Pampanga 135
Table 3 - 66 Flood Hazard Exposure: Agricultural Areas, Pampanga 138
Table 3 - 67 Liquefaction Hazard Exposure: Agricultural Areas, Pampanga 140
Table 3 - 68 Volcanic Hazard Exposure: Agricultural Areas, Pampanga 142
Table 3 - 69 Flood Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities Bridges, Pampanga 146
Table 3 - 70 Flood Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities School, Pampanga 147
Table 3 - 71 Flood Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities Government Buildings, 148
Pampanga

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PROVINCE OFPAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 72 Flood Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities Hospital, Pampanga 149


Table 3 - 73 Liquefaction Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities Bridges, 150
Pampanga
Table 3 - 74 Liquefaction Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities School, Pampanga 151
Table 3 - 75 Liquefaction Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities Government 152
Buildings, Pampanga
Table 3 - 76 Liquefaction Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities Hospital, Pampanga 153
Table 3 - 77 Volcanic Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities Bridges, Pampanga 154
Table 3 - 78 Volcanic Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities School, Pampanga 155
Table 3 - 79 Volcanic Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities Government Buildings, 156
Pampanga
Table 3 - 80 Volcanic Hazard Exposure: Critical Facilities Hospital, Pampanga 156
Table 3 - 81 Flood Hazard Exposure: Pampanga - National Roads 158
Table 3 - 82 Flood Hazard Exposure: Pampanga - Provincial Roads 159
Table 3 - 83 Flood Hazard Exposure: Pampanga Municipals / Barangays/ Sub 160
Roads
Table 3 - 84 Liquefaction Hazard Exposure: Pampanga - National Roads 161
Table 3 - 85 Liquefaction Hazard Exposure: Pampanga - Provincial Roads 162
Table 3 - 86 Liquefaction Hazard Exposure: Pampanga Municipals / Barangays/ 163
Sub Roads
Table 3 - 87 Volcanic Hazard Exposure: Pampanga - National Roads 164
Table 3 - 88 Volcanic Hazard Exposure: Pampanga - Provincial Roads 165
Table 3 - 89 Volcanic Hazard Exposure: Pampanga Municipals / Barangays/ Sub 166
Roads
Table 4 - 1 Comparative ranking of the different Urban forms using weighted 172
average
Table 4 - 2 The Core Areas and Hinterlands of the various Growth Centers in 174
Pampanga in relation to the Preferred Spatial Strategy
Table 4 - 3 Existing General Land Use of Pampanga, 2010 178
Table 4 - 4 Major Land Use categories located inside or outside areas highly 180
susceptible to GHHs
Table 4 - 5 Area accounting of the land categories in the development constraints 184
Map of Pampanga
Table 4 - 6 Proposed General Land Use Distribution 185
Table 4 - 7 Urban Land Density in selected areas within the greater capital region 187
Table 4 - 8 Strategic Land Optimization Schemes of Pampanga 188
Table 4 - 9 Breakdown of Settlement Areas 188
Table 4 - 10 Breakdown of Production Areas 191
Table 4 - 11 Breakdown of Protection Areas 193
Table 4 - 12 Breakdown of Infrastructure Areas 196
Table 6 - 1 DRRM / CCA PPAs 235
Table 6 - 2 List of Projects 238

CONTENTS
PROVINCE OFPAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Figures
Figure 3 - 1 Regional Location Map 16
Figure 3 - 2 Population Density by Municipality: 2000 & 2010 20
Figure 3 - 3 Annual Population Growth Rate (APGR) by Municipality 21
Figure 3 - 4 Pampanga Population Hierarchy, 2010 26
Figure 3 - 5 Slope Map 33
Figure 3 - 6 Soil Map 34
Figure 3 - 7 Crude Birth Rate and Death Rate, Pampanga 2009 2013 65
Figure 3 - 8 Climate Map 117
Figure 3 - 9 Population Exposure on Flood Hazard Map 125
Figure 3 - 10 Population Exposure on Liquefaction Hazard Map 127
Figure 3 - 11 Population Exposure on Volcanic Hazard Map 129
Figure 3 - 12 Built-up Exposure on Flood Hazard Map 132
Figure 3 - 13 Built-up Exposure on Liquefaction Hazard Map 134
Figure 3 - 14 Built-up Exposure on Volcanic Hazard Map 136
Figure 3 - 15 Agriculture Exposure on Flood Hazard Map 139
Figure 3 - 16 Agriculture Exposure on Liquefaction Hazard Map 141
Figure 3 - 17 Agriculture Exposure on Volcanic Hazard Map 143
Figure 4 - 1 Strips or Linear Development 167
Figure 4 - 2 Concentric Development 168
Figure 4 - 3 Central and Nodal Development 169
Figure 4 - 4 Radial and Circumferential Development 170
Figure 4 - 5 Grid Pattern Development 170
Figure 4 - 6 The Preferred Urban Form Radial and Circumferential 173
Development
Figure 4 - 7 Existing General Land Use Map, 2010 179
Figure 4 - 8 Areas Highly Susceptible to Geologic and Hydro-meteorologic 181
Hazards
Figure 4 - 9 Development Constraints Map 183
Figure 4 - 10 Proposed General Land Use Map 186
Figure 4 - 11 Settlements Framework 189
Figure 4 - 12 Production Framework 192
Figure 4 - 13 Protection Framework 194
Figure 4 - 14 Infrastructure Framework 197

CONTENTS
PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Introduction
1. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF THE PROVINCE
Ancient Pampanga

The ancestors of the Kapampangan came from the Madjapahit Empire of the
Malang Region in Central Java (Indonesia). They came with the second wave of
Malayan migration, the last of the three prehistoric migrant that took place in the
Philippines between 200 to 300 B.C.These migrants, led by Prince Balagtas, settled
along the coastal areas of Luzon which became the nucleus of the so-called
Pampanga Empire. The empire included all areas in Luzon from Manila up to
Cagayan. The coming of the Spaniards led to the eventful disintegration and
diminution of the empire.

Early Civilization

Before the Spaniards came, the Kapampangans had a civilization of their own
which was comparable to any civilization existing then at that time. They practised
irrigated agriculture, producing rice and sugar cane. They cultivated fruit trees, fiber
and ornamental plants and spices. They made tools, weapons, utensils and body
ornaments out of metals. Many were expert jewelers. They had a syllabary and
knew how to read and write. The government which they established was a
government of laws.

Spanish Period

Fifty years after the Battle of Mactan, Legaspi arrived in Manila only to meet
resistance from Prince Soliman and Raja Lakandula, two Kapampangan rulers.
Leading a contingent of 1,000 Kapampangan warriors armed with spears and bolos,
Soliman and Lakandula engaged the Spaniards led by Martin de Goiti in a fierce
battle that marked the fall and disintegration of the Kapampangan Empire.

Hardly had the conquest of Pampanga been completed when the region was
formally created into a province with Bacolor as capital. As created, the new
province occupied a vast region, including parts of the present provinces of Bataan,
Tarlac and Nueva Ecija.

During the early years of Spanish rule, the Kapampangans became loyal to the
Spaniards. When Manila was invaded in 1754 by the Chinese pirate Limahong and
4,000 of his men, the Kapampangans helped the Spaniards drive away the Chinese
invaders. In 1647, the Dutch attacked and plundered the coastal areas of Luzon.
Kapampangan soldiers were employed to repulse the Dutch incursions. When the
English assaulted the captured Manila in 1762, the soldiers fought valiantly to

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

recapture Manila from the hands of the English. The Kapampangans also joined the
Spaniards in a military expedition.

About the middle of the seventeenth century, two great rebellions broke out in the
province. The first of these took place in 1645 as a result of the injustices connected
with the collection of tributes. It spread quickly and extended to Zambales. The
second revolt took place fifteen years later as a result of the forcible employment of
natives in the work of cutting timber and the failure of the government to pay for large
amounts of rice collected in Pampanga for the use of loyal officials. The leader of
the rebellion was Francisco Maniago. It spread rapidly among the inhabitants of the
towns along the banks of the Pampanga River and was only suppressed after drastic
measures were taken by Governor-General Manrique de Lara.

Pampanga was one of the first provinces to start the Revolution. During the early
part of the war, Mariano Llanera commanded the Revolutionary forces. Later,
Tiburcio Hilario took possession of the province as governor in the name of the
Revolutionary Government. Civil government was established in Pampanga on
February 13, 1901.

Diminution of Pampanga to its Present Size

The province of Pampanga as created on December 11, 1571 comprised a vast


region, which, however was reduced from time to time. In 1754 when Bataan was
created it was given a narrow strip of Pampanga territory comprising the towns of
Dinalupihan, Hermosa, Orani, Samal, Abucay, Balanga, Pilar and Orion. In 1848 by
adjudication of Nueva Ecija, Pampanga lost the towns of Gapan, Cabiao, San Isidro,
San Antonio and Aliaga, as well as the towns of San Miguel and its neighbourhood
which was given to Bulacan. For the third time in 1860, Pampanga lost a portion of
her territory. It was in this year that its northern district including the towns of
Bamban, Capas, Concepcion, Victoria, Tarlac, Mabalacat, Magalang, Porac and
Floridablanca was detached and erected into a commandancia, politico-militar. The
last four towns, however, were returned to Pampanga in 1873.

Origin of the name PAMPANGA

The name Pampanga was given by the Spaniards. When some Spaniards
stumbled upon the natives, they were asked their place of residence, and they
answered king pampang ning ilug which means near the river bank. From then
on the natives of the place were called the people from Pampang. Later, through
the peculiarity and unpredictability of the communication process, the pampang
became Pampanga.

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2. PLAN OBJECTIVES AND CONTEXT


The Disaster Risk Reduction-Climate Change Adaptation (DRR-CCA)
Enhanced Provincial Development and Physical Framework Plan (PDPFP) for 2015-
2042 provide the physical and spatial development directions of the province for the
next 27 years. It is intended to serve as a vertical link between the Central Luzon
Regional Development Plan (2011-2016) and the municipal and city comprehensive
development plans. It provides the framework for the various Comprehensive Land
Use Plans of the municipalities and cities. It also serves as the main source
document of the provinces Executive-Legislative Agenda and as a source document
for higher level sectoral plans by national government agencies.

2.1 OBJECTIVES

Specifically, the plan aims to:

define the long term development vision of the province;


translate the long term vision into a spatial strategy that serves as the
blue print of the provinces physical development;
provide the analytical basis for understanding of the planning environment
or existing conditions through knowledge on natural hazards and the
vulnerabilities of exposed communities, their social and economic
fragilities and their lack of resilience or ability to cope with or recover
during times of disaster;
increase awareness among policy/decision makers in setting
development goals and targets on loss of life and property from natural
hazards and disasters;
provide a more realistic projections of demand and supply of land for
settlements, production, protection and infrastructure;
provide framework for the inclusion of appropriate risk reduction
measures in priority programs and projects in the Provincial Development
Investment Program (PDIP).

2.2 CONTEXT

The formulation of DRR-CCA enhanced PDPFP was based on the


national policy set forth by President Benigno S. Aquino III, through
Administrative Order No. 1 which directs all Local Government Units (LGU),
particularly provinces, to adopt and use in their planning activities the
Guidelines on Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction in Sub-national
Development and Physical/Land Use Planning. The Presidents issuance of
AO 1 recognizes the need for practical solutions to minimize the potential
damage of natural hazards. Specifically, it acknowledges local plans prepared
by the LGUs as potent tool to effectively carry out disaster mitigation measures.

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The DRR-CCA enhanced PDPFP will significantly contribute to the


resiliency of the people by ensuring that the negative effects of natural hazards
are lessened, if not totally mitigated. In general, the strategies may relate to
the following situations:

a. Increased resiliency of the province to natural disasters

Programs, projects and activities that increase resilience (i.e.,


poverty alleviation, food security, access to health services, etc.) may
already have been addressed in the sectoral development goals and
objectives, but the importance attached to their objectives (and related
criteria) may be changed in view of the vulnerabilities and risks, which
highlight the role of increased resilience in DRR.

b. Reduced exposure of populations and assets through appropriate DRR


measures

Programs, projects and activities related to reducing human and


property exposure to hazard (i.e., early warning, preparedness,
structural mitigation, community-based risk management, asset
protection through insurance, etc.) are more likely to compete with other
interests in the use of limited public funds. Its importance in the overall
development framework will depend on the value placed by decision
makers on risk assessment especially in the way DRR strategies
complement development objectives.

Figure 1 illustrates the process in mainstreaming disaster risk reduction in


land use/ physical planning. Hazard assessment involves hazard
characterization, exposure analysis and vulnerability assessment.

Hazard characterization involves identifying and characterizing the


hazard(s) that threaten the province. Exposure analysis using the Arc GIS
indicates the number of people and type of assets that will be potentially
affected by certain hazards (Flood, Earthquake, Landslide, Liquefaction, and
Volcanic). Vulnerability assessment is the qualitative description of the
vulnerability of selected strategic sectors to climate change that are relevant to
the province based on the set of indicators of Sensitivity, Exposure, and
Adaptive Capacity.

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
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Figure 1 - 1
Mainstreaming Disaster Risk
Reduction in Land Use/Physical
Planning
DISASTER RISK DEVELOPMENT PLANNING
ASSESSMENT

Population Vision
Hazard
Economic
Characterization
Activity Income
and
Physical Services
Resources
Hazard Exposure Transport
Analysis Project

Land Use and Physical Evaluation and


Framework
Development
Vulnerability
Assessment Development Issues, Goals,
Objectives/Targets

Strategies and PPAs Investment


Program

Budgeting

Implementation, Monitoring and


Evaluation

The focal information for mainstreaming in the PDPFP covers the key
results and findings of the Disaster Risk Assessment (DRA), Climate Change
Vulnerability Assessment (CCVA), and the measures to reduce disaster risk
(DRRM) and adapt to the climate change vulnerability. Mainstreaming DRA
operationally means extracting, summarizing and synthesizing the highlights of
the DRA-CCA and weaving them in the right sections of the PDPFP to enhance
the plan and make it disaster risk and climate change sensitive and responsive.

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Hence, the goals of DRR mainstreaming is to ensure that the plan


formulated contribute to disaster risk reduction, make the province resilient to
natural hazards and ensure that all development efforts being pursued do not
increase the risks and vulnerabilities to these hazards.

Mainstreaming of DRR does not end in the plan formulation process, but
should be promoted towards the remaining stages of the development planning
cycle: investment programming, budgeting/ financing, project evaluation and
development and project implementation and monitoring and evaluation.

2.3 KEY POLICIES AND LEGAL BASIS OR MANDATES FOR THE


FORMULATION OF THE PDPFP AND THE INTEGRATION OF DRR-CCA
INTO THE PLAN

The two main legal frameworks that mandate the integration of CCA into
local plans are the Climate Change Act of 2009 or RA 9729 and the Disaster
Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010 or RA 10121. The preparation of
local climate change action plans (Sec. 14, RA 9729) and disaster
risk reduction mitigation plans (Sec. 11 (b) (2), RA 10121) by local government
units (LGUs).

The CCA law does not explicitly provide that CCAs should be integrated
into their local development plans but merely assumes such integration through
the formulation and regular updating of their local plans. The DRRM law,
though, is more explicit in the task of LGUs to integrate DRRM and CCA
into local development plans to ensure the integration of DRR and CCA into
local development plans, programs and budgets as a strategy in sustainable
development and poverty alleviation. - Sec.11 (b) (2), RA 10121.

The Local Government Code of 1991 or RA 7160 also gives


LGUs responsibility to ensure ecological security and protection of their
constituencies. Other relevant laws that have specific impacts to CCA and
DRRM plans are the Clean Air Act or RA 8749 and Clean Water Acts or RA
9275, Ecological Solid Waste Management Act (RA 9003), Forestry Code,
Urban Development and Housing Act and National Integrated Protected Areas
System (NIPAS) Act, among others.

National Administrative and Planning Guidelines Integrating CCA and


DRRM into local Plans. Tied to the enabling laws on CCA and DRRM are the
various national administrative and planning directives that encourages the
integration of CCA and DRRM into local development plans. The National
Climate Change Action Plan (NCCAP) has identified climate change adaptive
housing and land uses as part of the plan outputs of the NCCAP Strategic

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Action on Climate Smart Industries and Services for the period 2011-2028. It
also identifies climate-proofing of infrastructures in cities and municipalities and
implementation of ecological solid waste management as other key outputs for
this strategy of developing green cities and municipalities. (See Figure below)
Among the different LGUs (i.e. HLURB, DILG, DENR, NEDA, DA, etc.), only
the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) Guidelines on
Local Planning is the closest document that emphasizes integration of DRRM
inter-local plans. All other guidelines do not specifically highlight DRRM and
CCA integration into either physical/ land use or development plans. On the
other hand, there have been several policy pronouncements encouraging
LGUs on the integration of CCA and DRRM into local plans, however, no
formal policy order, i.e. executive or department orders have been issued to
implement these pronouncements. President Benigno S. Aquino III in a speech
delivered in Davao City on 16 March 2011 during the LGU Summit on
Mainstreaming CCA in the Philippines admonished LGUs to integrate CCA in
their plans but did not issue any formal directive for its implementation.

3. COVERAGE OF THE PLAN


The DRR-CCA enhanced PDPFP is a twenty seven year development plan that
is guided by the long term development vision. The PDPFP covers the nineteen (19)
municipalities, two (2) component cities and one (1) highly urbanized city.

PDPFP Sectoral Coverage

Core Elements Sector

Population Population and settlements

Economic Activity Agriculture, fisheries, forestry, trade, industry,


services, tourism

Physical Resources Health, education, housing, social welfare, public


works, energy, security, other services and facilities

Income/ Access to Physical integration of all sectors


Services

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4. OUTLINE OF THE PLAN


The DRR-CCA enhanced PDPFP (2015-2042) is organized as follows:

Chapter I - Introduction contains the historical background of the province, the


bases of the PDPFP and mainstreaming of DRR-CCA and its general
goals and objectives.
Chapter II - Vision contains the desired state of the province reflecting the DRR
goals.

Chapter III - Planning Environment describes the physical, economic, and social
environments of the province that are analyzed along with the hazard
assessment to serve as inputs in the identification of issues, problems,
strategies and PPAs.
Chapter IV - Land Use and Physical Framework contains policies on the existing
and proposed land use plan accompanied by appropriate GIS-based
maps

Chapter V - Development Goals, Issues and Strategies addresses issues and


problems, development gaps and constraints.

Chapter VI - Strategies, Programs, Projects and Activities are courses of


actions, programs, projects and activities to achieve goals

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1. Vision Statement
1. Development Vision

We envision Pampanga as a prosperous and competitive province and a


home to resilient communities and environment, where every Kapampangan
enjoys fullness of life nurtured by a synergized good governance and
responsible citizenry; and an efficient and effective public-private
partnership.

The vision statement guides and directs the provinces leaders and people to
achieve the developmental goals of Pampanga. Every policy penned, every plan
drawn, and every work done is in pursuit of a progressive Pampanga that is home to
the Kapampangan spirit of nobleness, courage, selflessness, ingenuity, and
perseverance.

Pampanga stands tall as the regional center of the entire Central Luzon. Its
growth is all-inclusive as it covers all areas of development and ensures that the
marginalized sector is integrated in the progress without sacrificing cultural heritage
and environmental protection. Its continual development is a testament to its
peoples determination, diligence, and dynamism. To make this progress
uninterrupted is a challenge that can only be matched by the collective and
collaborative efforts of every Kapampangan led by a responsive and ethical local
government.

Pampanga remains a vibrant community of peace-loving, God-fearing and driven


people powered by their faith in one another and their love for the province.

The elements of the long-term vision of the province are embodied in the 12-
point development agenda of the present administration.

2. 12-Point Development Agenda


2.1. Good Governance

According to the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia
and the Pacific, good governance has eight major characteristics: It is
participatory, consensus oriented, accountable, transparent, responsive, effective
and efficient, equitable and inclusive and follows the rule of law.

Since governance involves not only the government but the different
stakeholders in the society, good governance is difficult to attain. However, as
the administration continues to adhere to these standards of good governance
and implements them for the benefit of everybody, we are coming close to the
ideal.

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2.2. Poverty Alleviation

NSCB poverty statistics show that Pampanga was consistently included in


the least poor cluster of provinces in 2003, 2006, & 2009. Poverty incidence rate
in Pampanga was posted at 6.7% in 2009, but poverty is perceived to be
concentrated in the flood-prone areas.

The probability of halving poverty between 1990 and 2015 remains a


concern.

On rice sufficiently, the provinces average yield per hectare is well enough to
meet the populations needs.

The favourable peace and order situation in the province is one of the factors
why we have maintained an attractive and dynamic business climate for
investors that we need to create jobs to alleviate poverty.

2.3. Social Amelioration

One of the more important issues that the provincial government needs to
address is social amelioration. We cannot forever rely on national grants for our
social development. The private and the public sectors need to combine efforts
and resources to alleviate the plight of the common masses: the poor and the
sick, the elderly and the vulnerable, the differently-abled and the marginalized.
Projects on social services are lined-up to improve human development.

2.4. Sustainable quality health services

The provision of free and/or affordable health services is among the main
thrusts of the Pineda administration.

2.5. Equal access to quality education

Learning skills must be emphasized in our society especially to growing


children. The right to education also encompasses the obligation to rule out
discrimination at all levels of the educational system.

2.6. Environmental sustainability and disaster resiliency

2.6.1. Natural Resources

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2.6.1.a. Quarrying

One of the major contributors to the provincial revenue is the quarry


industry. However, sand mining, and degradation are interconnected.
The provincial administration recognizes the need to regulate the
industry. There is a need to strictly implement policies to ensure that
nature is not comprised.

Mineral extraction activities must be in accordance with the


Philippine Mining Act of 1055. The Provincial Mining Regulatory Board
through the Provincial Environment and Natural Resources Office shall
conduct strict monitoring of activities, with penalties accorded to
violators. Quarrying shall be limited only to designated quarrying areas.

2.6.1.b. Rivers and Waterways

One perennial problem of rivers is siltation. Though it is the


mandate of the Provincial Government to provide augmentation
support, it must, however, be a priority concern of all local government
units all stakeholders to address the problem by strictly complying with
RA 9003.

2.6.1.c. Candaba Swamp

To preserve the natural role of Candaba Swamp as a wildlife


sanctuary measure, legislative measures must be infused to delineate
some 500 hectares of the swamp. The establishment of Candaba
Swamp as a multiple use sanctuary has likewise been proposed to
provide an educational and recreational facility for the general public,
and a water storage reservoir for fisheries and for emergency irrigation
of surroundings farmland.

2.6.1.d. Coastal and Marine Resources

The zigzagging fishponds hinder the flow of waters during rainy


seasons that cause massive flooding in the province. It is therefore
necessary to strengthen the efforts to reclaim and keep the area open
to restore free flow of rain and flood water. This initiative shall be given
priority attention.

Rehabilitation of mangroves should be undertaken with the


cooperation of concerned agencies and local communities. Island
barangays should also be assisted specifically in managing their
household wastes.

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Island barangays should also be assisted specifically in managing


their household wastes.

2.6.1.e. Mt. Arayat National Park and Upland Areas

Mt. Arayat National Park is in need of total rehabilitation.


Reforestation projects shall be continuously undertaken with the
cooperation of the DENR, Provincial Government of Pampanga and the
municipal government of Arayat including upland communities.

2.6.2. Solid Waste Management

The Ecological Solid Waste Management Act, Republic Act (RA)


No. 9003.provides for the closure of all open and controlled dumpsites
and the shift to segregation. Segregation is the best method in
addressing solid waste as it separates bio-degradable from non-
biodegradable at the household level. Segregated waste is transported
to Materials Recovery Facility where sorting, recycling and composting
is done. This undertaking can be an alternative source of income
especially to indigents.

Generating maximum public awareness is one key solution to the


problem of trivializing the negative effects of indiscriminate disposal.

Solid waste must be properly handled to provide for a clean and


healthy environment to complement human advancement. The LGUs,
private sector, business, academe, and NGOs must be encouraged to
participate in the initiative.

2.6.3. Disaster Resiliency

Due to the increasing threats of natural calamities brought about by


climate change and the geographical location of the province, it is
necessary to pool resources, educates people, and finds new ways to
protect lives and communities.

Infrastructure damages, infectious disease outbreaks and financial


losses are among the large-scale consequences that the government
needs to address during times of calamities.

The provincial government has lined up programs dedicated to


strengthening Pampangas resiliency focusing on the dredging and
desilting of waterways, maintenance of well-trained and well equipped
DRRM office and personnel, advocating of disaster risk reduction and

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(2015-2042)

management awareness in LGUs and communities and construction of


evacuation centers. It is the provincial governments effort to sustain
the established resiliency of the Kapampangan.

2.7. Attractive Investment Climate

The favourable peace and order situation in the province, the provinces
strategic location and low cost of doing business and our huge manpower with
a variety of skills putting together these things equals good business
environment.

2.8. Adequate Infrastructure Support

As recommended by NEDA in the first Provincial Development and


Physical Framework Plan, Governments primordial intervention shall be to
improve physical access from the peripheral areas to the financial and services
cluster considering the existing and developed major road transport network.

2.9. Peace and Order and Public Safety

Pampanga is generally peaceful except for some isolated cases of crimes


and illegal-drug related cases. Police visibility is seen to complement the
continuous decrease of crimes.

2.10. Conservation and Promotion of Kapampangan Culture, Arts and Heritage

Conserving heritage for progress and development is one of the things we


must not take for granted, through increasing the awareness of each
Kapampangan and entire province of the importance of preserving the
architectural heritage of the province, promoting local history, culture,
language, arts and crafts, folk festivals and rituals and the like.

2.11. Tourism Promotion

The challenge is to turn Pampanga into a veritable tourist experience and


destination capitalization on the folk and religious festivities accentuated by
good food and excellent facilities and punctuated by a rich and varied shopping
experience of take home food and goodies and souvenirs with true local flavour
and show of craftsmanship.

All and everything about the conservation of our Kapampangan cultural


heritage is the key to have culture-based tourism related activities we can
promote, we can share and we can develop to create a culture of tourism and
have a sense of belonging and pride of place.

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2.12. Promotion of Public-Private Partnership

In the context of local governance, the main actors are the (1) government
and (2) the different stakeholders of within the locality. Since governance
involves not only the attainment of the government but the different
stakeholders in the society, good governance is difficult to attain.

A public-private partnership is a government service or private business


venture which is funded and operated through a partnership of government and
one or more private sector companies. Here are some of the existing PPPs in
the province: 1. Partnership with drug companies, 2) Operation and
maintenance of dialysis centers in the province, 3) Operation of diagnostic
centers, and 4) partnership with service provider on waste segregation and
collection.

3. Mission Statement

The Provincial Government of Pampanga adheres to uphold effective


and comprehensive delivery of social services, role model in terms of good
governance, environment protection, promotion of culture, peace and
catalyst of change through sustainable trade and investment, quality and
affordable education, availability of needed infrastructures and public
utilities where public officials, private sectors and the Kapampangans are
partners and committed to the principles of common unity, love of country,
and dedicated service to God Almighty.

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The Planning Environment


1. LOCATION, LAND AREA AND POLITICAL SUBDIVISION

1.1 Geographic Location

Pampanga is located at the center of Central Luzon Region which is at the


center of Luzon (Its heart-shaped area even earned its moniker of being the
heart of Central Luzon).Except for Aurora Province which is at eastern
seaboard, Pampanga is bounded by five provinces: Tarlac and Nueva Ecija in
the north, Zambales in the west, Bataan in the south, and, Bulacan in the east.

The City of San Fernando is the capital city located at near the geometric
center of the province. Its main land marks includes Mt. Arayat in the north that
towers over the vast central plains, Porac mountains that borders the province
from Zambales and Pampanga River that meanders from Nueva Ecija through
the low-lying areas of the Candaba Swamp into Manila Bay.

1.2 Land Area

Pampanga has a total land mass of 218,068 hectares. Its terrain is


relatively flat with one distinct mountain, Mount Arayat and the
notable Pampanga River. Among its municipalities, Porac has the largest land
mass with 30,835 hectares; Candaba comes in second with 20,820 hectares;
followed by Lubao with 16,096 hectares. Santo Tomas, with an area of 1,446
hectares is the smallest.

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
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Figure 3 - 1

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PROVINCE OFPAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
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1.3 Political Subdivision

Pampanga is composed of one (1) highly urbanized city (Angeles City), two
(2) component cities (City of San Fernando and Mabalacat City) and nineteen
(19) municipalities grouped into four (4) legislative districts.

Table 3 - 1.Total Barangays, Land Area, Type, and Income Class by City/ Municipality/ District of Pampanga

Legislative Total Land Area Income


City/ Municipality TYPE
District Barangays (in has.) Class

1. Angeles City Highly urbanized independent city 1st District 33 6,280 1st class
2. Apalit Municipality 4th District 12 6,010 1st class
3. Arayat Municipality 3rd District 30 17,667 1st class
4. Bacolor Municipality 3rd District 21 7,424 3rd class
5. Candaba Municipality 4th District 33 20,820 1st class
6. Floridablanca Municipality 2nd District 33 16,133 1st class
7. Guagua Municipality 2nd District 31 4,893 1st class
8. Lubao Municipality 2nd District 44 16,096 1st class
9. Mabalacat City Component city 1st District 27 18,255 1st class
10. Macabebe Municipality 4thDistrict 26 10,591 1st class
11. Magalang Municipality 1st District 27 10,453 1st class
12. Masantol Municipality 4thDistrict 25 4,622 2nd class
13. Mexico Municipality 3rd District 43 12,201 1st class
14. Minalin Municipality 4th District 15 4,713 4th class
15. Porac Municipality 2nd District 29 30,835 1st class
16. City of San Fernando Component City 3rd District 35 6,857 1st class
17. San Luis Municipality 4thDistrict 17 5,525 3rd class
18. San Simon Municipality 4thDistrict 14 5,993 3rd class
19. Santa Ana Municipality 3rd District 14 4,044 3rd class
20. Santa Rita Municipality 2nd District 10 2,319 4th class
21. Santo Tomas Municipality 4thDistrict 7 1,446 4th class
22. Sasmuan Municipality 2nd District 12 4,892 4th class
PAMPANGA Province 538 218,068 1st class
Source: ArcGIS, PPDO

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2. POPULATION AND SETTLEMENTS

2.1 Regional and National Context

Based on the 2010 Census on Population and Housing (CPH) of the


National Statistics Office (NSO), the total population of the Philippines as of
May 2010 is 92.34 million with an increased rate of 1.90% annually. Central
Luzon (Region III) with 10.14 million populations, ranked third among the
regions with largest population size. The region comprised less than eleven
percent of the total population nationwide.

Table 3 - 2.Area, Population, Annual Population Growth Rate and Density, Central Luzon Provinces: 1990, 2000, 2010
Annual Population
Growth Rate Density
% Pop. (APGR)
Region/ Province/ Area 1990 2000 2010
Share
City (km) Population Population Population
2010 1990- 2000- 1990-
1990 2000 2010
2000 2010 2010

PHILIPPINES 300,000.00 60,703,810 76,506,928 92,337,852 2.34 1.90 2.12 202 255 308
Central Luzon 21,470.36 6,338,590 8,204,742 10,137,737 100 2.61 2.14 2.37 295 374 472
Aurora 3,239.54 139,573 173,797 201,233 1.98 2.22 1.48 1.84 43 54 62
Bataan 1,372.91 425,803 557,659 687,482 6.78 2.73 2.11 2.42 310 406 501
Bulacan 2,625.05 1,505,219 2,234,088 2,924,433 28.85 4.02 2.73 3.37 573 851 1,114
Nueva Ecija 5,284.33 1,312,680 1,659,883 1,955,373 19.29 2.37 1.65 2.01 248 314 370
Pampanga 2,120.41 1,295,929 1,618,759 2,014,019 19.87 2.25 2.21 2.23 611 762 950
Angeles City 60.27 236,686 263,971 326,336 3.22 1.10 2.14 1.62 3,927 4,380 5,415
Tarlac 3,053.45 859,708 1,068,783 1,273,240 12.56 2.2 1.76 1.98 282 350 417
Zambales 3,529.40 369,665 433,542 534,443 5.27 1.61 2.11 1.86 105 123 151
Olongapo City 185 193,327 194,260 221,178 2.18 0.05 1.31 0.67 1,045 1,050 1,196

Source: 2010 Census and Housing Population, NSO

Pampanga had more than 2.01 million population (excluding Angeles City)
on the same census year. It ranked ninth among all the provinces nationwide in
terms of population and second among the seven provinces in Central Luzon. It
accounts to almost 20% of the 10.14 million population of the region.

The provinces population density in the 2010 census year is 950, which is
twice as high as the regional average of 472 persons per square kilometer and
far higher than the national average of 308 persons per square kilometer.

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Angeles City, with a total population of 326,336, surpassed the provinces in


Central Luzon in terms of population density of 5,415 persons per square
kilometer. It is almost equal to the summation of the other densities in the
region and twenty times higher than the national average.

Among the provinces in the region, Bulacan had the largest population with
2.92 million and top the density rate of 1,114 persons per square kilometer.
Nueva Ecija had the third largest population size of 1.95 million. Aurora had the
lowest population size of 201,233 and the lowest density rate of 62 persons per
square kilometer.

Before Mt. Pinatubo erupted in 1991, Pampanga was the most populous
province in Central Luzon. But in the succeeding census years (2000 and
2010), there were more people counted in Bulacan. For the ten year period
(2000-2010), the population of Pampanga grew faster than the regional
average although not as fast as that of Bulacan.

2.2 Population Size, Density and Growth Rates

The province of Pampanga posted a total population of 2,340,355 persons


as of May 1, 2010. This is larger by 457,625 persons compared to its total
population of 1,882,730 persons counted in the 2000 CPH. The increase in the
population count from 2000 to 2010 translated to an average annual population
growth rate (APGR) of 2.20%. This is slightly higher than the 2.08% APGR of
the province between the census years 1990 and 2000.

Between census years 1990, 2000 and 2010, the population density of the
neighboring municipalities and cities around Clark Special Economic and
Freeport Zone increased, although Angeles City continue to have the highest
population density followed by the City of San Fernando and Mabalacat City.

The municipality of Bacolor registered a remarkable decrease in population


between 1990 and 2000 due to the resettlement of whole barangays affected
by lahar flows from Mt. Pinatubos slopes. However, its population almost
doubled in 2010 so it registered a growth rate of almost 7% and density of 424
persons per square kilometers from 217 in 2000.

Although the municipality of Guagua exhibits a high population density, its


growth rate is lower compared to the other municipalities. Between 2000 and
2010, it registered the second lowest growth rate. Among LGUs, Angeles City,
City of San Fernando and Mabalacat City continue to have the most number of
people. These three combine for more than one third of Pampangas
population.

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Figure 3 - 2

6,000
Population Density by Municipality
5,000 2000 Pop. Density 2010 Pop. Density

4,000

3,000

2,000

1,000

PORAC
ARAYAT

LUBAO

MEXICO
APALIT

GUAGUA

MAGALANG

SAN LUIS

SASMUAN
ANGELES CITY

BACOLOR

FLORIDABLANCA

MINALIN

SANTA ANA
CANDABA

MABALACAT CITY
MACABEBE

SAN SIMON

SANTO TOMAS
SANTA RITA
CITY OF SAN FERNANDO
MASANTOL

In the same years, Porac showed resurgence as its population growth rate
increased.

The municipalities along the banks of Pampanga River account for the least
shares in provincial population individually. This may be attributed to the
regular recurrence of flooding especially in the Pampanga Delta area.

The least populated area was the municipality of Sasmuan with almost
1.16% share to the total population of the province.

If the average annual PGR recorded at 2.20% during the period 2000 to
2010 continues, the population of Pampanga would double in 32 years. By the
end of plan period 2015-2042, the province will have an additional population of
2,354,926 with an estimated population density of 1,073 persons per square
kilometer.

Based on growth and density characteristics, municipalities are classified


into the following criteria, such as

a. High Density and Fast-Growing Settlement: Angeles City, Apalit,


Floridablanca, Mabalacat City, Magalang, Mexico, Minalin, and City of San
Fernando

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These eight (8) city/municipalities have population densities greater


than five hundred (500) persons per square kilometer and population
growth rates higher than the provincial average rate of 2.20% in 2000-2010

b. Low Density and Fast-Growing Settlement: Candaba, Bacolor and Porac

These three (3) municipalities are bordering the urban centers of the
province. Candaba rapid growth is attributed to growth in the area of
agriculture, and Porac due to its richness mineral resources such as sand
and gravel

c. High Density and Slow-Growing Settlement: Santo Tomas, Guagua,


Sasmuan, Santa Rita, Santa Ana, Lubao, Arayat, San Luis and San Simon

These nine (9) municipalities showed a slowing down of growth, but are
high in population density.

d. Low Density and Slow-Growing Settlement: Masantol and Macabebe

With their population density of less than five hundred per square
kilometer, these two municipalities also have a population growth below
provincial average of 0.86% and 0.80% respectively.

Figure 3 - 3

10.00
Annual Population Growth Rate (APGR)
by Municipality

5.00

0.00

-5.00

-10.00

APGR 1990-2000 APGR 2000-2010

-15.00

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Table 3 - 3. Area, Population, Annual Population Growth Rate, Density, Share by Municipality, PAMPANGA: 1980, 1990, 2000, 2010
2010
Population Annual Population Growth Rate (APGR) in % Density (persons/km) Pop. %
City/ Area share to
Municipality (in km) 1980- 1990- 2000- 1980- 1990- 1980- the
1980 1990 2000 2010 1980 1990 2000 2010 province
1990 2000 2010 2000 2010 2010
Angeles City 62.80 188,834 236,686 263,971 326,336 2.28 1.10 2.14 1.69 1.62 1.84 3007 3,769 4,203 5,196 13.94
Apalit 60.10 48,253 62,373 78,295 101,537 2.60 2.30 2.63 2.45 2.47 2.51 803 1,038 1,303 1,689 4.34

Arayat 176.67 56,742 73,189 101,792 121,348 2.58 3.35 1.77 2.97 2.56 2.57 321 414 576 687 5.19

Bacolor 74.24 50,942 67,259 16,147 31,508 2.82 -13.29 6.91 -5.58 -3.72 -1.59 686 906 217 424 1.35

Candaba 208.20 52,945 68,145 86,066 102,399 2.56 2.36 1.75 2.46 2.06 2.22 254 327 413 492 4.38

Floridablanca 161.33 51,648 66,146 85,394 110,846 2.50 2.58 2.64 2.55 2.61 2.58 320 410 529 687 4.74

Guagua 48.93 72,609 88,290 96,858 111,199 1.97 0.93 1.39 1.45 1.16 1.43 1,484 1,804 1,980 2,273 4.75

Lubao 160.96 77,502 99,705 125,699 150,843 2.55 2.34 1.84 2.45 2.09 2.24 481 619 781 937 6.45

Mabalacat City 182.55 80,966 121,115 171,045 215,610 4.11 3.51 2.34 3.81 2.93 3.32 444 663 937 1,181 9.21

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


Macabebe 105.91 45,830 55,505 65,346 70,777 1.93 1.64 0.80 1.79 1.22 1.46 433 524 617 668 3.02

Magalang 104.53 34,840 43,940 77,530 103,597 2.35 5.84 2.94 4.08 4.38 3.70 333 420 742 991 4.43

Masantol 46.22 35,350 41,964 48,120 52,407 1.73 1.38 0.86 1.55 1.12 1.32 765 908 1,041 1,134 2.24

Mexico 122.01 53,491 69,546 109,481 146,851 2.66 4.64 2.98 3.65 3.81 3.42 438 570 897 1,204 6.27

Minalin 47.13 27,414 34,795 35,150 44,001 2.41 0.10 2.27 1.25 1.18 1.59 582 738 746 934 1.88

Porac 308.35 50,906 68,215 80,757 111,441 2.97 1.70 3.27 2.33 2.48 2.65 165 221 262 361 4.76
City of San
68.57 110,891 157,851 221,857 285,912 3.59 3.46 2.57 3.53 3.01 3.21 1,617 2,302 3,235 4,170 12.22
Fernando
San Luis 55.25 25,701 31,920 41,554 49,311 2.19 2.67 1.73 2.43 2.20 2.20 465 578 752 893 2.11

San Simon 59.93 23,518 30,678 41,253 48,353 2.69 3.00 1.60 2.85 2.30 2.43 392 512 688 807 2.07

Santa Ana 40.44 25,361 32,540 42,990 52,001 2.52 2.82 1.92 2.67 2.37 2.42 627 805 1,063 1,286 2.22

Santa Rita 23.19 24,995 28,296 32,780 38,762 1.25 1.48 1.69 1.36 1.59 1.47 1,078 1,220 1,414 1,671 1.66

Santo Tomas 14.46 24,951 33,309 32,695 38,062 2.93 -0.19 1.53 1.36 0.67 1.42 1,726 2,304 2,261 2,632 1.63
Sasmuan 48.92 17,901 21,148 23,359 27,254 1.68 1.00 1.55 1.34 1.28 1.41 366 432 477 557 1.16

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PAMPANGA 2,180.68 1,181,590 1,532,615 1,882,730 2,340,355 2.64 2.08 2.20 2.36 2.14 2.30 542 703 863 1,073 100.00
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22
Source: National Statistics Authority
Table 3 - 4. Projected Population by Municipality, PAMPANGA: 2011 - 2042
BASE PROJECTED POPULATION
City/
Municipality YEAR
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Angeles City 326,336 333,331 340,476 347,774 355,229 362,844 370,621 378,566 386,680 394,969 403,435
Apalit 101,537 104,211 106,955 109,772 112,663 115,630 118,675 121,800 125,008 128,300 131,678

Arayat 121,348 123,499 125,689 127,917 130,185 132,493 134,842 137,232 139,665 142,141 144,661

Bacolor 31,508 33,686 36,015 38,505 41,167 44,013 47,056 50,310 53,788 57,506 61,482

Candaba 102,399 104,194 106,020 107,879 109,769 111,693 113,651 115,643 117,670 119,733 121,832

Floridablanca 110,846 113,776 116,783 119,869 123,037 126,289 129,627 133,053 136,570 140,179 143,884

Guagua 112,745 112,655 114,313 115,902 117,513 119,147 120,804 122,483 123,398 125,913 127,663

Lubao 150,843 153,619 156,446 159,325 162,257 165,243 168,283 171,380 174,534 177,746 181,017

Mabalacat City 215,610 220,661 225,829 231,119 236,533 242,074 247,744 253,548 259,487 265,565 271,786

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


Macabebe 70,777 71,344 71,916 72,493 73,074 73,659 74,250 74,845 75,445 76,050 76,659

Magalang 103,597 106,644 109,780 113,008 116,332 119,753 123,275 126,900 130,632 134,474 138,428

Masantol 52,407 52,856 53,309 53,766 54,227 54,692 55,160 55,633 56,110 56,591 57,076

Mexico 146,851 151,227 155,734 160,376 165,155 170,077 175,146 180,366 185,741 191,276 196,977

Minalin 44,001 45,000 46,022 47,068 48,137 49,230 50,348 51,492 52,661 53,857 55,081

Porac 111,441 115,088 118,855 122,745 126,763 130,911 135,196 139,621 144,191 148,910 153,784
City of San
285,912 293,257 300,791 308,518 316,443 324,573 332,911 341,463 350,235 359,233 368,461
Fernando
San Luis 49,311 50,162 51,028 51,909 52,805 53,717 54,644 55,587 56,547 57,523 58,516

San Simon 48,353 49,127 49,913 50,712 51,524 52,349 53,187 54,038 54,903 55,782 56,675

Santa Ana 52,001 53,000 54,018 55,056 56,114 57,192 58,291 59,410 60,552 61,715 62,901

Santa Rita 38,762 39,417 40,083 40,761 41,450 42,151 42,863 43,588 44,325 45,074 45,836

SantoTomas 38,062 38,645 39,237 39,838 40,448 41,067 41,696 42,335 42,983 43,642 44,310
Sasmuan 27,254 27,678 28,108 28,545 28,988 29,439 29,896 30,361 30,833 31,312 31,798

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23
Table 3 - 4. Projected Population by Municipality, PAMPANGA: 2011 2042
City/ Municipality BASE
PROJECTED POPULATION
YEAR
2010 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030
Angeles City 326,336 412,083 420,916 429,939 439,154 448,568 458,183 468,004 478,036 488,283 498,750
Apalit 101,537 135,146 138,705 142,358 146,107 149,955 153,904 157,957 162,116 166,386 170,767

Arayat 121,348 147,226 149,836 152,492 155,196 157,947 160,747 163,597 166,497 169,449 172,453

Bacolor 31,508 65,733 70,277 75,136 80,331 85,884 91,822 98,170 104,957 112,214 119,972

Candaba 102,399 123,967 126,140 128,351 130,601 132,890 135,219 137,589 140,001 142,455 144,952

Floridablanca 110,846 147,687 151,590 155,597 159,709 163,930 168,263 172,710 177,275 181,960 186,769

Guagua 111,199 129,438 131,238 133,063 134,913 136,788 138,690 140,618 142,573 144,556 146,565

Lubao 150,843 184,348 187,740 191,195 194,713 198,297 201,946 205,662 209,447 213,301 217,226

Mabalacat City 215,610 278,153 284,668 291,337 298,161 305,145 312,293 319,609 327,095 334,757 342,599

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


Macabebe 70,777 77,274 77,893 78,518 79,147 79,781 80,421 81,066 81,715 82,370 83,031

Magalang 103,597 142,499 146,690 151,004 155,445 160,016 164,722 169,566 174,553 179,686 184,970

Masantol 52,407 57,565 58,058 58,556 59,058 59,564 60,075 60,590 61,109 61,633 62,161

Mexico 146,851 202,847 208,892 215,118 221,529 228,131 234,930 241,931 249,141 256,566 264,212

Minalin 44,001 56,332 57,611 58,920 60,258 61,627 63,026 64,458 65,922 67,419 68,950

Porac 111,441 158,817 164,015 169,383 174,927 180,652 186,564 192,670 198,976 205,489 212,214

City of San Fernando 285,912 377,927 387,635 397,594 407,808 418,284 429,030 440,051 451,356 462,951 474,844

San Luis 49,311 59,526 60,554 61,599 62,662 63,744 64,845 65,964 67,103 68,261 69,439

San Simon 48,353 57,582 58,504 59,440 60,392 61,359 62,341 63,339 64,353 65,383 66,429

Sta. Ana 52,001 64,109 65,341 66,596 67,876 69,180 70,509 71,863 73,244 74,651 76,085

Sta. Rita 38,762 46,610 47,398 48,200 49,014 49,843 50,685 51,542 52,413 53,299 54,200

Sto. Tomas 38,062 44,989 45,678 46,377 47,088 47,809 48,541 49,284 50,039 50,806 51,584
Sasmuan 27,254 32,293 32,795 33,304 33,822 34,347 34,881 35,423 35,974 36,533 37,101

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Table 3 - 4. Projected Population by Municipality, PAMPANGA: 2011 2042
City/ BASE PROJECTED POPULATION
Municipality
YEAR 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042
2010
Angeles City 326,336 509,440 520,360 531,515 542,908 554,545 566,432 578,574 590,976 603,643 616,583 629,799 643,299

Apalit 101,537 175,264 179,880 184,617 189,479 194,469 199,950 204,846 210,241 215,778 221,460 227,292 233,278

Arayat 121,348 175,510 178,622 181,788 185,011 188,291 191,629 195,027 198,484 202,003 205,584 209,229 212,938

Bacolor 31,508 128,266 137,134 146,615 156,751 167,588 179,175 191,562 204,806 218,965 234,103 250,288 267,592

Candaba 102,399 147,493 150,078 142,708 155,385 158,109 160,880 163,700 166,569 169,489 172,460 175,483 178,559

Floridablanca 110,846 191,706 196,772 201,973 207,311 212,790 218,414 224,187 230,112 236,194 242,437 248,844 255,421

Guagua 111,199 148,603 150,669 152,764 154,888 157,041 159,225 161,439 163,683 165,959 168,266 170,606 172,978

Lubao 150,843 221,223 225,294 229,440 233,663 237,962 242,342 246,801 251,343 255,968 260,678 265,476 270,361
Mabalacat
215,610 350,624 358,837 367,243 375,845 384,650 393,660 402,881 412,318 421,977 431,861 441,978 452,331
City

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


Macabebe 70,777 83,696 84,367 85,043 85,725 86,412 87,105 87,803 88,507 89,216 89,931 90,652 91,379

Magalang 103,597 190,410 196,010 201,774 207,708 231,816 220,104 226,577 233,240 240,100 247,161 254,429 261,912

Masantol 52,407 62,694 63,231 63,773 64,319 64,871 65,427 65,987 66,553 67,123 67,699 68,279 68,864

Mexico 146,851 272,087 280,195 288,546 297,145 306,001 315,120 324,511 334,183 344,142 354,398 364,960 375,837

Minalin 44,001 70,516 72,118 73,756 75,431 77,145 78,897 80,689 82,521 84,396 86,313 88,273 90,278

Porac 111,441 219,160 226,333 233,741 241,391 249,291 257,450 265,877 274,578 283,565 292,846 302,431 312,329
City of San
285,912 487,042 499,554 512,388 525,551 539,052 552,900 567,104 581,672 596,615 611,942 627,662 643,787
Fernando
San Luis 49,311 70,638 71,857 73,098 74,360 75,643 76,949 78,240 79,629 81,003 82,402 83,824 85,271

San Simon 48,353 67,493 68,573 69,671 70,786 71,919 73,070 74,240 75,428 76,636 77,862 79,109 80,375

Sta. Ana 52,001 77,547 79,037 80,555 82,103 83,680 85,288 86,948 88,596 90,298 92,033 93,801 95,603

Sta. Rita 38,762 55,116 56,048 56,995 57,959 58,939 59,935 60,948 61,978 63,026 64,091 64,174 66,276

Sto. Tomas 38,062 52,374 53,176 53,990 54,817 55,657 56,509 57,375 58,253 59,145 60,051 60,971 61,905

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Sasmuan 27,254 37,677 38,263 38,858 39,461 40,075 40,698 41,330 41,972 42,625 43,287 43,960 44,643
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PAMPANGA 2,340,355 3,695,885 3,777,182 3,860,266 3,945,178 4,031,958 4,120,646 4,211,286 4,303,919 4,398,590 4,495,343 4,594,224 4,695,281
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2.3 Existing Settlement Pattern

More than 26% of the provinces total population reside in Angeles City and
City of San Fernando. The high population densities of the cities show sign of
preference for settlement. The presence of economic opportunities, basic
services and developed infrastructures are some of the factors of population
movement in these areas.

The existing settlement pattern of the province is described following the


criteria on the hierarchy of settlement based on the population size.

Figure 3 - 4

Urban Centers

With population of more than 300,000, Angeles City (326,336) is the


largest urban center. Following closely is the regional center of the province,
City of San Fernando its a population of 285,912. These urban centers are the
providers of the highest level of services within the province.

Large Towns

With population sizes of over 100,000: Mabalacat City (215,610), Lubao


(150,843), Mexico (146,851), Arayat (121,348), Porac (111,441), Guagua
(111,199), Floridablanca (110,846), Magalang (103,597), Candaba (102,399)
and Apalit (101,537) are classified as large towns.

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Medium Towns

With population sizes of over 50,000: Macabebe (70,777), Masantol


(52,407), Sta. Ana (52,001) are classified as medium towns.

Small Towns

With population sizes of below 50,000: San Luis (49,311), San Simon
(48,353), Minalin (44,001), Sta. Rita (38,762), Sto. Tomas (38,062), Bacolor
(31,508) and Sasmuan (27,254) are classified as small towns.

3. PHYSICAL RESOURCES

3.1 Topography and Slope

The province is a part of the great plain extending from Manila Bay north of
the gulf of Lingayen, Pangasinan. Most of this area is only a few meters above
sea level. Mt. Arayat with a height of 3,200 ft. above sea level and the elevated
strip along the western boundary where a few peak of the Zambales Mountain
rise to height of nearly 1,900 meters constitute the high land.

The general slope is south and southeast towards Manila Bay and Rio
Grande. In the northern part of the province, however, the slope is going
downwards towards Mt. Arayat. Not far from the base is the Pampanga River
which channels floodwaters into the wide Candaba Swamp, then to tributaries,
rivulets, creeks and finally to Manila Bay.

Table 3 - 5. Slope Classification


Category Description Area (hectares)

0-3% Level to gently sloping 167,357.06


3-8% Gently sloping to undulating 13,331.13
8-18% Moderately sloping to rolling 12,475.58
18-30% Rolling to moderately steep 14,116.31
30-50% Steep 6,684.06
above 50% Very steep 4,104.11
TOTAL 218,068.25

Areas that belong to 0-3% slope category are most suitable for irrigation
because of their flat terrain. Depending on soil condition, 3% is about the

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maximum slope of land to be used for lowland rice production.

Gently sloping land (3 8%) are suitable for irrigation but require slight
terrain modification in terms of contouring on terracing. Depending on soil and
climate condition in the area, 8% is about the maximum slope for upland crop
production that will require more complex and expensive soil conservation
practices.

Due to terrain restrictions in 8-18% slope category, irrigation of lowland rice


will not be feasible. Intensive soil conservation measures are necessary to
keep the soil in place when cultivated.

On 18-30% slope, cultivated crops cannot be produced continuously. On


extended period of time, tree crops can be grown.

The 30-50% and above (slope category) is not suitable to any cultivated
crops and should be left as forest cover.

3.2 Soil Characteristics

The soils of Pampanga are generally of recent alluvial origin. The whole
plain and foothills north and northwest of San Fernando consist of coarse to
very fine sand, and in the south and southeast, silt loam and clay.

Pampangas surface soils are composed of 54 percent sand, 21 percent


silt, and 25 percent clay. They are slightly acidic with the exception of the
Arayat sandy clay loam which is somewhat alkaline. Also, they are not sticky
and plastic because the magnesium content is very much lower than half of the
calcium content.

3.3 Ecosystems of the Province

3.3.1 Freshwater and Coastal Marine Ecosystems

Inland Waters (Rivers/River Basins)

Numerous rivers ply through Pampanga. The largest and longest of


these is Pampanga River which runs from Nueva Ecija and flows along the
slope of Mt. Arayat, cutting across the entire eastern section of the province
until it reaches Manila Bay.

The Pampanga River basin extends over the southern slopes of the
Caraballo Mountains, the western slopes of the Sierra Madre range and the
major portions of the Central Plain of Luzon. It encompasses the provinces of

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Nueva Ecija; part of Bulacan, Tarlac and Quezon; and almost whole of
Pampanga. The total length of the main river, the Pampanga River, is about
260 kilometers.

Adjacent to Mount Arayat, across Pampanga River, just on the eastern side
is the Candaba swamp, covering an area of some 250 sq. km. absorbing most
of the flood flows coming from the eastern sections of the basin (western
slopes of a portion of the Sierra Madre mountain range) and the overflowing of
the Pampanga River via the Cabiao Floodway. This area is submerged during
the rainy season but is relatively dry during summer. At the lower sections of
the basin, where the Pampanga delta lies, the Pampanga River system divide
into relatively small branches, crisscrossed with fishponds to form a network of
sluggish, tidal flats and canals, which eventually find their way to Manila Bay.
The main river has a relatively low-gradient channel particularly at the middle
and lower sections.

Other rivers are the Abacan, Porac, Gumain and Caulaman Rivers. These
major streams drain the southwestern central plains of the region originating
from the mountainous regions of Zambales near the western boundary of the
province and flow southeasterly towards Manila Bay. It is also through these
rivers that lahar from Mt. Pinatubo heavily flows burying low-lying areas in the
province.

One perennial problem of rivers is siltation, with various elements


contributing to the condition. Soil degradation is the main cause of siltation,
which can be a consequence of intensive agricultural practices in rural areas
and clearing activities in urbanized communities. Underwater erosion is also a
factor, though it is inevitable since it is a natural occurrence.

The Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the early 90s caused tremendous siltation of
rivers which led to waterways and passages being clogged and impermeable.
Though desilting activities helped revived rivers and passageways, siltation still
continues and the cause today is man-made rather than nature induced.

Social irresponsibility in coastal areas and along rivers is largely to blame


for silted rivers and tributaries. As evidenced by the amount of solid wastes
found in rivers, garbage disposal along riverbanks and coastal areas has
contributed greatly to siltation which has become a huge concern of the
government.

Efforts on freshwater/coastal marine ecosystems management are not


deliberately initiated and carefully planned.

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Ground Waters

The groundwater is the primary source of potable water supply in the


province. According to the National Water Resources Council, the estimated
potential inflow which can be yielded from the province is 505 mm per year. It
can be extracted through the construction of wells equipped with pumps or
available spring water.

Coastal and Marine Resources

Pampanga is partly bounded by Manila Bay where fishing operators (who


are mostly not residents of Pampanga) maintain large areas of fishponds.
These zigzagging fishponds hinder the flow of flood waters during rainy season
that cause massive flooding in the province.

The clearing of mangroves and their conversion to fishponds practically


eliminated the spawning grounds of some fish species and contributed to the
declining yield of the municipal marine fisheries.

3.3.2 Mineral, Forest and Geothermal Ecosystems

Pampanga was observed to have metallic deposits of gold, silver and


copper and non-metallic deposits of clay, sand and gravel.

Metallic Minerals

Gold and Silver were explored, extracted and developed from the
porphyritic quartz bearing andesite in Sitio La Kalyusan, Pabanlag,
Floridablanca.

Copper was also explored in Pio, Planas, Porac.

Non-Metallic Minerals

Deposits of red-burning clays were seen in San Luis, Candaba and vicinity.
Other clay deposits are also present in Sta. Ana and other surrounding areas.
The indication of clay is the presence of manganese traces mixed with pyrolitic
form of iron oxide. Very plastic brown clay deposit was also observed in San
Fernando, San Matias, Mexico and Bacolor.

The most prominent non-metallic deposit that was encountered was the
quarry deposit of sand and gravel. The thick, loose consolidated gravel and
sand were found in the southwestern part of Angeles City and the vicinity of
Porac, particularly the Abacan and Pasig-Potrero Rivers, which may be result

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of various eruptions of Mt. Pinatubo. Other quarry deposits that can be found
along major drainage of Gumain River are sand and gravel which are good
concrete aggregates due to their quarts and feldspar contents.

One of the major contributions to the provincial revenue is the quarry


industry. However, sand mining and degradation are interconnected.

Forestland

Forestland covers almost 21% of the total land area of the province or
approximately forty-six thousand (46,000) hectares. Mt. Arayat dominates the
landscape (Figure 3-6) towering over extensive flat lands but access around
the mountain is cut off and one has to pass through Nueva Ecija if traveling
between Arayat and Magalang.

The Arayat National Park covers approximately 3.7 thousand hectares,


508.69 hectares of which consists of the park resort area. It used to be a major
tourist attraction in Pampanga with its spring-fed swimming pools, viewing
deck, fishpond, campsites and the famous 100 steps leading to the mountain
top. The park is now in need of a total rehabilitation due to devastation both
man-made and nature-induced. Mt. Arayat has been the subject of landslides
due to forest degradation. This has caught the attention of President Benigno
Aquino III who pledged one billion pesos (P1,000,000,000) for the rehabilitation
of Mt. Arayat.

Geothermal Prospects

Philippine power generator and distribution company Aboitiz Power is


currently exploring geothermal power source in some 20,000 hectares of land
in Pampanga and nearby Zambales. The companys planned exploration is in
Porac and Floridablanca in Pampanga; and San Marcelino and Botolan in
Zambales. At least forty percent (40%) of the area is in Pampanga. The
company is planning to invest $300 million for the planned 100-MW plant in the
area. The same area was explored by the Philippine National Oil Co. and their
partners for energy source shortly before Mt. Pinatubo erupted in 1991.

3.3.3 Urban Ecosystems

The province of Pampanga is composed of nineteen (19) municipalities,


two (2) component cities and one (1) independent city.

Out of 19 municipalities, ten (10) are first class; one (1) second class; four
(4) are third class; and four (4) are fourth class. (Table 3-1)

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The cities: Angeles City (independent), Mabalacat City (component), and


City of San Fernando (component)

The first class municipalities are: Apalit, Arayat, Candaba, Floridablanca,


Guagua, Lubao, Magalang, Macabebe, Mexico, Porac

The municipality of Masantol is the only second class municipality in the


province.

The third class municipalities are: Bacolor, Sta. Ana, San Simon, and San
Luis.

The fourth class municipalities are: Minalin, Sasmuan, Sta. Rita and Sto.
Tomas.

Pampanga has no fifth and sixth class municipality.

4. LOCAL ECONOMY

Regional Context

In 2012, the Philippine Growth Domestic Product (GDP) grew by 6.8 percent.
The Gross Regional Domestic Product (GDRP) of Central Luzon grew by 7.5
percent. The provinces in the region constantly contribute to the national economy,
accounting for about 9.2 percent of the national GDP.

The sectoral distribution of Central Luzon economy is similar to the national.


Central Luzon remained the top contributor to the growth of Industry (at 2.3%) and
AHFF (at 1.2%) sectors in the country and had the largest share of 14 percent to the
Gross Value Added (GVA) of AHFF sector in 2012.

The Industry sector is the major contributor in the regions economy. The sector
accounted for the biggest share in 2012, with 42.2 percent share, the Services sector
with 40.9 percent and Agriculture/Hunting/Forestry and Fishing (AHFF) sector with
16.8 percent.

The way to fight poverty is to create jobs.

The continuous influx of investors and the yearly turn-out of graduates affect the
tempo of our employment turn-over in the province. However, the recent global crisis
cannot be ignored.

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Figure 3 - 5
Figure 2 - 1

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Figure 3 - 6

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Table 3 - 6. Region III CENTRAL LUZON


GROSS REGIONAL DOMESTIC PRODUCT BY INDUSTRIAL ORIGIN (2010 TO 2012)
PERCENT DISTRIBUTION, AT CONSTANT 2000 PRICES
INDUSTRY/ YEAR 2010 2011 2012
I. AGRI., HUNTING, FORESTRY & FISHING 17.8 16.4 16.8
a. Agriculture and Forestry 14.0 13.0 13.6
b. Fishing 3.7 3.4 3.2
II INDUSTRY SECTOR 40.2 42.6 42.2
a. Mining and Quarrying 0.3 0.4 0.5
b. Manufacturing 31.6 34.3 33.4
c. Construction 5.9 5.6 6.1
d. Electricity, Gas and Water Supply 2.4 2.2 2.2
III SERVICE SECTOR 42.0 41.0 40.9
a. Transport, Storage & Communication 10.3 9.9 9.9
b. Trade and Repair of Motor Vehicles, Motorcycles, Personal and
Household Goods 8.8 8.5 8.5
c. Financial Intermediation 5.7 5.8 5.9
d. R. Estate, Renting & Business Activities 7.8 7.7 7.8
e. Public Administration & Defense; Compulsory Social Security 2.5 2.4 2.4
f. Other Services 6.9 6.7 6.5
GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT 100.0 100.0 100.0
Source : National Statistical Coordination Board

Going over the employment facilitation of the province is like travelling endless
miles without the feel of exhaustion. We must always be consistent in generating
employment and providing alternative means of livelihood to our people.

In the preferred spatial strategy for province of Pampanga, which is the Radial
and Circumferential urban form, the following urban core/ hub and growth nodes will
be developed as sources of growth and employment:

1. Export-and-investment-led growth in the Urban core or Hub (Metro Clark) to


support business industry and finance services

2. Agribusiness, eco-tourism, biodiversity and ecological services development


in the growth nodes of Arayat Growth Center, Candaba Wetland Growth
Center, and Porac-Gumain Growth Center

3. Fisheries industry and coastal ecosystem rehabilitation and development in


the growth node of Pampanga Bay Growth Center; and

4. Manufacturing industry, aviation, tourist destination, as well as leisure and


entertainment in the Clark Freeport Zone

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4.1 Agriculture

The province of Pampanga is a typical agriculture province, and possesses


natural resources which have strengthened the agricultural production. Due to
the various agro-ecological conditions and with more than half or 51.49% of the
provinces land area devoted to agriculture, several agricultural products have
been produced abundantly. Rice is the major crop for both economy and food
security of the province (followed by corn and sugarcane). Other crops include
ampalaya banana, camote, gabi, mongo, eggplant, okra, pechay native,
squash fruit, string beans, mango, etc. The rivers and fishponds produce fish,
shrimps, and crabs.

Agricultural equipment in the province includes 251 units of four-wheel


tractors and 6.7 thousand units of hand tractors. Other facilities include 206
rice mills, 290 reapers, 476 warehouses, 16 cold storages, 11 processing
plants, 690 multipurpose drying pavements, 10 mechanical reaper and 4 re-
circulating dryers.

In 2013, palay production was at 419,721 metric tons and yield per hectare
was recorded at an average of 4.61 metric tons. Pampanga ranked third in
terms of palay production contributing 12 percent to Central Luzons palay
production in 2013.

Table 3-7 PALAY PRODUCTION (in Metric Tons)


Central Luzon Provinces, 2010-2014

Province 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

Aurora 84,994 85,433 90,791 87,900 94,785


Bataan 131,610 123,511 134,960 140,067 155,056
Bulacan 298,376 227,607 351,307 366,927 372,110
Nueva Ecija 1,374,173 1,313,487 1,587,163 1,672,666 1,930,996
Pampanga 393,328 310,456 388,187 419,721 433,106
Tarlac 562,180 450,757 549,299 585,077 638,906
Zambales 113,754 104,832 118,900 137,110 140,191

Central Luzon 2,958,415 2,616,083 3,220,607 3,409,468 3,765,150

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics, http://countrystat.bas.gov.ph

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In 2014, the province contributed 11.50% to the total palay production of


central Luzon yielding (4.73 metric tons per hectare), which is equivalent to
433,106 metric tons. The production recorded an increase of 133.85 metric
tons against 2013 production. The annual average increase of palay
production from year 2010 to 2015 is 20% or 388,959 metric tons.

Pampanga ranked third among the provinces in the region in terms of palay
production. Rice is still the most important crop in Pampanga agriculture which
dominates the most productive part of the provinces economy.

Pampanga ranked second to Tarlac in corn production, contributing 24% to


Central Luzons total produce in 2010 to 2014. There was an average annual
increase of 20% or 5.686 metric tons in annual production within the five-year
period.

Table 3-8. CORN PRODUCTION (In Metric Tons)


CENTRAL LUZON, 2010-2014

Province 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

Aurora 18,395 13,386 21,146 21,527 22,583.00


Bataan 9,361 8,814 7,230 10,753 7,391.00
Bulacan 2,532 2,267 2,580 3,270 3,665.00
Nueva Ecija 15,103 15,135 19,352 24,435 25,804.00
Pampanga 49,447 47,478 49,021 54,331 58,157.00
Tarlac 102,666 100,888 110,633 112,107 122,226.00
Zambales 386 526 612 1,342 1,043.00
Central Luzon 197,890 188,494 210,574 227,765 240,870.00
Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics, http://countrystat.bas.gov.ph

Among provinces, Pampanga contributed the second largest share


(17.85%) to the regional production in terms of other crops produced, which
was recorded at 309,059.32 metric tons in 2014.

In terms of aquatic production, the province of Pampanga had the highest


produce from year 2010 to 2014; the total production was accounted for the
60% share to its total regional production. The annual average increase in
production was 20% or 159,658.98 metric tons within the five-year period.

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Table 3 9. OTHER CROP PRODUCTION (in Metric Tons)


Central Luzon Provinces, 2012-2014
PROVINCE 2012 2013 2014

Central Luzon 1,738,435.30 2,131,577.89 1,731,814.08


Aurora 240,252.82 236,976.83 211,217.31
Bataan 28,028.80 28,123.75 26,549.53
Bulacan 92,238.42 90,745.97 95,526.33
Nueva Ecija 208,974.79 206,910.74 209,869.63
Pampanga 339,931.02 553,007.60 309,059.32
Tarlac 772,552.39 959,787.42 814,392.71
Zambales 56,467.06 56,025.58 65,199.25
Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics, http://countrystat.bas.gov.ph

Pampanga is a major producer of various aquatic products but family


incomes are low due to: (1) absence of alternative value adding activities to
fresh fish harvested; (2) absence of cold storage; (3) inadequacy of fish
logistics handling e.g. ports; and (4) Pampanga is falling behind in terms of
coastal resources management& assistance to fisheries sector.

The province has 38,422.44 hectares of fishponds, most of which are


brackish (found in Sasmuan, Lubao, Guagua, Macabebe, Minalin, Masantol,
Sto. Tomas -producing tilapia, bangus, sugpo, alimango), while the rest are
freshwater (in Candaba, San Luis, Guagua, Sta. Ana, Minalin, Magalang,
Macabebe, Sta. Rita, Lubao, Mexico -- producing tilapia, ulang, wild hito,
dalag).

In terms of fisheries production, the province of Pampanga remains the


top producer in the region, especially in tilapia production.

Table 3-10. FISHERIES: Volume of Production (in Metric Tons)


Central Luzon Provinces, 2007-2012
Province 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Aurora 3,793 3,468 3,256 3,309.60 3,390.72
Bataan 23,373 23,234 22,424 22,667.03 26,098.25
Bulacan 44,355 40,791 41,879 42,549.63 41,481.04
Nueva Ecija 5,974 5,287 5,148 4,430.70 4,928.77
Pampanga 159,528 156,834 155,755 162,455.09 163,722.81
Tarlac 6,366 6,716 7,783 7,699.17 8,505.68
Zambales 21,291 22,638 23,155 26,499.28 29,834.52
Central Luzon 264,679 258,967 259,399 269,560.50 277,961.79
Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics, http://countrystat.bas.gov.ph

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4.2 Trade & Industry

Investments

In 2011, the province had generated a total of Php 25.33 Billion in new
investments, which is 14% of the total investments in the region. Some of the
big investments generated include the establishment of SM, City San
Fernando, the Porac Eco-Tourism Park, the Field Plaza Realty Condominiums
and eNTEC building both in Angeles City.

Table 3 11. Central Luzon Investment Performance by Province, 2011


2011 Investments
Province % Share
( in Million )
Aurora 631.33 0.35%
Bataan 75,520.80 41.76%
Bulacan 4,342.78 2.41%
Nueva Ecija 3,062.67 1.69%
Pampanga 25,332.23 14.00%
Tarlac 2,105.87 1.16%
Zambales 69,886.90 38.83%
CENTRAL LUZON 180,862.58

4.3 Exports

Pampanga remains the highest contributor to Central Luzons exports. For


year 2011, the export performance of the province amounted to US$2.36 Billion
or 60% share of the regions overall performance of US$3.93 Billion. The
sectors significantly contributing to this are: 1) electronics; 2)
machinery/transport; and 3) garments/ textiles. The top 5 country destinations
for Pampanga products are: China, Japan, USA, Hongkong and Finland.

Table 3 12. Central Luzon Export Performance by Province, 2011


2011 Exports Generated
Province % Share
(in Million US$)
Bataan 265,380,416.64 6.74
Bulacan 95,884.222.30 2.44
Nueva Ecija 4,236,072.00 0.11
Pampanga 2,362,566,183.81 60.04
Tarlac 547,483,676.44 13.91
Zambales 659,630,935.49 16.76
CENTRAL LUZON 3,935,181,506.68

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Table 3 - 13. Pampanga Top 10 Export Performers, 2011

Sector Export Performance (US$)

Electronics 1,604,782,780.11
Machinery/Transport Equipment/Apparatus and Parts 310,174,307.93
Garments/Textiles 251,101,623.87
Metal Manufacture 92,466,334.69
Other Industrial Manufacture 28,701,076.72
Fashion Accessories/Leather Goods 14,406,798.18
Gifts, Toys and Housewares (GTH) 12,002,263.66
Food, & Processed Food 10,258,756.06
Source: OSEDC Manila and Clark
Clark Development Corporation

Industrial Estates and Ecozones

Pampanga is envisioned to become a major player in the industrial hub of


the W Growth Corridor of Central Luzon. To complement this vision, the
province has three (3) special economic zones and numerous industrial estates
that are operational and hosts to several international and local companies.

Major Existing Industries

Home Furnishings (Furniture, Wood-based products, Ceramics)

The province supports thriving cottage industries that specialize in wood


carving, furniture-making, guitars and ceramics/handicrafts. The Pampanga
furniture industry remains as key source of high quality furniture and
furnishings contributing to about 40% of the Philippines furniture exports.

Woodcarving and furniture making are the two of the oldest professions in
the province. Pampanga boasts of world-class quality furniture. The towns
known for this enterprise are Guagua, Angeles City, Mabalacat City, and the
City of San Fernando. Betis in Guagua is famous for its guitar making industry.
Pampanga has been the home of skilled furniture manufacturers for decades.
The province had gained the reputation as place of fine furniture and wood
works.

For many generations, Kapampangans are known to have fashioned pots

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and bowls of baked clay for their daily use. In Santo Tomas, where clay
remains abundantly available, this age-old art continues to thrive and find
expression as one of the towns primary source of commerce. Home to many
traditional potters, Santo Tomas known for its decorative clay jars, classic
earthenware, and assorted potteries.

Christmas Lanterns

Every year during the Christmas season, the province becomes the center
of thriving industry centered on handcrafted lighted lanterns called parols that
display a kaleidoscope of lights and colors.

Food

The province is famous for its sophisticated culinary industry.


Kapampangans are well known for their culinary creations. Well known food
products range from the ordinary to exotic. Kapampangans are also known to
be producing the best processed meat products such as pork and chicken
tocinos, beef tapa, hotdogs, and longanizas (Philippine-style sausages and
cured meats). The more exotic betutetugak (stuffed frog), kamaru (mole
crickets) cooked ala adobo, bulanglang (pork/fish cooked in guava juice),
lechon kawali, and bringhe (green sticky rice dish like paella) are a mainstay
in Kapampangan feasts. Native sweets and delicacies like pastillas, turones de
casuy, and buro are the most sought after by Filipinos including a growing
number of tourists who enjoy Kapampangan cuisine.

Gifts and Holiday Decors

The local gifts and holiday decors (GHD) industrys strengths are the
natural materials available in the province and the ingenuity of local craft
persons. The industry is labor intensive since products area mainly
handcrafted. Product lines include baskets, resins, toys and dolls, glassware
and other handcrafted ornaments and decorations for Christmas, Halloween,
Easter, and other festive celebrations.

Information Communication and Technology (ICT)

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is an industry where


Filipinos have competitive advantage over our neighbors in the Asian region.
The Philippines is now the world leader in terms of jobs for shared services and
Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) services. Pampanga is fast becoming
one of the IT/BPO outsourcing destinations. With the higher level of
commitments of the stakeholders in the industry, human resource development

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programs were implemented to prepare the manpower needs of the industry.


Pampanga has the potentials to fully benefit from an ICT-driven world.
Contact/call center, medical transcription, software development, shared
financial and accounting animation services are the identified niches in the ICT
industry.

4.4 Tourism

Tourism is one of the potential economic contributors of the province.


Pampanga, the heart of Central Luzon, plays a vital role in the economic
activities of the region. The presence of NLEX, SCTeX, and the international
airport in CSEFZ makes Pampanga the gateway to North Luzon and the world.
Doing cultural activities and continuous partnership with private stakeholders
contributed much in the emerging tourism sector of the province.

Pampanga is endowed with both natural and man-made tourist attractions


making it one of the favorite destinations of local and foreign tourists. The rich
culture of the Kapampangan is blended with the most modern and first-rate
recreational, leisure and tourism facilities which make ones stay both
memorable and truly enjoyable.

And yet, for the longest time, Pampanga has not been a major tourist
destination for land bound tourists. It is a mere landmark for people travelling
up to Baguio, Sagada, or Banaue; a mere stop for families on their way to
Olongapo, Subic or Zambales. Tourists perception of Pampanga has been
relegated to its old stone churches, food and recently the convenience of mall
and budget air-travel at CSEFPZ.

The challenge is to turn Pampanga into a veritable tourist experience and


destination capitalizing on the folk and religious festivities accentuated by good
food, goodie and souvenirs with true local flavour and show of craftsmanship.

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Within the Clark Special Economic Zone are well established hotels and
resorts:

MONTEVISTA VILLAS - Located in, and an integral part of


the Mimosa Golf & Leisure Resort, these large villas offer the
absolute best accommodations found anywhere in the
Philippines. Formerly the Clark Air Base U.S. Air force
officers luxury villas, entirely renovated for your enjoyment.

MIMOSA GOLF & LEISURE RESORT - One of the first


resorts in Clark, Freeport. Beautiful Acacia Trees everywhere
and 36 holes of the best golf courses in Central Luzon.

FONTANA VILLAS RESORT - This is a full-feature resort


with golf courses, casino and a huge American style water
park with wave machine and water slides. The park is in a
state of constant expansion with a shopping center and a
1000 room hotel under construction.

ASIANA GREENVILLE SUITES RESORT - Now you and


your family can enjoy luxury suites for the weekend at a fair
price. You'll feel like you just drove-up to your new
subdivision when you avail yourself of this facility. Small and
quaint, new and relaxing. Only a few minutes from the
Fontana resort with its U.S. style water park and world-class
casino.

OXFORD HOTEL - In the center of the Freeport, the Oxford


Hotel is a budget hotel with 250 rooms, pool, Chinese
restaurant and a large convention center. Room rates
starting at PHP 3000. Next door to the J&K Golf Training
Center.

CLARK HOLIDAY INN - As one of the original


establishments in Clark after the U.S. military left, this hotel
has recently been renovated and renewed. Enjoy what
seems like 5 star accommodations with wonderful
restaurants and amenities such as a world-class swimming
pool, tropical spa/massage and additional luxuries of the
pampered lifestyle.

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CLARK HOTEL, CLARK SPA -Starting at only Php 3,000,


this hotel was voted Best Deal/Quality Hotel in the Clark
Freeport by the staff at Clark Subic Marketing. This brand
new, classy hotel will surprise you in the price/quality
quotient. From the extremely large square-footage area of
the rooms, to the 42 inch wide screen plasma televisions,
extra-tall ceilings, this is the hot-spot in Clark.

CLARK HOSTEL - The Clark hotel/Condotel with down-


home Filipino hospitality. For the budget-minder leisure or
business traveller who wants to feel like he or she is at home.
Great price without sacrificing features of amenities.

HOTEL STOTSENBERG - A prideful, elegantly appointed


and beautiful sanctuary with exciting nightlife and a large
casino in the center of the Clark Zone. Only 5-minutes from
the Diosdado Macapagal International Airport.

HOTEL VIDA, WIDUS VACATION CLUB The latest in the


line-up of fine hotels in Clark Freeport Zone. CSM offers the
best prices available for Hotel Vida with many extra discounts
and perks. This hotel features upgraded amenities and room
accommodations. Here youll find classy, contemporary
Asian styles throughout and a great restaurant. The hotel
includes a 700 person convention center/ ball room for your
social and corporate events.

Source :http://www.clarksubicmarketing.com/

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Popular historical landmarks and tourist destinations of the province include:

Bayanihan Park is located in front of Clark main gate and


formerly known as Astro Park. Bayanihan Park is a
beehive of activities everyday from basketball, volleyball to
kite flying. It is a perfect venue for carnival fairs, religious
rites and political rallies. A portion of the park was
devoted to a passenger terminal for jeepneys plying
Balibago-Angeles route.

Salakot Arch located in front of the Clark main gate, and


fashioned after a farmers hat, this cavernous welcome
landmark was built in 1979 to commemorate the historic
signing of the RP-US Military Bases Agreement, which
conferred complete sovereignty over all US military bases
on the Philippine government. In 2005, the arch was
transferred at the center of the so-called Bayanihan Park
which underwent complete renovation to become a world-
class public park and transport terminal.

Mt. Arayat is an extinct stratovolcano on Luzon Island,


rising to a height of 1,026 meters (3,200 ft.). There is no
recorded eruption of the volcano, and its last activity
probably dates to the Holecene era. The volcano is
located in a flat agricultural region at 1512N 12045E.
The southern half of the mountain lies within the
municipality of Arayat while the north half and the
mountain summit lies within Magalang.

Mt. Arayat National Park is located in Brgy. San Juan Bao,


Arayat. The park is an ideal site for picnickers and nature
lovers with its quaint environs under cool shades of lush green
foliage, mountain breeze, natural waterfalls and three
standard-sized swimming pools. It offers opportunities for
mountain climbing on the legendary Mt. Arayat as well as
outdoor camping.
Museo Ning Angeles is located at the center stretch of the
historical street of Sto. Rosario. The museum has become the
venue of the citys cultural activities, be it from the private or
government sector. From the time it opened in the year 1999,
it has been a beehive of activity from exhibits, arts classes,
and concerts, venue for performance and climax for traditional
celebrations

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Death March Marker in San Fernando marks the endpoint


of one of the most heinous war crimes committed by the
Japanese in the country. A marker has been built on the
site to commemorate the day the prisoners ended their long
and excruciating march and boarded box carts that took
them to their final destination in Capas, Tarlac.

Kamikaze Peace Shrine is a memorial and sign mark the


site of the old runway, and it is frequently visited by tourists,
especially Japanese. The memorial was built not for the
glorification of the Kamikaze but rather for the use of war
history as a tool for the promotion of peace and friendship
among nations. The shrine serves as a reminder that the
Kamikaze phenomenon shall never happen again.

San Fernando Railway Station (San Fernando Station) is


a defunct railway station of the Philippines National Railway
North rail line of PNR. Historically, the old PNR train station
was the site of a stopping place for Filipino and American
prisoners of war during the Bataan death March in 1942.

Pampanga Provincial Capitol is the seat of government of


Province of Pampanga. The original building was
constructed shortly after the provincial capital of Pampanga
was transferred from Bacolor to San Fernando in 1904. The
Capitol is one of the most beautiful civil architectural
landmarks in Pampanga.

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Heritage, Churches and Shrine

Holy Rosary Parish Church is the most distinctive landmark of


Angeles City today upon seeing the twin towers of the church.
The church is a living monument. It is not only to the
engineering and architectural skills of a certain Don Antonio de
la Camara from Manila, a great admirer and exponent of the
Byzantine art, but also the unselfish and untiring cooperation of
the townspeople of Angeles during the churchs construction.

Metropolitan Cathedral of San Fernando is the seat of the


Archbishop and the mother church of the Archdiocese of San
Fernando. The round majestic dome rising from the rotonda of
the transept is reminiscent of the baroque style with some
renaissance touch. The church and the convent were burned
by the Philippine Revolutionary Army and destroy again by fire
in 1939. In 1948, the church was restored by Pampango
Architect Fernando H. Ocampo. The looming structure of white,
beige, gray and maroon may look ancient, but both exterior and
interior are relatively new, really neo-Art Nouveau with faux
columns.

Sta. Monica Parish Church commonly known as the Minalin


Church is a Baroque (heritage) church. It is a Spanish-era
church declared a National Cultural Treasure by the National
Museum of the Philippine and the National Commission for
Culture and the Arts (NCCA). The titular is Sta. Monica, whose
Feast Day is May 4

San Agustin Parish Church (Lubao) was built in 1572 in


barrio Santa Catalina, Lubao by Fr. Juan Gallegos and
due to annual floods in the area; it was moved to the
present site thirty years later. The church was occupied
by the Philippine revolutionary forces in 1898. In 1899, it
was used also as a hospital by American soldiers.

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St. Aloysius Gonzaga Church (San Luis) is located in a


place that used to be called Cabagsac, referring to the
proliferation of fruit bats. Today, a fishnet is permanently
installed high above the altar precisely to catch thousands
of bats that are roosting inside the church. The main
attraction is the three-tower facade, perhaps one of its
kinds in the country.

San Guillermo Parish Church (the Sunken Church) is


named after San Guillermo, the patron saint of Bacolor,
Pampanga, the Philippines, where the church is erected.
The church was originally constructed by the Augustinian
Friars in 1576. On September 3, 1995, lahar flow from
the slopes of Mt. Pinatubo buried the church at half its 12-
m height prompting its more than 50,000 town residents
to evacuate to safer grounds in resettlement areas.

Parish Church of St. James the Apostle is a Baroque


church located in Betis, Guagua. The church was
established in 1607 and declared a National Cultural
Treasure by the National Museum of the Philippines and
the NCCA.

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5. TRANSPORTATION AND ACCESS

The province of Pampanga is strategically located at the crossroads of central


Luzon and is highly accessible by both air and land. The extensive road network
spans 5,002.66 kilometers.

Most are municipal, barangay and private roads comprising 84.85 percent of the
total road network; national roads comprising 10.40 percent and provincial roads
comprising 4.75 percent. National roads are 52% concrete, 47% asphalt and only 1%
unpaved. Provincial roads are 79% concrete, 2% asphalt and only 19% unpaved.

There are twelve (12) existing major national roads linking Pampanga with
nearby provinces. These are mostly concrete and asphalt. Major provincial roads
that link municipalities are twenty-five (25) and are 77% concrete/asphalt.

In terms of road density, the province has 2.29 kilometer of road per square
kilometer of land area.

5.1 External Linkages

Manila North Road (MNR), which is still called


by its old name MacArthur Highway, is a
primary trunk road traversing the provinces of
Bulacan, Pampanga and Tarlac. It serves as
a major transport linkage between the
National Capital Region (NCR) and the
northwest (Ilocos) and northcentral
(Cordillera) regions of Luzon. The highway
parallels the North Luzon Expressway (NLEX/R-8) from Epifanio de los Santos
Avenue (EDSA/C-4) to Mabalacat City, Pampanga and the SubicClarkTarlac
Expressway (SCTEX/R-8 Extension) from Mabalacat City, Pampanga to Tarlac
City. Two of the more critical bridges along MNR are located in Pampanga: the
Apalit Bridge in the highway boundary Bulacan and Pampanga and the Abacan
Bridge in Angeles City.

North Luzon Expressway (NLEx), which is


formerly called the North Diversion
Road and Manila North Expressway (MNEX),
and officially known as Radial Road 8 is a 2
to 8-lane limited-access toll expressway that
connects Metro Manila to the provinces of
the Central Luzon. The expressway begins

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in Quezon City at a cloverleaf interchange with EDSA: a continuation of Andres


Bonifacio Avenue. It then passes through Quezon City, Caloocan,
and Valenzuela in Metro Manila, Meycauayan, Marilao, Bocaue, Balagtas,
Guiguinto, Malolos, Plaridel, and Pulilan in Bulacan. San Simon, San
Fernando, Mexico and Angeles City. The expressway currently ends at
Mabalacat and merges with the MacArthur Highway, which continues
northward into the rest of Central and Northern Luzon. The expressway
significantly reduces travel times to and from the region and Metro Manila.

The rehabilitated North Luzon Expressway has contributed to the economic


development of the province and the whole of Central and Northern Luzon.
The presence of the new shopping malls, tourist sites and entertainment
complexes near toll junctions in and near the Clark Special Economic Zone and
the cities of Angeles and San Fernando had increased the employment
opportunities, promoted tourism and private sector investment in Pampanga.

Subic Clark-TarlacExpressway
(SCTEx). The 94-kilometer four-lane Subic
Clark-Tarlac Expressway (SCTEx), is the
longest toll expressway in the Philippines. Its
southern terminus is located at the Subic Bay
Freeport Zone in Zambales, and passes
through the North Luzon Expressway (NLEx)
interchange near the Clark Special Economic
Zone in Angeles City. Its northern terminus is located at the Central Techno
Park in Tarlac City, Tarlac. The four-lane divided highway is divided into two
major sections. The first section, the Subic-Clark section is 50.5 kilometers
long; the Clark-Tarlac section measures 43.27 kilometers long.

The SCTEX links three major business centers: the Subic Freeport Zone,
the Clark Freeport and Special Economic Zone, and the Centro Techno Park in
Tarlac. Formerly military bases of the US, Subic and Clark have emerged as
major business hubs in Northern Luzon.

Since its construction, the SCTEX has become the backbone of the Central
Luzon logistics hub, bringing Subic and Clark closer to each other and these
two territories closer to the rest of Northern Luzon. Travel time from Clark to
Subic has been reduced to 40 minutes while travel time from Clark to Tarlac
has been reduced to 25 minutes. The reduced travel time has benefitted
tourism and business activities in Clark, especially at Clark International Airport.

Jose Abad Santos Avenue (JASA). Formerly


known as Gapan-San Fernando-Olongapo

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(GSO Road), JASA is a major lateral road connecting PJH junction in Gapan
and MNR junction in the City of San Fernando and goes westward towards
Olongapo City.

The JASA stretches across four provinces in Central Luzon. The road starts
from the City of Gapan in Nueva Ecija and passes through the towns of
Pampanga in Sta. Ana, Arayat, and Mexico, and crossing the NLEX and
MacArthur Highway along the City of San Fernando. Then the road heads west
through Bacolor, Sta. Rita, Guagua, and Lubao. It exits Pampanga from Lubao
and to Bataan via Dinalupihan, and finally to Olongapo City in Zambales. It
used to be the only main route towards Bataan and Zambales from the North-
South corridor defined by NLEX and SCTEX prior to the construction of the
latter. So now it also serves as an alternate route when travelling between
Pampanga and Zambales.

There are two flyovers along the San Fernando section of JASA, namely:
San Fernando Flyover (at the intersection of MacArthur Highway or Manila
North Road and JASA) and the Lazatin Flyover (at the intersection of Lazatin
Avenue and JASA).

In 2003, the San Fernando Flyover was


constructed under the Presidents Bridge
Program after Mabey Johnson consultants
started its studies and coordination efforts with
concerned stakeholders regarding traffic
volume, effectiveness of on-going road widening
activities, and re-evaluation of the geometric
design of the intersection based on present
condition.

The Lazatin Flyover was constructed in


2012 under the Mega Bridges for Urban and
Rural Development Project (MBURDP). The
flyover is a modular steel type flyover has a total
length of 195.00 linear meters and with total
approach length of 120.00 meters. It was built in
anticipation of the increase in population,
improving business climate and productivity in
the areas served by the said flyover.

The completion of the flyovers contribute in increasing the existing road


capacity that will ease the traffic congestion along Lazatin Avenue and Jose

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Abad Santos Avenue intersection and McArthur intersection thereby providing


thorough traffic from Manila to Zambales, Bataan and vice versa. The economy
in this area and neighboring provinces as well as their tourism potential are
projected to improve as a result since travel time is slashed by at least an hour.

The Angeles-Porac-Floridablanca-DinalupihanRoad (APFDR) is the route


that shortens the distance from Angeles City to Dinalupihan by about 13
kilometers bypassing the busy Angeles-San Fernando-Lubao corridor.

The APFDR, the Lubao-San Fernando Road, and the Floridablanca-San


Antonio Road have been undergoing major rehabilitation. The Lubao Bypass
Road (including Marimla Bridge in San Juan Lubao) further improved traffic
along GSO Road.

The SCTeX interchange in Porac next to the Clark Economic Zone has
attracted the Ayala Land Incorporated to put up a major township in Hacienda
Dolores. The JASA (former GSO road) was widened, bridges along it were
widened, and the Porac-Gumain River was rechanneled at P1.5Billion. Korean
funding enabled this improvement. Ease of traffic along this road was
enhanced by the construction of the P150 million Lubao bypass which opened
in 2010. In 2014, DPWH has a Korean-assisted allocation for the JASA Sta.
Cruz, Lubao-Dinalupihan Section of P246.518 million.

The Lubao-Sasmuan Road was likewise widened. There were other roads
provincewide which were also rehabilitated leading to the central business
districts.

Be it for business or pleasure, one can easily move around because of


effective infrastructure facilities and utilities that abound in the province.

5.2 Internal Circulation, Routes and Facilities

Based on ArcGIS, the provinces total road network is 5,002.66 kilometers;


total length of national roads is 520.08 kilometers or 10.40% of the total road
network, provincial roads are 237.71 kilometers or 4.75%; municipal, barangay
and private roads have an aggregate length of 4,244.87 kilometers or 84.85%
of the provinces total road network.

Out of the total 520.08 kilometers of national roads, 330.048 kilometers are
being maintained by the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH)
and others are under the concession of the Tollways Management Corporation
(TMC).

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Pampangas road density is 2.29 kilometers per square kilometer. Bridges


along national road totaled to One Hundred Thirteen (113) units and being
maintained by DPWH.

5.3 Road Condition and Level of Service

The table below shows the types of roads, which are being maintained by
the DPWH (national roads) and Pampanga LGU (provincial roads). National
roads are 52% concrete, 47% asphalt and only 1% unpaved. Provincial roads
are 79% concrete, 2% asphalt and only 19% unpaved.

Provincial
National Roads Length (km.) Length (km.)
Roads
Concrete 170.949 Concrete 235.315

Asphalt 156.234 Asphalt 4.484

Unpaved 2.868 Unpaved 57.913

TOTAL 330.048 TOTAL 297.712


Source: DPWH Region 3 Source: PPDO-Pampanga

Most of the municipal and barangay roads, which comprise almost 85% of
the provinces total road network are also concrete.

5.4 Transport System


Land travel to the province is made easy by numerous buses that travel the
routes of Manila-Pampanga-Bataan, Manila-Pampanga-Zambales, Manila-
Pampanga-Tarlac, Manila-Pampanga-Nueva Ecija, Manila-Bulacan-
Pampanga, and Manila-Pampanga-Dagupan. These buses are serviced by:

Philippine Rabbit Sierra Madre Trans. Dagupan Bus Company


Five Star Bus Co. Partas Farias Trans.
Fermina Express Baliwag Transit Arayat Express
Victory Liner Genesis Transport Service RJ Express
Santrans Hernandez Liner Vizcaya Liner
Dominion Bus Lines Saulog Transit Inc. Solid North Transit Inc.

In 2013, the Land Transportation Office (LTO) had registered a total of


265,153 transport vehicles in Pampanga. Out of the total registered vehicles,
224,032 (84%) were private, 39,110 (15%) were for-hire and only 1,963 (1%)
were government owned vehicles.

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Table 3 14 Number of Motor Vehicles Registered by Classification & by Mode of Registration


Pampanga: 2013
Private For Hire Government Total Grand
District Office
New Renewal New Renewal New Renewal New Renewal Total
Angeles City 5,559 71,965 160 14,733 7 411 5,726 87,109 92,835
Apalit Extension 4,878 15,223 70 1,581 5 19 4,953 16,823 21,776
Mabalacat Ext. 4,697 19,552 384 2,756 24 213 5,105 22,569 27,674
Guagua 2,396 33,743 208 9,503 89 130 2,693 43,376 46,069
San Fernando 7,267 49,106 294 9,421 37 1,028 7,598 59,555 67,153
OSS San Fernando 9,646 9,646 9,646
PAMPANGA 24,797 199,235 1,116 37,994 162 1,801 26,075 239,078 265,153
Source: Land Transportation Office

Access to the coastal areas is over Arnedo Dike that protects the province
from overtopping floodwaters from Pampanga River. The province has five (5)
municipal ports utilized mostly as fish landing center. These are located in the
municipalities of Guagua, Macabebe, Masantol, Minalin and Sasmuan.

The province is home to two airstrips: the Clark International Airport in


Clarkfield, Angeles City and Basa Air Base in Floridablanca, which is utilized by
the military.

The Clark International Airport (CRK) is a major aviation center in the


country within the Clark Freeport Zone serving the general area of Angeles
City in the Philippines; and it is about 80 kilometer northwest of Manila. The
airport is surrounded by the cities of Angeles and Mabalacat; and conveniently
reached by Subic-Clark-Tarlac Expressway which is linked into North Luzon
Expressway. Clark serves the general vicinity of Greater Manila Area, along
with the northern regions of Luzon. It is currently a hub for Cebu
Pacific and Tigerair Philippines. The airport mainly serves low-cost carriers.
The airport is managed and operated by Clark International Airport
Corporation (CIAC), a government-owned enterprise; and the southern part of
the facility is utilized by the Philippine Air Force as Clark Air Base.

In 2012, the UK-based fDi Magazine chose CRK as the 3rd Best Airport
Zone. The future international gateway for the country is currently being built at
Clark International Airport. It is planned to become one of the worlds biggest in
terms of terminal size and land area. A high speed railway system will be built
to connect the new airport to Metro Manila.

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6. INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, POVERTY AND SERVICE ACCESS

6.1 Family Income

Based on the 2009 Family Income and Survey (FIES) of the NSO, families
in Pampanga had an average annual income of PhP235,621. In comparison,
their average annual expenditure for the same year was PhP207,560 and their
average annual savings was PhP28,061. Pampanga ranked third among
provinces in the region in terms of family income.

Table 3 15 Average Annual Family Income, Expenditure, and Savings


Central Luzon Provinces: 2009

Income Expenditure (in Savings


Province
(in pesos) pesos) (in pesos)

Bataan 277,019 244,402 32,617

Bulacan 253,279 212,492 40,787

Nueva Ecija 169,592 136,407 33,185

Pampanga 235,621 207,560 28,061

Tarlac 190,392 169,765 20,627

Zambales 200,640 172,029 28,611

Aurora 175,235 149,806 25,429


Source: National Statistical Coordination Board, 2012 FIES

PhP207,560 and their average annual savings was PhP28,061. Pampanga


ranked third among provinces in the region in terms of family income.

Income is a means toward development not an end. According to the


Philippine Human Development Report 2012/13, Pampanga (with an HDI of
0.634) is among the top performing provinces in human development.

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary of measure of human


development, computes using the average achievement in the three basic
dimensions: a long and healthy life, knowledge, and a decent standard of living.
Ideally, the HDI should be close to one (1). It is motivated by the principle that
income alone cannot faithfully reflect the basic dimensions of human
development.

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6.2. Employment

In 2013, Pampangas annual Table 3 16 Labor Force Statistics,


employment rate was estimated at Pampanga: 2013
88.4% and the annual unemployment
rate at 11.6% based from the 2013
Pampanga Statistics
Estimates
preliminary results of the quarterly
Labor Force Survey (LFS) of the Population 15 years old and over 1,164,103
NSO. Unemployment rate was at
11.6%. Labor Force Participation Rate 58.97%

The total of employed persons for Employment Rate 88.4%


the same year was approximately
Unemployment Rate 11.6%
1,135,891. Employed persons include
all those who, during the reference Source: National Statistics Office,
period are 15 years and over and are (January, April, July) 2013 LFS
reported either at work or with a job but not at work.

Table 3 - 17. Overseas Workers 10 Years Old and Over by Age Group and Sex:
Pampanga*, 2010
Age Group Male Female Both Sexes
Below 20 856 839 1,695
20 24 2,259 1,935 4,194
25 29 5,524 3,602 9,126
30 34 7,028 3,422 10,450
35 39 6,564 2,834 9,398
40 44 6,092 2,277 8,369
45 and over 10,627 3,909 14,536
TOTAL 38,950 18,818 57,768
Source: 2010 CPH
Note: * Excluding Angeles City

6.3. Poverty

In 2012, Pampanga stands second to Bataan with least poverty incidence


among families in Central Luzon, which was posted at 5.4%. While the
proportion of families in extreme poverty (subsistence) in the province whose
incomes are not sufficient to meet their basic food need was estimated at 4,710
or 0.9%. The magnitude of poor families was numbered at 28,483, which
represents only .7% to the total of poor families nationwide and almost 12% to
the total of poor families in Central Luzon.

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Table 3 - 18. Full Year Thresholds, Incidences and Magnitude of Poor Families
Philippines, Central Luzon Provinces: 2012
Annual Annual Poverty
Subsistence Magnitude of
Per Capita Per Capita Incidence Magnitude Share to
Region/ Incidence Extreme
Poverty Food among of Poor Poor
Province among (Subsistence)
Threshold Threshold Families Families Families
Families (%) Poor Families
(in Pesos) (in Pesos) (%)
PHILIPPINES 18,935 13,232 19.7 7.5 4,214,921 1,610,865 100.0
Region III 20,071 14,136 10.1 2.7 240,079 63,604 5.7
Aurora 18,466 12,895 27.1 8.6 12,789 4,034 0.3
Bataan 19,383 13,517 4.5 1.9 7,116 2,948 0.2
Bulacan 19,910 13,932 5.4 1.4 38,103 9,989 0.9
Nueva Ecija 20,847 14,605 19.6 5.1 91,168 23,464 2.2
Pampanga 19,163 13,500 5.4 0.9 28,483 4,710 0.7
Tarlac 18,810 13,089 13.5 3.4 40,174 10,023 1.0
Zambales 21,885 15,556 12.1 4.6 22,246 8,436 0.5
Source: National Statistical Coordination Board, 2012 Poverty Statistics

Based from the 2012 Poverty Statistics, a family of five in Pampanga needs
around Php7,985 monthly income to buy their minimum basic food and non-
food needs, and around Php5,625 monthly income for their minimum basic
food needs.

The income gap of the province was estimated at 15.11%. This means that
an average poor family with five members needed a monthly additional income
of Php1,206 to move out of poverty in 2012.

Table 3 19 Income Gap, Poverty Gap, Severity of Poverty


Pampanga: 2006, 2009, 2012
Estimate Increase/Decrease
Statistics
2006 2009 2012 2006-2009 2009-2012

Income Gap 14.4 16.5 15.11 2.1 (1.4)


Poverty Gap 0.3 0.8 0.82 0.5 0.0
Severity of Poverty 0.1 0.2 0.18 0.1 (0.0)
Source: National Statistical Coordination Board

Some negative events between 2006 and 2009 were: (1) the world food
crisis which increased the price of ordinary rice by 44%, (2) the global financial
crisis and (3) the start of El Nio.

The probability of halving extreme poverty between 1990 and 2015


remains a goal.

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6.4. Service Access


One of the more important issues that the provincial government needs to
address is social amelioration. The Kapampangangans are a notably resilient
people. However we cannot forever rely on national grants for our social
development. The private and public sector need to combine efforts and
resources to alleviate the plight of the common masses. The provincial
administration is constantly reaching out to the poor and the sick, the elderly
and the vulnerable, the differently-abled and the marginalized. Projects on
social services for rebel returnees, persons with disabilities (PWDs), senior
citizens, youth, indigenous peoples (IPs), and womens welfare are lined up to
improve human development.

6.4.1. Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps)

The national government, Table 3 20. 4Ps Beneficiaries by


through the Department of Cities/Municipalities,
Social Welfare and PAMPANGA
Development (DSWD), had No. of No. of
City/Municipality
implemented the Pantawid Households Members
Pamilyang Pilipino Angeles City 2,815 12,298
Apalit 2,788 11,685
Program (4Ps) as part of the Arayat 3,378 14,088
governments convergence Bacolor 665 2,884
framework that aims to Candaba 4,348 17,970
maximize the impact of its Floridablanca 1,868 7,998
Guagua 1,669 6,510
poverty reduction and social Lubao 3,130 12,513
protection program. The Mabalacat City 1,748 7,693
Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Macabebe 2,443 10,537
Program is a human Magalang 1,687 6,897
development program that Masantol 1,417 6,174
Mexico 2,508 10,138
invests in the health and Minalin 1,110 4,751
education of poor household, Porac 2,875 12,131
particularly aged 0-14 years City of San Fernando 2,454 10,671
old and/ or pregnant women. San Luis 1,727 7,164
San Simon 1,200 5,172
Patterned after the
Sta. Ana 1,206 4,950
conditional cash transfer Sta. Rita 826 3,383
scheme implemented in Sto. Tomas 671 2,848
other developing countries, Sasmuan 850 3,415
the program provides cash PAMPANGA 43,383 181,870
grants to beneficiaries
provided that they comply with the set of conditions required by the
program

Pantawid Pamilya operates in 79 provinces covering 1,484

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municipalities and 143 key cities in all 17 regions nationwide. As of June


2013, the program had registered 3,927,917 households.

In the province, there are 43,383 poor families that benefit from the
program.

6.4.2. Health Facilities and Manpower

The province of Pampanga has a total of 16 public hospitals located


within its territorial jurisdiction including Angeles City. Eleven (11) of
these hospitals are managed by the provincial government. These are the
Dr.Emigdio C. Cruz Sr. Memorial Hospital in Arayat, San Luis District
Hospital in San Luis, Macabebe District Hospital in Macabebe, R.P.
Rodriguez Memorial District Hospital in Bulaon Resettlement, R.P.
Rodriguez Memorial District Hospital Annex in Bacolor,
RomanaPanganDistrict Hospital in Floridablanca, Jose SongcoLapid
District Hospital in Porac, Dr. Andres Luciano District Hospital in
Magalang, Escolastica Romero District Hospital in Lubao, Mabalacat
District Hospital in Mabalacat, and the Diosdado M. Macapagal Memorial
Hospital in Guagua. There are also at least 37 private hospitals and
clinics operating in the province.

The fifty-three (53) government and private hospitals have total bed
capacity of 2,412 with a bed to population ratio of 1:924 as against to the
standard ratio of 1:1,000 proportion. The bed occupancy rate of each
district hospital exceeds the desired standard of 80%. Eight (8) of the
district hospitals maintain a 25 bed capacity but there are plans of
upgrading them into 50 bed capacity, while the other two (2) district
hospitals maintain 50 bed capacity and one (1) which serves as the
provincial hospital occupies 100 bed capacity.

All district hospitals run by the province are licensed to operate as


Level 2 health facilities. Eight (8) private hospitals and clinics are
categorized by the CHD-3 License Division as Level 1 while 27 hospitals
are Level 2 and 11 hospitals are Level 3. There are three (3) hospitals in
the province operating as Level 4. These are Jose B. Lingad Memorial
General Hospital, Our Lady of Mount Carmel Medical Center and the
Angeles City University Foundation.

The province has a total of 42 Rural Health Physicians, 59 public


health nurses, 22 dentists, 238 rural health midwives, 29 medical
technologists, 32 sanitary inspectors and 2,777 barangay health workers
providing primary health care services.

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Based from the latest ratios of public health workers to population as


reported by the Provincial Health Office-Pampanga, the ratio of doctors
against population is 1:36,075 which do not meet the standard of
1:20,000. Same with the ratios on the number of nurses, dentists,
midwives, medical technologists, sanitary inspectors and barangay health
workers, they dont meet the standard numbers against the population.
This means that we should hire more health workers to meet the
standards.

The 11 district hospitals and one (1) Provincial Hospital has a total of
91 full-time physicians, 12 dentists, 335 nurses, 36 midwives, 36 medical
technologists, 38 pharmacists, 11 nutritionists and 12 medical social
workers. The number of full-time nurses and midwives does not meet the
required standard proportion of 1:5 beds.

There are 41 rural health units (RHUs), 452 barangay health stations
and seven (7) birthing stations which render health services in the entire
province. There is a need to improve the physical facilities of the following
RHUs to qualify for TB DOTS accreditation namely: Mexico II, Mexico III,
Mabalacat I ,Masantol II and Sta. Ana I. Two (2) of the existing birthing
stations also require some minor renovations. These are located in Apalit
and Sto. Tomas. None of the birthing stations are accredited by
PHILHEALTH for Maternal Care Packages (MCP). The facilities of some
Social Hygiene Clinics in Angeles City and San Fernando have to be
upgraded. Moreover, 20 Rural Health Units (RHUs) and 139 Barangay
Health Stations (BHS) necessitate facility improvement ranging from
minor to major repairs. (Source: PHO Pampanga)

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Table 3 21 Number of Health Facilities, Pampanga by Municipality, 2013

Hospitals/Medical Clinic Rural Barangay


Birthing
Province/ Health Health
Stations
Municipality Public Private Total Units Stations
(BS)
(RHU) (BHS)
Angeles City 2 12 14 6 33

Apalit 5 5 2 12

Arayat 1 3 4 3 25

Bacolor 1 - 1 2 17

Candaba - - 3 12 1

Floridablanca 2 - 2 2 13

Guagua 1 4 5 3 31

Lubao 1 1 2 3 43

Mabalacat City 1 3 4 3 29 1

Macabebe 1 - 1 2 18 1

Magalang 1 - 1 2 20 1

Masantol - - 2 4

Mexico 1 - 1 4 30

Minalin - - 1 9 1

Porac 1 - 1 2 24

San Luis 1 - 1 2 12

San Simon - - - 1 14

Sasmuan - - - 1 3

Sta. Ana - - 1 14

Sta. Rita - - - 1 7

Sto. Tomas - - - 1 5 1

City of San Fernando 2 9 11 5 39

PAMPANGA 16 37 53 52 414 7
Source: PIPH

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Table 3 - 22. Bed Capacity of Government and Private Hospitals


Province of Pampanga, Year 2013
No. of Bed
ILHZ Population Hospital TYPE
beds Population
DISTRICT I
Magalang 113,322 Dr. Andres Luciano District Hospital G 25 1: 3944
Mabalacat 231,534 Mabalacat District Hospital G 25
Tiglao General Hospital P 20
Dee HwaLiong Foundation Med Center P 200 1: 713
St. Raphael Foundation & Medical Center P 40
SUB-TOTAL 344,856 310

DISTRICT II
Floridablanca 120,143 Basa Airbase Hospital G 60
RomanaPangan District Hosp G 50 1 : 939
Porac 123,152 Jose SongcoLapid District Hospital G 25 1 :5587
Sta Rita 40,790
Guagua 115,927 Diosdado P. Macapagal Memorial Hosp G 25
Mercy Clinic Hospital P 15
Rosario Memorial Hospital P 24
1: 841
Yabut-Pangan Medical Clinic P 10
Pampanga Medical Specialist Hospital P 50
Lubao 159,478 Escolastica Romero District Hospital G 25
Sasmuan 28,559 West Pampanga Doctors Hospital P 20 1:3859
SUB-TOTAL 588,049 304

DISTRICT III
Arayat Dr. Emigdio C. Cruz Memorial Hospital G 25
128,026
Arayat Medical & Maternal Clinic P 7
Sta. Ana 55,116 Holy Trinity PlazangLumaMed.Clinic P 8 1:6445
Mexico 160,831 W.G.Cortez Med & Diagnostic Clinic P 8
Bacolor 38,859 Ricardo P. Rodriguez Memorial Hospital G 25 1: 496
Ricardo P. Rodriguez Memorial Hospital (Annex) G 25
City of San 309,186 Jose B. Lingad Memorial General Hosp G 250
Fernando Jimenez Child Clinic P 12
Munoz Clinic P 10
Pampanga EENT & General Hosp P 15
Mother Theresa of Calcutta Med.Center P 100
Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Med Center P 108
San Fernandino Hospital P 90
Manabat Maternity & General Hospital P 30
St. Claire Psychiatric care P 13
V.L. Makabali Memorial Hosp P 97
SUB-TOTAL 692,018 823

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Table 3 - 22. Bed Capacity of Government and Private Hospitals


Province of Pampanga, Year 2013
No. of Bed
ILHZ Population Hospital TYPE
beds Population
DISTRICT IV
San Luis 51,949 San Luis District Hospital G 25 1:7686
Candaba 107,967
San Simon 50,741
Masantol 53,730
Macabebe 72,438 Domingo B. Flores District Hospital G 25
Apalit 110,021 Apalit Doctors Hospital Inc. P 12
Asscom DLSUMC Friendship Hosp P 30
D.H.Polintan Medical Clinic P 12
E.D.Lim Maternity & General Hosp P 17
Our Lady of Rosary Hosp. Inc. P 20
Minalin 47,147
Sto. Tomas 39,856
SUB-TOTAL 533,849 141

STAND ALONE ILHZ


Angeles City 346,202 Rafael Lazatin Memorial Medical Center G 120
Clinica Henson P 10
Mercedes Medical Center P 50
MLY Medical Center Foundation Inc. P 25
Mother of Perpetual Help Hospital P 50
R.S. Clinic & Hospital P 15
Angeles Medical Center P 100
1:366
Dr. Armando L. Garcia Med. Center P 100
Angeles University Foundation Hosp P 150
Dee HwaLiong Foundation Med Center P 85
Divine Shepherd Medical Center P 54
St. Catherine of Alexandria Foundation& Med. Ctr. P 40
Clark Airbase Hospital P 60
SUB-TOTAL 346,202 859
SOURCE: PHO-PAMPANGA

Table 3 - 23. Ratio of Public Health Workers to Population, Pampanga, Year 2013
No. of Health
Category of Health Workers Ratio to Population Standard
Workers
Doctor/RHP 42 1:36,075 1:20,000
Nurses 59 1:34,142 1:20,000
Dentists 22 1,63,732 1:20,000
Midwives 238 1:5,742 1:5,000
Medical Technologists 29 1:65,929 1:20,000
Sanitary Inspectors 32 1:40,680 1:20,000
Barangay Health Workers 2,777 1:25 HH 1:20HH
SOURCE: PHO-PAMPANGA

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(2015-2042)

Table 3 - 24. Number of Public Health Manpower, Pampanga by Municipality, 2013


PUBLIC HEALTH MANPOWER
Province/ Public Public Rural Barangay
Municipality MHO/ Medical Sanitary
Health Health Health Health
RHP Technologist Inspector
Nurse Dentist Midwife Worker
Angeles City 8 9 6 33 6 8 33

Apalit 2 2 1 9 1 1 93

Arayat 4 3 2 19 3 3 401

Bacolor 1 2 1 9 1 1 30

Candaba 2 4 1 11 1 4 115

Floridablanca 1 2 2 13 1 1 175

Guagua 3 4 0 20 3 2 189

Lubao 3 3 3 34 2 0 385

Mabalacat 3 4 3 19 3 3 181

Macabebe 2 2 1 10 1 1 120

Magalang 2 4 0 12 1 2 167

Masantol 2 2 1 7 1 0 92

Mexico 4 4 1 17 1 1 158

Minalin 1 1 1 9 1 1 60

Porac 3 2 2 11 2 2 214

San Luis 2 2 1 8 2 2 114

San Simon 1 14 1 8 1 3 86

Sasmuan 1 1 0 6 1 1 53

Sta. Ana 2 1 0 7 1 2 83

Sta. Rita 1 1 1 3 1 1 29

Sto. Tomas 1 1 0 6 1 1 32

City of San Fernando 5 6 4 32 4 7 390

PAMPANGA 54 74 32 303 39 47 3,200


Source: PHO-Pampanga

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6.4.2.1. Crude Birth Rate (CBR) and Crude Death Rate (CDR)

Crude Birth Rate indicates the number of live births occurring during the
year, per 1,000 population estimated at midyear. The Crude Birth Rate (CBR)
from 2009 to 2013 of the province as reported by the Provincial Health Office
(PHO) was fluctuating from 17 births to 15 births per 1,000 live population.

While Crude Death Rate indicates the number of deaths occurring during
the year, per 1,000 population estimated at midyear. There was no significant
increase in the Crude Death Rate (CDR) of the province from 2009 to 2013
which remains at 3 deaths per 1,000 population. Both the CBR and CDR of
the province are lower than the national average of 27 births/1,000 population
and 5 deaths/1,000 population.

Figure 3 - 7

Crude Birth Rate and Death Rate, Pampanga: 2009-2013

20.00

15.00

10.00 CDR CBR

5.00

0.00
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
SOURCE: PHO-PAMPANGA

6.4.2.2. Infants with low birth weight

As of 2013, total numbers of Infants with birth weight below 2.5 kilos were
378. Only 43.39& or 164 infants were given Iron supplementation at the Rural
Health Centers. The municipality of Candaba registered the highest
incidence of low birth weights with 106 infants and followed by San Simon
with 55 and Guaguawith 47 infants with low birth weights. The
municipalities of Apalit, Arayat, Floridablanca, Masantol, San Luis, Sta. Ana,
Sta. Rita, Sto. Tomas and Sasmuan had zero case of low birth weights
among infants, as reported by the Provincial Health Office.

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(2015-2042)

Table 3 - 25. Infants with Low Birth Weight Seen, Pampanga 2013

Infants with low birth weights seen


Area Population
Male Female Total
Apalit 109,182 0 0 0
Arayat 128,003 6 3 9
Bacolor 36,340 5 5 10
Candaba 107,964 61 45 106
Floridablanca 119,215 0 0 0
Guagua 116,217 25 22 47
Lubao 159,367 12 16 28
Mabalacat 230,398 28 14 42
Macabebe 72,855 12 13 25
Magalang 112,107 15 11 26
Masantol 54,026 0 0 0
Mexico 159,041 1 3 4
Minalin 46945 7 8 15
Porac 121393 3 3
San Luis 51,958 0 0 0
San Simon 50,796 27 28 55
Sta. Ana 55,043 0 0 0
Sta. Rita 40,808 0 0 0
Sto. Tomas 39,918 3 0 3
Sasmuan 28,599 0 0 0
District Hospitals 2 3 5
PAMPANGA 1,840,175 207 171 378
SOURCE: PHO

6.4.2.3. Morbidity and Mortality Rates

Morbidity refers to the state of being diseased or unhealthy within a


population. From year 2009 to 2013, Upper Respiratory Infection has been
consistently the first leading cause of morbidity among all ages in the
province. In 2013, about 110,498 individuals suffered from the disease or
6,004.75 per 100,000 population. Second cause is skin diseases 14,250
cases or 6,004.75 per 100,000 population and third is animal bite with 12,700
cases or 690.15 per 100,000 population. It is alarming that for the last four
years , animal bite occupies fifth in the list but in 2013 it went up to third
place. Other leading cases of morbidity are hypertension, urinary tract
infection, gastrointestinal disorder, diabetes mellitus, pulmonary tuberculosis,
wound, pneumonia and bronchitis.

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(2015-2042)

Table 3 - 26. Ten (10) Leading Causes of Morbidity, Pampanga 2013 and 2009-2012
2013 2009-2012

CAUSES RATE/100,000 RATE/100,000


NO. NO.
POPULATION POPULATION
1. Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (URTI) 110,498 6,004.75 102,194 6,084.54
2. Skin Diseases 14,250 774.38 10,389 618.55
3. Animal Bite 12,700 690.15 5,571 331.69
4. Hypertension 9,749 529.78 11499 684.64
5. Urinary Tract Infection (URI) 7,285 395.88 6,509 387.54
6. Gastrointestinal Disorders 5,860 318.44 5,106 304.00
7. Diabetes Mellitus 4,147 225.35 2,832 168.61
8. Pulmonary Tuberculosis 3,937 213.94 3,193 190.10
9. Wound 3,525 191.55 5,123 305.01
Pneumonia 2,852 154.98 3,676 218.86
10. Bronchitis 2,196 119.33 3,186 189.69
SOURCE:PHO-PAMPANGA

Mortality is the term used for the number of people who died within a
period. The primary causes of deaths are life-style related diseases which are
cardiovascular diseases and followed by all forms of cancer. In 2013, there
are 2,031 individuals who died caused by cardiac diseases, which is the
leading cause of mortality or at the rate of 110.36 per 100,000 populations.
Second leading cause of mortality was all forms of cancer with total deaths of
842 individuals or 45.75 per 100,000 populations.

These diseases can be attributed to cultural and environmental factors.


The traditional dietary habits and bubbly lifestyle of Kapampangans may have
played a major role in the rising cases of cancer, diabetes, chronic respiratory
and heart diseases.

In recent years, the province was suffering from double burden of


diseases. While deaths from transmittable diseases such as tuberculosis had
not dramatically gone down yet, lifestyle- related diseases began to overtake
communicable diseases as the leading causes of mortality.

Respiratory Distress Syndrome was reported as the first leading cause of


mortality among infants from 2009-2013. It is a breathing disorder of new
born babies. In 2013, there were 44 cases of death or a rate of 17.06 % per
1,000 live births cause by Respiratory Distress Syndrome and second (2nd)
by Pneumonia with 18 cases or a rate of 2.89%per 1,000 live births. Other
causes of infant mortality include cardiac diseases, sepsis, asphyxia,
meningitis, dehydration, accident, gastrointestinal disorders and asthma.

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Table 3 - 27. Ten (10) Leading Causes of Mortality, Pampanga 2013 and 2009-2012
2013 2009-2012
CAUSES RATE/100,000 RATE/100,000
NO. NO.
POPULATION POPULATION
1. Cardiac Diseases 2,031 110.36 1,590 94.66
2. Cancer, all forms 842 45.75 932 49.53
3. Cerebrovascular Disorders 773 42.00 - -
4. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease(COPD) 433 23.53 314 18.69
5. Pneumonia 383 25.87 368 21.90
6. Renal Failure 356 1934 287 17.08
7. Diabetes Mellitus 321 17.44 273 16.25
8. Accidents 200 10.86 139 8.27
9. Pulmonary Tuberculosis 127 6.90 145 8.62
10. Multiple Organ Failure 100 5.43 77 0.41
SOURCE:PHO-PAMPANGA

Eclampsia was reported as the first leading cause of maternal deaths since 2009. It
is a fatal complication of hypertension in pregnant women. In 2013, there were 6 cases
of deaths caused by eclampsia. Other causes of maternal deaths include hemorrage or
uterine atony with five (5) reported cases, unknown cause with two (2) cases, and
embolism with one (1) case. Pregnant mothers are encourage by medical personnel to
have regular check-ups especially on the first three months of pregnancy to prevent
maternal deaths and other complications.

Table 3 - 28. LEADING CAUSES OF INFANT MORTALITY, 2013, 2009-2012


` 2013 2009-2012
CAUSES RATE/1,000 RATE/1,000
NO. NO.
LIVE LIVE
1. Respiratory Distress Syndrome 44 17.06 32 1.20
2. Pneumonia 18 2.89 9 0.33
3. Cardiac Diseases 17 2.72 10 0.37
4. Sepsis 8 1.28 8 0.30
5. Asphyxia 4 0.64 2 0.07
6. Meningitis 3 0.48 3 0.11
7. Dehydration 2 0.32 3 0.11
8. Accident 2 0.32 1 0.03
9. Gastrointestinal Disorders 2 0.32 - -
10. Asthma 1 0.32 - -
SOURCE: PHO-PAMPANGA

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015-2042)

Table 3 - 29. LEADING CAUSES OF MATERNAL MORTALITY, 2013, 2009-2012


2013 2009-2012
CAUSES
NO. RATE/1,000 LIVE NO. RATE/1,000 LIVE
1. Eclampsia 6 0.22 4 0.150
2. Hemorrage/Uterine Atony 5 0.18 4 0.150
3. Unknown Cause 2 0.07 - -
4. Embolism 1 0.04 3 0.112
5. Sepsis - - 2 0.075
6. Myocardial Infarction - - 2 0.075
7. Retained Placenta - - 1 0.037
SOURCE: PHO-PAMPANGA

6.4.3. Nutrition Services

There were 10,899 pre-school children or 5.18% of the 210,297 total


pre-school children weighed were found to be severely underweight and
underweight. The top municipalities with highest rate of underweight and
severely underweight pre-school children were Apalit with prevalence rate
of 10.21% followed by Candaba with 7.99%, San Simon with 7.46%,
Minalin with 7.12% and Macabebe with 6.88%. The municipality of
Mexico got the lowest prevalence rate of 2.15%. City of San Fernando
and Mabalacat was not included in the Operation Timbang.

Table 3 - 30. NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN, RANKING BY MUNICIPALITY, 2013


UNDERWEIGHT CHILDREN (0-5 YEARS OLD)
MUNICIPALITY VERY LOW LOW TOTAL
NO. % NO. % NO. %
1. Apalit 422 2.81% 1108 7.39% 1530 10.21%
2. Candaba 252 1.93% 793 6.06% 1045 7.99%
3. San Simon 106 1.56% 402 5.90% 508 7.46%
4. Minalin 72 1.24% 341 5.88% 413 7.12%
5. Macabebe 162 1.67% 504 5.20% 666 6.88%
6. Magalang 195 1.71% 578 5.07% 773 6.78%
7. Porac 336 2.29% 609 4.16% 945 6.45%
8. Sta. Rita 98 1.63% 270 4.48% 368 6.11%
9. Masantol 98 1.35% 318 4.38% 416 5.73%
10. Bacolor 64 1.55% 155 3.77% 219 5.32%
11. Sto. Tomas 78 1.32% 223 3.77% 301 5.09%
12. San Luis 59 0.92% 221 3.45% 280 4.37%
13. Lubao 214 0.98% 729 3.35% 943 4.33%
14. Floridablanca 184 1.16% 503 3.17% 687 4.33%
15. Arayat 75 0.45% 526 3.18% 601 3.63%
16. Sta. Ana 59 0.80% 174 2.36% 233 3.16%
17. Guagua 62 0.37% 354 2.09% 416 2.45%
18. Sasmuan 2 0.04% 102 2.21% 104 2.26%
19. Mexico 83 0.39% 368 1.75% 451 2.15%
PAMPANGA 2,621 1.25% 8,278 3.94% 10,899 5.18%
Note : Mabalacat City and City of San Fernando not included
SOURCE: PHO

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(2015-2042)

Based from the Operation Timbang for school children conducted in 2013, the
municipality of Masantol ranked first with a total of 1,579 school children who were
severely wasted and wasted or 19.84% of the 7,958 total school children weighed. It
was followed by Minalin, Macabebe, Arayat, Mexico, Bacolor, Sto. Tomas, San
Simon, Apalit, Floridablanca, Sta. Ana, Magalang, Candaba, Porac, Guagua, Sta.
Rita., Sasmuan, San Luis and Lubao.

The districts Lubao East and West had the lowest prevalence rates 9.23% of
severely wasted and wasted against the 18,953 total school children weighed. The
City of Mabalacat and City of San Fernando were not included in the report.

Table 3 - 31. NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF SCHOOL CHILDREN, RANKING BY MUNICIPALITY


BASED FROM OPERATION TIMBANG 2013
NUTRITIONAL STATUS
WASTED WASTED
TOTAL NO.
TOTAL % SEVERELY
ENROLLED
NAME OF SCHOOL SEVERELY WASTED SCHOOL SCHOOL WASTED +
SCHOOL/RANKING CHILDREN WASTED CHILDREN CHILDREN WASTED
WEIGHED WEIGHED
No. No. No. %
1. Masantol 7,962 558 1,021 7,958 99.95 1,579 19.84%
2. Minalin 5,492 256 708 5,482 99.82 964 17.58%
3. Macabebe (East & West) 9,370 500 1,097 9,346 99.74 1,597 17.09%
4. Arayat (East & West) 17,023 720 1,755 17,014 99.95 2,475 14.55%
5. Mexico (North & South) 17,593 641 1,830 17,455 99.22 2,471 14.16%
6. Bacolor 12,825 478 1,293 12,805 99.84 1,771 13.83%
7. Sto. Tomas 3,971 147 386 3,961 99.75 533 13.46%
8. San Simon 6,217 203 629 6,205 99.81 832 13.41%
9. Apalit 11,889 435 1,137 11884 99.96 1,572 13.23%
10. Floridablanca East & West) 14,083 503 1,335 14,082 99.99 1,838 13.05
11. Sta. Ana 7,227 225 664 7,198 99.60 889 12.35%
12. Magalang (North & South) 11,437 319 1,076 11,429 99.93 1,395 12.21%
13. Candaba (East & West) 12,675 309 1,091 12,669 99.95 1,400 11.05%
14. Porac (East & West) 14,720 383 1,217 14,713 99.95 1,600 10.87%
15. Guagua (East & West) 12,653 314 1,016 12,650 99.98 1,330 10.51%
16. Sta. Rita 5,305 142 396 5,263 99.21 538 10.22%
17. Sasmuan 3,602 72 275 3,602 100.0 347 9.63%
18. San Luis 6,595 97 525 6,529 99.00 622 9.53%
19. Lubao (East & West 18,958 397 1,353 18,953 99.97 1,750 9.23%
NOTE: Mabalacat City & City of San Fernando were not included in the report.

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Table 3 32. Comparative Nutritional Situation, Central Luzon , Philippines 2011


Rate/ Nueva
Particulars Phil. Region 3 Aurora Bataan Bulacan Pamp. Tarlac Zambales
Rank Ecija
Underweight Rate 20.2 15.80 26.1 24.8 13.3 17.5 13.0 16.1 21.7
0-5 yrs. Old
Rank 1 2 6 4 7 5 3
Stunted Rate 33.6 22.2 43.7 28.0 18.2 20.9 21.3 25.2 31.4
children 0-5
yrs. old Rank 1 3 7 6 5 4 2
Wasted Rate 7.3 7.0 0 6.2 8.8 6.4 6.9 6.6 3.3
children 0-5
yrs. old Rank 7 5 1 4 2 3 6
Underweight Rate 32.0 25.2 36.3 26.8 25.4 24.5 24.1 21.3 33.5
children 5.08-
10 yrs. old Rank 1 3 4 5 6 7 2
Stunted Rate 33.6 22.2 19.0 22.2 25.7 20.7 20.1 20.8 23.9
children 5.08-
10 yrs. old Rank 7 3 1 5 6 4 2
Wasted Rate 8.5 11.0 16.8 15.0 9.0 11.9 10.4 10.5 13.0
children 5.08-
10 yrs. old Rank 1 2 7 4 5 6 3
SOURCE: NNS 2011 (FNRI)

LEGENDS:

UNDERWEIGHT Low weight-for-age which is <-2 standard deviation (SD) of the WHO
Child Growth Standard Median. It is an indicator of current and past nutritional status.

STUNTING Low weight-for-age which is <-2 standard deviation (SD) of the WHO Child
Growth Standard Median. It is an indicator of long standing or chronic malnutrition.

WASTING Low weight-for height which is <-2 standard deviation (SD) of the WHO
Child Growth Standard Median. It is an indicator of acute malnutrition.

Based from the National Nutrition Survey (NNS 2011) conducted by the
Food and Nutrition Research Institute (FNRI) in 2011, for underweight children
aged 0-5 years old, Pampanga ranked seventh (7th) or last among the
provinces in Central Luzon (Region 3) with a prevalence rate of 13.0%. The
province of Aurora ranked first (1st) in the region with a prevalence rate of
26.1%. It was lower than the regional rate of 15.8% and national rate of 20.2%.

For stunted children aged 0-5 years old, the province was ranked fifth (5th)
among the provinces in the region with a prevalence rate of 21.3%. The province
of Aurora occupied the first (1st) rank with a prevalence rate 43.7%. Still, it was
lower than the regional rate of 22.2% and national prevalence rate of 33.6%.

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While for wasted children aged 0-5 years old, Pampanga placed second
(2nd) among the seven (7) provinces in the region with a prevalence rate of
6.9%. The province of Bulacan ranked first (1st) with a rate of 8.8% while the
province of Aurora ranked seventh (7th) with a prevalence rate of 0%. The
province was a bit lower than Region 3 prevalence rate of 7.0% and the national
prevalence rate of 7.3%.

Underweight children aged 5.08-10 years old (61-120 months old),


Pampanga was ranked 6th in the region with a prevalence rate of 20.1%. The
province of Aurora was the first (1st) in ranking with a prevalence rate of 36.3%.
While, the regions prevalence rate was 25.2% and the national rate was 32.0%.

For stunting children aged 5.08-10 years old, the province ranked sixth (6th)
place in the whole region with a prevalence rate 20.1%. The province of Bulacan
ranked first (1st) among the seven provinces in the region with a prevalence rate
of 25.7%.The regions prevalence rate for stunting children was 22.2% and the
national rate was 33.6%.

Severely wasted and wasted children aged 5.08-10 years old (61-120
months old), Pampanga ranked fifth (5th) in the region with a prevalence rate of
10.4%. The province of Aurora ranked first among the provinces in the region
with a prevalence rate of 16.8%. The region got the prevalence of 11.0% and the
national prevalence rate was 8.5%. Thus, the survey proved that Pampanga
maintained lower prevalence rates than the regional and national level.

6.4.4. Education
In 2011, DepEd started the implementation of a new educational
system in the country, which is the compulsory K-12 Educational System
that includes the new curricula for all schools. All public elementary
schools were mandated to offer kindergarten for all children aged 5 to 6
years old.

For School Year 2013-2014, there are 558 public elementary schools
catering Kindergarten in the province. The Division of Angeles City has
43 kindergarten schools with 4,807 total enrolments. The Division of
Mabalacat City has 39 kindergarten schools with 3,579 total kindergarten
enrolees. While the Division of Pampanga has 437 kindergarten schools
with 27,529 total enrolees. And the Division of the City of San Fernando
has a total of 39 kindergarten schools with total kindergarten enrolees of
4,454. So, the total number of enrolment in kindergarten in public
elementary schools totalled 40,369.

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(2015-2042)

At the national level, there are 1,865,807 total enrolees in the


kindergarten while in Region 3, total enrolees for kindergarten totalled
192,946 for the SY 2013-2014.

Table 3 - 33. NUMBER OF KINDERGARTEN BY DIVISION/MUNICIPALITY, PAMPANGA SY


2013-2014
KINDERGARTEN ENROLLMENT
DIVISION/MUNICIPALITY
SCHOOLS MALE FEMALE TOTAL
ANGELES CITY 43 2,444 2,363 4,807
MABALACAT CITY 39 1,814 1,765 3,579
CITY OF SAN FERNANDO 39 2,244 2,210 4,454
PAMPANGA 437 14,199 13,330 27,529
Apalit 15 863 760 1,623
Arayat 31 1,187 1,094 22,81
Bacolor 28 801 774 1,575
Candaba 34 938 889 1,827
Floridablanca 34 1,129 1,093 2,222
Guagua 25 896 860 1,756
Lubao 42 1,236 1,181 2,417
Macabebe 28 648 607 1,255
Magalang 29 825 780 1,605
Masantol 22 527 448 975
Mexico 39 1,323 1,325 1,648
Minalin 12 393 389 782
Porac 29 1,029 933 1,964
San Luis 17 465 424 889
San Simon 14 446 425 871
Sasmuan 9 316 267 583
Sta. Ana 12 521 453 974
Sta. Rita 9 351 323 674
Sto. Tomas 8 305 305 610

TOTAL 558 20,701 19,668 40,369

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015-2042)

Table 3 - 34. Number of Schools by Level of Education by Sector by Municipality, SY 2013-2014

TERTIARY /
ELEMENTARY SECONDARY VOCATIONAL
MUNICIPALITY TOTAL
Public Private Public Private Public Private

Angeles City 43 67 13 32 2 23 180

Mabalacat City 39 31 13 15 6 104

City of San Fernando 42 47 20 19 2 13 143

PAMPANGA 434 135 107 72 8 14 764

Apalit 15 10 6 8 39

Arayat 31 6 5 4 46

Bacolor 24 3 5 1 1 34

Candaba 34 8 8 4 54

Floridablanca 34 15 6 5 1 3 64

Guagua 25 22 4 11 1 63

Lubao 42 10 12 7 2 73

Macabebe 28 5 8 4 1 46

Magalang 30 12 7 5 1 1 56

Masantol 22 2 4 3 31

Mexico 39 10 7 4 1 61

Minalin 12 3 4 2 21

Porac 29 7 7 3 1 47

San Luis 17 2 8 27

San Simon 14 4 5 3 26

Santa Ana 12 3 3 2 2 22

Santa Rita 9 4 3 2 18

Santo Tomas 8 7 2 2 1 20

Sasmuan 9 2 3 2 16
TOTAL 558 280 153 138 12 50 1191
SOURCE: www.ebeis.deped.gov.ph

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT &PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015-2042)

Table 3 35. Performance Indicators in Public Elementary by Gender


Pampanga: SY 2010-2011, SY 2011-2012, & SY 2012-2013

2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 - 2013


INDICATORS
Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total
Cohort Survival Rate 82.80 87.30 85.00 78.10 85.60 81.60 80.90 87.10 83.80

Promotion Rate 97.60 98.60 98.10 93.40 95.80 94.50 96.40 98.10 97.24

Repetition Rate 1.81 0.98 1.41 1.70 0.92 1.32 1.73 0.82 1.29

School Leaver Rate 8.15 6.26 7.26 4.92 3.29 4.14 4.21 2.89 3.59

Transition Rate 98.10 99.10 98.6 97.10 98.30 97.70 97.00 98.60 97.76

Failure Rate 1.18 0.69 0.94 2.32 1.19 1.78 0.70 0.54 0.63

Retention Rate 94.20 96.70 95.40 94.20 96.00 95.10 94.60 96.60 95.53

Drop-Out Rate 1.18 0.69 0.94 0.64 0.48 0.56 0.56 0.29 0.43

Graduation Rate 99.00 99.40 99.20 97.50 98.80 98.10 91.20 92.70 92.03

Completion Rate 66.30 73.00 69.40 76.20 84.60 80.10 79.70 86.40 82.88

Gross Enrolment Ratio 92.90 91.90 92.40 94.30 93.10 93.70 95.10 93.60 94.37

Net Enrolment Ratio 81.50 82.70 82.00 81.10 82.60 81.80 82.90 81.30 82.10

NAT 69.69 75.36


SOURCE: www.ebeis.deped.gov.ph

The percentage of Grade 1 enrollees who reached Grade 6 (Cohort


Survival Rate) shows an erratic trend from SY 2009-2010 to SY 2012-
2013. The province cohort rate for SY 2012-2013 was decreased by 1.35
percent with the rate of 82.05% from the rate of 83.44 in SY 2010-2011.
The lowest rate was observed in SY2009-2010 with 79.26 percent. In
secondary level, a higher rate was recorded in SY 2012-2013 with 83.80
percent compared to the rate of 81.64 % in SY 2011-2012.

The average pupil-teacher ratio (PTR) of the province is 1:42 and 1:40
for elementary and secondary level respectively, which generally surpass
the national standard ratio of one teacher and for every forty pupils. The
pupil-classroom ratio (PCR) is 1:34 and 1:55 for elementary and
secondary level, respectively.

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Table 3 36. Cohort Survival Rate in Public Elementary by Gender,
Central Luzon: SY 2009 2010, SY 2010-2011, SY 2011-2012, & SY 2012-2013
SY 2009 - 2010 SY 2010 - 2011 SY 2011 - 2012 SY 2012 2013
DIVISION
MALE FEMALE TOTAL MALE FEMALE TOTAL MALE FEMALE TOTAL MALE FEMALE TOTAL

Angeles City 74.91 81.95 78.34 73.46 84.89 78.76 75.42 83.84 79.61 75.96 85.77 80.58
Aurora 69.34 80.45 74.44 76.67 87.60 81.80 70.56 80.50 75.23 73.49 80.44 76.80
Balanga City 83.39 92.67 88.25 86.66 99.05 93.08 85.48 88.52 87.00 86.43 92.14 89.48
Bataan 85.89 92.68 89.08 85.38 93.14 89.02 87.48 92.23 89.73 87.86 95.01 91.21
Bulacan 82.34 89.00 85.61 74.88 84.46 79.35 76.51 85.32 80.63 76.52 83.07 79.61
Cabanatuan City 76.69 87.60 81.97 70.98 79.49 74.94 75.98 83.36 79.48 79.41 88.44 84.02
Gapan City 68.95 74.56 71.52 74.42 86.90 80.14 71.45 78.86 75.62 67.33 72.74 69.87

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


Malolos City 79.80 92.33 86.62 74.82 81.18 77.84 78.82 87.05 83.16 83.12 87.56 85.38
Munoz Science City 79.93 85.92 83.24 86.94 95.36 92.80 75.33 80.63 77.90 76.68 82.90 79.47
Nueva Ecija 74.90 84.95 79.55 74.07 84.05 78.70 76.39 86.23 80.97 76.05 84.12 79.82
Olongapo City 69.33 74.30 71.63 74.82 87.08 81.19 83.03 83.83 83.39 78.90 84.85 81.71
Pampanga 78.88 86.43 82.40 81.14 88.25 84.70 78.10 85.63 81.64 80.88 87.10 83.80
San Fernando City 81.47 86.58 84.53 79.61 83.55 82.01 84.49 90.39 87.36 85.56 91.06 88.35
San Jose City 68.73 81.19 74.55 75.44 80.79 78.67 83.62 91.58 88.30
San Jose del Monte City 78.58 85.81 82.52 76.83 88.90 82.42 81.88 89.14 85.33 80.35 86.55 83.60
Tarlac 80.09 88.38 83.93 77.60 86.26 81.59 77.63 83.15 80.20 77.67 84.70 80.94
Tarlac City 75.17 83.74 79.14 68.63 77.58 72.79 75.61 84.15 79.58 81.64 87.41 84.30
Zambales 80.06 88.12 83.88 75.55 82.03 78.58 76.29 82.65 79.25 76.83 83.21 79.80
Region IIII - Central Luzon 78.85 87.02 82.66 76.87 86.06 81.15 77.99 85.73 81.62 78.81 85.78 82.08

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76
Table 3 37. Cohort Survival Rate in Public Secondary by Gender,
Central Luzon: SY 2009 2010, SY 2010-2011, SY 2011-2012, & SY 2012-2013
SY 2009 - 2010 SY 2010 - 2011 SY 2011 - 2012 SY 2012 - 2013
DIVISION
MALE FEMALE TOTAL MALE FEMALE TOTAL MALE FEMALE TOTAL MALE FEMALE TOTAL

Angeles City 60.86 72.42 66.60 63.85 76.46 70.00 61.43 75.38 68.41 62.25 78.45 70.32
Aurora 67.22 77.76 72.30 76.65 85.25 80.88 66.67 75.87 71.19 65.24 77.42 71.21
Balanga City 71.58 84.51 78.08 72.75 86.63 79.74 67.16 80.26 73.85 67.95 81.75 74.80
Bataan 69.24 83.80 76.01 73.63 84.92 78.97 70.31 84.17 76.75 76.33 86.06 80.97
Bulacan 72.07 85.43 78.53 70.20 83.55 76.63 67.55 81.28 74.20 67.96 81.14 74.31
Cabanatuan City 76.08 85.17 80.57 69.96 80.15 75.02 67.47 87.24 77.03 80.19 83.27 81.78
Gapan City 85.14 85.76 85.49 82.29 91.16 87.48 78.53 81.40 79.98 73.37 80.19 76.81

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


Malolos City 66.63 83.73 74.74 65.74 80.58 72.65 86.89 99.03 93.25 96.20 98.02 97.78
Munoz Science City 77.82 82.86 83.61 66.68 79.60 73.01 71.29 72.41 71.75 73.69 79.98 76.77
Nueva Ecija 70.57 80.99 75.69 74.77 84.06 79.42 74.70 82.41 78.52 64.61 74.80 69.57
Olongapo City 72.57 89.47 81.47 78.16 84.58 81.33 68.80 83.54 75.67 79.61 93.24 86.19
Pampanga 73.74 85.23 79.26 77.11 90.25 83.44 74.42 86.56 80.25 76.25 88.44 82.05
San Fernando City 75.09 84.32 79.83 92.87 97.33 96.33 74.33 90.20 82.00 76.42 85.03 80.71
San Jose City 71.57 74.31 72.94 73.62 85.93 79.67 76.49 77.20 76.81
San Jose del Monte City 64.03 81.75 72.55 72.22 85.34 78.70 67.28 85.17 75.88 79.61 93.18 86.63
Tarlac 73.56 85.17 79.22 71.63 82.47 76.92 73.67 82.40 77.89 71.41 82.56 76.77
Tarlac City 58.83 73.53 65.59 72.22 85.44 78.48 59.47 69.11 64.10 68.75 91.75 79.36
Zambales 74.90 85.37 79.94 72.19 81.66 76.75 65.79 82.70 73.74 74.11 85.08 79.36
Region IIII - Central Luzon 71.44 83.55 77.31 73.37 84.82 78.94 70.97 83.03 76.81 71.87 83.39 77.45

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Table 3 - 38. Pupil Teacher & Pupil - Classroom Ratio in Public Elementary & Secondary by
Municipality, Pampanga: SY 2013-2014

ELEMENTARY SECONDARY

Sec. Pupil-Teacher Ratio


Pupil-Classroom Ratio
(EOSY 2012 2013)

(EOSY 2012 2013)


Sec. Pupi-Classroom
Pupil-Teacher Ratio
(EOSY 2012-2013)

(EOSY 2012-2013)
Province/Munici

No. of Classroom

No. of Classroom
pality

No. of Teachers

No. of Teachers

Ratio (SCR)
Enrolment

Enrolment
(PCR)
(PTR)

(STR)
Angeles City 54,199 1,162 36.50 1,024 41.42 22,295 584 38.18 411 54.25
Mabalacat City 30,814 658 36.63 604 39.91 11,990 251 47.77 178 67.36
City of San
40,515 862 36.87 769 41.33 19,141 487 39.30 343 55.80
Fernando
PAMPANGA 226,132 5,694 39.71 5,824 30.39 95,295 2,405 39.62 1,787 53.33
Apalit 13,560 320 33.10 310 34.16 4,727 122 38.75 95 49.76
Arayat 19,523 445 34.11 452 33.58 7,334 177 41.44 107 68.54
Bacolor 11,296 284 31.37 283 31.48 3,615 121 29.88 95 38.05
Candaba 14,512 376 30.20 362 31.36 6,519 171 38.12 138 47.24
Floridablanca 16,308 412 30.86 415 30.64 6,215 179 34.72 121 51.36
Guagua 14,424 380 29.69 410 27.51 4,531 126 35.96 108 41.95
Lubao 21,412 548 30.90 574 29.50 9,756 244 39.98 200 48.78
Macabebe 10,622 321 25.93 301 27.65 5,305 145 36.59 110 48.23
Magalang 14,826 354 32.92 390 29.88 9,936 195 50.95 164 60.59
Masantol 8,786 252 27.28 244 28.17 2,775 67 41.42 50 55.50
Mexico 20,733 492 32.98 524 30.97 9,618 238 40.41 134 71.78
Minalin 6,278 171 28.70 170 28.86 2,235 60 37.25 42 53.21
Porac 16,521 377 34.31 387 33.43 5,578 138 40.42 108 51.65
San Luis 7,389 200 29.15 210 27.76 4,057 88 46.10 86 47.17
San Simon 7,088 176 31.42 191 28.95 2,950 70 42.14 55 53.64
Santa Ana 8,091 184 34.43 198 32.00 2,554 69 37.01 41 62.29
Santa Rita 5,975 157 30.15 164 28.86 2,558 63 40.60 56 45.68
Santo Tomas 4,595 126 28.29 131 27.21 3,388 88 38.50 38 89.16
Sasmuan 4,193 119 27.03 108 29.78 1,644 44 37.36 39 42.15

TOTAL 351,660 8,376 41.98 8,221 33.50 148,721 3,727 39.90 2,719 54.70

SOURCE: www.ebeis.deped.gov.ph

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6.4.5. Housing

In 2010, 78.1 percent of the occupied housing units in the province


had outer walls made of concrete/brick/stone, higher than the proportion
of 56.5 percent recorded in 2000. The proportion of occupied housing
units with outer walls made of half concrete/brick/stone and half wood
decreased from 21.7 percent in 2000 to 11.5 percent in 2010.
Meanwhile, the most of the occupied housing units (91.6%) in 2010 had
roofs made of galvanized iron/ aluminum, higher than the proportion of
82.4 percent recorded in 2000.

Of the total 416,271 households, four fifths (80.0 percent) owned or


amortized the lots that they occupied. Moreover, 11.5 percent of the
households occupied lots which were rent-free but with consent of the
owner, 6.2 percent rented the lots that they occupied while 1.2 percent
occupied lots which were rent-free but without consent of the owner.

Table 3 - 39. Occupied Housing Units by Construction Materials of the Roof and Outer Walls:
Pampanga* 2010
Construction Materials of the Roof
Total Half
Construction Makeshift/
Occupied Galvanized Tile/ Galvanized Cogon/
Materials of the Salvaged/ Asbestos/ Not
Housing Iron/ Concrete/ Iron and Wood Nipa/
Outer Walls Improvised Others Reported
Units Aluminum Clay Tile Half Anahaw
Materials
Concrete
Concrete/ 319,109 311,050 3,398 2,943 912 599 109 98 -
Brick/ stone
Wood 26,546 20,140 111 851 4,175 1,121 122 26 -
Half concrete/ 46,835 35,213 259 9,702 779 771 82 29 -
brick/ stone
and half wood
Galvanized 1,243 1,020 16 159 19 24 5 - -
Iron/
aluminium
Bamboo/ 12,353 5,578 - 258 396 5,996 100 25 -
sawali/ cogon/
nipa
Asbestos 35 27 2 2 2 - - 2 -
Glass 166 136 30 - - - - - -
Makeshifts/ 1,264 660 - 23 9 87 483 2 -
salvaged/
improvised
materials
Others/ not 778 390 2 26 20 95 68 28 149
reported
No walls 77 62 - - 1 11 - 3 -
TOTAL 408,406 374,276 3,818 13,964 6,313 8,704 969 213 149
Source: 2010 CPH
Note: * Excluding Angeles City

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Table 3 - 40. Number of Households by Tenure Status of the Lot: Pampanga*, 2010

Tenure Status of the Lot Number of Households


Owned/ being amortized / owner-like 322,890
Rented 25,913
Rented-free with consent of owner 47,920
Rented-free without consent of owner 5,126
Not reported 214
Not applicable 4,208
TOTAL 416,271
Source: 2010 CPH
Note: * Excluding Angeles City

6.4.6. Public Order and Safety

Peace and Order

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS AND STREET CRIMES

Pampanga PPO recorded a total of 2,707 crime incidents from 01


January 2013 to 31 December 2013 which is higher by 168 or 6.62% from
the 2,539 crime incidents recorded last year. Out of the 2,707 crime
incidents, 1,435 were Index Crimes and 1,272 were Non-Index Crimes.
With these figure, the PPO obtained a 37.68% Crime Solution Efficiency
which is lower by 3.76% recorded on the same period last year. Also, this
Office obtained an Average Monthly Crime Rate of 10.97 per month, an
increase of 6.62% on the same period covered.

INDEX CRIMES

The 1,435 Index Crimes recorded for the past year decreased by 12
or 0.83% from the 1,447% Index Crimes recorded on the same period last
year. These 1,435 Index Crimes comprised the 467 crimes against
person and 968 crimes against property which were further broken down
as follows: Murder 80; Homicide 21; Physical Injury 256; Rape
110; Robbery 365; Theft - 450; Carnapping - 163; Cattle Rustling - 0.

NON-INDEX CRIMES

Non-Index Crimes was pegged at 1,272 with an increase of 180 or


16.48% from the 1,092 recorded last year. Below is the breakdown of
crimes recorded for the period in review:

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Table 3 - 41. Comparative Statistics of Crime Incidents in Pampanga: 2012-2013

Crime Incidents 2012 2013 Variance Remarks


Total Crime Volume 2539 2707 6.62% Inc. by 168 cases
Total Index Crimes 1447 1435 0.83% Dec by 12 cases
Index Crimes Cleared 576 526 -8.68% Dec by 50 cases
Index Crime Solved 425 390 -8.24% Dec by 35 cases
Index Clearance Efficiency 39.81% 36.66% -7.92% Dec by 7.92%
Index Solution Efficiency 29.37% 27.18% -7.47% Dec by 7.47%
A. Crime vs Person 5.33 467 -12.38% Dec by 66 cases
1. Murder 115 80 -30.43% Dec by 35 cases
2. Homicide 24 21 -12.50% Dec by 3 cases
3. Physical Injury 312 256 -17.95% Dec by 56 cases
4. Rape 82 110 34.15% Inc by 128 cases
B. Crime vs Property 914 968 5.91% Dec by 54 cases
1. Robbery 370 355 -4.05% Dec by 15 cases
2. Theft 360 450 25.00% Inc by 90 cases
3. Carnapping 182 163 -10.44 Dec by 19 cases
4. Cattle Rustling 2 0 100.00% Dec to 100.00%
Total Non-Index Crimes 1092 1272 16.48% Inc by 180 cases
N.I. Crime Cleared 793 851 7.31% Inc by 58 7.31%
N.I. Crime Solved 569 633 11.25% Inc by 11.25%
N.I. Clearance Efficiency 72.62% 66.90% -7.87% Dec by7.87%
N.I. Solution Efficiency 52.11% 49.76% -4.49% Dec by 4.49%
A. Implementation of Special Laws 713 790 10.80% Inc by 77 cases
Violation of 9287 (Illegal gambling) 77 63 -18.18 Dec. by 44 cases
Violation of RA 9165 (Illegal Drugs) 251 305 21.51% Inc by 54 cases
Violation of RA7610 (Child Abuse) 175 209 19.43% Inc by 34 cases
Violation of RA 8294 (Illegal possession of firearms 60 60 0.00% Same as last year
Violation of RA 9262 (Violation Against Women and Children) 180 153 2.00% Inc by 3 cases
B. Other Forms of Non Index Crimes 379 482 27.18% Dec by103 cases
Malicious Mischief 33 57 72.73 Inc by 24 cases
Threats 51 63 23.53% Inc by 12 cases
Estafa 47 36 -23.40% Dec by 11 cases
Direct Assault 58 49 -15.52% De4c by 8 cases
Alarm and Scandal 30 32 6.67% Inc by 2 cases
Others 160 245 53.13% Inc by 85 cases
Average Monthly Crime Rate 10.29 10.97 6.62% Inc by 6.62%
Total Crime Cleared 1369 1379 0.66% Inc by0.66%
Total Solved 994 1020 2.62% Inc by 2.62%
Clearance Efficiency 53.92% 50.91% -5.59% Dec by 5.59%
Solution Efficiency 39.15% 37.68% -3.75 Dec by 3.75%

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Police Force per Capita

The Province of Pampanga which is located at the heart of the region


of Region III in Central Luzon has a total population of 2,014,019 as of
March 2014. Wherein the City of San Fernando as capital City, housed
the biggest population of 285,912, where almost all important regional
offices located. This implies that the area needs more security to meet
public security, but it only have 113 police personnel. The daily
consolidated report shows the population ratio to police is 1:1774. Which
mean that the ratio of the police personnel to the population is very small
based on the PNP target of 1:500 declared by Sec. Mar Roxas.Further
shows that the province needs additional police personnel to strengthen
peace and order.

Table 3 - 42. Daily Consolidated Strength Report, 2014

POL-POP
UNIT/STATION POPULATION TOTAL POLICE
RATIO

APALIT MPS 101,537 28 1 : 3626


ARAYAT MPS 121,348 29 1 : 4184
BACOLOR MPS 31,508 35 1 : 900
CANDABA MPS 102,399 33 1 : 3103
FLORIDABLANCA MPS 110,846 47 1 : 2358
GUAGUA MPS 111,199 36 1 : 3089
LUBAO MPS 150,843 49 1 : 3078
MABALACAT CPS 215,610 74 1 : 2914
MACABEBE MPS 70,777 25 1 : 2831
MAGALANG MPS 103,597 44 1 : 2354
MASANTOL MPS 52,407 26 1 : 2016
MEXICO MPS 146,851 40 1 : 3671
MINALIN MPS 44,001 26 1 : 1692
PORAC MPS 111,441 44 1 : 2533
SAN FERNANDO CPS 285,912 113 1 : 2530
SAN LUIS MPS 49,311 26 1 : 1897
SAN SIMON MPS 48,353 31 1 : 1560
SASMUAN MPS 27,254 25 1 : 1090
STA ANA MPS 52,001 24 1 : 2167
STA RITA MPS 38,762 26 1 : 1491
STO TOMAS MPS 38,062 28 1 : 1359
TOTAL 2,014,019 1155 1 : 1744
AUTHORIZED STR 2,014,019 1267

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COMPARISON OF INDICATORS FROM PREVIOUS VALUES WITH


REGIONAL, NATIONAL AND OTHER BENCHMARKS

The recent report shows the increase of crime incidents compare to


previous year. Based on the performance of the police personnel in the
province thus, manifest that the few number of policemen contribute to
weaker implementation of peace and order.

Performance Effectiveness-

Considers the extent and quality of the police services efforts to


produce law and order and respond to all levels of crime. The simple
cases can be resolve by the police officer such as petty theft and traffic
violations at one hand.

Management and Oversight Assesses

The police services basic management structure for carrying out


operations and being accountable to the community. Each personnel
must be aware of his area of responsibility.

Community Relations

Consider the police services relations with the local community in


securing the publics support and trust. Police officer assigned and
designated in certain area must establish a good rapport with the people
to enhance their trust.

Sustainability

Evaluates the ability of the police service to sustain itself and its
capabilities, which means that policemen and the personnel serving the
police force must be given the right and proper compensation and
benefits which is due to them, to make them work efficiently and
effectively.

6.4.7. Other Service Utilities


6.4.7.1. Telecommunications

Six (6) telephone companies provide telephone services to the cities


of Angeles and San Fernando and other municipalities. These are the
Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company, the Angeles City
Telephone Company, Digitel, Dau Telecom, Datelcom, Smart, Sun and
Globe,

The United Parcel Service (UPS) provides internal courier services for

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the province and the rest of the country. The company is a locator of
Clark Special Economic Zone as well. It is complemented by four (4) local
couriers operating as communication and baggage carriers in the
province. There are 3 postal district offices and 35 post office stations
distributed in 20 municipalities and 2 cities within the province. Other
communication facilities operating in the province are cable networks and
radio stations.

There are four (4) cable service providers in the province, namely:
ACCTN in Angeles City, PROSTAT in Mabalacat, Satellite Cable Network
(SCN) in San Fernando and BRANCOM in Pandacaqui, Mexico.There
are seven (7) radio and TV stations in the province, namely:

Radio Broadcast Area


1. Infomax RV 44 Pampanga Pampanga
2. ABS-CBN TV 46 Pampanga Pampanga
3. DWRW-TV (CLTV 36) Central Luzon, part of Metro Manila & Cavite
4. UNTV 9 Pampanga Pampanga
5. DWGV 99.1 Drive Radio Central Luzon, part of Metro Manila & Cavite
6. DWRW (RW 95.1 FM) Central Luzon, Ilocos Region & Northern Luzon
7. D Ultimate 105.5 FM Central Luzon and some parts of Metro Manila & Rizal Province

6.4.7.2. Power and Electrification Facilities

Almost 99.04% of the province is energized, brought about by the


existing major power transmission lines providing electric power in the
province.

The largest is the Pampanga Electric Cooperative (PRESCO),


Angeles Electric Corporation (AEC), San Fernando Electric Company
(SFELAPCO). The Manila Electric Company (MERALCO) also extends
services to some parts of Pampanga.

Electric power is distributed to majority of the towns through the


distribution centers of the PELCO which include PELCO I, II, III. Small
parts of Candaba and Macabebe are also supplied by MERALCO.
Angeles City and some portions of Mabalacat, Bacolor, and Porac are
supplied by Angeles Electric Corporation. The City of San Fernando is
supplied by SFELAPCO.

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6.4.7.3. Water

There are three water supply service systems in the province, which
are classified into three (3) levels: Level 3 as the system by the piped
household connections provided by the water districts, LGU and other
private water providers; Level 2 as the system by the piped communal
faucets; and Level 1 as the point water sources.

As of 2013, the 48.79% of the population has the Level 3 water


system. These are distributed to the cities of Angeles, Mabalacat and San
Fernando and the municipalities of Bacolor, Candaba, Guagua,
Floridablanca, Lubao, Macabebe, Masantol, Porac, and Sta Rita. Further
data for each municipality are shown in Table 3 - 15.

Table 3 - 43. PERCENT OF LEVEL 3 WATER SYSTEM SERVED, PRICE,


NRW, NUMBER OF SPRING SOURCES BY MUNICIPALITIES,
2013
PRICE OF
% NO. OF
WATER COASTAL
MUNICIPALITIES POPULATION NRW (%) SPRING
(10 cubic /INLAND
SERVED SOURCES
meters)
Bacolor 55.9 272.10 12 3 Inland
Candaba 18.7 260.00 15 3 Inland
City of San Fernando 79.6 226.00 18 28 Inland
Mabalacat City 100.0 223.20 18 26 Inland
Angeles City 88.1 217.00 25 28 Inland
Masantol 33.9 207.20 14 3 Inland
Santa Rita 7.8 207.00 2 2 Inland
Macabebe 45.3 206.10 25 7 Inland
Guagua 58.5 203.70 33 11 Inland
Porac 25.6 190.00 20 6 Inland
Floridablanca 97.4 182.50 14 14 Inland
Lubao 46.7 156.50 11 9 Coastal
Source: CP David

6.4.7.3. Irrigation

Pampangas agricultural land has a potential irrigable area of 81,388


hectares in which a total of 58,097 is actually being serviced.

There are four national irrigation systems constructed and being


operated and maintained by the National Irrigation Administration. These

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are the Porac-Gumain Rivers Irrigation System (PGRIS), Caulaman River


Irrigation System (CRIS), Angat-Maasim Rivers Irrigation System
(AMRIS) and the Upper Pampanga River Irrigation System (UPRIS) with
a total coverage of 19,099 hectares.

PGRIS decreased its coverage by 37.8% while CRIS remained un-


operational. AMRIS however increased its coverage from two (2)
hectares to 6.5 as a result of the improvement and wide coverage of th
system. The irrigation component of the Pampanga Delta Development
Project was able to irrigate seven (7) thousand hectares of farmland.

The 122 communal irrigation systems which are being managed by


the Provincial Irrigation Office and other government agencies have a
total service area of 38,988 hectares. The Small Water Impoundment
Management Projects (SWIMPs) are nine and being managed by the
Department of Agriculture. The SWIMP and shallow tube wells are used
to alleviated the drought spell and were able to support nine (9) thousand
hectares. Pumps numbering 8.7 thousand were able to irrigate 27
thousand hectares.

6.4.7.4. Flood Control and Drainage

The flood control facilities in the province are earth dikes, revetments
levees, and drainage mains. The Arayat-Apalit-Masantol Setback Levee
has the longest length of 40 kilometers. The levees protect the right bank
of Pampanga River against flood, and more serious flood overflow tends
to rush on the left bank area where Candaba (covering the Candaba
Swamp), San Luis and San Simon are located. Moreover, the other river
dikes/levees aim mainly at preventing river bank erosion and/or fixing the
river alignment and hardly contribute to the increment of river channel
flow capacity. As a result, most of the downstream and midstream
sections of Pampanga River have small channel flow capacities, which
could not cope with even the probable flood runoff discharge of 5-year
return period.

The Pampanga Delta Development Project was launched in 1982 and


Phase I was implemented in 1992 to 2002, in order to increase such
small channel flow capacity. The target river channel improvement length
was 14.2km.while the completed length was only 13.9km.due to
budgetary constraint and difficulty of land acquisition.

Sediment prevention works had been installed in the eastern area of


Mt. Pinatubo in the 1990s and 2000s to cope with the large volume of

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sediment runoff caused by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. Among others,


the major projects for sediment prevention and management are: a) the
Pinatubo Hazard Urgent Mitigation Project (PHUMP), Phase I for
Sacobia-Bamban River (a tributary of Pampanga River); b) the
Construction of Mega Dike and Transverse Dike for Pasig-Potrero (a
tributary of Pasac River); and c) the PHUMP Phase II for Pasig-Potrero
River and San Fernando River.

Table 3 - 44. Major Structural Flood Mitigation Projects


Implementation
Project Purpose
Period
1. Arnedo Dike Flood control 1940s

2. Apalit-Arayat-Masantol Flood control 1970s


Setback Levee (right bank of Pampanga River)
3. Arayat-Cabiao Ring Levee Flood control 1970s

4. Candaba Floodway Flood control 1970s

5. Cabiao-San Isidro-Gapan Levee Flood control 1970s

6. Bebe-San Esteban Diversion Channel Flood control 1970s

7. Pampanga Delta DevelopmentProject (PDDP) Phase I Flood control 1990-2000s


(P2.9B worth)
8. Mega Dike and Transverse Dike on Pasig Potrero Flood control and sabo 1990s
River works (P.9B worth)
9. PHUMP Phase II (for Pasig- Potrero River and San Flood control and sabo 2000s
Fernando River) works (P4.55B worth)
10. PHUMP Phase III in Pasac River Flood mitigation for Pasac 2005-2010
Delta (P4.7B worth)
11. PHUMP Phase IV in Pasac Flood mitigation for Sn.
Fernando River and
connecting channels
12. PDDP Phase II Flood mitigation for
Pampanga Delta (P8.8B worth)
13. PPDP Phase III Flood mitigation for
Candaba Swamp area

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7. DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION

7.1. Revenue Generation

For the year 2012, the total revenue generated by the Provincial
Government of Pampanga amounted to P1.7 billion. Due to the intensified
efforts of the present administration, there was an increase in the revenue
collection amounting to P31.5 million or 1.86% compared against year 2011s
total revenue of P1.696 billion and in year 201ed at 0, there was a total
revenue of P1.4 billion.

The total revenue collected for local resources by the province was
reported at 506.5 millions, which includes tax revenues of P289.6 billion and
non-tax revenues amounting to P216.8 million.

The total revenues from external sources amounted to P1.2 billion which
includes the internal revenue allotment (IRA) amounting to P1..195 billion;
PCSO/PAGCOR, P25 million, and gain on disposed assets, P310 thousand.

Revenue generation is the priority service area on administrative


governance. This is mainly due to the high cost to collect revenue compared to
outside benchmarks, i.e. national average and average first class province.

7.2. Resource Allocation and Utilization

There is limited amount of expenditure per capita. Intensification of revenue


generation was identified to answer this limitation.

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8. DISASTER RISK REDUCTION AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT

8.1 Existing Policies, Laws, Regulations and Programs on Disaster Risk


Reduction Management and Climate Change Adaptation (DRRM/CCA)

In the last 50 years, the vast majority of those affected by disasters have
resided in low and middle income countries. Besides causing death and
suffering, disasters erase development gains, destroy infrastructure, restrict
access to education and health care, undermine livelihoods, and exacerbate
vulnerabilities to further natural hazard events. To break this cycle, the Hyogo
Framework for Action (HFA), endorsed by 168 countries, calls on Member
States to build resilience and reduce disaster risk. With its operational
presence in 177 countries (including the Philippines) and a wealth of
technical expertise, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) was
tasked by the United Nations General Assembly to support member states in
preventing and preparing for disasters. Since the Hyogo Framework for
Action was put into effect, UNDP has devoted its efforts to helping countries
achieve its ambitious outcomes, which include the substantial reduction of
disaster losses. (UNDP)

The HFA is a 10-year plan to make the world safer from natural hazards. It
was endorsed by the UN General Assembly in the Resolution
A/RES/60/195 following the 2005 World Disaster Reduction Conference. It was
developed and agreed on with the many partners needed to reduce disaster
risk - governments, international agencies, disaster experts and many others -
bringing them into a common system of coordination. The HFA outlines five
priorities for action, and offers guiding principles and practical means for
achieving disaster resilience. Its goal is to substantially reduce disaster losses
by 2015 by building the resilience of nations and communities to disasters.
This means reducing loss of lives and social, economic, and environmental
assets when hazards strike. (Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015)

The Philippines, in 2009, had adopted and updated national legislations on


disaster risk management as a commitment to achieving the HFA objectives.
The following laws, policies, regulations and programs on disaster risk
reduction (DRR) were stated in the Philippines national progress report on the
implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action (2009-2011):

At the national level, DRR finds institutional foundation with the passage of
the DRRM Act of 2010 (RA10121) and its Implementing Rules and
Regulations supported by the Climate Change Act of 2009 (RA9729), which
complement each other. The DRRM Act also calls for the development of a
National DRR and Management Framework and National DRR and

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Management Plan, which will build on, reinforce and harmonize with the
current Strategic National Action Plan (SNAP) per Executive Order 888. The
National Strategic Framework for Climate Change recognizes and adopts DRR
as one of its strong pillars, while integration of CCA are likewise being pursued
by mandated agencies.

The DRRM Act empowers local governments and communities to enforce


DRR measures to effectively address their respective risks. In terms of
decentralization, sectoral agencies led by the National Economic and
Development Authority are implementing the Mainstreaming Disaster Risk
Reduction in Subnational Development and Land Use/ Physical Planning
project. A new mandate has been given on17 September 2010 when the
Office of the President issued Administrative Order No. 1 directing the local
government units, particularly the provinces, to adopt the DRR Mainstreaming
Guidelines and use it in their planning activities. The guideline, launched in
July 2009, is being rolled out to all provinces and capacity building activities
are being conducted under the NEDA/ UNDP/ AusAID Integrating DRR/CCA
Project.

Disaster preparedness has been strengthened at the national level. Efforts


to familiarize the cluster coordination mechanism to different parts of the
country have been stepped up to contribute to local disaster preparedness. Its
usefulness has been proven at the provincial level, cultivating a team spirit
among humanitarian actors which synchronized activities by cluster. Much is
achieved through regular information sharing and joint planning. Manuals and
training modules for different target groups are increasing in number and
quality is expected to improve from feedback with usage and knowledge
building. Good practices have been identified through Gawad Kalasag.
Improvements in disaster preparedness is improved by continuing dialogues
among different stakeholders, good understanding of hazard maps and risk,
mobilization towards the cluster approach, existence of updated contingency
plan, regular conduct of drills, installation of early warning devices (such as
flood markers), and the use of local calamity fund for preparedness and
mitigation.

Programs are also being implemented by the DILG and LGUs that include
the promotion of LGU innovative and indigenous coping mechanisms and
practices to mitigate effects of disasters and climate changes (supported by
Oxfam and AusAID) as well as capacity development through knowledge
management through development of advocacy and communication program,
documentation of cross learning experiences and best practices as well as
important lessons learned, and generation of localized and indigenous IEC
materials integrating local experiences.

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Studies, reports, and atlases on multi-hazard analyses do exist in the


country in the sub-regional level. The READY project has spearheaded this
initiative and is now being pursued as a model methodology throughout the
country. A standard methodology for the conduct of Disaster Risk Assessment
in the sub-national level is also being promoted through the NEDA, the Rapid
Earthquake Damage Assessment System (REDAS) software developed by
PHIVOLCS is likewise being enhanced and developed to accommodate multi-
hazard risk analysis.

In terms of flood early warning system (EWS), a community based flood


EWS and Information Dissemination Network has been implemented by
PAGASA. A related program is the Enhancement of Flood Forecasting and
Warning System (FFWS) which utilizes three types of flood bulletins: Flood
Outlook-Possibility of flooding within next 24 hours, Suggests awareness;
Flood Alert - Threat of flooding within next 24 hours, Suggests preparedness;
and Flood Warning - Flooding expected within next 24 hours or flooding has
occurred, Suggests response. PAGASA implements the following programs:

Establishment of Early Warning and Monitoring System for Disaster


Mitigation covering Metro Manila and Rizal Province (Pasig-Marikina
River Basin)
Improvement of the Flood Forecasting and Warning System in the
Pampanga and Agno River Basin involves the construction,
procurement and installation of FFWS.
Strengthening of the Flood Forecasting and Warning System for Dam
Operation Recovering 6 dams in Luzon
Improvement of the Flood Forecasting and Warning System in Magat
Dam and Downstream Communities
Strengthening of the Flood Forecasting and Warning System in the
Bicol River Basin

For geophysical hazards, a communitybased EWS for tsunami is being


piloted by PHIVOLCS in several high-risk barangays all over the country.

The Philippines has an impressive array of environmental laws and policies


which date back to the1970s with Presidential Decrees 1121 (Creation of the
National Environmental Protection Council) and1151 (Philippine Environmental
Decree). Currently, legal instruments are in place to govern the utilization and
management of various environmental and ecological system such as RA
7586 The National Integrated Protected Areas System, RA 7076 and RA
7942 Mining, RA 8371 Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA), RA 8550
Fisheries Code of 1998, PD 705 Forestry Code, RA 8435 Agriculture and

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Fisheries Modernization Act (AFMA), and RA 7279 Urban Development and


Housing Act (UDHA) for the urban built environment.

Per RA 10121, at the local level, not less than five percent (5%) of the
estimated revenue from regular sources shall be set aside as the Local
Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund (LDRRMF) to support disaster
risk management activities such as, but not limited to, pre-disaster
preparedness programs including training, purchasing life-saving rescue
equipment, supplies and medicines, for post-disaster activities, and for the
payment of premiums on calamity insurance. Of the amount appropriated for
LDRRMF, thirty percent (30%) shall be allocated as Quick Response Fund
(QRF) or stand-by fund for relief and recovery programs in order that situation
and living conditions of people in communities or areas stricken by disasters,
calamities, epidemics, or complex emergencies, may be normalized as quickly
as possible.

8.2. HAZARD PROFILE

The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) defines
hazard as a dangerous phenomenon, substance, human activity or condition
that may cause loss of life, injury or other health impacts, property damage,
loss of livelihoods and services, social and economic disruption, or
environmental damage.

The hazards of concern to disaster risk reduction as stated in the Hyogo


Framework are hazards of natural origin and related environmental and
technological hazards and risks. Such hazards arise from a variety of
geological, meteorological, hydrological, oceanic, biological, and technological
sources, sometimes acting in combination. In technical settings, hazards are
described quantitatively by the likely frequency of occurrence of different
intensities for different areas, as determined from historical data or scientific
analysis.

There is no such thing as a 'natural' disaster, only natural hazards.


Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) aims to reduce the damage caused by natural
hazards like earthquakes, floods, droughts and cyclones, through an ethic of
prevention. (UNISDR)

Natural hazards that may affect the province of Pampanga may be


classified as geologic and hydrometeorologic in nature.

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8.2.1 HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL HAZARDS

Hydrometeorological Hazard is a process or phenomenon of


atmospheric, hydrological or oceanographic nature that may cause loss
of life, injury or other health impacts, property damage, loss of
livelihoods and services, social and economic disruption, or
environmental damage. Hydrometeorological hazards include tropical
cyclones (also known as typhoons and hurricanes), thunderstorms,
hailstorms, tornados, blizzards, heavy snowfall, avalanches, coastal
storm surges, floods including flash floods, drought, heatwaves and
cold spells. Hydrometeorological conditions also can be a factor in
other hazards such as landslides, wildland fires, locust plagues,
epidemics, and in the transport and dispersal of toxic substances and
volcanic eruption material. (UNISDR)

1. Floods

The most frequent hazard affecting the province is flooding


during rainy seasons, often aggravated by silted rivers and
waterways.

According to the records of PDRRMO, there were nine (10)


damaging floods occurred from year 2000 to 2011. The most
disastrous is the typhoon Pedring which was placed under Public
Storm Signal No. 2 on September 27, 2011. Strong winds and
heavy rains was experienced that brought twenty (20) municipalities
with two hundred ninety (290) barangays severely submerged in
floodwaters affecting 50,674 families or a total of 245,171
individuals. On September 29, while Typhoon Pedring moves away
from the Philippine Area of Responsibility, Tropical Storm Quiel
entered moving almost with the same direction. Its heavy rains
significantly increased the number of flooded areas, affected
families to 114,956 or 541,540 individuals.

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Table 3 - 45. Matrix for Past Flood Events and their Impacts, Pampanga: 2000 - 2011
POPULATION/AREAS
DESCRIPTION IMPACT
AFFECTED
October 2000 due to Typhoon Reming 14 municipalities P307M total worth of damages to infrastructure
89,939 families (180M), agriculture (132M), and fisheries
375,610 population (158M)
2 fatalities
August 29, 2003 due to typhoon Marce 19 municipalities P233M total worth of damages to infrastructure
112,186 families (63M), agriculture (150M), and fisheries (20M)
8 fatalities 5,490 displaced families
October 3, 2005 due to typhoon 34,045 persons 224 damaged houses, P71M total worth of
Milenyo damage to agriculture
August 11, 2007 due to typhoon 15 municipalities P244M total worth of damages to infrastructure
Dodong 64,474 families (113M) and agriculture (231M), and 415
6 fatalities persons displaced
August 21, 2007 due to typhoon Egay 20 municipalities 36 damaged houses,
84,550 families 1,105 persons displaced
June 24, 2008 due to typhoon Frank 3, 111 families P40M total worth of damages in agriculture (27)
1 fatality and fisheries (13M)
August 6, 2008 due to typhoon Julian 8,313 persons P133M worth of damages in infrastructure
October 3, 2008 due to typhoon Pablo 15,225 persons 15, 225 persons displaced
June 21, 2011 due to typhoon Falcon 487,904 persons 4,690 individuals evacuated, P120M estimated
121,585 families damages to infrastructure facilities, 535M to
4 fatalities agriculture, and 5M to poultry and livestock
September 27 to October 1, 2011, due 114,956 families or
to typhoon Pedring & Quiel 541,540 individuals
Source: Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction Management Office (PDRRMO)

Table 3-48 shows that the


municipalities that are located in
high susceptibility of flooding
are: Sasmuan (100%),
Macabebe (94.02%), Minalin
(90.32%), Masantol (89.52%),
Sto. Tomas (85.16%), Apalit
(79.58%), San Luis (75.31%),

San Simon (64.12%), Candaba


(63.14%).Areas susceptible to
low flooding are: Angeles City
(84.84%), Santa Rita (68.80%),
Mabalacat (65.04%), Mexico
(59.55%) and Floridablanca
(52.36%).

On the 2002 Final Report of the Feasibility Study on the

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Proposed PHUMP Phase III of the DPWH, almost all of the


households in Guagua, Lubao and Sasmuan had experienced
flooding caused by poor drainage. The study further revealed that
the most affected were the residential areas. The frequency of
flooding was twice/thrice a year with 51% of households or once a
year with 27% of households surveyed. The flooding was described
by most households as more serious than previous years.

Flooding was reported to last for months, particularly in


Sasmuan and Guagua.. Moreover, more than 90% of the
households in these municipalities described the height of flooding
to be higher than the floor area of their houses or from 50 cm. to
more than 1 meter.

2. Rain-Induced Landslide

On September 26, 2009, tropical storm Ondoy had caused rain-


induced landslide in San Juan Bao, Arayat particularly in Purok 7
and Purok 6 which were in the direct impact zone of the debris flow.
The strong rains had brought not just mud but also large rocks that
claimed the lives of twelve (12) residents in the area.

Through the request of the Provincial Government of


Pampanga, a post disaster geohazard assessment was conducted
to include the barangays of the municipalities of Arayat and
Magalang located in the periphery and at the foot slope of Mt.
Arayat. There are five barangays in the municipality of Magalang
that were identified to be located at the footslope and flanks of the
volcano/mountain (San Vicente, San Agustin, Ayala, Sto. Nio and
Turu).

The MGB had the following finding and observations at San


Juan Bao, Arayat after the geohazard assessment:

a. Several factors contributed


to the mass movement along
the creek such as: the
moderate to steep slopes,
unconsolidated materials
along the creek channel,
artificial damming, the
presence of a large amount
of water accumulating at the

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slopes rendering the materials incompetent, ground motion


caused by the force created by the rock fall coming from a steep
to almost vertical slopes, and continuous rainy day periods
which usually trigger or induce landslides.

b. The presence of a large


volume of air and water
usually mobilize the
landslide materials as debris
flow moving further and
depositing its load along the
debris accumulation zone,
usually spreading its load
and loosing its energy at the
breaks in slope and in the flat areas.

c. With the opening up of the creek channel, the affected Purok 7


will be considered as a permanent danger zone for debris
accumulation and flash flooding. Further down Purok 7, Purok 6
will also be constantly affected by sediment laden flashflood
waters.

3. Typhoons

With 210 events in the span of 103 years, typhoon hazard tops
the list of natural phenomena linked to disaster in the Philippine
archipelago. Indeed, located on the western edge of the Pacific
Ocean, the Philippine group of islands is regularly swept by
typhoons and tropical storms. These typhoons and tropical storms
usually originated from the Western Pacific, between the Marianas
and Caroline islands above 5oN before moving westward at an
average speed of 15km/hr. Then, wind velocity increases and can
reach 200 km/hr when approaching Philippine shores. In the largest
part of the country the typhoon season stretches from May to
December, but some tropical storms can occasionally hit the country
from December to April as well (Brown et. Al, 1991). (Philippine
Geographical Journal).

According to the records of PDRRMO, from year 1998 to 2008,


Pampanga was visited by eighteen (18) typhoons that affected
many families and had caused damaged to infrastructure facilities,
agriculture, livestock and fisheries.

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4. Storm Surge
As a typhoon approaches lands, its winds produce a rush of
seawater called a storm surge that can devastate coastal areas.

A storm surge is a rise above the usual water level along the
shore that is the result of strong onshore winds and/or reduced
atmospheric pressure; the actual surge height is the difference of
the observed water level minus the predicted tide. (No data
recorded for past occurrences)

Table3 - 48 shows that the municipalities susceptible to high


storm surge are located in the coastal areas of Macabebe,
Masantol, Sasmuan and Lubao.

8.2.2 Geological Hazards

Geological process or phenomenon that may cause loss of life,


injury or other health impacts, property damage, loss of livelihoods and
services, social and economic disruption, or environmental
damage. Geological hazards include internal earth processes, such as
earthquakes, volcanic activity and emissions, and related geophysical
processes such as mass movements, landslides, rockslides, surface
collapses, and debris or mud flows. Hydrometeorological factors are
important contributors to some of these processes. Tsunamis are
difficult to categorize; although they are triggered by undersea
earthquakes and other geological events, they are essentially an
oceanic process that is manifested as a coastal water-related hazard.
(UNISDR)

There are four major geologic structures that may influence the
province of Pampanga. These are the East Zambales Fault, West
Marikina Valley Fault, Iba-Botolan Fault and Manila Trench.

Tectonically, Luzon Island, where Pampanga is located, is bounded


by three subduction zones, namely: the Manila Trench on the west,
East Luzon Trough on the east, and the Philippine Trench on the east
of southern Luzon. These trenches and trough represent the point of
collision of the ocean crust of the earth where a crustal block of the
earths crust descends (subducts) relative to another crustal block.
Normally, active volcanisms and earthquake belts occur along these
plate boundaries.

These can be exemplified by the formation of active volcanoes on


the north and south of Luzon represented by Pinatubo and Mayon

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Volcanoes, respectively. Based on PHIVOLCS data, numerous low to


high intensity earthquakes are recorded north and south of Luzon and
are related to the subduction process of these trenches.

The Manila Trench which is an east-dipping subduction zone is


located west of northern Luzon. It represents the morphologic
expression of the subduction of the oceanic crust of South China Sea
Plate under the Luzon Arc (Karig, 1973; Cardwell et. al., 1980). Recent
developments show that the low intensity quakes that occurred during
the later and early parts of 1999 and 2000 are related to the subduction
process of this trench.

The East Luzon Trough which is a west-dipping subduction zone is


classified to be an ancient subduction zone (Balce et. al., 1979) justified
by the occurrence of an inactive accretionary prism to the west of the
present location of the trough. At present there had been no recent
intensity quakes recorded in relation to this trough. Further, the west-
dipping Philippine Trench which is located east of southeastern Luzon
extending from Bicol to Mindanao Island is the morphological
expression of the westward subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate
under the eastern Philippine Arc (Cardwell et al., 1980; Fitch 1972;
Hamburger et. al., 1983).

1. Ground Shaking

An earthquake disperses its seismic energy on the surrounding


country rock and cause ground vibration with varying intensities
depending on the present lithology. In large magnitude earthquakes,
ground shaking can cause building collapse, liquefaction, and
landslides. Surface waves are amplified on marshy/swampy areas
like the Candaba Swamp and on deltaic deposits like Pampanga
Delta or Pampanga Bay. Areas of shallow overburden (bedrock
lithology) generally attenuate seismic signals and are therefore less
vulnerable to ground shaking compared to areas with thick piles of
alluvial materials. Mountainous regions have a more complicated
response to ground shaking. In general, high peaks or mountains
tend to concentrate the incoming seismic waves, causing severe
vibrations of the type experienced in Baguio City during the July 16,
1990 Luzon earthquake.

During the July 16, 1990 North Luzon Earthquake, the eastern
portion of Luzon experienced intense ground shaking. Based on
PHIVOLCS data, the felt intensity within the vicinity of the epicenter

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was Intensity VIII on the Richter scale. In the province of


Pampanga, the vicinity had experienced an Intensity VII strong
ground shaking.

Based from the three iterations using the Rapid Earthquake


Damage Assessment System (REDAS), the municipalities
vulnerable to PEIS VIII ground shaking are: Angeles City, Arayat
(except Mt. Arayat area), Bacolor, Guagua, Floridablanca, 11
barangays in Lubao, 8 barangays in Candaba, Mabalacat (except
Clark sub-zone), Magalang, Mexico, 3 barangays in Minalin, and 5
barangays in Porac

2. Liquefaction
Following severe and intense ground shaking, the ground loses
support as it turns into a liquid state particularly in areas that are
underlain by poorly consolidated sediments and where groundwater
is shallow. Areas that are underlain by poorly consolidated sand
and where groundwater level is shallow are particularly highly
susceptible to such type of geohazards.

Areas prone to liquefaction are sites with unconsolidated,


uncompacted sand, and water-saturated layers. These sites can be
found along shorelines, deltaic plain (Pampanga Bay) and on
marshy areas of thick alluvial deposits like Candaba Swamp. The
areas of lahar deposition are also susceptible to liquefaction.

PHILVOLCS reported incidence of sand upwelling and


liquefaction near Sasmuan during 1990 earthquake.

Based on the iterations using REDAS, the municipalities


susceptible to high liquefaction are: Apalit, Bacolor, Candaba,
Macabebe, Masantol, Minalin, San Luis, San Simon, Santo Tomas
and Sasmuan. (Table 3 - 50).

3. Earthquake-Induced Landslide

Earthquake induced landslides are caused by mild to violent


shaking of the ground caused by movements of rocks beneath the
surface usually along active faults and volcanic centers. In the
province of Pampanga there are nearby active faults that may
generate strong magnitude earthquakes.
During the July 16, 1990 Luzon Earthquake, most of the
landslides are at slopes greater than 15 percent. Other determining

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factors were the presence of thick overburden, the water saturation


of the slopes and the presence of fractures.

According to MGB, there are portions of the Mt. Arayat summit


that has a high susceptibility to mass movement as manifested
around the summit of the mountain/volcano. There are collapsed
portions facing both the municipality of Magalang and Arayat. There
are portions of the collapsed structures that has active landslides
and landslide scars. The possibility of the collapse of the protrusions
should not be ruled out given the nature of the adjacent
escarpments. The resettlement site in San Juan Bao, Arayat is
located in the impact zone of earthquake-induced landslides as
shown in the hazard map of the PHIVOLCS-READY Project.

Based on the hazard map generated by Mines and Geosciences


Bureau (MGB), the municipalities susceptible to high earthquake-
induced landslide are located in the mountainous areas of Arayat,
Porac, Floridablanca, Mabalacat and Angeles City. (Table 3 - 51)

4. Tsunami

Tsunamis are huge sea waves brought about by disturbances


such as offshore earthquakes, submarine volcanic eruptions and
undersea landslides. The crests of these waves can exceed heights
of 25 meters. The destructive potential of tsunami is similar to that of
storm surge. Tsunamigenic earthquakes (M7, shallow and offshore)
can be generated by the Manila Trench.

The hazard map for tsunami indicates that coastal areas prone
to tsunami are the barangays of Bancal Pugad and Mabuanbuan in
Lubao, Batang I & II in Sasmuan and the barangays of San Esteban
and Consuelo in Macabebe. (Table 3 -52)

8.2.3 VOLCANIC HAZARDS

The eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June 15, 1991 was the most
devastating volcanic hazard event that severely affected adjoining
lowlands including Pampanga. From June 1991 to November 1992, the
National Disaster Council (NDCC) had recorded 178 barangays and
253,328 families affected by the disaster.

Mount Pinatubo is located about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila


near the west coast of Central Luzon in the Republic of the Philippines.

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Between June 12 to 15, 1991, the most violent volcanic events of the
Mount Pinatubo eruption occurred, eventually resulting in the deposition
of about 6 cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and debris on the mountain
slopes and in river basins surrounding the mountain. In addition, an
estimated 1 cubic kilometer of ash covered a 40 kilometer area around
the mountain.

This explosive eruption produced ash clouds that reached 40


kilometers high, blasted 300 meters from the mountains original
summit, and formed a crater that is some 2 kilometers wide and 600
meters deep. Eight major river basins: Pasig Potrero, Sacobia-Bamban,
Abacan, ODonnell, Sto. Tomas, Bucao, Maloma and Gumain-Porac
were filled with volcanic ash and debris.

Pinatubo is one of the twenty-one (21) active volcanoes in the


Philippines. The volcanic edifice, in terms of geology, is composed of
multiple lava domes and widespread voluminous pyroclastic flow
deposits mainly andesitic to dacitic in composition. Age determination
indicates that the moset recent eruption before 1991 took place about
450 years ago. The eruption at that time was so gigantic that more than
1.5 billion cubic meters of pyroclastic materials filled valleys on the
southeastern and eastern slopes of the mountain. A vast area of large
composite fans of lahar deposits thus surrounds the mountain.

At the end of May 1991, volcanic activity increased. Earthquakes


with hypocenters (< 2 km) associated with magma movement took
place frequently. Epicenters were clustered near the steaming vents.

Table 3 46. 1991 Mount Pinatubo Volcanic Activity


5 June Eruption Alert Level 3 was raised. Large scale eruption was expected within 2 weeks

7 June Eruption Alert Level 4 was raised. Large eruption was expected within 24 hours. Ash
cloud reached as high as 8 km
9 June Eruption Alert Level 5 was raised. The volcano erupted, and a pyroclastic flow reached
as far as 5 km toward the West
10 June As many as 14,000 military personnel at Clark Air Base evacuated to Subic Naval
Base
12 June Large eruption took place at 08:51. Ash column reached as high as 20 km. Pyroclastic
flow reached as far as 15 km. Area with 30 km-radius was declared as high hazard
area. As many as 58,000 people evacuated
15 June The largest eruption took place at 13:42. Ash column reached as high as 40 km.
Gigantic pyroclastic flows were generated all around the volcano. A 2-km wide caldera
was formed at the summit

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A number of lahar events triggered by typhoons broke out and


devastated low-lying areas adjacent to the eight river systems draining
the volcano. A crater lake was formed in the summit caldera. Small
scale steam emission continued.

In July 1992, a lava dome was observed to emerge from the crater
lake. PHIVOLCS, in response to the increase of volcanic tremor since
January 1994 raised the warning level from 2 to 3 on 4 February and
designated the area with 10 km radius as the hazard area. Another
eruption, although not so large as the ones in 1991, was expected
within 2 weeks. In fact, small-scale eruption took place on 24 February
1994.( See Table 3-42 on details of lahar events)

Preliminary volcanic hazard map shows areas that are prone to


lahar hazard at varying susceptibility levels. These are classified as
follows:

Zone 2 Areas: low susceptibility to large magnitude lahar; moderate


to high susceptibility to small-magnitude lahars, and high susceptibility
to sedimant-laden streamflow and/or flashfloods). These are barangays
in Manibaug, Mitla and Mancatian in Porac.

Zone 3 Areas at low susceptibility to small-magnitude lahars and


high susceptibiltiy to sediment-laden streamflows.These are the
barangays inside the Megadike.

Zone 4 Areas safe from lahars but prone to sediment-laden (muddy)


streamflows or siltation. These are: (1.) Angeles City along abacan
river bank. (2.) Bacolor all barangays lower part of JASA. (3.) City of
San Fernando San Juan, Sto. Nino,Lourdes, Juliana, Sta. Teresita,
Poblacion, Del Pilar, San Jose, San Felipe, Sta. Lucia, San Pedro and
San Nicolas. (4.) Floridablanca barangays along Gumain River.
(5.)Guagua barangay Bancal, Sta. Ursula, Sta. Ines and San Rafael.
(6.) Lubao barangays along Porac-Gumain River. (7.) Mabalacat
barangay Dolores, Tabun, Sapang Balen and Cacutud. (8).Magalang
barangay Sto. Rosario, San Roque, Navaling, Sta. Maria, San Ildefonso
and Escaler. (9.) Mexico barangays along Abacan River down to San
Fernando River. (10.) Minalin barangay Maniango, Bulac, Dawe, San
Francisco 1 and 2, Sta. Catalina, Sto. Rosario, San Nicolas, Sta. Rita
and San Pedro. (11). Sasmuan barangay San Pedro, Malusac,
Sebitanan, Batang 1 and 2 and Mabuanbuan.

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The Zone 5 areas are safe from lahars but prone to persistent (>1
week) or recurrent flooding and/or backflooding to drainage blockage.
These are: (1.) Mexico - Lagundi, San Jose Matulid (2.) San Fernando -
Dolores, Magliman, San Agustin, Alasas, Del Rosario, San Isidro,
Pandaras, San Nicolas, San Jose(3). Bacolor - San Isidro, Magliman,
Macabacle, Sta. Barbara, Cabetican, (4.) Sta. Rita, San Isidro, San
Juan, San Jose), (5.) Guagua - San Matias, San Juan Nepomuceno,
San Miguel, Sta. Inez, San Juan Bautista, San Nicolas I&II, San
Agustin, San Roque, San Juan I, San Antonio, Siran, San Isidro, San
Pablo, San Pedro, Sto Cristo, Sto. Nino, Bancal, Plaza Burgos, Sta.
Filomena, San Agustin, San Jose (6.) Lubao- Sta. Monica, San Matias,
Sto. Tomas, San Nicolas, Sta. Lucia, San Juan, Sta. Barbara, Sta.
Catalina, San Agustin, San Nicolas II, San Antonio, Concepcion, San
Miguel, San Jose Gumi, Bancal Sinubli (7.) Sasmuan - Sto. Tomas,
San Nicolas I&II, Sitio Remedios, Sta. Lucia, San Antonio (8.) Minalin-
San Pedro, San Isidro, Dawe, Saplad (9.) Macabebe - Tecasan,
Saplad David, Mataguiti, Pastuli, Lutgarda, San Juan, San Roque, San
Gabriel, San Rafael, San Jose, Sta. Maria, Dalayap, San Esteban(10.)
Masantol - San Isidro Matua, Sta. Lucia Anak, Paguiaba, Sta. Lucia
Matua, Sta. Lucia Wakas, Sua, Palimpe (11.) Sto. Tomas - Sto.
Rosario Pau, Moras Dela Paz, Sto. Nino Sapa, San Vicente, San
Bartolome, Poblacion, San Matias.

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8.3 CLIMATE PROFILE

The climate of the province of Pampanga falls under the Type 1 climate
based on the Modified Coronas Climate Map of the Philippines. This type of
climate consists of two (2) pronounced seasons, dry from December to May
and wet from June to September. During wet season, the amount of rainfall is
largely influenced by the activities of the southwest monsoon, Inter-tropical
Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the passing of tropical cyclones, which are at
their peak during the months of July to September. (PAGASA)

April is the hottest month in Pampanga with an average temperature of


28.5C (83.3F) and the coldest is November at 26.5C (79.7F). The wettest
month is June with an average of 200mm of rain.

Table 3 - 47. Recorded Maximum Annual Rainfall Intensity within the Four Rainfall
Stations in Pampanga: 1990-2006
Rainfall (mm/hr)
Year
Arayat Candaba Sasmuan Apalit
1990 2.75 2.96 10.54 8.21
1991 3.08 5.88 3.38 2.79
1992 4.13 2.96 8.13 3.71
1993 4.54 3.63 4.79 4.67
1994 6.83 2.88 4.17 5.83
1995 2.83 6.25 3.92 3.71
1996 2.71 3.08 1.96 2.54
1997 1.13 3.63 6.67 8.83
1998 6.33 7.83 13.58 8.88
1999 5.38 4.33 9.42 6.33
2000 5.13 4.92 6.88 7.50
2001 3.08 4.00 2.33 2.71
2002 1.92 5.58 6.08 1.29
2003 3.88 3.21 1.96 7.13
2004 9.04 11.88 6.79 4.71
2005 3.58 2.92 2.75 2.67
2006 3.46 4.50 3.46 3.29

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`Table 3 48. Summary Matrix for Flood Hazard, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Possible Format/ Remarks
Brief Susceptibility
Type Map Source Scale Reference (technical Areas Affected
Description Levels
Source/s System/ Date / notes)
Flood Map indicating PHIVOLCS Composite 1:50,000 Raster Format Hazard map High Susceptibility 1. Angeles City 11.91%
Hazard areas prone to Flood Hazard (JPEG)/Universal was converted 2. Apalit 79.58%
flooding at Map of Transverse to vector format 3. Arayat 27.43%
varying Pampanga by Mercator Zone 51, and processed 4. Bacolor 39.52%
susceptibility READY Luzon Datum/Date using ArcGIS 5. Candaba 63.14%
levels Projects not indicated 9.3 6. City of San Fernando 37.14%
through 7. Floridablanca 16.00%
PHIVOLCS 8. Guagua 51.67%
9. Lubao 55.65%
10. Mabalacat 14.14%
11. Macabebe 94.02%
12. Magalang 44.45%
13. Masantol 89.52%
14. Mexico 18.39%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


15. Minalin 90.32%
16. Porac 11.78%
17. San Luis 75.31%
18. San Simon 64.12%
19. Santa Ana 22.36%
20. Santa Rita 18.73%
21. Santo Tomas 85.16%
22. Sasmuan 100.00%
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Table 3 - 48. Summary Matrix for Flood Hazard, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Format/
Possible Remarks
Brief Reference Susceptibility
Type Map Source Scale (technical Areas Affected
Description System/ Levels
Source/s notes)
Date /
Flood Map indicating PHIVOLCS Composite 1:50,000 Raster Format Hazard map was Moderate 1. Angeles City 0.38%
Hazard areas prone to Flood (JPEG)/Universal converted to Susceptibility 2. Apalit 14.00%
flooding at Hazard Map Transverse vector format 3. Arayat 18.02%
varying of Mercator Zone and processed 4. Bacolor 26.45%
susceptibility Pampanga 51, Luzon using ArcGIS 9.3 5. Candaba 30.14%
levels by READY Datum/Date not 6. City of San Fernando 17.97%
Projects indicated 7. Floridablanca 9.28%
through 8. Guagua 19.08%
PHIVOLCS 9. Lubao 22.10%
10. Mabalacat 2.07%
11. Macabebe 5.95%
12. Magalang 13.80%
13. Masantol 10.40%
14. Mexico 22.06%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


15. Minalin 5.01%
16. Porac 1.49%
17. San Luis 5.56%
18. San Simon 16.80%
19. Santa Ana 47.46%
20. Santa Rita 12.51%
21. Santo Tomas 14.84%
22. Sasmuan 0.00%
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`Table 3 48. Summary Matrix for Flood Hazard, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Type Brief Possible Source Scale Format/ Remarks Susceptibility Areas Affected
Description Map Reference (technical Levels
Source/s System/ notes)
Flood Map indicating PHIVOLCS Composite 1:50,000 Date
Raster /
Format Hazard map Low Susceptibility 1. Angeles City 84.84%
Hazard areas prone to Flood Hazard (JPEG)/Univer was converted 2. Apalit 6.38%
flooding at Map of sal Transverse to vector 3. Arayat 26.88%
varying Pampanga by Mercator Zone format and 4. Bacolor 34.02%
susceptibility READY 51, Luzon processed 5. Candaba 6.68%
levels Projects Datum/Date using ArcGIS 6. City of San Fernando 44.90%
through not indicated 9.3 7. Floridablanca 52.36%
PHIVOLCS 8. Guagua 29.24%
9. Lubao 22.30%
10. Mabalacat 65.04%
11. Macabebe 0.00%
12. Magalang 34.31%
13. Masantol 0.00%
14. Mexico 59.55%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


15. Minalin 4.65%
16. Porac 36.49%
17. San Luis 19.14%
18. San Simon 19.07%
19. Santa Ana 30.17%
20. Santa Rita 68.80%
21. Santo Tomas 0.00%
22. Sasmuan 0.00%
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Table 3 - 49. Summary Matrix for Storm Surge Hazard, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Type Brief Possible Source Scale Format/ Remarks Susceptibility Areas Affected
Description Map Reference (technical Levels
Source/s System/ notes)
Storm Map indicating PAGASA, Storm Surge 1:50,000 Date
Vector /
Format Hazard map Inundations of >1 Coastal areas of Lubao, Sasmuan, Macabebe,
Surge areas prone to Office of Civil Map of Bohol, Universal was further to 4m. surges Masantol
storm surge at Defense Office of Civil Transverse processed
varying (READY Defense under Mercator Zone using ArcGIS
inundation Project) the READY 51, Luzon 9.3
heights Project Datum/2008 Inundations of 1m.
surges

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Table 3 - 50. Summary Matrix for Ground Shaking, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Type Brief Possible Source Scale Format/ Remarks Susceptibility Areas Affected
Description Map Reference (technical Levels
Source/s System/ Date / notes)
Ground Map depicting PHIVOLCS Composite 1:50,000 Vector format, Composite map Intensity VII and Provincewide 100%
Shaking active faults, Ground Universal Transverse was based from Intensity VIII
Hazard fault traces, shaking map of Mercator Zone 51, three iterations
trenches and the Pampanga Luzon Datum, 2011 using the Rapid
other Province by Earthquake
earthquake READY Damage
generators Projects Assessment
near the through System -
Province. PHIVOLCS Philippine Institute
of Volcanology and
Seismology.
Raster based
iteration maps
were reprojected

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


to UTM Zone 51,
Luzon Datum,
converted to vector
format and
processed using
ArcGIS 9.3
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Table 3 - 51. Summary Matrix for Liquefaction Hazard, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Type Brief Possible Source Scale Format/ Remarks Susceptibility Areas Affected
Description Map Reference (technical Levels
Source/s System/ Date / notes)
Liquefaction Map indicating PHIVOLCS/OC Composite 1:50,000 Vector format, Composite map High Susceptibility 1. Angeles City 100.00%
Hazard areas prone to D/MGB Liquefaction Universal Transverse was based from 2. Apalit 0.00%
liquefaction at Hazard Map of Mercator Zone 51, three iterations 3. Arayat 3.62%
varying Pampanga by Luzon Datum, 2011 using the Rapid 4. Bacolor 93.26%
susceptibility READY Earthquake 5. Candaba 94.61%
levels Projects Damage 6. City of San Fernando 13.46%
through Assessment 7. Floridablanca 6.82%
PHIVOLCS System - 8. Guagua 61.32%
Philippine 9. Lubao 61.87%
Institute of 10. Mabalacat 0.00%
Volcanology and 11. Macabebe 100.00%
Seismology. 12. Magalang 0.00%
Raster based 13. Masantol 99.39%
iteration maps 14. Mexico 0.07%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


were re-projected 15. Minalin 100.00%
to UTM Zone 51, 16. Porac 12.75%
Luzon Datum, 17. San Luis 83.89%
converted to 18. San Simon 95.81%
vector format and 19. Santa Ana 0.00%
processed using 20. Santa Rita 54.19%
ArcGIS 9.3 21. Santo Tomas 99.93%
22. Sasmuan 100.00%
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Table 3 - 51. Summary Matrix for Liquefaction Hazard, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Type Brief Possible Source Scale Format/ Remarks Susceptibility Areas Affected
Descriptio Map Reference (technical Levels
n Source/s System/ notes)
Liquefaction Map PHIVOLCS/OC Composite 1:50,000 Date
Vector /
format, Composite Moderate 1. Angeles City 8.54%
Hazard indicating D/MGB Liquefaction Universal map was Susceptibility 2. Apalit 0.00%
areas prone Hazard Map Transverse based from 3. Arayat 58.97%
to of Mercator Zone three iterations 4. Bacolor 6.74%
liquefaction Pampanga 51, Luzon using the 5. Candaba 5.39%
at varying by READY Datum, 2011 Rapid 6. City of San Fernando 76.86%
susceptibility Projects Earthquake 7. Floridablanca 49.75%
levels through Damage 8. Guagua 38.68%
PHIVOLCS Assessment 9. Lubao 38.16%
System - 10. Mabalacat 8.19%
Philippine 11. Macabebe 0.00%
Institute of 12. Magalang 4.49%
Volcanology 13. Masantol 0.00%
and 14. Mexico 72.66%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


Seismology. 15. Minalin 0.00%
Raster based 16. Porac 3.72%
iteration maps 17. San Luis 16.11%
were re- 18. San Simon 4.19%
projected to 19. Santa Ana 100.00%
UTM Zone 51, 20. Santa Rita 38.98%
Luzon Datum, 21. Santo Tomas 0.07%
converted to 22. Sasmuan 0.00%
vector format
and processed
using ArcGIS
9.3
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Table 3 - 51. Summary Matrix for Liquefaction Hazard, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Type Brief Possible Source Scale Format/ Remarks Susceptibility Areas Affected
Description Map Reference (technical Levels
Source/s System/ notes)
Liquefaction Map indicating PHIVOLCS/OC Composite 1:50,000 Date
Vector /
format, Composite Low Susceptibility 1. Angeles City 38.65%
Hazard areas prone to D/MGB Liquefaction Universal map was 2. Apalit 0.00%
liquefaction at HazardMap of Transverse based from 3. Arayat 10.36%
varying the Pampanga Mercator Zone three iterations 4. Bacolor 0.00%
susceptibility by READY 51, Luzon using the 5. Candaba 0.00%
levels Projects Datum, 2011 Rapid 6. City of San Fernando 9.68%
through Earthquake 7. Floridablanca 0.00%
PHIVOLCS Damage 8. Guagua 0.00%
Assessment 9. Lubao 0.00%
System - 10. Mabalacat 26.23%
Philippine 11. Macabebe 0.00%
Institute of 12. Magalang 86.96%
Volcanology 13. Masantol 0.00%
and 14. Mexico 27.26%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


Seismology. 15. Minalin 0.00%
Raster based 16. Porac 0.00%
iteration maps 17. San Luis 0.00%
were re- 18. San Simon 0.00%
projected to 19. Santa Ana 0.00%
UTM Zone 51, 20. Santa Rita 0.00%
Luzon Datum, 21. Santo Tomas 0.00%
converted to 22. Sasmuan 0.00%
vector format
and processed
using ArcGIS
9.3
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Table 3 - 52. Summary Matrix for Earthquake Induced Landslide Hazard, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Type Brief Possible Source Scale Format/ Remarks Susceptibility Areas Affected
Description Map Reference (technical Levels
Source/s System/ Date notes)
Earth- Map indicating PHIVOLCS/OC Composite 1:50,000 /
Vector format, Composite High Susceptibility Mountain areas of Arayat, Porac,
quake areas prone to D/MGB Earthquake Universal map was Floridablanca, City of Mabalacat and
Induced earthquake Induced Transverse based from Angeles City
Landslide induced landslide Landslide Mercator Zone three iterations
Hazard at varying Hazard Map of 51, Luzon Datum, using the
susceptibility Pampanga by 2011 Rapid
levels READY Earthquake
Projects Damage
through Assessment
PHIVOLCS System -
Philippine
Institute of
Volcanology
and

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


Seismology.
Raster based
iteration maps
were re-
projected to
UTM Zone 51,
Luzon Datum,
converted to
vector format
and processed
using ArcGIS
9.3
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Table 3 - 53. Summary Matrix for Tsunami Hazard, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Type Brief Possible Source Scale Format/ Remarks Susceptibility Areas Affected
Description Map Reference (technical Levels
Source/s System/ notes)
Tsunami Map PHIVOLCS/O Composite 1:50,000 Date
Vector /
format, Tsunami Prone Sasmuan - Bancal Pugad
indicating CD/MGB Tsunami Universal Hazard map Mabuanbuan
coastal areas Hazard Map Transverse was converted Batang I
Mercator Zone to vector Batang II
prone to of Pampanga
51, Luzon format and
Tsunami by READY Datum, 2007 processed
Projects using ArcGIS Macabebe - San Esteban
through 9.3 Consuelo
PHIVOLCS

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Table 3 -54. Summary Matrix for Volcanic Hazard, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Type Brief Possible Source Scale Format/ Remarks Susceptibility Areas Affected
Description Map Reference (technical Levels
Source/s System/ notes)
Volcanic Map indicating PHIVOLCS/ Composite 1:50,000 Date
Raster /
Format Hazard map Moderate 1. Angeles City 0.00%
Hazard areas prone to OCD/ MGB Volcanic (JPEG) / was converted Susceptibility 2. Apalit 0.00%
Volcanic Hazard Map of Universal to vector 3. Arayat 0.00%
Hazard at Pampanga by Transverse format and 4. Bacolor 53.32%
varying READY Mercator Zone processed 5. Candaba 0.00%
susceptibility Projects 51, Luzon using ArcGIS 6. City of San Fernando 0.00%
levels through Datum/ Date 9.3 7. Floridablanca 0.00%
PHIVOLCS not indicated 8. Guagua 0.00%
9. Lubao 0.00%
10. Mabalacat 11.93%
11. Macabebe 0.00%
12. Magalang 0.00%
13. Masantol 0.00%
14. Mexico 0.00%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


15. Minalin 0.00%
16. Porac 0.00%
17. San Luis 0.00%
18. San Simon 0.00%
19. Santa Ana 0.00%
20. Santa Rita 9.14%
21. Santo Tomas 0.00%
22. Sasmuan 0.00%
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Table 3 - 54. Summary Matrix for Volcanic Hazard, Province of Pampanga
Map Currently available Areas Affected
Type Brief Possible Source Scale Format/ Remarks Susceptibility Areas Affected
Description Map Reference (technical Levels
Source/s System/ notes)
Volcanic Map indicating PHIVOLCS/ Composite 1:50,000 Date
Raster /
Format Hazard map Low Susceptibility 1. Angeles City 7.75%
Hazard areas prone to OCD/ MGB Volcanic (JPEG) / was converted 2. Apalit 0.00%
Volcanic Hazard Map of Universal to vector 3. Arayat 0.82%
Hazard at Pampanga by Transverse format and 4. Bacolor 38.73%
varying READY Mercator Zone processed 5. Candaba 0.00%
susceptibility Projects 51, Luzon using ArcGIS 6. City of San Fernando 35.55%
levels through Datum/ Date 9.3 7. Floridablanca 8.91%
PHIVOLCS not indicated 8. Guagua 51.71%
9. Lubao 35.34%
10. Mabalacat 10.76%
11. Macabebe 53.15%
12. Magalang 23.00%
13. Masantol 20.86%
14. Mexico 24.57%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT


15. Minalin 75.74%
16. Porac 0.00%
17. San Luis 0.00%
18. San Simon 0.50%
19. Santa Ana 0.41%
20. Santa Rita 15.47%
21. Santo Tomas 65.69%
22. Sasmuan 91.09%
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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
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Figure 3 - 8

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8.3.1 CLIMATE PROJECTIONS

Climate projections presented below were outputs made by the


Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services
Administration (PAGASA) on projected seasonal temperature increase,
and rainfall change and total frequency of extreme using the mid-range
emission scenario. The projected changes are relative to the baseline
(1971-2000) climate.

Seasonal Temperature Change

According to PAGASA, all areas in the Philippines will get warmer,


more so in the relatively summer months (March, April, May). Mean
temperature in all areas of the Philippines are expected to rise by 0.9oC
to 1.1oC in 2020 and by 1.8oC to 2.2oC in 2050. Likewise, all seasonal
mean temperatures will also have increase in these time slices; and
these increase in the four seasons are quite consistent in all parts of the
country. Largest temperature increase is projected during the summer
(MAM) season.

Table 3 55. Projected Values of Seasonal Mean Temperature, Pampanga: 2020 and 2050
Observed Baseline 2020 2050
Season
(1971-2000) Projected Values Projected Values
Northeast Monsoon (DJF) 26 27 28.1
Summer (MAM) 28.3 29.4 30.5
Southwest Monsoon (JJA) 27.5 26.4 29.3
Transition Season (SON) 27.1 28.1 29
Source: Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Authority (PAGASA)

Table 3-55 shows that the mean temperature in the summer months
of March, April and May (MAM) of 2020 is projected to rise to 29.4 and
30.5 in 2050, or seasonal temperature changes of 1.1oC in 2020 and
2.2oC in 2050.

Seasonal Rainfall Change

Generally, there is reduction in rainfall in most parts of the country


during the summer (MAM) season. However, rainfall increase is likely
during the southwest monsoon (JJA) season until the transition (SON)
season in most areas of Luzon and Visayas, and also, during the
northeast monsoon (DJF) season particularly in provinces/areas
characterized as Type II climate in 2020 and 2050. There is however,
generally decreasing trend in rainfall by 2050.

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Table 3 - 56. Projected Values of Seasonal Mean Temperature (in mm), Pampanga: 2020
and 2050
Observed Baseline 2020 2050
Season
(1971-2000) Projected Values Projected Values
Northeast Monsoon (DJF) 120.2 140.5 102.2
Summer (MAM) 320.6 260.3 236.0
Southwest Monsoon (JJA) 1,030.4 1,075.73 1,173.6
Transition Season (SON) 785.2 745.2 728.7
Source: Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Authority (PAGASA)

Table 3 56 shows that Pampangas projected rainfall increase in


the wet seasons (JJA) of 2020 is from 1,030.4mm to 1075.73mm or an
increase of 4.4% to the baseline climate. The highest projection is in
wet seasons of 2050, with an increase of 13.9% to the baseline climate
or a rainfall of 1,173.6mm. However, there will be a decreasing trend in
rainfall by 2050 in the rest of the seasons.

According to PAGASA, these projections clearly indicate the likely


increase in the performance of northeast and southwest monsoon in the
province. Thus the usually wet seasons will become wetter and the
usually dry season become drier, and these could lead to more
occurrences of floods and drought.

Extreme temperature events

Extreme temperatures exceeding 35oC will continue to become


more frequent in the future. The projected number of dry days (rainfall
less than 2.4mm/day) is greatly increasing in 2020 and 2050.

Table 3 57. Frequency of Extreme Events in 2020 and 2050


No. of days with Tmax No. of Dry Days No. of days with rainfall
Station >35oC >200mm
OBS 2020 2050 OBS 2020 2050 OBS 2020 2050
PAMPANGA Clark 355 1855 3108 889 5701 5754 8 12 12
Source: Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Authority (PAGASA)

Heavy rainfall will continue to become more frequent, extreme


rainfall (exceeding 300mm/day) is projected to increase by 2020 and
2050.
These findings of PAGASA under the mid-range scenario show that
climate change is being experienced within the country particularly in
the second decade of the century.

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The Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) defines


climate change as: a change in the state of the climate that can be
identified (e.g., by using statistical tests) by changes in the mean and/or
the variability of its properties, and that persists for an extended period,
typically decades or longer. Climate change may be due to natural
internal processes or external forcing or to persistent anthropogenic
changes in the composition of the atmosphere or in land use.

The Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), defines


climate change as: a change of climate which is attributed directly or
indirectly to human activity that alters the composition of the global
atmosphere and which is in addition to natural climate variability
observed over comparable time periods. The UNFCCC thus makes a
distinction between climate change attributable to human activities
altering the atmospheric composition, and climate variability attributable
to natural causes.

Human activities are continuing to affect the Earths energy budget


by changing the emissions and resulting atmospheric concentrations of
radiatively important gases and aerosols and by changing land surface
properties. Human interference with the climate system is occurring,
and climate change poses risks for human and natural systems. (Fifth
Assessment Report of the IPCC)

The countrys temperature anomalies or difference in surface


temperature increase begin to diverge only in the middle of the 21 st
century. The climate in the next 30 to 40 years is greatly influenced by
past greenhouse gas emissions. The long lifetimes of the greenhouse
gases already in the atmosphere with the exception of methane (with a
lifetime of only 13 years), will mean that it will take at least 30 to 40
years for the atmosphere to stabilize even if mitigation measures are
put in place, notwithstanding that in the near future there could be some
off-setting between sulfate aerosol (cooling effect) and the greenhouse
gas concentrations (warming effect). (PAGASA)

8.3.2 IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE

The IPCC Fourth Assessment Report: Climate Change 2007 stated


possible impacts of climate change due to changes in extreme weather
and climate events, based on projections to the mid- to late 21st century.
The likelihood estimates in column two relate to the phenomena listed in
column one.

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Table3 - 58. POSSIBLE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE DUE TO EXTREME WEATHER AND
CLIMATE EVENTS
MAJOR PROJECTED IMPACTS BY SECTOR
Likelihood
Phenomenon and Agriculture,
of future Industry, settlement
Direction of Trend forestry and Water resources Human health
trends * and society
ecosystems
Over most land Virtually Increased yields in Effects on water Reduced human Reduced energy
areas, warmer and certain colder environments; resources; effects on mortality from demand for heating;
fewer cold days decreased yields in some water supplies decreased cold increased demand for
and nights, warmer warmer exposure cooling; declining air
and more frequent environments; quality in cities
hot days and nights increased insect
outbreaks
Warm spells/heat Very likely Reduced yields in Increased water demand; Increased risk of Reduction in quality of
waves. Frequency warmer regions due water quality problems, heat-related life for people in warm
increases over to heat stress; e.g. algal blooms mortality, especially areas without
most land areas increased danger of for the elderly, appropriate housing;
wildfire chronically sick, very impacts on the elderly,
young and socially very young and poor
isolated
Heavy precipitation Very likely Damage to crops; Adverse effects on Increased risk of Disruption of
events. Frequency soil erosion, inability quality of surface and deaths, injuries and settlements, commerce,
increases over to cultivate land due groundwater; infectious, respiratory transport and societies
most areas to waterlogging of contamination of water and skin diseases due to flooding:
soils supply; water scarcity pressures on urban and
may be relieved rural infrastructures;
loss of property
Area affected by Likely Land degradation; More widespread water Increased risk of Water shortage for
drought increases lower yields/crop stress food and water settlements, industry
damage and failure; shortage; increased and societies; reduced
increased livestock risk of malnutrition; hydropower generation
deaths; increased increased risk of potentials; potential for
risk of wildfire water- and food- population migration
borne diseases
Intense tropical Likely Damage to crops; Power outages causing Increased risk of Disruption by flood and
cyclone activity windthrow disruption of public water deaths, injuries, high winds; withdrawal
increases (uprooting) of trees; supply water- and food- of risk coverage in
damage to coral borne diseases; vulnerable areas by
reefs post-traumatic stress private insurers;
disorders potential for population
migrations; loss of
property
Increased Likely Salinisation of Decreased fresh- water Increased risk of Costs of coastal
incidence of irrigation water, availability due to deaths and injuries protection versus costs
extreme high sea estuaries and fresh- saltwater intrusion by drowning in of land-use relocation;
level (excludes water systems floods; migration- potential for movement
tsunamis) related health effects of populations and
infrastructure; also see
tropical cyclones above
Source: IPCC Fourth Assessment Report: Climate Change 2007
Note: * based on projections for 21st century using SRES scenario

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Past Occurrences of Extreme Climatic Events

Table 3-59 describes the extreme climatic events happened in


Pampanga. The events were identified in a study conducted on the
Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptive Capacity of the Guagua
Community in Pampanga (Cosio et al, 2010).

Table3 - 59. Extreme Climatic Events Identified by Community Residents


in Guagua Pampanga (1966-2008)
Year Climate Variability and Extremes
1966 Typhoon Gading brought very strong wind which caused the falling or destruction of houses
1972 Great Flood of Luzon (90 days continuous intense rain)
- the continuous intense rain caused severe flooding to a level of human height which was the first
time to happen in the municipality, though there was no reported specific typhoon during the
time
1985 A typhoon caused heavy flooding because of the release of water from Angat Dam, and which was
even aggravated by high tide
1995 El Nino
1997 Severe flood caused by typhoon that reached the 1 st floor of the Municipal Building of Guagua,
Pampanga
2002 For July alone, 6 typhoons (Florita, Gloria, Hambalos, Inday and Kaka) brought the most intense
rainfall and floods
2004 Typhoon Marce caused severe flooding in August 26-27, 2004
2006 Typhoon Glenda, the strongest typhoon that hit Guagua on July 24-26, 2006
2008 Typhoon Julian, the most destructive in 2008 which caused flooding in the Central Business District
and affected 8,313 people from 1,600 families in seven villages

Source: Cosio et al, 2010, Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptive Capacity of the Guagua Community in
Pampanga

8.4 HAZARD ASSESSMENT

Using the Geographic Information System (GIS) tools, the number of


exposed population, built-up areas, agricultural lands and critical facilities were
determined within the low, moderate and high susceptibility areas of flood,
groundshaking, liquefaction and volcanic hazards.

8.4.1. Hazard Exposure of the Population

Flood Hazard
out of Pampangas total population, 93% (2,168,477) is exposed to
flood hazards;
39% or 924,414 live in highly susceptible areas;
13% or 295,455 in moderate susceptibility areas;

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41% or 948,609 in low susceptibility areas.


the municipalities with most exposed population in highly
susceptible areas are Sasmuan (100%), Minalin (90%), Macabebe
(94%), Masantol (90%), Sto. Tomas (85%), Apalit (80%), San Luis
(75%),San Simon (64%), Candaba (63%), Lubao (55%), and
Guagua (52%)
Angeles City has the least exposed population to flood hazard

Liquefaction Hazard
out of Pampangas total population, 79% (1,840,799) is exposed to
liquefaction hazard;
35% or 808,470 live in highly susceptible areas;
29% or 679,268 live in moderate susceptibility areas;
15% or 353,061 live in low susceptibility areas.
the municipalities with 100% exposed population in highly
susceptible areas are Apalit, Macabebe, Minalin, Sasmuan and Sto.
Tomas.
other municipalities with most exposed population in highly
susceptible areas are Bacolor (93%), Candaba (94%), Masantol,
(99%), San Luis (83%), San Simon (95%), Lubao (62%) and
Guagua (61%)
Angeles City has the least exposed population (to liquefaction
hazard

Groundshaking Hazard
all of Pampangas population is highly exposed to groundshaking
hazard.

Volcanic Hazard
26% of the total provincial population is exposed to moderate to low
susceptibility areas of volcanic hazard;
people that are mostly exposed to volcanic hazard are in the
municipality of Bacolor, where 53% of the towns population is in
moderate susceptibility areas and 39% in low susceptibility areas;
other municipalities that are exposed in moderate susceptibility of
volcanic hazard are: Porac (12%), Sta. Rita (9%), Mabalacat (2%),
and the City of San Fernando with only .2%
municipalities with most exposed population in low susceptibility
areas are: Sasmuan (91%), Minalin (75%), Sto. Tomas (65%),
Macabebe (53%) and Guagua (51%)

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Table 3 60. FLOOD HAZARD EXPOSURE: POPULATION, PAMPANGA

Number of Number of Number of


Percentage of Percentage Percentage of
Exposed Exposed Exposed
Municipal Population in of Population Population in
Municipal Population in Population in Population in
Municipality Population High in Moderate Low
Population High Moderate Low
Density Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility
Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility
Areas Areas Areas
Areas Areas Areas
Angeles 326,336 51.96 38,868 11.91% 1,224 0.38% 276,868 84.84%

Apalit 101,537 16.90 80,805 79.58% 14,211 14.00% 6,477 6.38%

Arayat 121,348 6.87 33,285 27.43% 21,868 18.02% 32,623 26.88%

Bacolor 31,508 4.24 12,453 39.52% 8,335 26.45% 10,719 34.02%

Candaba 102,399 4.92 64,657 63.14% 30,865 30.14% 6,844 6.68%


City of San
285,912 41.70 106,180 37.14% 51,365 17.97% 128,379 44.90%
Fernando
Floridablanca 110,846 6.85 17,739 16.00% 10,287 9.28% 58,044 52.36%

Guagua 111,199 22.73 57,455 51.67% 21,216 19.08% 32,518 29.24%

Lubao 150,843 9.34 83,941 55.65% 33,331 22.10% 33,642 22.30%

Mabalacat 215,610 11.81 30,490 14.14% 4,463 2.07% 140,241 65.04%

Macabebe 70,777 6.68 66,546 94.02% 4,210 5.95% 0 0.00%

Magalang 103,597 9.91 46,054 44.45% 14,301 13.80% 35,548 34.31%

Masantol 52,407 11.34 46,917 89.52% 5,449 10.40% 0 0.00%

Mexico 146,851 12.04 27,009 18.39% 32,396 22.06% 87,450 59.55%

Minalin 44,001 9.34 39,743 90.32% 2,205 5.01% 2,046 4.65%

Porac 111,441 3.60 13,123 11.78% 1,659 1.49% 40,666 36.49%

San Luis 49,311 8.93 37,137 75.31% 2,743 5.56% 9,438 19.14%

San Simon 48,353 8.07 31,003 64.12% 8,122 16.80% 9,223 19.07%

Sta. Ana 38,762 9.59 8,668 22.36% 18,398 47.46% 11,696 30.17%

Sta. Rita 38,062 16.41 7,128 18.73% 4,762 12.51% 26,186 68.80%

Sto. Tomas 27,254 18.84 23,210 85.16% 4,044 14.84% 0 0.00%

Sasmuan 52,001 10.63 52,001 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%

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Figure 3 - 9

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Table 3 - 61. LIQUEFACTION HAZARD EXPOSURE: POPULATION, PAMPANGA

Exposed
Exposed Percentage of Percentage of Exposed Percentage of
Population
Population Population in Population in Population in Population in
Municipal Areas in
City/Muncipality Areas in High High Moderate Low Low
Population Moderate
Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility
Susceptibility
Area Area Area Area Area
Areas

Angeles 326,336 0 0.00% 27,869 8.54% 126,141 38.65%

Apalit 101,537 101,536 100.00% 1 0.00% 0 0.00%

Arayat 121,348 4,393 3.62% 71,564 58.97% 12,573 10.36%

Bacolor 31,508 29,383 93.26% 2,125 6.74% 0 0.00%

Candaba 102,399 96,876 94.61% 5,523 5.39% 0 0.00%


City of San
285,912 38,485 13.46% 219,758 76.86% 27,668 9.68%
Fernando
Floridablanca 110,846 7,555 6.82% 55,143 49.75% 0 0.00%

Guagua 111,199 68,188 61.32% 43,011 38.68% 0 0.00%

Lubao 150,843 93,321 61.87% 57,519 38.13% 0 0.00%

Mabalacat 215,610 0 0.00% 17,655 8.19% 56,555 26.23%

Macabebe 70,777 70,777 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%

Magalang 103,597 0 0.00% 4,654 4.49% 90,089 86.96%

Masantol 52,407 52,089 99.39% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%

Mexico 146,851 107 0.07% 106,709 72.66% 40,035 27.26%

Minalin 44,001 44,001 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%

Porac 111,441 14,203 12.75% 4,147 3.72% 0 0.00%

San Luis 49,311 41,367 83.89% 7,944 16.11% 0 0.00%

San Simon 48,353 46,326 95.81% 2,027 4.19% 0 0.00%

Sta. Ana 38,762 0 0.00% 38,762 100.00% 0 0.00%

Sta. Rita 38,062 20,627 54.19% 14,836 38.98% 0 0.00%

Sto. Tomas 27,254 27,234 99.93% 20 0.07% 0 0.00%

Sasmuan 52,001 52,001 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%

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Figure 3 - 10

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Table 3 - 62. VOLCANIC HAZARD EXPOSURE: POPULATION, PAMPANGA

Percentage of
Exposed Exposed
Exposed Percentage of
Population in Population in
Municipal Population in Exposed Population
MUNICIPALITY Pop2010 Moderate Low
Land Area Moderate in Low Susceptibility
Susceptibility Susceptibility
Susceptibility Areas
Areas Areas
Areas

Angeles City 326,336 6,280.27 0 0.00% 25,275 7.75%

Arayat 121,348 17,667.26 0 0.00% 996 0.82%

Bacolor 31,508 7,424.26 16,799 53.32% 12,203 38.73%

City of San Fernando 285,912 6,857.12 501 0.18% 101,630 35.55%

Floridablanca 110,846 16,171.80 0 0.00% 9,877 8.91%

Guagua 111,199 4,893.09 0 0.00% 57,501 51.71%

Lubao 150,843 16,149.20 0 0.00% 53,304 35.34%

Mabalacat 215,610 18,253.99 3,819 1.77% 23,208 10.76%

Macabebe 70,777 10,591.05 0 0.00% 37,620 53.15%

Magalang 103,597 10,455.16 0 0.00% 23,831 23.00%

Masantol 52,407 4,621.80 0 0.00% 10,931 20.86%

Mexico 146,851 12,201.14 0 0.00% 36,079 24.57%

Minalin 44,001 4,712.96 0 0.00% 33,326 75.74%

Porac 111,441 30,924.27 13,295 11.93% 0 0.00%

San Simon 48,353 5,992.95 0 0.00% 244 0.50%

Sta. Ana 38,762 4,043.57 0 0.00% 159 0.41%

Sta. Ritta 38,062 2,318.87 3,479 9.14% 5,887 15.47%

Sto. Tomas 27,254 1,446.41 0 0.00% 17,903 65.69%

Sasmuan 52,001 4,891.87 0 0.00% 47,368 91.09%

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Figure 3 - 11

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8.4.2 Hazard Exposure of Built-Up Areas

Flood Hazard
99.39% of the total built-up areas in Pampanga is exposed to flood
hazard;
26.42% is exposed in highly susceptible areas;
8.76% of the total built-up areas in Angeles City is exposed in high
susceptibility;0.67% in moderate susceptibility; and 90.57% in low
susceptibility.
34.69% of the total built-up areas in the City of San Fernando is
exposed in high susceptibility areas of flooding, 21.39% in moderate
susceptibility areas, and 43.93% in low susceptibility areas.
8.85% of the total built-up areas in Mabalacat City is exposed in
high susceptibility areas of flooding; 2.25% in moderate
susceptibility areas, and 88.88% in low susceptibility areas.

Liquefaction
Out of 28,692.76hectares of Pampangas total built-up area, 81.73%
(23,449.67 has.) is exposed to liquefaction hazard;
26.16% (7,504.67has.) is exposed in high susceptibility areas of
liquefaction;
38.38% (11,012.10has.) is exposed in moderate susceptibility
areas;
17.19% (4,932.90 has.) is exposed in low susceptibility areas.
Angeles City has 59.28% of its total built-up areas exposed in low to
moderate susceptibility areas of liquefaction.
City of San Fernandos built-up areas are mostly exposed in
moderate susceptibility areas (82.40%)
Mabalacat City has 40.64% of its total built-up areas exposed in low
to moderate susceptibility areas

Volcanic Hazard
Out of 28,692.76 hectares of Pampangas total built-up area, only
19.13% (5,488.68has.) is exposed to volcanic hazard;
0.80% (229.06.) is exposed in moderate susceptibility area;
18.33% (5,259.62 has.) is exposed in low susceptibility areas;
5.01% of Angeles Citys total built-up areas is exposed in moderate
susceptibility area;
40.08% of the City of San Fernandos built-up areas are exposed in
moderate to low susceptibility areas;

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TABLE 3 - 63. FLOOD HAZARD EXPOSURE: BUILT-UP AREAS (in Hectares), PAMPANGA

Percentage of Built-Up Areas Percentage of Built-Up Areas Percentage of


Built Up Areas
Built-Up Areas Exposed in Built-Up Areas in Exposed in Built-Up Areas
Total Municipal Exposed in High
Municipality in High Moderate Moderate Low in Low
Built-Up Area Susceptibility
Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility
Areas
Areas Areas Areas Areas Areas

Angeles 3,439.08 301.31 8.76% 22.96 0.67% 3,114.67 90.57%

Apalit 832.96 462.53 55.53% 209.56 25.16% 160.87 19.31%

Arayat 1,321.95 175.51 13.28% 217.58 16.46% 901.93 68.23%

Bacolor 853.40 227.25 26.63% 152.18 17.83% 473.96 55.54%

Candaba 1,089.96 618.47 56.74% 365.25 33.51% 106.24 9.75%

City of San Fernando 3,660.49 1,269.79 34.69% 782.82 21.39% 1,607.89 43.93%

Floridablanca 1,799.58 131.04 7.28% 183.16 10.18% 1,467.46 81.54%

Guagua 1,107.05 573.34 51.79% 199.20 17.99% 334.50 30.22%

Lubao 1,778.18 658.03 37.01% 552.89 31.09% 567.26 31.90%

Mabalacat 3,808.70 336.92 8.85% 85.69 2.25% 3,385.31 88.88%

Macabebe 447.80 241.61 53.95% 206.18 46.04% - 0.00%

Magalang 1,225.58 278.11 22.69% 96.42 7.87% 757.08 61.77%

Masantol 316.79 204.85 64.66% 111.94 35.34% - 0.00%

Mexico 2,404.25 522.83 21.75% 333.02 13.85% 1,548.40 64.40%

Minalin 358.74 224.37 62.54% 48.48 13.51% 85.89 23.94%

Porac 1,561.83 121.28 7.77% 32.37 2.07% 1,372.72 87.89%

San Luis 631.99 422.34 66.83% 60.87 9.63% 148.79 23.54%

San Simon 658.96 313.14 47.52% 182.63 27.71% 163.19 24.76%

Sta. Ana 467.64 116.64 24.94% 147.09 31.45% 203.90 43.60%

Sta. Rita 482.10 37.29 7.73% 40.43 8.39% 404.38 83.88%

Sto. Tomas 353.32 251.37 71.15% 101.95 28.85% - 0.00%

Sasmuan 92.41 92.41 100.00% - 0.00% - 0.00%

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Figure 3 - 12

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Table 3 64. LIQUEFACTION HAZARD EXPOSURE: BUILT-UP AREAS, PAMPANGA

Exposed Built- Percentage of Exposed Built- Percentage of Exposed Built- Percentage


Total Up Areas Built-Up Areas Up Areas in Built-Up Areas Up Areas in of Built-up
Municipality Municipal within High in High Moderate in Moderate Low Areas in Low
Built-Up Area Susceptibility Susceptiblity Susceptibility Susceptiblity Susceptibility Susceptibility
Areas Area Areas Area Areas Area

Angeles 3,439.08 0 0.00% 466.10 13.55% 1572.56 45.73%

Apalit 832.96 832.95 100.00% 0.01 0.00% 0 0.00%

Arayat 1,321.95 33.12 2.51% 1036.50 78.41% 229.84 17.39%

Bacolor 853.40 590.18 69.16% 263.22 30.84% 0 0.00%

Candaba 1,089.96 1065.17 97.73% 24.80 2.28% 0 0.00%

City of San Fernando 3,660.49 448.38 12.25% 3016.20 82.40% 195.92 5.35%

Floridablanca 1,799.58 95.45 5.30% 1532.72 85.17% 0 0.00%

Guagua 1,107.05 670.29 60.55% 436.76 39.45% 0 0.00%

Lubao 1,778.18 735.52 41.36% 1042.66 58.64% 0 0.00%

Mabalacat 3,808.70 0 0.00% 240.07 6.30% 1307.71 34.33%

Macabebe 447.80 447.80 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%

Magalang 1,225.58 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 1162.03 94.81%

Masantol 316.79 316.79 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%

Mexico 2,404.25 1.55 0.06% 1937.85 80.60% 464.84 19.33%

Minalin 358.74 358.74 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%

Porac 1,561.83 109.70 7.02% 155.05 9.93% 0 0.00%

San Luis 631.99 515.73 81.60% 116.27 18.40% 0 0.00%

San Simon 658.96 639.99 97.12% 18.97 2.88% 0 0.00%

Sta. Ana 467.64 0 0.00% 467.64 100.00% 0 0.00%

Sta. Rita 482.10 198.32 41.14% 256.54 53.21% 0 0.00%

Sto. Tomas 353.32 352.58 99.79% 0.74 0.21% 0 0.00%

Sasmuan 92.41 92.41 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%

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Figure 3 - 13

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Table 3 - 65. VOLCANIC HAZARD EXPOSURE:BUILT-UP AREAS, PAMPANGA

Municipality Total Built-Up Percentage Built-Up Percentage


Municipal Areas of Built-Up Areas of Built-Up
Built-Up Exposed in Areas in Exposed in Areas in Low
Area Moderate Moderate Low Susceptibility
Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility Areas
Areas Areas Areas

Angeles 3,439.08 0 0.00% 172.15 5.01%

Arayat 1,321.95 0 0.00% 0.97 0.07%

Bacolor 853.40 104.68 12.27% 481.74 56.45%

City of San Fernando 3,660.49 2.59 0.07% 1,464.71 40.01%

Floridablanca 1,799.58 0 0.00% 133.21 7.40%

Guagua 1,107.05 0 0.00% 593.41 53.60%

Lubao 1,778.18 0 0.00% 618.76 34.80%

Mabalacat 3,808.70 30.15 0.79% 210.39 5.52%

Macabebe 447.80 0 0.00% 156.96 35.05%

Magalang 1,225.58 0 0.00% 75.25 6.14%

Masantol 316.79 0 0.00% 86.59 27.33%

Mexico 2,404.25 0 0.00% 556.68 23.15%

Minalin 358.74 0 0.00% 213.86 59.61%

Porac 1,561.83 91.07 5.83% 0 0.00%

San Simon 658.96 0 0.00% 7.68 1.17%

Sta. Rita 482.10 0.57 0.12% 82.06 17.02%

Sto. Tomas 353.32 0 0.00% 312.79 88.53%

Sasmuan 92.41 0 0.00% 92.41 100.00%

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Figure 3 - 14

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

8.4.3 Hazard Exposure of Agricultural Lands

Flood Hazard
Out of the provinces total agricultural land area of 153,529.38
hectares, almost 98.41% (151,091.34 hectares) is exposed to flood
hazards.
50.89% (78,136.20 hectares) is exposed in high susceptibility areas;
16.82% (25,822.03 hectares) is exposed in moderate susceptibility
areas;
30.70% (47,133.11 hectares) is exposed in low susceptibility areas.
Municipalities with most exposed agrilands in high susceptibility of
flood hazard are: Apalit 83%, Macabebe 95%, Masantol 91%,
Minalin 92%, San Luis 76%, Sto. Tomas 89% and Sasmuan 100%.

Liquefaction Hazard
Out of the provinces total agricultural land area of 153,529.38
hectares, 90.27% (138,596.05 hectares) is exposed to liquefaction
hazard;
53.11% (81,532.83 hectares) is exposed in high susceptibility areas;
26.00% (39,916.92 hectares) is exposed in moderate susceptibility
areas;
11.17% (17,146.30 hectares) is exposed in low susceptibility areas.
Municipalities with most exposed agrilands in high susceptibility of
liquefaction hazard are: Apalit 100%, Macabebe 100%, Minalin
100%, Sasmuan 100%, Sto. Tomas almost 100%, Masantol 99%,
Bacolor 96%, San Simon 95%, Candaba 94% and San Luis 84%.

Volcanic Hazard
Out of the provinces total agricultural land area of 153,529.38
hectares, 27.06% (41,547.13 hectares) is exposed in moderate to
low susceptibility areas of volcanic hazard;
5.42% (8,324.41 hectares) is exposed in moderate susceptibility
areas;
21.64% (33,222.72 hectares) is exposed in low susceptibility areas;

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table3 - 66. FLOOD HAZARD EXPOSURE: AGRICULTURAL AREAS, PAMPANGA


Percentage
Exposed
Exposed Percentage of of Exposed Percentage of
Agricultural
Total Municipal Agricultural Agricultural Agricultural Agricultural Agricultural
Area in
Municipality Agricultural Areas in High Areas in High Areas in Area in Low Areas in Low
Moderate
Area Susceptibility Susceptibility Moderate Susceptibility Susceptibility
Susceptibility
Area Area (%) Susceptibility Area Area (%)
Area
Area (%)
2,576.65 394.95 15.33% 25.52 0.99% 1,994.95 77.42%
Angeles
5,176.78 4,322.54 83.50% 631.69 12.20% 222.55 4.30%
Apalit
11,597.34 4,398.66 37.93% 3,036.83 26.19% 3,847.67 33.18%
Arayat
6,570.86 2,705.84 41.18% 1,812.63 27.59% 2,052.39 31.23%
Bacolor
19,730.16 12,466.63 63.19% 5,948.31 30.15% 1,315.22 6.67%
Candaba

City of San 3,196.63 1,230.94 38.51% 494.55 15.47% 1,471.14 46.02%


Fernando
10,323.23 1,807.18 17.51% 1,327.76 12.86% 6,509.94 63.06%
Floridablanca
3,786.04 1,955.68 51.66% 742.59 19.61% 1,087.75 28.73%
Guagua
13,977.61 8,114.00 58.05% 2,853.94 20.42% 3,009.65 21.53%
Lubao
5,801.58 1,667.85 28.75% 415.48 7.16% 3,693.04 63.66%
Mabalacat
9,639.33 9,215.57 95.60% 423.76 4.40% - 0.00%
Macabebe
8,669.21 4,074.59 47.00% 1,364.59 15.74% 2,895.41 33.40%
Magalang
4,305.01 3,936.37 91.44% 368.64 8.56% - 0.00%
Masantol
9,796.89 1,614.19 16.48% 2,525.82 25.78% 5,656.88 57.74%
Mexico
4,354.22 4,033.28 92.63% 187.72 4.31% 133.21 3.06%
Minalin
12,927.24 2,435.12 18.84% 414.54 3.21% 9,153.17 70.81%
Porac
4,892.73 3,737.69 76.39% 246.42 5.04% 908.63 18.57%
San Luis
5,333.99 3,529.18 66.16% 828.05 15.52% 976.76 18.31%
San Simon
3,575.93 751.03 21.00% 1,810.75 50.64% 1,014.15 28.36%
Sta. Ana
1,836.77 396.50 21.59% 249.67 13.59% 1,190.60 64.82%
Sta. Rita
1,093.09 980.32 89.68% 112.77 10.32% - 0.00%
Sto. Tomas
4,368.09 4,368.09 100.00% - 0.00% - 0.00%
Sasmuan

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Figure 3 - 15

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 139


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 67. LIQUEFACTION HAZARD EXPOSURE: AGRICULTURAL AREAS, PAMPANGA

Exposed Percentage of
Exposed Percentage of Exposed Percentage of
Total Agricultural Agricultural
Agricultural Agricultural Agricultural Area Agricultural
Municipal Area in Area in
Municipality Area in High Area in High in Low Area in Low
Agricultural Moderate Moderate
Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility
Area Susceptibility Susceptibility
Area Area (%) Area Area (%)
Area Area (%)
2,576.65 0.00 0.00% 70.25 2.73% 855.00 33.18%
Angeles
5,176.78 5176.70 100.00% 0.08 0.00% 0 0.00%
Apalit
11,597.34 606.44 5.23% 9279.74 80.02% 1567.27 13.51%
Arayat
6,570.86 6333.43 96.39% 237.43 3.61% 0 0.00%
Bacolor
19,730.16 18632.00 94.43% 1098.15 5.57% 0 0.00%
Candaba

City of San 3,196.63 474.63 14.85% 2254.34 70.52% 467.66 14.63%


Fernando
10,323.23 1006.84 9.75% 6214.58 60.20% 0 0.00%
Floridablanca
3,786.04 2330.19 61.55% 1455.85 38.45% 0 0.00%
Guagua
13,977.61 9128.54 65.31% 4849.07 34.69% 0 0.00%
Lubao
5,801.58 0.00 0.00% 834.20 14.38% 3479.52 59.98%
Mabalacat
9,639.33 9639.33 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%
Macabebe
8,669.21 0.00 0.00% 469.73 5.42% 7915.37 91.30%
Magalang
4,305.01 4276.99 99.35% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%
Masantol
9,796.89 7.34 0.07% 6928.07 70.72% 2861.48 29.21%
Mexico
4,354.22 4354.22 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%
Minalin
12,927.24 3826.28 29.60% 995.83 7.70% 0 0.00%
Porac
4,892.73 4119.00 84.19% 773.74 15.81% 0 0.00%
San Luis
5,333.99 5101.70 95.65% 232.30 4.36% 0 0.00%
San Simon
3,575.93 0.00 0.00% 3575.93 100.00% 0 0.00%
Sta. Ana
1,836.77 1058.32 57.62% 647.33 35.24% 0 0.00%
Sta. Rita
1,093.09 1092.79 99.97% 0.30 0.03% 0 0.00%
Sto. Tomas
4,368.09 4368.09 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%
Sasmuan

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 140


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Figure 3 - 16

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 141


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 68. VOLCANIC HAZARD EXPOSURE:AGRICULTURAL AREAS, PAMPANGA

Exposed Exposure Exposed Exposure


Agricultural Area Percentage Agricultural Area Percentage
Total Municipal
Municipality Within Moderate Within Moderate Within Low Within Low
Agri Area
Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility
Area Area (%) Area Area (%)

2,576.65 0 0.00% 235.94 9.16%


Angeles City
11,597.34 0 0.00% 137.08 1.18%
Arayat
6,570.86 3,845.23 58.52% 2,374.10 36.13%
Bacolor
3,196.63 9.41 0.29% 968.96 30.31%
City of San Fernando
10,323.23 0 0.00% 1,227.07 11.89%
Floridablanca
3,786.04 0 0.00% 1,936.81 51.16%
Guagua
13,977.61 0 0.00% 5,013.11 35.87%
Lubao
5,801.58 656.87 11.32% 1,554.66 26.80%
Mabalacat
9,639.33 0 0.00% 5,511.69 57.18%
Macabebe
8,669.21 0 0.00% 2,351.02 27.12%
Magalang
4,305.01 0 0.00% 877.46 20.38%
Masantol
9,796.89 0 0.00% 2,381.17 24.31%
Mexico
4,354.22 0 0.00% 3,355.67 77.07%
Minalin
12,927.24 3,602.02 27.86% 0 0.00%
Porac
5,333.99 0 0.00% 22.52 0.42%
San Simon
3,575.93 0 0.00% 16.03 0.45%
Sta. Ana
1,836.77 210.88 11.48% 272.03 14.81%
Sta. Rita
1,093.09 0 0.00% 637.32 58.30%
Sto. Tomas
4,368.09 0 0.00% 4,350.08 99.59%
Sasmuan

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 142


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Figure 3 - 17

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

8.4.4 Hazard Exposure of Critical Facilities

Flood Hazard

facilities such as bridges (100% or 331), school (99.44% or 354),


government building (100% or 32) and hospital (100% or 15) in the
province are exposed to flood hazard;
municipal bridges with 100% exposed in high susceptible in flood
are: Apalit, Magalang, San Luis, and Sasmuan;
25.56% or 91 schools in the province (Sasmuan 100%, Sto.
Tomas 71%, San Simon 56%, Guagua 50%, Minalin 50%;
San Luis 50%; Sta. Ana 50%) are exposed in high susceptible;
four (4) municipalities (Guagua, Lubao Santa Ana and Sasmuan)
are 100% of government building are exposed in high susceptible;
26.09% or 4 hospitals in the municipalities of Bacolor 100%,
Guagua 100%, Lubao 100% and City of San Fernando 50%
are exposed in high susceptible.

Liquefaction Hazard

facilities such as bridges (91.54% or 303), school (78.53% or 278),


government building (93.75% or 30) and hospital (73.33% or 11) in
the province are exposed to liquefaction hazard;
municipal bridges with 100% exposed in high susceptible in
liquefaction are: Apalit, Bacolor, Candaba, Macabebe, Masantol,
Minalin, San Luis, San Simon, Sta. Rita, Sto. Tomas and Sasmuan;
29.49% or 105 schools in the province (Apalit 100%, Candaba
100%, Macabebe 100%, Masantol 100%, Minalin 100%, San
Simon 100%, Sto. Tomas 100%, Sasmuan 100%, Bacolor
82%, San Luis 75%; Guagua 64%; Sta. Rita 57%) are
exposed in high susceptible;
thirteen (13) or 40.63% of the government building are exposed in
high susceptible in liquefaction in the municipalities of Apalit,
Bacolor, Candaba, City of San Fernando, Guagua, Lubao,
Macabebe, Masantol, Minalin, San Luis, San Simon Sto, Tomas and
Sasmuan;
26.67% or 4 hospitals in the municipalities of Bacolor 100%,
Guagua 100%, Lubao 100% and Macabebe 100% are
exposed in high susceptible in liquefaction.

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(2015 2042)

Volcanic Hazard
facilities such as bridges (45.32% or 150), school (25.56% or 91),
government building (40.63% or 13) and hospital (26.67% or 4) in
the province are exposed in volcanic hazard;
municipal bridges exposed in moderate susceptible in volcanic are
Bacolor (23% or 3) and Porac (11% or 2);
only 25.56% or 91 schools in the province (Angeles City 3%,
Bacolor 82%, City of San Fernando 24%, Guagua 59%, Lubao
51%, Mabalacat 5%, Macabebe 53%, Masantol 100%,
Mexico 48%, Minalin 63%, Sta. Rita 29%, Sto. Tomas 86%
and Sasmuan 100%) are exposed in low susceptible;
out of the thirty-two (32) government building, thirteen (13) or
40.63% are exposed in low susceptible;
26.67% or 4 hospitals in the municipalities of Bacolor 100%,
Guagua 100%, Lubao 100% and City of San Fernando 50%
are exposed in lowsusceptible.

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 69. FLOOD HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-BRIDGE, PAMPANGA

Exposed Exposed Exposed


Percentage of Percentage of Percentage of
Total Critical Critical Critical
Type of Critical Critical Critical
Count of Facilities Facilities in Facilities in
Municipality Critical Facilities in Facilities in Facilities in
Facilities Within High Moderate Low
Facility High Moderate Low
by Type Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility
Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility
Areas Areas Areas

Angeles City Bridge 24 19 79% 0 0% 5 21%

Apalit Bridge 9 9 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Arayat Bridge 17 11 65% 2 12% 4 24%

Bacolor Bridge 13 12 92% 0 0% 1 8%

Candaba Bridge 7 6 86% 1 14% 0 0%

City of San Fernando Bridge 62 49 79% 8 13% 5 8%

Floridablanca Bridge 14 13 93% 0 0% 1 7%

Guagua Bridge 28 24 86% 1 4% 3 11%

Lubao Bridge 32 29 91% 3 9% 0 0%

Mabalacat Bridge 18 16 89% 0 0% 2 11%

Macabebe Bridge 5 2 40% 3 60% 0 0%

Magalang Bridge 9 9 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Masantol Bridge 7 7 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Mexico Bridge 17 15 88% 2 12% 0 0%

Minalin Bridge 12 11 92% 1 8% 0 0%

Porac Bridge 18 9 50% 1 0% 9 50%

San Luis Bridge 8 8 100% 0 0% 0 0%

San Simon Bridge 7 6 86% 0 0% 1 14%

Sta. Ana Bridge 6 4 67% 2 33% 0 0%

Sta. Rita Bridge 6 4 67% 0 0% 2 33%

Sto. Tomas Bridge 9 6 67% 3 33% 0 0%

Sasmuan Bridge 3 3 100% 0 0% 0 0%

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 70. FLOOD HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-SCHOOL, PAMPANGA

Exposed Exposed
Percentage of Exposed Percentage of
Critical Percentage of Critical
Type of Total Count Critical Critical Critical
Facilities Critical Facilities Facilities in
Municipality Critical of Facilities Facilities in Facilities in Low Facilities in
Within High in High Moderate
Facility by Type Moderate Susceptibility Low
Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility
Susceptibility Areas Susceptibility
Areas Areas

Angeles City School 39 3 8% 0 0% 36 92%

Apalit School 10 3 30% 2 20% 5 50%

Arayat School 15 1 7% 3 20% 11 73%

Bacolor School 11 3 27% 3 27% 5 45%

Candaba School 13 6 46% 7 54% 0 0%

City of San Fernando School 21 6 29% 4 19% 11 52%

Floridablanca School 22 0 0% 0 0% 21 95%

Guagua School 22 11 50% 3 14% 8 36%

Lubao School 35 13 37% 12 34% 10 29%

Mabalacat School 22 2 9% 0 0% 20 91%

Macabebe School 15 5 33% 10 67% 0 0%

Magalang School 13 1 8% 0 0% 11 85%

Masantol School 3 0 0% 3 100% 0 0%

Mexico School 33 6 18% 8 24% 19 58%

Minalin School 8 4 50% 2 25% 2 25%

Porac School 24 2 8% 1 4% 21 88%

San Luis School 12 6 50% 2 17% 4 33%

San Simon School 9 5 56% 2 22% 2 22%

Sta. Ana School 11 5 50% 4 36% 2 18%

Sta. Rita School 7 0 0% 0 0% 7 100%

Sto. Tomas School 7 5 71% 2 29% 0 0%

Sasmuan School 4 4 100% 0 0% 0 0%

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 71. FLOOD HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-GOVERNMENT BUILDING, PAMPANGA

Exposed Exposed Exposed


Percentage of Percentage of Percentage
Total Critical Critical Critical
Type of Critical Critical of Critical
Count of Facilities Facilities in Facilities in
Municipality Critical Facilities in Facilities in Facilities in
Facilities Within High Moderate Low
Facility High Moderate Low
by Type Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility
Susceptibility Susceptibility Susceptibility
Areas Areas Areas

Govt.
Angeles City 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%
Bldg.
Govt.
Apalit 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%
Bldg.
Govt.
Arayat 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%
Bldg.
Govt.
Bacolor 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%
Bldg.
Govt.
Candaba 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
City of San Fernando 11 1 9% 3 27% 7 64%
Bldg.
Govt.
Floridablanca 2 0 0% 0 0% 2 100%
Bldg.
Govt.
Guagua 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Lubao 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Mabalacat 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%
Bldg.
Govt.
Macabebe 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Magalang 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%
Bldg.
Govt.
Masantol 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Mexico 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Minalin 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Porac 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%
Bldg.
Govt.
San Luis 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
San Simon 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%
Bldg.
Govt.
Sta. Ana 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Sto. Tomas 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Sasmuan 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 72. FLOOD HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-HOSPITAL, PAMPANGA

Exposed Exposed
Percentage of Percentage Exposed Percentage
Total Critical Critical
Type of Critical of Critical Critical of Critical
Count of Facilities Facilities in
Municipality Critical Facilities in Facilities in Facilities in Low Facilities in
Facilities Within High Moderate
Facility High Moderate Susceptibility Low
by Type Susceptibility Susceptibility
Susceptibility Susceptibility Areas Susceptibility
Areas Areas

Angeles City Hospitals 2 0 0% 0 0% 2 100%

Arayat Hospitals 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%

Bacolor Hospitals 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%

City of San Fernando Hospitals 2 1 50% 1 50% 0 0%

Floridablanca Hospitals 2 0 0% 0 0% 2 100%

Guagua Hospitals 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Lubao Hospitals 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Mabalacat Hospitals 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%

Macabebe Hospitals 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%

Magalang Hospitals 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%

Porac Hospitals 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%

San Luis Hospitals 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 73.
LIQUEFACTION HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-BRIDGE, PAMPANGA

Exposed Exposed
Total Percentage of Percentage of Exposed Percentage
Critical Critical
Type of Count of Critical Critical Critical of Critical
Facilities Facilities in
Municipality Critical Facilitie Facilities in Facilities in Facilities in Low Facilities in
Within High Moderate
Facility s by High Moderate Susceptibility Low
Susceptibility Susceptibility
Type Susceptibility Susceptibility Areas Susceptibility
Areas Areas

Angeles City Bridge 24 0 0% 11 46% 6 25%

Apalit Bridge 9 9 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Arayat Bridge 17 0 0% 13 76% 4 24%

Bacolor Bridge 13 13 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Candaba Bridge 7 7 100% 0 0% 0 0%

City of San Fernando Bridge 62 14 23% 47 76% 1 2%

Floridablanca Bridge 14 4 29% 10 71% 0 0%

Guagua Bridge 28 24 86% 4 14% 0 0%

Lubao Bridge 32 29 91% 3 9% 0 0%

Mabalacat Bridge 18 0 0% 2 11% 10 56%

Macabebe Bridge 5 5 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Magalang Bridge 9 0 0% 0 0% 9 100%

Masantol Bridge 7 7 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Mexico Bridge 17 0 0% 14 82% 3 18%

Minalin Bridge 12 12 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Porac Bridge 18 2 11% 1 6% 0 0%

San Luis Bridge 8 8 100% 0 0% 0 0%

San Simon Bridge 7 7 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Sta. Ana Bridge 6 0 0% 6 100% 0 0%

Sta. Rita Bridge 6 6 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Sto. Tomas Bridge 9 9 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Sasmuan Bridge 3 3 100% 0 0% 0 0%

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 74. LIQUEFACTION HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-SCHOOL, PAMPANGA

Exposed Exposed
Total Percentage of Percentage of Exposed Percentage
Critical Critical
Type of Count of Critical Critical Critical of Critical
Facilities Facilities in
Municipality Critical Facilitie Facilities in Facilities in Facilities in Low Facilities in
Within High Moderate
Facility s by High Moderate Susceptibility Low
Susceptibility Susceptibility
Type Susceptibility Susceptibility Areas Susceptibility
Areas Areas

Angeles City School 39 0 0% 6 15% 23 59%

Apalit School 10 10 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Arayat School 15 0 0% 12 80% 3 20%

Bacolor School 11 9 82% 2 18% 0 0%

Candaba School 13 13 100% 0 0% 0 0%

City of San Fernando School 21 0 0% 19 90% 2 10%

Floridablanca School 22 0 0% 20 91% 0 0%

Guagua School 22 14 64% 8 36% 0 0%

Lubao School 35 0 0% 1 3% 0 0%

Mabalacat School 22 0 0% 0 0% 13 59%

Macabebe School 15 15 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Magalang School 13 0 0% 0 0% 12 92%

Masantol School 3 3 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Mexico School 33 0 0% 31 94% 2 6%

Minalin School 8 8 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Porac School 24 0 0% 3 13% 0 0%

San Luis School 12 9 75% 3 25% 0 0%

San Simon School 9 9 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Sta. Ana School 11 0 0% 11 100% 0 0%

Sta. Rita School 7 4 57% 2 29% 0 0%

Sto. Tomas School 7 7 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Sasmuan School 4 4 100% 0 0% 0 0%

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 75. LIQUEFACTION HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-GOVERNMENT BUILDING,


PAMPANGA

Exposed Exposed
Percentage of Percentage of Exposed Percentage of
Total Critical Critical
Type of Critical Critical Critical Critical
Count of Facilities Facilities in
Municipality Critical Facilities in Facilities in Facilities in Low Facilities in
Facilities Within High Moderate
Facility High Moderate Susceptibility Low
by Type Susceptibility Susceptibility
Susceptibility Susceptibility Areas Susceptibility
Areas Areas

Govt.
Angeles City 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%
Bldg.
Govt.
Apalit 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Arayat 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Bacolor 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Candaba 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
City of San Fernando 11 1 9% 10 91% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Floridablanca 2 0 0% 2 100% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Guagua 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Lubao 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Macabebe 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Magalang 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%
Bldg.
Govt.
Masantol 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Mexico 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Minalin 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
San Luis 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
San Simon 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Sta. Ana 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Sto. Tomas 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.
Govt.
Sasmuan 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%
Bldg.

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 152


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 76. LIQUEFACTION HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-HOSPITALS, PAMPANGA

Exposed Exposed
Total Percentage of Percentage of Exposed Percentage
Critical Critical
Type of Count of Critical Critical Critical of Critical
Facilities Facilities in
Municipality Critical Facilitie Facilities in Facilities in Facilities in Low Facilities in
Within High Moderate
Facility s by High Moderate Susceptibility Low
Susceptibility Susceptibility
Type Susceptibility Susceptibility Areas Susceptibility
Areas Areas

Arayat Hospitals 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%

Bacolor Hospitals 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%

City of San Fernando Hospitals 2 0 0% 2 100% 0 0%

Floridablanca Hospitals 2 0 0% 2 100% 0 0%

Guagua Hospitals 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Lubao Hospitals 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Macabebe Hospitals 1 1 100% 0 0% 0 0%

Magalang Hospitals 1 0 0% 0 0% 1 100%

San Luis Hospitals 1 0 0% 1 100% 0 0%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 153


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 77. VOLCANIC HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-BRIDGES, PAMPANGA

Exposed Exposed
Percentage of Percentage
Critical Critical
Type of Total Critical of Critical
Facilities in Facilities in
Municipality Critical Count of Facilities in Facilities in
Moderate Low
Facility Facilities Moderate Low
Susceptibility Susceptibility
Susceptibility Susceptibility
Areas Areas

Angeles City Bridge 24 0 0% 7 29%

Bacolor Bridge 13 3 23% 10 77%

City of San Fernando Bridge 62 0 0% 34 55%

Floridablanca Bridge 14 0 0% 4 29%

Guagua Bridge 28 0 0% 24 86%

Lubao Bridge 32 0 0% 26 81%

Mabalacat Bridge 18 0 0% 1 6%

Magalang Bridge 9 0 0% 1 11%

Masantol Bridge 7 0 0% 2 29%

Mexico Bridge 17 0 0% 10 59%

Minalin Bridge 12 0 0% 10 83%

Porac Bridge 18 2 11% 0 0%

Sta. Rita Bridge 6 0 0% 4 67%

Sto. Tomas Bridge 9 0 0% 9 100%

Sasmuan Bridge 3 0 0% 3 100%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 154


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 78. VOLCANIC HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-SCHOOLS, PAMPANGA

Exposed Exposed
Percentage of Percentage
Total Critical Critical
Critical of Critical
Type of Count of Facilities in Facilities in
Municipality Facilities in Facilities in
Critical Facility Facilities Moderate Low
Moderate Low
by Type Susceptibility Susceptibility
Susceptibility Susceptibility
Areas Areas

Angeles City School 39 0 0% 1 3%

Bacolor School 11 0 0% 9 82%

City of San Fernando School 21 0 0% 5 24%

Guagua School 22 0 0% 13 59%

Lubao School 35 0 0% 18 51%

Mabalacat School 22 0 0% 1 5%

Macabebe School 15 0 0% 8 53%

Masantol School 3 0 0% 3 100%

Mexico School 33 0 0% 16 48%

Minalin School 8 0 0% 5 63%

Sta. Rita School 7 0 0% 2 29%

Sto. Tomas School 7 0 0% 6 86%

Sasmuan School 4 0 0% 4 100%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 155


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 79. VOLCANIC HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-GOVERNMENT BUILDING


PAMPANGA

Exposed Critical Percentage of Percentage of


Total Exposed Critical
Facilities in Critical Critical
Type of Critical Count of Facilities in Low
Municipality Moderate Facilities in Facilities in
Facility Facilities Susceptibility
Susceptibility Moderate Low
by Type Areas
Areas Susceptibility Susceptibility

Bacolor Government Building 1 0 0% 1 100%

City of San Fernando Government Building 11 0 0% 5 45%

Guagua Government Building 1 0 0% 1 100%

Lubao Government Building 1 0 0% 1 100%

Masantol Government Building 1 0 0% 1 100%

Mexico Government Building 1 0 0% 1 100%

Minalin Government Building 1 0 0% 1 100%

Sto. Tomas Government Building 1 0 0% 1 100%

Sasmuan Government Building 1 0 0% 1 100%

Table 3 - 80. VOLCANIC HAZARD EXPOSURE: CRITICAL FACILITIES-GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS


PAMPANGA

Exposed Critical Percentage of Exposed Percentage of


Total
Facilities in Critical Critical Critical
Type of Critical Count of
Municipality Moderate Facilities in Facilities in Low Facilities in
Facility Facilities
Susceptibility Moderate Susceptibility Low
by Type
Areas Susceptibility Areas Susceptibility

Bacolor Hospitals 1 0 0% 1 100%

City of San Fernando Hospitals 2 0 0% 1 50%

Guagua Hospitals 1 0 0% 1 100%

Lubao Hospitals 1 0 0% 1 100%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 156


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

8.4.5 Hazard Exposure of Pampanga Roads

Flood Hazard

out of the 520.08 km. national road, 99.94% (519.75km.), 96.07%


(228.37 km.) of the provincial road and 99.08% (4,205.32 km.) of
the municipal/ barangay/ sub roadsareexposed in flood hazard;
28.02% (145.70 km.) of the national road is exposed in high
susceptibility;
32.35% (76.91 km.) of the provincial road is exposed in high
susceptibility;
27.91% (582.29 km.) of the municipal/ barangay/ sub road is
exposed in high susceptibility;

Liquefaction Hazard

out of the 520.08 km. national road, 78.53% (408.41 km.), 95.71%
(227.52 km.) of the provincial road and 85.25% (3,618.63 km.) of
the municipal/ barangay/ sub roadsare exposed in flood hazard;
37.04% (192.63 km.) of the national road is exposed in high
susceptibility;
43.78% (104.08 km.) of the provincial road is exposed in high
susceptibility;
23.78% (1,009.45 km.) of the municipal/ barangay/ sub road is
exposed in high susceptibility;

Volcanic Hazard

out of the 520.08 km. national road, 25.13% (130.71 km.), 25.47%
(60.55 km.) of the provincial road and 19.94% (846.52 km.) of the
municipal/ barangay/ sub roadsare exposed in flood hazard;
6.18% (32.13 km.) of the national road is exposed in
moderatesusceptibility;
0.97% (2.29 km.) of the provincial road is exposed in
moderatesusceptibility;
0.77% (32.77 km.) of the municipal/ barangay/ sub road is exposed
in moderatesusceptibility;

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 157


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 81. FLOOD HAZARD EXPOSURE: PAMPANGA - NATIONAL ROADS

Exposure
Exposure Exposure
Exposed Percentage
Exposed Exposed Percentage Percentage
Total Road Length of Road
Road Length Road Length of Road of Road
Road Within Length
Municipal Name Type of Road Within High Within Low Length Length
Length Susceptible Moderate Susceptible Within High Within
Within Low
(km.) Susceptible Moderate
Areas Areas Susceptible Susceptible
Areas Susceptible
Areas Areas
Areas
Angeles City National Road 42.67 4.45 0.14 38.15 10.42% 0.32% 89.41%

Apalit National Road 20.67 9.74 4.95 5.96 47.11% 23.94% 28.83%

Arayat National Road 30.32 2.91 3.17 22.94 9.61% 10.46% 75.65%

Bacolor National Road 28.48 8.97 4.98 14.62 31.49% 17.47% 51.33%

Candaba National Road 36.00 19.01 16.30 0.67 52.80% 45.28% 1.87%

City of San Fernando National Road 39.15 12.50 7.25 19.33 31.93% 18.53% 49.36%

Floridablanca National Road 40.57 6.00 4.81 31.09 14.78% 11.86% 76.64%

Guagua National Road 14.54 10.21 3.13 1.21 70.22% 21.52% 8.33%

Lubao National Road 34.56 16.91 9.27 8.44 48.92% 26.83% 24.42%

Mabalacat National Road 89.60 9.77 0.55 79.44 10.90% 0.61% 88.67%

Macabebe National Road 5.52 1.95 3.58 0.00 35.24% 64.74% 0.00%

Magalang National Road 11.64 2.20 2.11 7.32 18.90% 18.16% 62.93%

Masantol National Road 0.68 0.15 0.52 0.00 22.38% 77.55% 0.00%

Mexico National Road 24.58 8.63 1.54 14.52 35.10% 6.26% 59.07%

Minalin National Road 2.87 1.32 0.18 1.36 46.01% 6.41% 47.55%

Porac National Road 52.24 9.07 0.53 41.84 17.37% 1.02% 80.08%

San Luis National Road 9.66 5.55 1.42 2.69 57.45% 14.70% 27.83%

San Simon National Road 17.87 8.80 6.75 2.32 49.23% 37.75% 12.98%

Santa Ana National Road 9.73 1.12 2.40 6.25 11.54% 24.71% 64.22%

Santa Rita National Road 4.22 2.94 0.00 1.30 69.69% 0.00% 30.91%

Santo Tomas National Road 3.56 2.57 0.99 0.00 72.13% 27.92% 0.00%

Sasmuan National Road 0.94 0.94 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 520.08 145.70 74.58 299.46 28.02% 14.34% 57.58%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 158


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 82. FLOOD HAZARD EXPOSURE: PAMPANGA - PROVINCIAL ROADS


Exposure
Exposure
Exposed Exposed Exposure Percentage
Exposed Percentage
Total Road Road Length Percentage of of Road
Road Length of Road
Road Length Within Road Length Length
Municipal Name Type of Road Within Low Length
Length Within High Moderate Susceptible Within High Within
Within Low
(km.) Susceptible Susceptible Areas
Susceptible Moderate
Susceptible
Areas Areas Areas Susceptible
Areas
Areas
Angeles City Provl. Road 3.31 0.33 0.00 2.98 10.03% 0.00% 89.92%

Apalit Provl. Road 7.90 3.20 0.00 4.70 40.50% 0.00% 59.50%

Arayat Provl. Road 11.21 0.89 0.03 10.29 7.92% 0.26% 91.75%

Bacolor Provl. Road 11.04 6.75 2.82 1.41 61.13% 25.52% 12.74%

Candaba Provl. Road 6.73 0.00 0.00 6.73 0.00% 0.00% 100.00%

City of San Fernando Provl. Road 8.37 2.91 1.47 3.98 34.82% 17.58% 47.59%

Floridablanca Provl. Road 12.12 2.25 0.64 9.33 18.58% 5.31% 77.02%

Guagua Provl. Road 24.27 14.70 1.44 8.01 60.58% 5.92% 33.00%

Lubao Provl. Road 15.60 4.35 5.72 5.58 27.86% 36.65% 35.80%

Macabebe Provl. Road 0.81 0.81 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Magalang Provl. Road 10.87 1.60 0.00 7.91 14.71% 0.00% 72.75%

Mexico Provl. Road 38.06 4.38 1.92 31.77 11.50% 5.06% 83.47%

Minalin Provl. Road 14.60 10.33 1.18 3.09 70.81% 8.08% 21.15%

Porac Provl. Road 10.61 0.16 0.68 9.77 1.50% 6.38% 92.09%

San Luis Provl. Road 12.64 3.12 1.01 8.54 24.66% 7.98% 67.61%

San Simon Provl. Road 19.03 7.26 4.83 6.97 38.13% 25.38% 36.63%

Santa Ana Provl. Road 12.57 7.45 3.16 1.86 59.31% 25.12% 14.77%

Santa Rita Provl. Road 8.59 1.87 0.00 6.73 21.71% 0.00% 78.27%

Santo Tomas Provl. Road 7.28 5.65 1.62 0.00 77.67% 22.29% 0.00%

Sasmuan Provl. Road 2.11 2.11 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 237.71 76.91 26.51 124.95 32.35% 11.15% 52.56%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 159


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 83. FLOOD HAZARD EXPOSURE: PAMPANGA MUNICIPAL/ BARANGAY/ SUB ROADS

Exposure
Exposure Exposure
Exposed Exposed Percentage
Exposed Percentage Percentage
Road Road Length of Road
Total Road Road Length of Road of Road
Length Within Length
Municipal Name Type of Road Length Within Low Length Length
Within High Moderate Within
(km.) Susceptible Within High Within Low
Susceptible Susceptible Moderate
Areas Susceptible Susceptible
Areas Areas Susceptible
Areas Areas
Areas
Mun/Bry/Sub
Angeles City 574.25 40.31 1.78 531.85 7.02% 0.31% 92.62%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Apalit 110.64 67.82 28.20 14.63 61.30% 25.48% 13.22%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Arayat 186.18 41.52 22.69 117.02 22.30% 12.19% 62.85%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Bacolor 157.33 37.19 28.84 91.22 23.64% 18.33% 57.98%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Candaba 144.18 91.93 41.78 10.69 63.76% 28.98% 7.41%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
City of San Fernando 680.89 235.27 149.64 296.83 34.55% 21.98% 43.59%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Floridablanca 276.17 33.58 26.74 212.46 12.16% 9.68% 76.93%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Guagua 138.25 76.19 20.23 41.74 55.11% 14.64% 30.19%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Lubao 242.95 104.74 77.15 61.47 43.11% 31.76% 25.30%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Mabalacat 453.22 53.59 16.90 381.29 11.82% 3.73% 84.13%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Macabebe 60.34 40.59 19.79 0.00 67.27% 32.79% 0.00%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Magalang 224.97 61.16 22.83 123.74 27.19% 10.15% 55.00%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Masantol 49.79 35.43 14.28 0.00 71.15% 28.69% 0.00%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Mexico 398.38 79.13 55.24 264.11 19.86% 13.87% 66.30%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Minalin 46.89 34.88 6.21 5.80 74.38% 13.24% 12.38%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Porac 222.33 9.45 3.09 196.01 4.25% 1.39% 88.16%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
San Luis 54.54 41.13 5.25 8.25 75.42% 9.63% 15.13%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
San Simon 58.97 38.57 11.09 9.49 65.41% 18.81% 16.08%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Santa Ana 50.63 10.37 14.29 26.11 20.49% 28.23% 51.57%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Santa Rita 55.11 4.74 4.58 45.84 8.61% 8.31% 83.19%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Santo Tomas 45.40 33.73 11.67 0.00 74.29% 25.71% 0.00%
Road
Mun/Bry/Sub
Sasmuan 13.26 13.26 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Road
TOTAL 4,244.67 1,184.59 582.29 2,438.55 27.91% 13.72% 57.45%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 160


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 84. LIQUEFACTION HAZARD EXPOSURE: PAMPANGA NATIONAL ROADS


Exposure
Exposed Exposure Exposure
Exposed Exposed Percentage
Road Percentage Percentage
Total Road Road of Road
Length of Road of Road
Road Length Length Length
Municipal Name Type of Road Within Length Length
Length Within High Within Low Within
Moderate Within High Within Low
(Km.) Susceptible Susceptible Moderate
Susceptible Susceptible Susceptible
Areas Areas Susceptible
Areas Areas Areas
Areas
Angeles City National Road 42.67 0.00 6.86 16.07 0.00% 16.07% 37.65%

Apalit National Road 20.67 20.67 0.00 0.00 99.99% 0.01% 0.00%

Arayat National Road 30.32 0.00 23.71 4.84 0.00% 78.19% 15.95%

Bacolor National Road 28.48 27.47 1.01 0.00 96.44% 3.56% 0.00%

Candaba National Road 36.00 34.26 1.74 0.00 95.17% 4.83% 0.00%

City of San Fernando National Road 39.15 5.09 34.07 0.00 12.99% 87.01% 0.00%

Floridablanca National Road 40.57 1.84 27.36 0.00 4.53% 67.45% 0.00%

Guagua National Road 14.54 13.60 0.94 0.00 93.53% 6.47% 0.00%

Lubao National Road 34.56 20.00 14.55 0.00 57.89% 42.11% 0.00%

Mabalacat National Road 89.60 0.00 10.39 25.92 0.00% 11.60% 28.93%

Macabebe National Road 5.52 5.52 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Magalang National Road 11.64 0.00 0.00 11.64 0.00% 0.00% 100.00%

Masantol National Road 0.68 0.68 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Mexico National Road 24.58 0.00 20.59 3.99 0.00% 83.78% 16.22%

Minalin National Road 2.87 2.87 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Porac National Road 52.24 26.74 0.00 0.00 51.19% 0.00% 0.00%

San Luis National Road 9.66 7.49 2.16 0.00 77.61% 22.39% 0.00%

San Simon National Road 17.87 17.67 0.20 0.00 98.88% 1.12% 0.00%

Santa Ana National Road 9.73 0.00 9.73 0.00 0.00% 100.00% 0.00%

Santa Rita National Road 4.22 4.22 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Santo Tomas National Road 3.56 3.56 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Sasmuan National Road 0.94 0.94 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 520.08 192.63 153.33 62.45 37.04% 29.48% 12.01%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 161


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 85. LIQUEFACTION HAZARD EXPOSURE: PAMPANGA PROVINCIAL ROADS

Exposure
Exposed Exposure Exposure
Exposed Exposed Percentage of
Total Road Length Percentage of Percentage of
Road Length Road Length Road Length
Type of Road Within Road Length Road Length
Municipal Name Within High Within Low Within
Road Length Moderate Within High Within Low
Susceptible Susceptible Moderate
(km.) Susceptible Susceptible Susceptible
Areas Areas Susceptible
Areas Areas Areas
Areas
Provl.
Angeles City 3.31 0.00 0.00 3.31 0.00% 0.00% 100.00%
Road
Provl.
Apalit 7.90 7.90 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
Arayat 11.21 0.00 11.14 0.07 0.00% 99.33% 0.67%
Road
Provl.
Bacolor 11.04 11.04 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
Candaba 6.73 5.88 0.86 0.00 87.29% 12.71% 0.00%
Road
City of San Provl.
8.37 3.34 4.93 0.10 39.93% 58.92% 1.15%
Fernando Road
Provl.
Floridablanca 12.12 2.89 9.22 0.00 23.87% 76.13% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
Guagua 24.27 13.39 10.88 0.00 55.19% 44.81% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
Lubao 15.60 2.19 13.41 0.00 14.03% 85.97% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
Macabebe 0.81 0.81 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
Magalang 10.87 0.00 0.00 10.27 0.00% 0.00% 94.50%
Road
Provl.
Mexico 38.06 0.03 30.04 7.99 0.09% 78.92% 20.99%
Road
Provl.
Minalin 14.60 14.60 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
Porac 10.61 0.00 1.70 0.00 0.00% 16.00% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
San Luis 12.64 9.94 2.70 0.00 78.65% 21.35% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
San Simon 19.03 19.03 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
Santa Ana 12.57 0.00 12.57 0.00 0.00% 100.00% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
Santa Rita 8.59 3.66 4.26 0.00 42.55% 49.63% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
Santo Tomas 7.28 7.28 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Road
Provl.
Sasmuan 2.11 2.11 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Road
TOTAL 237.71 104.08 101.70 21.75 43.78% 42.78% 9.15%

Chapter 3: THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT Page | 162


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Table 3 - 86. LIQUEFACTION HAZARD EXPOSURE: PAMPANGA MUNICIPAL/ BARANGAY/ SUB


ROADS
Exposure Exposure
Exposed Exposure
Exposed Exposed Percentage Percentage of
Road Length Percentage of
Total Road Road Length Road Length of Road Road Length
Type of Within Road Length
Municipal Name Length Within High Within Low Length Within
Road Moderate Within Low
(km.) Susceptible Susceptible Within High Moderate
Susceptible Susceptible
Areas Areas Susceptible Susceptible
Areas Areas
Areas Areas
Mun/Bry/S
Angeles City 574.25 0.00 74.32 297.12 0.00% 12.94% 51.74%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Apalit 110.64 110.64 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Arayat 186.18 7.88 135.80 39.01 4.23% 72.94% 20.95%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Bacolor 157.33 104.06 53.26 0.00 66.14% 33.86% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Candaba 144.18 137.89 6.29 0.00 95.64% 4.36% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
City of San Fernando 680.89 83.23 557.33 40.33 12.22% 81.85% 5.92%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Floridablanca 276.17 14.48 235.17 0.00 5.24% 85.15% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Guagua 138.25 89.58 48.67 0.00 64.79% 35.21% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Lubao 242.95 109.01 133.94 0.00 44.87% 55.13% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Mabalacat 453.22 0.00 40.73 234.30 0.00% 8.99% 51.70%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Macabebe 60.34 60.34 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Magalang 224.97 0.00 0.00 208.49 0.00% 0.00% 92.67%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Masantol 49.79 49.79 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Mexico 398.38 0.00 305.05 93.33 0.00% 76.57% 23.43%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Minalin 46.89 46.89 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Porac 222.33 13.07 15.35 0.00 5.88% 6.90% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
San Luis 54.54 45.19 9.35 0.00 82.86% 17.14% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
San Simon 58.97 56.42 2.55 0.00 95.68% 4.32% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Santa Ana 50.63 0.00 50.63 0.00 0.00% 100.00% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Santa Rita 55.11 22.43 28.06 0.00 40.70% 50.92% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Santo Tomas 45.40 45.29 0.10 0.00 99.77% 0.23% 0.00%
ub Road
Mun/Bry/S
Sasmuan 13.26 13.26 0.00 0.00 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
ub Road
TOTAL 4,244.67 1,009.45 1,696.60 912.58 23.78% 39.97% 21.50%

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Table 3 - 87. VOLCANIC HAZARD EXPOSURE: PAMPANGA NATIONAL ROADS


Exposure
Exposed Exposure
Exposed Percentage
Road Percentage
Road of Road
Total Road Length of Road
Length Length
Municipal Name Type of Road Length Within Length
Within Low Within
(km.) Moderate Within Low
Susceptible Moderate
Susceptible Susceptible
Areas Susceptible
Areas Areas
Areas
Angeles City National Road 42.67 0.00 2.03 0.00% 4.77%

Bacolor National Road 28.48 14.86 15.54 52.17% 54.56%

City of San Fernando National Road 39.15 1.11 25.24 2.83% 64.47%

Floridablanca National Road 40.57 0.00 2.42 0.00% 5.96%

Guagua National Road 14.54 0.00 12.91 0.00% 88.75%

Lubao National Road 34.56 0.00 17.35 0.00% 50.21%

Mabalacat National Road 89.60 1.48 11.86 1.65% 13.24%

Magalang National Road 11.64 0.00 0.96 0.00% 8.25%

Masantol National Road 0.68 0.00 0.55 0.00% 81.65%

Mexico National Road 24.58 0.00 4.96 0.00% 20.16%

Porac National Road 52.24 14.62 0.00 27.99% 0.00%

Santa Rita National Road 4.22 0.06 1.73 1.43% 41.04%

Santo Tomas National Road 3.56 0.00 2.08 0.00% 58.50%

Sasmuan National Road 0.94 0.00 0.94 0.00% 100.00%

TOTAL 520.08 32.13 98.58 6.18% 18.95%

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Table 3 - 88. VOLCANIC HAZARD EXPOSURE: PAMPANGA PROVINCIAL ROADS


Exposure
Exposed Exposure
Exposed Percentage
Road Percentage
Road of Road
Total Road Length of Road
Length Length
Municipal Name Type of Road Length Within Length
Within Low Within
(km.) Moderate Within Low
Susceptible Moderate
Susceptible Susceptible
Areas Susceptible
Areas Areas
Areas
Bacolor Provincial Road 11.04 2.29 8.76 20.79% 79.39%

City of San Fernando Provincial Road 8.37 0.00 3.35 0.00% 40.02%

Floridablanca Provincial Road 12.12 0.00 2.89 0.00% 23.87%

Guagua Provincial Road 24.27 0.00 10.58 0.00% 43.60%

Lubao Provincial Road 15.60 0.00 4.27 0.00% 27.36%

Mexico Provincial Road 38.06 0.00 10.12 0.00% 26.58%

Minalin Provincial Road 14.60 0.00 8.49 0.00% 58.19%

Santa Rita Provincial Road 8.59 0.00 1.09 0.00% 12.72%

Santo Tomas Provincial Road 7.28 0.00 6.60 0.00% 90.64%

Sasmuan Provincial Road 2.11 0.00 2.11 0.00% 100.00%

TOTAL 237.71 2.29 58.26 0.97% 24.51%

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Table 3 - 89. VOLCANIC HAZARD EXPOSURE: PAMPANGA MUNICIPAL/ BARANGAY/ SUB


ROADS
Exposure
Exposure
Exposed Percentage
Exposed Percentage
Road Length of Road
Total Road Road Length of Road
Within Length
Municipal Name Type Of Road Length Within Low Length
Moderate Within
(km.) Susceptible Within Low
Susceptible Moderate
Areas Susceptible
Areas Susceptible
Areas
Areas
Angeles City Mun/Bry/Sub Road 574.25 0.00 21.27 0.00% 3.70%

Bacolor Mun/Bry/Sub Road 157.33 20.40 83.00 12.97% 52.75%

City of San Fernando Mun/Bry/Sub Road 680.89 0.42 250.30 0.06% 36.76%

Floridablanca Mun/Bry/Sub Road 276.17 0.00 20.00 0.00% 7.24%

Guagua Mun/Bry/Sub Road 138.25 0.00 83.16 0.00% 60.15%

Lubao Mun/Bry/Sub Road 242.95 0.00 91.86 0.00% 37.81%

Mabalacat Mun/Bry/Sub Road 453.22 0.96 36.87 0.21% 8.13%

Macabebe Mun/Bry/Sub Road 60.34 0.00 21.96 0.00% 36.39%

Magalang Mun/Bry/Sub Road 224.97 0.00 11.06 0.00% 4.92%

Masantol Mun/Bry/Sub Road 49.79 0.00 14.78 0.00% 29.68%

Mexico Mun/Bry/Sub Road 398.38 0.00 76.81 0.00% 19.28%

Minalin Mun/Bry/Sub Road 46.89 0.00 34.91 0.00% 74.45%

Porac Mun/Bry/Sub Road 222.33 10.99 0.00 4.94% 0.00%

San Simon Mun/Bry/Sub Road 58.97 0.00 1.25 0.00% 2.12%

Santa Rita Mun/Bry/Sub Road 55.11 0.00 8.81 0.00% 15.98%

Santo Tomas Mun/Bry/Sub Road 45.40 0.00 44.47 0.00% 97.95%

Sasmuan Mun/Bry/Sub Road 13.26 0.00 13.26 0.00% 100.00%

TOTAL 4,244.67 32.77 813.76 0.77% 19.17%

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Land Use and Physical Framework


1. SPATIAL STRATEGY
1.1 ALTERNATIVE URBAN FORMS OR SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT
STRATEGIES

The spatial development strategy reflects the land use activities and
development implications of the provinces strategies and policies. It
determines both the physical and development directions of the area. With the
proper implementation of the preferred urban form, development can be easily
attained.

1.1.1 Generation and Characterization of Alternative Urban Forms

Different urban forms were analyzed for the province of Pampanga.


The most applicable spatial strategy will serve as framework for
physical and socio-economic development of the province. As
presented in the Guidelines for the Formulation of Comprehensive Land
Use Plan by the HLURB, there were five (5) stereotype urban forms that
were reviewed, namely: (1) Strip or Linear Development; (2) Concentric
Development; (3) Central and Nodal Development; (4) Radial and
Circumferential; and (5) Grid Pattern.

Alternative 1 - Strip or Linear Development

Shown in Figure 4-1 is the schematic diagram of the strip or linear


development urban form. This type of urban form is characterized by a
ribbon/strip type of development parallel to both sides of the highway or
river or other transport networks.

Figure 4-1 Strip or Linear


Development

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Strip/linear development type of spatial strategy considers roads as


drivers or catalysts of development. Roads are built for settlements and
for urban development to follow. In the case of Pampanga, traffic
congestion has long been a problem along major roads originating from
the urban core, such as the MacArthur highway. Because of high
population density and high land use intensity in the urban core (City of
San Fernando, Angeles City, and Mabalacat City) and along major
roads, the strip/linear development urban form may no longer be
appropriate for the province.

Alternative 2 Concentric Development

The second possible urban form alternative is the concentric


development form (Figure 4-2). This is characterized initially by
expansion of development that is contiguous or adjacent to the present
center or core of activities.

Figure 4-2 Concentric


Development

Congestion in the city core is also a disadvantage of this type of


urban form. Pampanga has historically followed this course of urban
development. Again, it has already outgrown this spatial form and has
to reinvent itself to remedy congestion within the city center. Thus, the
concentric urban form may no longer be appropriate for the province.

Alternative 3 Central and Nodal Development

This spatial strategy evolves from the concentric urban form (Figure
4-3). It is a hub-and-spoke or a center periphery system. Instead of
concentrating urban activities in the core, development nodes are
developed around the core connected by a radial road network system.

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This urban form aims to decongest the city center. The identified
growth nodes may perform specialized function, based on resource
capacity or existing competitive advantages.

Figure 4-3 Central & Nodal


Development

The only downside of this spatial strategy is that only radial roads
are provided. If one has to go from an adjacent node, he has to go to
the hub (center) first, and then to the spoke node of interest. This
system has again resulted to the congestion of the city center when
population and socio-economic activities have caught up with the
capacities if the different growth nodes.

Alternative 4 Radial and Circumferential Development

This urban form (Figure 4-4) is the extension and modification of the
central and nodal urban form. Instead of only building radial roads,
circumferential roads are established to directly connect two or more
adjacent growth nodes or centers. This strategy is presently the official
development strategy of some city in the province like in Angeles City.

Radial and Circumferential spatial strategy is said to hasten the


decongestion of the city urban core since two or more adjacent nodes
may form a secondary urban center complementing the high level
services provided by the core.

In the case of Pampanga, the benefit of this spatial strategy is yet to


be fully realized. There is still a big gap on its circumferential road
system. Moreover, most of its radial road network system is already
providing low level of service which necessitates the construction of
new or alternate radial roads. This new road network system, in
addition to the widening and rehabilitation of existing ones must be

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given high priority in order to fully realize the benefits of this urban form.

Figure 4-4 Radial &


Circumferential Development

Alternative 5 Grid Pattern

This urban form is made up of rectangular blocks defined by parallel


and intersecting streets (Figure 4-5). Its grid block is a potential
development zone. Aside from the huge investment cost attributed to
the development of roads, the downside of this type of urban form is
that conflict of movement may arise due to numerous intersections.

Figure 4-5 Grid Pattern


Development

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Moreover, retrofitting the grid pattern to the existing circumferential


and radial road network system of Pampanga may be challenging if not
difficult to achieve. As such, Alternative 5 may not be a viable option for
the province.

1.1.2 Evaluation and Selection of the Preferred Spatial Development Strategy

Table 4-1 presents the characteristics/criteria in evaluating the different


types of urban forms. These are divided into six (6) sectors, namely: (i)
economic; (ii) social; (iii) infrastructure; (iv) environment; (v) governance; and
(vi) DRR/CCA.

The infrastructure sector was given the highest weight at 25 percent,


considering that improving roads networks and transportation is an important
determinant of urban development. The criteria used were the following: (a)
reduces infrastructure cost; (b) improves circulation/decongest the urban
core; and (c) strengthens the inter-regional transportation hub role. Economic
sector which is also an important factor of urban development was given a 20
percent weight and has the following criteria: (a) increases
investment/employment; (b) improves agglomeration and economic
complementation; (c) improves food affordability and availability.

The social, environment, and governance sectors were provided equal


weights at 15 percent. The criteria for the social sector include increasing
access to health, education, and shelter. For environment, sustainability and
conservation of natural resources were considered. While for governance,
improving LGU revenue and reducing cost of business were determined as
important characteristics of spatial development. Integration of disaster risk
reduction/ climate change adaptation to spatial development strategy was
also considered with 10 percent weight.

The result of the comparative ranking of the different urban forms


revealed that the preferred spatial strategy for province of Pampanga is the
Radial and Circumferential urban form. This type of spatial strategy ranked
first in the sectors on economic, infrastructure, and DRR/CCA. Central/Nodal
development which ranked second can also be a possible urban form of the
province, while concentric development which placed third rank, got the
highest scores in terms of environment and governance sectors.

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Table 4 1. Comparative ranking of the different urban forms using weighted average
Radial/
Weight Linear/ Central/
Sector Characteristics/ Criteria Grid Concentric Nodal Circum-
(%) Strip ferential
Economic 20% Increases 2 1.5 2.5 4.5 4.5
Investment/Employment
Improves agglomeration and 4 1 3 3 4
Economic complementation
Improves Food Affordability and 3 1.5 3 3.5 4.5
availability
Total: 9 4 8.5 11 13
Average: 3.00 1.33 2.83 3.67 4.33
Weighted Score: 0.60 0.27 0.57 0.73 0.87

Social 15% Increases access to health and 4 1 3.5 3.5 3


education services
Increases access to shelter 2.5 3.5 1 2 3.5
Total: 6.50 4.50 4.50 5.50 6.50
Average: 3.25 2.25 2.25 2.75 3.25
Weighted Score: 0.49 0.3375 0.3375 0.4125 0.4875

Infrastructure 25% Reduces Infrastructure Cost 3 1 3.5 3.5 4


Improves Circulation/ 2.5 2.5 1.5 4 4.5
Decongests the urban core
Strengthens the Inter-regional 2.5 1.5 3 3 5
Transportation Hub role
Total: 8.00 5.00 8.00 10.50 13.50
Average: 2.67 1.67 2.67 3.50 4.50
Weighted Score: 0.67 0.42 0.67 0.88 1.13

Environment 15% Improves Environmental 2 1 5 4 3


Sustainability
Enhances Natural resource 2.5 1.5 5 4 2
conservation/rehabilitation
Total: 4.50 2.50 10.00 8.00 5.00
Average: 2.25 1.25 5.00 4.00 2.50
Weighted Score: 0.34 0.1875 0.75 0.6 0.375

Governance 15% Improves LGU Revenue 2.5 3 2.5 2.5 4.5


Reduces cost of doing business 2.5 1 5 4 2.5
Total: 5.00 4.00 7.50 6.50 7.00
Average: 2.50 2.00 3.75 3.25 3.50
Weighted Score: 0.38 0.3 0.5625 0.4875 0.525

DRR/CCA 10% Improves readiness and 3 3 2 3 4


response during disasters
Improves resiliency to disasters 2 3 2 3.5 4.5
and hydrometeorologic hazards
Total: 5.00 6.00 4.00 6.50 8.50
Average: 2.50 3.00 2.00 3.25 4.25
Weighted Score: 0.25 0.3 0.20 0.325 0.425
TOTAL WEIGHTED SCORE: 2.72 1.81 3.08 3.43 3.80
RANK 4 5 3 2 1

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1.2 DETAILING THE PREFERRED SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

The Radial and Circumferential Development Strategy


Shown in Figure 4-6 is the schematic diagram of the preferred urban form for
Pampanga depicting the various growth centers.

Figure 4-6 The Preferred Urban


Form - Radial & Circumferential
Development

In order to implement the preferred spatial development strategy, the following urban
core/hub and growth nodes will be developed, to wit:

Urban core or Hub : 1. Metro Clark

Growth Nodes : 2. Arayat Growth Center


3. Candaba Wetland Growth Center

4. Pampanga Bay Growth Center

5. Clark Freeport Zone

6. Porac-Gumain Growth Center

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Urban Core/ Hub:

i. Metropolitan Clark

The province of Pampanga is on its way toward the achievement of its


development goals and objectives because of its location advantage. The
major urban areas have grown rapidly into a metropolitan area which serves
not only the requirements of the province, but also the needs of the whole
region. Pampanga has the proper mix of resource endowment, human capital
stock, and infrastructure support. Because of improved access to economic
opportunities, the three major cities of Mabalacat, Angeles, and San
Fernando move toward becoming a metropolitan area.

The Metropolitan Clark could be easily accessed by the cities of Gapan,


Olongapo, Meycauayan and Tarlac because of the established road systems.

The primacy of this area shall be maintained focusing on its competitive


advantages, which are as follows:

(a) Financial Center (Banking)


(b) Commercial and Trading Center
(c) Service Center
(d) Residential Center
(e) Center for Education and Higher Learning
(f) Regional Transportation Hub

Presented in the table below are the component cities/municipalities of


the different growth nodes of the preferred spatial strategy.

Table 4-2 The Core Areas and Hinterlands of the Various Growth Centers in Pampanga in Relation
to the Preferred Spatial Strategy

Growth Nodes/Center Core Area Hinterland

1. Metro Clark Mabalacat City, Angeles City, The rest of the province and the
City of San Fernando neighboring province of Tarlac and
Bulacan
2. Arayat Growth Center Arayat, Magalang Mexico, Sta. Ana, Candaba

3. Candaba Wetlands Candaba, San Luis, San Apalit, Sta. Ana, Sto. Tomas
Simon
4. Pampanga Bay Masantol, Macabebe, Lubao, Guagua, Minalin, Sto. Tomas
Growth Center Sasmuan,
5. Clark Freeport Zone Angeles City, Mabalacat City The rest of the region

6. Porac-Gumain River Porac, Lubao, Floridablanca, Guagua, Sasmuan, Sta. Rita, Bacolor

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The development of the growth nodes/ centers will contribute to the


realization of the vision and goals of the province of Pampanga. Discussed
below are the descriptions of the different components of the spatial strategy.

Growth Nodes:

ii. Arayat Growth Center

This growth center is located at the northeast part of the province with
Arayat and Magalang as core areas. A large portion of Mount Arayat is
located in this area. The National Park used to be a major tourist attraction in
Pampanga with its spring-fed swimming pools, viewing deck, fishpond,
campsites and the famous 100 steps stairway leading to the mountain top.
The municipalities of Mexico, Sta. Ana, and Candaba are the service areas of
the Arayat Growth Center.

Based on the physical characteristics and resource endowment, the


Arayat growth center may be devoted into an eco-tourism destination; agri-
forestry and bio-diversity.

iii. Candaba Wetland Growth Center

The municipalities included in this growth area are Candaba, San Luis,
San Simon at the core and the municipalities of Apalit, Sta. Ana, Sto. Tomas
as its service areas.

Some major economic activities that will be pursued in the area are the
following:

Agriculture: During rainy season, the entire area is submerged


underwater and dries out during dry season, where the swamp is
converted into agricultural land. Watermelon and rice may be planted,
comprising the vegetation of the flood plain, together with patches of
Nipa palm and some mangrove species.

Eco-tourism: The Candaba Swamp which is located some two


kilometers from the town proper of Candaba, transforms from an
agricultural area in the dry season to a haven of migratory birds in the
rainy season. It has become a popular tourist attraction as it serves as
suitable breeding habitat for endemic wildlife species.

Bio-diversity and ecological services: The Candaba swamp also acts

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as a natural flood retention basin during rainy season. It holds flood


water which overflows from five smaller rivers (Maasim, San Miguel,
Garlang, Bulu and Pearanda), which then drains into the Pampanga
River.

In order to achieve the development objectives in this area, there should


be the provision of access roads since Candaba due to its geographic
location and nature of lands have few paved roads.

iv. Pampanga Bay Growth Center

This growth center consists of the municipalities of Masantol, Macabebe,


Sasmuan as the core areas and the municipalities of Lubao, Guagua,
Minalin, Sto. Tomas as service areas, which are located at the southern part
of the province.

The existing competitive advantage of the area that need to be enhanced


are the following:

Inland fishery and aquaculture may have to be further enhanced


considering that the province is one of the major sources in the
aquaculture sector. Pampanga as the leading province in tilapia
production and a major producer of tiger prawn and shrimp will be
sustained.

Coastal Ecosystem Rehabilitation: Rehabilitation of mangroves along


coastal areas needs to be undertaken with the cooperation of
concerned agencies and coastal communities.

v. Clark Freeport Zone

This growth area is a redevelopment of the former Clark Air Base, a


former American Air base located on the northwest side of Angeles City and
on the west side of Mabalacat City. It has been a dominant area in terms of
manufacturing, industry, aviation, tourist destination, as well as leisure and
entertainment. With its near-zero crime rate, low pollution levels, absence of
traffic congestion and favourable tax structure, the Clark Freeport Zone is
well known among foreign investors as the destination of choice. It serves an
important urban center of Pampanga, and the rest of Central Luzon.

Included in the Master Plan of the growth area is the transformation of the
Clark International Airport into an international gateway which will become

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one of the worlds biggest in terms of terminal size and land area. The area is
also planned to be a Global Gateway Logistics City which is described as a
modern, state of the art mixed use logistics and business center of
excellence. With this plan, the area will be divided into four zones: 1)
Logistics park-warehousing, distribution and light manufacturing operations;
2) Business park-office requirements; 3) Aero park-research and
development, modelling, and simulation, IT; 4) Town center-retails and
shopping needs.

vi. Porac-Gumain River

The core areas in this growth center are the municipalities of Porac,
Lubao and Floridablanca, while the service areas are Guagua, Sasmuan,
Sta. Rita and Bacolor. Based on its competitive advantages, this growth
center is intended for the following dominant uses:

Agriculture, food and high value crop production


Small and medium enterprises (SMEs), industries
Forestry
Recreation and Ecotourism (including Pinatubo Trek)

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2. LAND USE FRAMEWORK


a. Existing General Land Use

Presented in Figure 4-7 is the existing general land use map of the
province of Pampanga broken into categories shown in Table 4-3.

Table 4-3. Existing General Land Use of Pampanga, 2010

Category Area (Ha) Share to Total (%)

Built-up/Infrastructures 28,692.76 13.16

Agriculture/Cultivated Land 112,435.39 51.56

Fishery/Fishpond/Inland Water 38,422.44 17.62

Forest 8,384.61 3.84

Mangrove Forest 98.73 0.05

Open Barren/Lahar 1,868.61 0.86

Grassland 7,554.97 3.46

Shrubs/Wooded Grassland 18,896.49 8.67

Marshland/Swamp 802.93 0.37

Beachfront 911.31 0.42

Total 218,068.24 100.00


Source: NEDA 3-CLRGIN / Pampanga GIS Team

The estimated built-up area of Pampanga is 28,692.76hectares, corresponding to 13.16


percent of the total land area of the province. The agriculture & fishery areas are about
150,857.83 hectares or 69.18percent of total land area. The forest and mangrove areas
are at 8,384.61hectares and 98.73 hectares representing 3.84 and 0.05percent of the
total land area, respectively. The rest are grassland, shrubs/wooded grassland, open/
barren/ lahar, marshland/swamp and beachfront with an aggregate area of 30,034.31
hectares (13.77%). Roads & infrastructures are included in the estimated built-up of the
province.

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Figure 4-7. Existing General Land Use Map, 2010

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b. Land Use Potentials and Physical Development Constraints

Consistent with the mainstreaming guidelines on DRR/CCA, a map


overlay analysis was done to determine the areas highly susceptible to a
hazard or combination of hazards, areas restricted to development, and
areas suitable to settlement development.

i. Areas Highly Susceptible to Geologic and Hydro-meteorologic


Hazards (GHHs)

A composite map (Figure 4-8) containing areas highly susceptible to


flooding, rain-induced landslide, earthquake-induced landslide, and fault
line buffer strips, among others, was overlain on the existing general
land use map. The resulting overlay revealed the built-up, agricultural,
forest areas, infrastructures, among others, that are located inside or
outside areas highly susceptible to hazards (Table 4-4).

Table 4-4. Major land use categories located inside or outside areas highly
susceptible to GHHs
Area (Ha)
Category
Outside HS Areas Inside HS Area Total

Built-up/ Infrastructures 17,814.01 10,878.75 28,692.76

52,309.38 60,126.01 112,435.39


Agriculture/ Cultivated Land

Fishery/Fishpond/Inland Water 1,721.37 36,701.07 38,422.44

Forest Area 6,364.76 2,018.85 8,384.61

Open/ Barren/ Lahar 274.96 1,593.65 1,868.61


1,680.46
Mangrove Forest - 98.73 98.73

Grassland 6,631.16 923.81 7,554.97

Shrubs/ Wooded Grassland 15,641.43 3,255.06 18,896.49

Marshland/ Swamp 0.21 802.72 802.93

Beachfront - 911.31 911.31

Total 100,758.28 117,309.96 218,068.24

Share to Total (%) 46.20 53.80 100

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(2015 2042)

Figure 4-8. Areas Highly Susceptible to Geologic and Hydrometeorologic Hazards

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About 100,758.28 hectares or 46.20% of the total territory of Pampanga are


located outside areas highly susceptible to GHHs. These are considered safe areas.
However, the remaining 117,309.96hectares (53.80percent) are located within areas
highly susceptible to GHHs. Note that 37.91 percent of the existing built up equal to
10,878.75hectares is located in highly susceptible areas. Mitigating infrastructure
measures, relocation, and on disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM)
initiatives are recommended in affected settlements. Further, built-up expansion and
new townships should be directed outside the hazard zones.

ii. Areas Highly Restricted to Development

Areas highly restricted to urban development include but not limited


to key production areas and protected areas performing vital ecological
services and functions, to wit:

a) Forest areas
b) Mangroves
c) Network of Integrated Protected Areas System (NIPAS) areas and
non-NIPAS areas
d) Strategic Agriculture and Fisheries Development Zone (SAFDZ)
areas
e) Ecotourism areas

iii. Buildable Zones/ Constraint-free Areas

The buildable zones are generally free of constraints, and located


outside areas highly susceptible to GHHs and/or areas highly
restricted to urban development. The marginal agricultural lands,
Network of Protected Areas for Agriculture and Agri-industrial
Development (NPAAAD) areas not identified as SAFDZs, and low-
lying areas feasible for reclamation are considered buildable, including
portions of the existing built-up in safe zones that are suitable for
densification, in-filling, mix-use, and urban renewal.

iv. Land Use Potentials and Development Constraints

The overlay analysis was extended to produce a development


constraints map (Figure 4-9). The area accounting was done and
presented in Table 4-5.

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Figure 4-9. Development Constraints Map

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Table 4-5. Area accounting of the land categories in the development constraints
map of Pampanga

Share to
Category Area (Ha)
Total (%)
Areas Highly Susceptible to Geologic and Hydrometeorologic Hazards 106,430.86 48.81
GHHs
Areas Highly Restricted to Urban Development (AHRTUD) 63,891.50 29.30

Existing Built-up located in Areas Highly Susceptible to GHHs 10,878.75 4.99

Existing Built-up located in Areas Highly Restricted to Urban Development 4,852.89 2.23

Existing Built-up in Constraint Areas 12,961.12 5.94

Suitable for Urban Expansion 19,053.12 8.74


218,068.24 100.00
Total

Note that the areas highly restricted to urban development that are
also found in areas highly susceptible to GHHs were accounted to the
latter to give emphasis on DRRM. About 106,430.86hectares
(48.81percent) and 63,891.50 hectares (29.30percent) of the total land
area of Pampanga are highly susceptible to GHHs and highly restricted
to urban development, respectively. Of the existing built-up of about
28,692.76 hectares, 12,961.12 hectares are in safe and unrestricted
(5.94percent) zones while 15,731.64hectares (7.21percent) are inside
restricted and hazard-prone areas. The buildable zones and constraint-
free areas that can be potentially used for urban expansion are at
19,053.12hectares representing 8.74percent of the total land area of the
province. The potentials and constraints for built-up expansion and
development can be interpreted, as follows:

a) Urban development and built-up expansion should be generally directed


in the buildable zones and constraint-free areas;
b) Existing built-up in areas highly susceptible to geologic and
hydrometeorologic hazards should be relocated or provided with
appropriate engineering solutions and DRRM measures to mitigate the
impacts;
c) Existing built-up in areas highly restricted to development, as applicable
and practical, should also be relocated in buildable zones; and,
d) Densification, in-filling, mix-use, and/or urban renewal can be introduced
in the existing built-up located in safe and unrestricted areas.

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c. Proposed General Land Use Plan

Presented in Figure 4-10 is the land use framework or proposed general


land use plan for Pampanga which was produced through an overlay analysis
using geographic information (GIS) software. This was done by combining
various maps as discussed above and other thematic shape files that
include but not limited to the following:

a) Administrative boundary maps


b) Land classification map
c) Slope/Contour/Elevation maps
d) Vegetation/Forest cover maps
e) Forest land use map
f) Infrastructure maps

The settlement areas, i.e. the residential portion of the built-up, include
private subdivisions, resettlement sites, socialized housing, public housing
areas, planned unit developments (PUDs) among others. Production areas
include agri-fishery lands, tourism and eco-tourism areas, commercial/mix
use, manufacturing areas, and industrial zones. The infrastructure areas of
the province are grouped into economic (e.g. Irrigation and flood control),
social (e.g. Housing, schools, and hospitals), administrative (e.g. Public
buildings, jails and prisons) and utilities & transportation (e.g. Water supply
and sanitation, roads and bridges). The protection areas as defined in the
National Integrated Protected Areas System (NIPAS) Law or R.A. 758 include
strict nature reserves, natural parks, natural Monument Wildlife Sanctuaries,
and protected landscapes and seascapes, among others. Protected non-
NIPAS areas refer to wetlands, coastal lands, mangroves, lakes and rivers,
important bird areas, and easements, among others. The proposed land use
distribution is shown in Table 4-6.

Table 4-6. Proposed General Land Use distribution


Category Area (Ha) Share to Total (%)
Settlement Areas 28,104.99 12.89

Production Areas 52,384.72 24.02

Protection Areas 132,137.75 60.59

Infrastructure Areas 5,440.78 2.49


Total 218,068.24 100.00

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(2015 2042)

Figure 4-10. Proposed General Land Use Map

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(2015 2042)

d. Policies on Settlement Areas

By getting the ratio of population and the total built-up of Pampanga in


2010, an urban land density (ULD) of 82 persons/ hectare was derived, as
shown below:

ULD (2010) = Population(2010) / Total Built-uparea (2010)


=2.34 M persons /28,692.76 hectares
=82 persons / hectare

Assuming that said density will not change until the doubling of
population, the province will need the same amount of land for urban
expansion. It must be noted, however, that the aggregate land demand is
more than 28,692.76 hectares since existing settlements in danger zones and
restricted areas may have to be relocated. Since the aggregate urban land
demand of 44,424.40hectares at full relocation is greater than the available
urban land supply of 19,053.13hectares in the buildable and constraint-free
areas, various densification and land demand management schemes were
considered to address said gap.

It was assumed that the present built-up of Pampanga can still


accommodate twice the number of people if proper land management
strategies (e.g. in-filling, densification, medium & high rise construction, mix
use, reclamation, and urban renewal) and appropriate engineering
interventions are provided. If the current urban land density of 82 persons
per hectare is doubled to 164 persons per hectare, there is no need for
additional lands for urban expansion. As shown in Table 4-7, the urban land
density of 164 persons per hectare is still on the low side if benchmarked with
neighbouring areas such as Makati City and Manila City, which are several
folds denser than the built-up of Pampanga.

Table 4-7. Urban Land Density in selected areas within the greater
capital region
Density
City/Municipality Population Built-up Area
(Persons/Ha)
Pampanga 2,340,355 (2010) 28,692.76 82
Pampanga 4,695,281 (2042) 28,692.76 164
Manila City 1,652,171 (2010) 2,498 661
Makati City 529,039 (2010) 2,157 245
Dagupan City
Source: NSCB; DENR R3; NEDA R3

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(2015 2042)

For the purposes of this plan, the following strategic land optimization
schemes were considered using densification factors ranging from 1.5 -2.0
or up to twice of the present density, to wit:

Table 4-8. Strategic Land Optimization schemes for Pampanga

Urban Land
Service Densification
Land Management Scheme Area (Ha) Density
Population Factor
(Persons/ Ha)
Densification of existing built-up in safe 10,585.19 2,169,964 2.5 205
and constraint-free areas
Provision of infrastructure and DRRM 8,486.10 1,043,790 1.5 123
measures in existing built-up (EBU)
located in areas highly susceptible to
GHHs
Relocation of EBU in GHH zones to 310.55 50,930 2 164
buildable/ constraint-free areas
Legitimization of EBU located in 3,870.14 634,703 2 164
SAFDZs and areas highly restricted to
urban development
Densification of built up expansion
4,853.01 795,894 2 164
areas
TOTAL 28,104.99 4,695,281 -- --

In consideration of the above, the resulting detailed settlement plan is


shown in Figure 4-11, with the estimated areas shown in Table 4-9. Please
note that the road networks originally included in the built-up areas have
already been extracted from the estimated built up areas.

Table 4-9. Breakdown of settlement areas

Share to
Category Area (Ha)
Total (%)
Existing built up in safe areas 10,585.19 37.66
Existing built-up (EBU) located in areas highly susceptible to
8,486.10 30.19
GHHs to be provided with infrastructure and DRRM measures
EBU in areas highly restricted to urban for delineation,
3,870.14 13.77
legitimization, and densification
Proposed relocation and urban expansion areas in the buildable
310.55 1.10
and constraint-free zones
Densification of built up expansion areas 4,853.01 17.27

Total 28,104.99 100.00

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Figure 4-11. Settlements Framework

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(2015 2042)

The implementation of the settlement plan will be facilitated by the


following settlement policies:

i. Detailed urban land uses will be provided in the Comprehensive Land


Use Plans (CLUPs) and Zoning Ordinances (ZOs) of municipalities and
cities.
ii. Agricultural land conversion for urban development and expansion will be
strictly regulated and restricted to ensure the food security of the
province.
iii. Land demand and supply management measures such as densification,
medium rise construction, in-filling of vacant / idle lands, among others,
will be implemented to optimize land utilization.
iv. Presidential Decree 957 and Batas Pambansa 220 will be strictly
enforced to ensure the liveability of settlements.
v. The development of medium to high rise residential units popularly known
in the country as condominiums will be promoted to help reduce the
pressure on the conversion of agricultural lands.
vi. The province will prioritize its shelter and resettlement program consistent
with the provisions of the Urban Development and Housing Act (UDHA),
and by implementing urban renewal and urban blight clean-up projects.
vii. Density control, type of housing, drainage facilities and retaining walls
and related slope stabilization structures will be made a requirement in
settlements development in sloping areas (more than 18% slope) in hills
and mountains.
viii. Building height limitations in geologically unstable areas and aviation
pathways will be established and strictly enforced, and building
construction must meet the requirements for seismic resistance or
resilience.
ix. Suitable and safe sites for settlement and relocation of vulnerable
communities and informal settlers will be identified and zoned
accordingly.
x. Lifeline support services and infrastructure such as schools, hospitals,
power, and water supply will be sited in areas safe from natural and man-
made hazards.
xi. Green parks, open spaces and green buildings (natural parks, vertical
greeneries, green rooftops, green open parking lots) in CBD or heat
islands will be encouraged among builders through economic incentive
and recognition reward systems.
xii. Evacuation/escape routes, evacuation sites and safe shelter facilities will
be established and developed in safe zones.
xiii. Sitting of toxic, hazardous and pollutive industries should be away from
settlements.

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

e. Policies on Production Area

The detailed plan of production areas as contained in proposed land use


framework is shown in Figure 4-12, with the estimated areas shown in Table
4-10.

Table 4-10. Breakdown of production areas

Category Area (Ha) Share to Total (%)

SAFDZs 38,184.60 72.89

Industrial/Ecozone areas 2,345.46 4.48

Agriculture/Cultivated Land 11,676.30 22.29

Quarrying 178.36 0.34


Total 52,384.72 100.00

The policies of the province on production areas are as follows:

i. Accessibility and connectivity between production and growth centers


of the province will be enhanced by implementing measures that will
reduce traffic decongestion and improve access and circulation.

ii. Subject to the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) system of the


Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), the
province will only cater to light, medium, and heavy industries.

iii. The SAFDZ areas of the province will be protected from, and are non-
negotiable for reclassification and conversion. Non-protected
agricultural lands may be applied for reclassification and or
conversion subject to the approval of the local Sanggunians and
concerned agencies of the national government.

iv. The development of ecotourism and tourism estates such as the


development of integrated resort complexes, sports and recreational
centers, accommodation, convention and cultural facilities,
commercial establishments will be promoted to create jobs and
economic opportunities.

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(2015 2042)

Figure 4-12. Production Framework

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(2015 2042)

f. Policies on Protection Area

The plan for protection areas as contained in proposed land use


framework is shown in Figure 4-13, with the estimated areas shown in Table
4-11.

Table 4-11. Breakdown of Protection Areas

Category Area (Ha) Share to Total (%)

Mt. Arayat National Park (NIPAS) 1,305.88 0.99

Shrubs/Wooded grassland 11,874.04 8.89

Open/ Barren/ Lahar 69.20 0.05

Grassland 3,094.50 2.34

Forest 6,301.35 4.77

Agriculture 3,055.06 2.34

Areas Highly Susceptible to GHHs 106,431.21 80.54

Fishpond/ Inland Water 6.51 0.01

Total 132,137.75 100.00

Policies on protected areas aims to protect sensitive and critical


ecosystems from human intrusion to preserve their integrity, allow degraded
resources to regenerate, and to protect the population from environmental
hazards, among other things. The National Integrated Protected Areas
System (NIPAS) Law or R.A. 7586 sets the general framework for the
protected areas, while the Agriculture and Fisheries Modernization Act
(AFMA) provides the guidelines on the utilization and protection of agricultural
lands from conversion. The policies of the province on production areas are
as follows:
i. The required easements on water bodies will be implemented
consistent with Article 51 of the Philippine Water Code (PD1067)
provides that the rivers and banks of rivers and streams and shores of
the seas and lakes through the entire length and within a zone of three
(3) meters in urban area, twenty (20) meters in agricultural areas, and
forty (40) meters in the forest areas, along their margins, are subject to
the easement of public use in the interest of recreation, navigation,
floatage, fishing, and salvage. No person shall be allowed to stay in this
zone longer that what is necessary for recreation, navigation, or salvage,
or to build structures of any kind.

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Figure 4-13. Protection Framework

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(2015 2042)

ii. The following right-of-way (ROW) standards of the Department of


Public Works and Highways (DPWH) on major thoroughfares will be
enforces, to wit:
1. Residential 10 meters
2. Commercial 20 meters
3. Industrial 30 meters

iii. The protected open spaces of the province will be expanded to


include but not limited to the following:

1. Neighbourhood or Planned Unit Development parks and open


spaces;
2. Commercial and industrial open spaces;
3. Easements and setbacks;
4. Planting strips and road islands;
5. Watershed preserves;
6. Buffer strips; and,
7. Power transmission lines.

iv. Consistent with the National Integrated Protected Areas System


(NIPAS) Law or R.A. 7586, the province will expand its protected
areas to include the following:

1. Strict Nature Reserve


2. Natural Park
3. Natural Monument
4. Wildlife Sanctuary
5. Protected Landscapes and Seascapes
6. Resource Reserve
7. Natural Biotic Areas

v. The protected non-NIPAS areas of the province as shown below will


also be expanded, to wit:

1. Wetlands
2. Important Bird Areas
3. Secondary Growth Forests
4. Easements
5. Ecotourism Sites (e.g. Resolution No. 2000-01 Adopting the
Operating Guidelines for EO No. 111 to promote ecotourism as a
tool for sustainable development, management, protection and
conservation of the countrys natural resources and cultural
heritage)

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(2015 2042)

vi. Environmentally constrained or areas prone to natural hazards


(geologic and hydro-meteorologic) will be protected.

vii. The identified SAFDZ areas of the province will protected from
conversion consistent with the provision of the Agricultural and
Fisheries Modernization Act (AFMA), the Local Government Code of
1991, the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Law (CARL), and the
Department of Agriculture (DA) Administrative Order (AO) No. 2,
Series of 2002, as provided for under the AFMA law.

viii. The heritage and historic treasures of the province such as historic
buildings, historical relics and memorabilia, historical or vintage cars,
among others will be protected, restored, and preserved.

g. Policies on Infrastructures Areas

The breakdown of the infrastructure areas as contained in proposed


land use framework is shown in Figure 4-14, with the estimated areas shown
in Table 4-12.

Table 4-12. Breakdown of Infrastructure areas

Category Area (Ha) Share to Total (%)

Road 5,440.78 100

Total 5,440.78 100

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Figure 4-14. Infrastructure Framework

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

The infrastructure areas of the province are grouped into economic,


social, administrative, and utilities & transportation. The development
policies are as follows:

i. The existing social infrastructure stock of the province will be further


improved, to wit:

1. Public and Private Schools


2. Non-Formal Educational Facilities
3. Day Care Centers
4. Health Centers
5. Sports and Recreational Facilities
6. Museums
7. Public Libraries
8. Public Memorial Parks and Cemeteries
9. Public Assembly Areas

ii. The location and operation of economic infrastructure facilities in the


province such as public markets, slaughterhouses, waste management
facilities will be rationalized.

iii. The administrative infrastructure facilities of the province will be


modernized to include government centers, barangay halls, and public
order and safety offices

iv. Policies on utilities and transportation are as follows:

1. Arterial Roads - ROW clean-up will be implemented to address


encroachment. No new crossroad intersection will be allowed unless
they are of same category

2. Collector Roads - A minimum lateral access along proposed collector


roads to be not less than 250 meters will be enforced and that only a
collector road will connect to an arterial road

3. Distributor Roads - The development of dead-end roads will be


discouraged and that all roads must form part of a loop or series of
loops.

4. Subdivision Roads These will connect to collector and distributor


roads only and provided with sidewalks, ramps, planting strips, street
lighting, waiting sheds, and others.

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

5. Drainage System and Flood Control Facilities - Measures to address


localized and flash floods during short duration and high intensity
rainfall events will be implemented based on a drainage master plan.

6. Sewerage System - The province will implement an inter-LGU


sewerage system.

7. Telecommunication - Regulation will focus on the location of cell sites


for public health and safety considerations.

8. Power Supply and Distribution The province, in cooperation with


LGUs and local electric utilities, will implement measures that will put
to minimum systems losses in order to lower the cost of electricity in
the province.

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Development Issues, Goals, Objectives & Targets


1. SOCIAL SECTOR

1.1 Education
(Provincial Development Agenda Point #5: Equal Access to Quality
Education)

Goal: to provide quality and affordable education

Issues:
o Inadequate chairs and tables in different public schools
o Two-shift classroom scheme
o Lack of extension classes and extension teachers
o High cost of education

Objectives and Targets

a. 100% elementary education participation rate by 2015


b. 75% achievement test scores

Quality Education through:

1. Early childhood education standard curriculum for day care centers


2. In basic education: (1) Use Special Education Fund of PhP2 million per
municipality to upgrade flooded classrooms, repair classrooms as
needed, build libraries and science laboratories, and support teacher
trainings; (2) Forge collaborative partnerships with the private sector such
as Ateneo de Manila especially in upgrading teacher capabilities
3. In tertiary education: (1) LGUs to support skills trainings required by
investors; and, (2) Establish branches of Don Honorio Ventura State
University and the Pampanga Agricultural College

Strategies:
1. Construction of additional classrooms and provision of desks and tables
2. Support programs for extension classes and teachers
3. Establishment of satellite schools

1.2 Peace and Order and Public Safety


(Provincial Development Agenda Point #9)

Goal : to create a safe, secure and peaceful environment

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(2015 2042)

Issues:
4. Prevalence of illegal drug related cases
5. Cases of children in conflict with the law
6. Inadequate number of police personnel
7. Incomplete list of barangay registry inhabitants
8. Inoperative local peace and order councils

Strategies
9. Creation and operationalization of the Anti-Drug Abuse Council
10. Support programs for children in conflict with the law
11. Force multipliers
12. Registration of barangay inhabitants
13. Operationalize local peace and order councils

1.3 Health (Provincial Development Agenda Point #4)

Goal: to ensure effective and efficient delivery of services

Issues:
o Expensive medicines
o Limited coverage of Philhealth
o Philhealth accreditation of facilities
o Inadequate number of medical specialists in government hospitals
o No appropriation for travelling allowances for barangay health workers (BHWs)
o Lack of electronic health operation management information and integrated
referral system

Objectives and Targets:

1. High quality of health care services in 1 provincial and 9 district hospitals


2. Access to medical services for remote barangays (use program modules created
by Unilab CSR)
3. Availability of cheaper medicine for the identified most common ailments
(Children: cough and colds, fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, skin lesions; Adults:
tuberculosis, diabetes, hypertension, arthritis [uric acid], cholesterol, fever, cough
and colds, allergy, antibiotics for all infections) through
4. Increased/improved distribution
5. Direct sourcing from pharmaceuticals
6. Increase health insurance coverage
7. Promote healthy lifestyle and preventive medicine e.g. use of urine strips for

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(2015 2042)

early diagnosis

Strategies:
1. Consignment of drugs and medical supplies for
equal access to quality but affordable medicines
2. Provision of more philhealth cards
3. DOTS and PCB accreditation of health facilities
4. Provision of schooling/training for doctors
5. Provision of travelling allowances to BHWs
6. Programs for preventive medicine

1.4 Housing and Basic Utilities

Goal: to uplift the living condition of informal settlers and coastal/island barangay
inhabitants and to provide potable water to waterless barangays

Issues:
o Presence of informal settlers along riverbanks and railroad tracks
o Inadequate supply of potable water, especially in coastal/island
barangays

Strategies:
o Relocation of informal settlers or providing them with titles. Informal settlers
along riverbanks need to be provided with shelter to give way to clearing of
waterways. Informal settlers along railroad tracks need to be provided with
titles, or with shelter the land has to give way to other uses;
o Provison of trainings on livelihood and providing employment to informal
settlers who need to be relocated shall be given priority;
o Provision of potable water systems to waterless barangays. In island
barangays where the water table is very low and construction is high, this
shall be done through the construction of deep wells.

1.5 Social Amelioration (Provincial Development Agenda Point #3)

Goals:
o just and responsive social welfare development policies
o members of vulnerable population mainstreamed in the provincial
development initiatives

Issues: Mainstreaming of members of the vulnerable population to the


provincial development initiatives

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(2015 2042)

Strategies:
o Partnership with non-governmental organizations and civil society
organizations in the provision of services to vulnerable groups;
o Formulation and implementation of development programs for rebel
returnees, persons with disabilities, senior citizens, womens welfare, youth
and indigenous peoples (IPs)

2. ECONOMIC SECTOR (INVESTMENT CLIMATE)


(Provincial Development Agenda Point #7)

2.1 Agriculture (Arayat Growth Center, Candaba Wetland Growth Center,


andPorac-Gumain Growth Center)

Goal: Food Security

Issue: Unsustained agricultural production

Strategies:
o Preservation of strategic agriculture and fisheries development zone
o Promotion of certified seeds for rice and corn production and for high value
commercial crops
o Provision of technical assistance on agribusiness development and value
adding methodologies
o Construction of farm-to-market roads
o Provision of post-harvest facilities like warehouses, etc.
o Rehabilitation of existing irrigation facilities
o Encourage the use of organic instead inorganic fertilizers
o Establishment of bagsakan centers for agricultural products

2.2 Livestock and Poultry

Goal: to improve the sanitary condition of slaughterhouses in different


municipalities

Issue: poor sanitary condition of slaughterhouses in different municipalities

Strategies:
o Construction/improvement of slaughterhouses in different municipalities
o Livestock and poultry production and protection program

2.3 Fisheries (Pampanga Bay Growth Center)

Goal: sustain high yields of fishponds

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(2015 2042)

Issues:
o Illegal structures for fishing
o Lack of cold storage facilities

Strategies:
o Strict implementation of fishery laws
o Establishment of fish handling/cold storage facilities in key locations in the
low-lying areas
o Inclusion of fishery post-harvest facilities in investment priority plans of the
province

2.4 Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry in the Urban Core Hub


(Metro Clark) and Clark Freeport Zone

Goal: to promote and undertake sustainable entrepreneurship business and


industry promotion

Issues:

o Job mismatch
o Absence of one-stop shop for Kapampangan products and delicacies
o Unsustained participation in inbound and outbound investment and trade
missions
o Outdated investment collateral for promotion

Strategies:

o Cooperative development program/livelihood and employment development


program
o Updating of investment collateral for promotion

2.5 Infrastructure (Provincial Development Agenda Point #8)

Goals:

o To provide adequate support on infrastructure and other utilities


o To improve traffic management

Issues:

o Flooding on major thoroughfares


o Traffic congestion

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Strategies:

o Rehabilitation of roads leading to central business districts


o Construction/rehabilitation of drainage along major municipal and barangay
thoroughfares
o Enforcement of traffic laws and the installation of signages
o Construction/rehabilitation of vertical infrastructure to modernize commerce

2.6 Culture, Arts and Heritage (Provincial Development Agenda Point #10)

Goal: to conserve and promote Kapampangan culture, arts and heritage

Strategies:

o Cultural mapping program


o Advocacy promotion on policy heritage conservation

2.7 Tourism (Provincial Development Agenda Point #11)

Goal:

Turn Pampanga into a veritable tourist experience and destination capitalizing on


the folk and religious festivities accentuated by good food, goodie and souvenirs
with true local flavor and show of craftsmanship

Strategy:

CHEERS tourism through public-private partnership (PPP) with Kapampangan


tour operators

C culinary tours
H heritage tours
E ecotourism
E educational tours
R recreational tourism
S shopping tours

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

3. ENVIRONMENT
(Provincial Development Agenda Point #6)

3.1 Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems

Goal: adequate freshwater and coastal marine eco-systems management

Issues:

o Absence of water and sea zoning plan


o Water pollution
o Perennial flooding
o Proliferation of informal settlers along riverbanks
o Siltation and sedimentation on waterways
o Climate change

Strategies:

o Protection and rehabilitation of rivers and creeks


o Dredging and clearing of waterways
o Control offshore development
o Protection and rehabilitation of coastal areas
o Formulation of water and sea zoning plan
o Environment consciousness

3.2 Urban Ecosystems

Goal: protection of the environment from water and air pollutants

Issues:

o Uncontrolled pollution, e.g., air and water pollution


o Perennial flooding
o Proliferation of informal settlers along railroad tracks
o Land subsidence
o Saline intrusion
o Climate change

Strategies:

o Urban space cleaning and greening


o Appropriate sanctions and erring entities
o Flood control

3.3 Mineral, Forest and Geothermal Ecosystems

Goals:

o Environmental sustainability

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(2015 2042)

o Sustainable protection and management of forest cover

Issues:

o Depletion of forest covers


o Landslides in Mt. Arayat
o Illegal quarrying activities/overlapping areas of operation
o Quarry overloading
o Continuing study on mining and geothermal energy
o Rehabilitation of mined-out/disturbed areas

Strategies:

o Conduct regular monitoring/inspection of all quarry areas


o Information, education, communication (IEC) about Anti-overloading Law and
related provincial ordinances
o Accreditation of motor vehicles/heavy equipment used in quarrying
o Reforestation and afforestation activities
o Conduct study on mining and geothermal resources

3.4 Solid Waste Management

Goal: environmental sustainability

Issues:

o Improper solid management


o Incomplete solid waste management plan
o Lack of MRFs
o Proliferation of informal settlers along riverbanks and railroad tracks
o Climate change

Strategies:

o Strict compliance with R.A. 9003


o Completion of the provincial waste management plan
o Establishment of barangay cluster MRFs
o Environment consciousness

4. DISASTER RISK REDUCTION MANAGEMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE


ADAPTATION

Goal: to enhance the provinces resiliency to disaster risks and climate change

Issues:

o Lack of permanent evacuation centers with basic amenities


o Limited personnel in disaster preparedness for disasters and emergencies

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Strategies:

o Establishment of permanent evacuation centers


o Training programs on disaster and emergency preparedness

5. GOVERNANCE (Provincial Development Agenda Point #1)

5.1 Revenue Generation

Goal: To increase tax collection thereby decreasing IRA dependency. The full
implementation of computerization program will bring reality to this concern. The
completion of tax-mapping activities in the municipalities of Floridablanca, Porac
and Candaba is viewed to complement this goal

Issue: high cost in collecting revenues compared to outside benchmarks, i.e.,


national average and average first class province

Strategies:

o Intensification of collecting Real Property Taxes (RPTs)


o Intensive tax collection campaign
o Full implementation of the computerization programs

5.2 Resource Allocation and Utilization

Goal: Increased expenditure per capita

Issue: limited amount of expenditure per capita

Strategies:

o Enact Provincial Investment Incentive Code


o Tax incentives to entice investors and entrepreneurs
o Subsidies to local government units as needed

5.3 Local Legislation

Goals:

o Computerization in the provincial capitol


o Updated/amended existing ordinances
o Approved Health and Sanitation Code
o AIDS/HIV Council
o Anti-Drug Abuse Council

Strategies:

o Computerization in all offices in the provincial capitol


o Legislation of the Health and Sanitation Code for strict implementation

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

o Legislation of Private-Public Partnership Code


o Legislation of the Provincial Incentive Code
o Creation of Anti-Drug Abuse Council

5.4 Development Planning

Goal:

o Healthy planning environment


o Project monitoring team for the 20% development fund

Issues:
o The Provincial Development and Physical Framework Plan is outdated
o Absence of a project monitoring team for the 20% development fund

Strategies

o Updating of the Provincial Development and Physical Framework Plan


o Creation of the project monitoring team for 20% development plan

5.5 Human Resource Development

Goal
o Efficiency in the government
o Streamlining of personnel
o Formulation of HRD Plan

Strategies:

o Fill-up positions with competent applicants


o Abolish redundant and irrelevant positions
o Conduct capability development training for provincial employees

5.6 Transparency

Goal: trust in the bureaucracy

Strategies
7. Conduct of assemblies and forums for sustainable communication to the
public
8. Posting of accomplishments through billboards, website and broadcast
media for updated information about the LGU services, plans, programs
and special events

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

6. PRIVATE-PUBLIC PARTNERSHIP
(Provincial Development Agenda Point #12)

Goal: strong private-public partnership

Issue: limited private-public partnership

Strategies:

o Accreditation of non-government organizations (NGOs), civil society


organizations (CSOs) and private partners

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Strategies, Programs, Projects, and Activities


Below are the strategic approaches, programs, projects and activities under each
development goals to translate the provinces vision into tangible results for planning
period 2015-2042:

1. SOCIAL SECTOR

1.1 Education
(Provincial Development Agenda Point #5: Equal Access to Quality
Education)

Strategies:

- Construction of additional classrooms and provision of desks and tables


- Support programs for extension classes and teachers
- Establishment of satellite schools

Programs, Projects or Activities

1. Construction of Academic Classrooms


2. Construction of a Library each in the 1st , 2nd and 3rd Legislative Districts of
Pampanga
3. Construction of Regional Education Learning Center, City of San Fernando
4. Construction of Toilets with Handwashing facilities
5. Construction of Multi-Purpose Workshop building
6. Completion of Division Office Dormitory Center
7. Construction of Elementary Science Laboratory building
8. Construction of Math Center each in the four Legislative Districts in
Pampanga
9. Construction of Secondary Math Center
10. Acquisition of New Site for the Regional Education Learning Center (RELC)
11. Establishment of DHVSU and PAC in Lubao
12. Training of ECCD Child Based Service Providers
13. Construction of Bacolor National High School

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

1.2 Peace and Order and Public Safety


(Provincial Development Agenda Point #9)

Strategies

o Creation and operationalization of the Anti-Drug Abuse Council


o Support programs for children in conflict with the law
o Force multipliers
o Registration of barangay inhabitants
o Operationalize local peace and order councils

Programs, Projects, Activities

1. Supporting the Provincial PNP


2. Capability building for barangay lupons (through DILG members)
3. Continuing capability building for barangay tanods (through DILG
modules)
4. Patrol service vehicles for barangay tanods
5. Supporting the AFP 7th Division and the Northern Luzon Command in the
implementation of its INTERNAL Peace and Security Plan Bayanihan
campaign plan Ugnayan that include
Information drive on rights of citizens and of pertinent laws
Information drive on livelihood, hygiene, and family planning

1.3 Health (Provincial Development Agenda Point #4)

Strategies

o Consignment of drugs and medical supplies for equal access to quality but
affordable medicines
o Provision of more PhilHealth cards
o DOTS and PCB accreditation of health facilities
o Provision of schooling/ training for doctors
o Provision of travelling allowances to BHWs
o Program for preventive medicine

Programs, Projects, Activities

1. Improvement of operations of provincial and districts hospitals with technical


assistance from St. Lukes Medical Center
2. Construction of additional buildings for the provincial and nine (9) district
hospitals
3. Construction of secondary hospital in Northern Candaba
4. Assistance to the operations of Botika sa Barangay
5. Streamlining of medical supplies procurement processes

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(2015 2042)

6. Health lifestyle and Management of Health Risks program


7. Disease-free Zone Initiative
8. Intensified Disease Preventive and Control
9. Water and Sanitation Program
10. Maternal and Child Health (MCH) (PHO program)
11. Nutrition Program (PHO program)
12. Control of Acute Respiratory Infection (CARI) (PHO program)
13. Control of Diarrheal Disease (CDD) (PHO program)
14. Expanded program on Immunization (PHO program)
15. Provincial Epidemiological Surveillance Unit (PHO program)
16. Integrated Management on Childhood Illness (PHO program)
17. STI, HIV/ AIDS (PHO program)
18. Rabies Control Program (PHO program)
19. Family Planning (PHO program)
20. National Tuberculosis Program (PHO program)
21. Non-Communicable Disease (PHO program)
22. Capability Building Non-Communicable Disease Program (PHO program)
23. Environmental Health Services (PHO program)
24. Health Education (PHO program)
25. Voluntary Blood Services Program (PHO program)
26. Dengue Control Program (PHO program)
27. Dental Control Program (Oral Health Services) (PHO program)

1.4 Housing and Basic Utilities

Strategies:
o Relocation of informal settlers or providing them with titles, informal
settlers along riverbanks need to be provided with shelter to give way to
clearing of waterways. Informal settlers along railroad tracks need to be
provided with titles, or with shelter the land has to give way to other uses;
o Provision of trainings on livelihood and providing employment to informal
settlers who need to be relocated shall be given priority;
o Provision of potable water systems to waterless barangays. In island
barangays where the water table is very low and construction of high, this
shall be done through the construction of deep wells.

Programs/Projects/Activities
1. Relocations of informal settlers and victims of landslides, or providing
them with titles
1) Materials for the rehabilitation of 11 units housing project
(damaged by typhoon Glenda), Sitio Tagak, Nabuklod,
Floridablanca Php279 thousand for pre-proc(sept.25, 2014)
2) Relocation of at-risk residents of Bancal Sinubli, Lubao

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PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

3) Relocation of railroad residents of Sto. Tomas, Lubao so area can


be used as relocation for sidewalk market vendors
4) Land Distribution to informal settlers of non-core PNR properties,
eg., in Guagua, Lubao, Floridablanca and other towns (data
incomplete for other towns)
5) Housing for Pinatubo victims in Manuali, Porac
6) Land Titles for Pinatubo victims in Pio, Porac Titling of evacuees
in Pio, Porac (NHA has issued demand letter for donor Col.
Ciriaco Reyes to produce title but willing to find a win-win solution
to speed up titling)
7) Pulung Santol, Porac with NHA congressional funding P5M
8) Relocation site for informal settlers displaced from San Rafael,
Guagua by PHUMP (Habitat can provide housing)

2. Provision of trainings on livelihood and providing employment thereof in


order to provide informal settlers with livelihood activities and gainful
employment

3. Provision of potable water


1) Construction of deep wells in coastal and island barangays where
potable water in scare, in order to provide potable water
2) P2M potable water supply system for Bancal Sinubli, Lubao
provided in 2014 GAA
3) Estimated funding requirement to convert polluted water into
potable water for the whole coastal community P30M
4) Financial assistance to Planas, Porac for the drilling of electric
generated water system P2.7M million
5) Water system in Saup, BabuSacan, Porac
6) Water system in Villamaria, Porac
7) Water system in Nabuclod, Floridablanca through PPP (proposal
to be submitted to Aboitiz Foundation)

1.5 Social Amelioration (Provincial Development Agenda Point #3)

Strategies

o Formulation and implementation of development programs for rebel


returnees, persons with disabilities, senior citizens, womens welfare,
youth and indigenous people (IPs)
o Partnership with non-government organizations and civil society
organizations in the provision of services to vulnerable groups

Programs, Projects, Activities

1. PWDs welfare and development program


Sheltered workshops (PSWDO regular program)

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Operation and maintenance of center for disadvantaged women


Provision of assistive devices to orthopedic patients and persons with
disabilities
Implement Accessibility Law on disabled-friendly buildings

2. Senior citizens welfare and development program


Social pension to senior citizen(PSWDO regular program)
Cash incentives to centenarian (PSWDO regular program)
Burial assistance (PSWDO regular program)
Medicines for Federation of Senior Citizens Associations of the
Philippine Centers
Damayan group insurance yearly renewable term of P10T death
benefits
Renovations of senior citizens office
Tents and chairs
Botika sa barangay
Assistance to activities of senior citizens and reservation of 5 beds in
each of the hospitals (provincial and district) for free use by senior
citizens

3. Womens welfare and development program


Strengthening of Government mechanism on anti-trafficking and
violence against women and children
Construction of Multi-Purpose Hall with stage at DSWD FO III-HAVEN
Legislation for Development for the Protection of women and children
Provision of skills trainings to OSY, PWDs, Women, DCW and
Barangay Councils on: (1) cosmetology; (20 barista;
(3)Housekeeping; (4) CICL; (5) BCPC; (6) ECCD; (7) Solid Waste
Management
Community-based skills training program for unemployed adults of
Sta. Ana, San Fernando, along Massage Therapy, Basic
computer Literacy, Candle-making, flower arrangement, meat
processing, candy making, accessory making, automotive
technology, electronics servicing, data encoding, etc.
ALIVE with TVET program for Moslem brothers in San Fernando
PESFA Scholarship program for unemployed adults of San
Fernando on Computer Hardware Servicing
Pangulong Gloria Scholarship/Training for Work Scholarship
Program
Construction of Productivity Center for women, PWDs, OSYs

4. Youth welfare and development program

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

Establishment of Woman and Child Protection Unit(WCPU) (PSWDO


regular program)
Foster Care
Supplemental feeding for children in poor communities
Establishment of anti-child abuse network such as the experience in
Floridablanca
Emergency employment for out of school youth to clean rivers
Establishment of birthing units to further reduce infant mortality
Training of ECCD Child-Based Service providers
Construction of Child Development Centers

5. Indigenous people welfare and development program


Orientation on sustainable livelihood programs (PSWDO regular
program)
IP agro-forestry projects
FMR for remotest IP barangays
Shared services facilities for banana chip in remotest barangays (c/o
DTI partnership)
Electricity in remotest barangays
IP components in Porac Comprehensive Land Use Plan
Implement Nabuclod-Mawacat Ancestral Domain Sustainable
Development Plan

6. Rebel returnees welfare and development program

7. Family welfare and development program


Provision of protective services to individuals and families in
especially difficult circumstances
Assistance to victims of disasters and calamities through disaster
relief and rehabilitation operations
Enrollment of CIU Clients to Philhealth
Livelihood projects as capability-building interventions for the poor
such as (1) organization of 25-30 members in self-managed
community-based organizations called SEA-K as conduits to various
sources, and (2) provision of capital assistance to SEA-K associations
through the formation of SEA-Kabayan
Implementation of PantawidPamilya, PODER and NHTS-PR
Encourage millionaire cooperatives and Non-government
organizations, thrift, rural and cooperative banks to provide more
microfinance products and services
Agrarian Reform Community in every town
Advocate security of tenure for families in relocation sites, agencies

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(2015 2042)

noncore properties such as that of the Philippine National railways,


national Development Corporation, Privatization Office
Facilitation of availment by LGUs of the devolution by HUDCC of
housing function
Housing Programs through Gawad Kalinga or Habitat
Water supply provision for 300 waterless barangays

2. ECONOMIC SECTOR (INVESTMENT CLIMATE)


(Provincial Development Agenda Point #7)

2.1. Agriculture (Arayat Growth Center, Candaba Wetland Growth Center, and
Porac-Gumain Growth Center)

Strategies:
- Preservation of strategic agriculture and fisheries development zone
- Promotion of certified seeds for rice and corn production and for high
value commercial crops
- Provision of technical assistance on agribusiness development and value
adding methodologies
- Construction of farm-to-market roads
- Provision of post-harvest facilities like warehouses, etc.
- Rehabilitation of existing irrigation facilities
- Encourage the use of organic instead inorganic fertilizers
- Establishment of bagsakan centers for agricultural products

Programs, Projects and Activities

1. Preservation of strategic agriculture and fisheries development zone


Rice production
Corn production
Indigenous people agro-forestry projects
Sampaguita livelihood project in Lubao and Carmencita, Floridablanca
Support services, as listed below
Sugar milling: MV Pangilinan group is willing to take over the ailing
Sweet Crystal sugar mill but requires 10,000 hectares of sugarland to
make the milling viable
Livelihood for farmers displaced in LLL property development

2. Rehabilitation of existing irrigation facilities


1. Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) funded NIA PGRIS
repair/rehab of diversion works, canal system, drainage system, road
system and on-farm facilities (P162M)

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
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(2015 2042)

3. Promotion of certified seeds for rice and corn production and for high value
commercial crops

Provincial plant nursery


High value crops development program (gulayan sa barangay)
Propagation of bamboo for value adding for Lubao, Porac, Guagua
and Magalang

4. Encourage the use of organic instead of Inorganic fertilizers


5. Farm Equipment support
6. Provision of assistance on agribusiness development and value adding
methodologies
7. Provision of post-harvest facilities (warehouses, solar drying pavement)
8. Construction of farm to market roads

2.2 Livestock and Poultry

Goal: to improve the sanitary condition of slaughterhouses in different


municipalities

Issue: poor sanitary condition of slaughterhouses in different municipalities

Strategies:

- Construction/improvement of slaughterhouses in different municipalities


Construct slaughterhouse in Guagua near market area, turn
unused slaughterhouse into a training center
Improvement of slaughterhouse in San Matias, Lubao and
relocate fisheries cold storage there for fish-fillet making
- Livestock and poultry production and protection program

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

2.3 Fisheries (Pampanga Bay Growth Center)

Strategies:

o Strict implementation of fishery laws


o Establishment of fish handling/cold storage facilities in key locations in the
low lying areas
o Inclusion of fishery post-harvest facilities in investment priority plans of the
province

Programs, Projects or Activities:

1. Strengthening and organization of FARMCs


2. Deputation of Bantay Dagat
3. Zoning of Municipal Waters
4. Zoning of areas for fish markets around fishlanding areas including fishponds
for protection through provincial and municipal legislation
5. Establishment of pocket trading posts for kapampangan products of other
clusters
6. Establishment of micro urban markets as alternative markets for fishfarmers
7. Establish aquaculture industries clusters in southern and northern
municipalities:
Lubao,Sasmuan,Guagua,Macabebe,Masantol,Minalin,Sto.Tomas,SanLuis,C
andaba,Arayat
8. Support to the development of OTOP barangay clusters to achieve
economies of scale
9. Pampanga pangasius project
10. Saline tilapia hatchery
11. Establishment of pre-cooling facility(Liquid Freezing Machines)
12. Establishment of Fish Processing Plants for Value Added Products
13. Provision of livelihood to fisherfolk
14. Village-level processing of fishery products
15. Post harvest facilities through private investments such as cold storage
16. Establishment of 200 kilometers bamboo plantation
17. Fishports in Batang 2 Sasmuan, Masantol, Sta. Cruz Lubao, Apalit, Candaba,
Guagua
18. Reclamation of coastal area near the mouth of Pampanga river
19. Asphalt-paving of Apalit - Arayat Setback Levee
20. Masantol-Lubao Road Opening
21. Road upgrading of Minalin-Macabebe Road
22. Mt. Pinatubo Hazard Urgent Mitigation Project
23. Road upgrading based on HDM-4 of Baliwag-Candaba-Sta.Ana Road
24. Dredging of Pampanga River (Macabebe to Masantol)
25. Rehabilitation of Sluice Gates along Pampanga Delta Dike

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
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(2015 2042)

2.4 Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry in the Urban Core Hub


(Metro Clark) and Clark Freeport Zone
Strategies:

Cooperative development program/livelihood and employment


development program
Updating of investment collateral for promotion

Programs, Projects or Activities:

1. Sustain, strengthen and expand current base of economic activities by:

Focusing on mix of industries identified as the provinces strength


- Processed foods e.g. tocino
- Furniture and furnishings
- Gifts, toys and housewares
- Other high-skills industries: electronics, business process
outsourcing and call centers
- Medium skill: tourism
- Simple skill: construction
- Quarrying
- Guitar-making in San Antonio, Guagua
- Small and Medium Enterprises
o Design Center, Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)
program for bamboo in Sta. Catalina Lubao, Porac and San
Agustin, Guagua
o Shared Service Facility (SSF) program of DTI for bamboo in
Lubao, including sander from Congressional Fund and
technical assistance from Department of Science and
Technology; banana chips in Villamaria and Diaz, Porac;
guitar-making in San Antonio, Guagua; palistambo for
Gutad, Floridablanca; kakanin for Sta. Filomena, Guagua
o Financial assistance for small enterprise in Sto. Cristo,
Guagua
o Financial assistance for livelihood in Calantas, Floridablanca
o Financial assistance for Floridablanca-Lubao Organic
Farmers Association to enable agro-processing plant to
comply with Food and Drug Administration requirements
Bamboo product development for Lubao, San Agustin in Guagua,
Magalang e.g. to produce cellphone zen speakers for SM c/o Bamboo
Foundation
New processed food product like fish fillet

a. Cooperative development program/livelihood and employment


development

Hollow block making cooperative in Mitla for LLL farmers of Hacienda


Dolores, Porac
Employment agreement with Ayala Land Inc.

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(2015 2042)

Training programs in Porac Manpower Training Center for jobs skills


required by Ayala Land Inc.
Employment and Call Center training with Sutherland
Pre-employment orientation for college graduates in the Industry-cum-
Tourism Quadrant and Yellow Quadrant
Microfinance through PPP (e.g., Uplift Microfinance Philippines)
Negocarts and starter kit set for Guagua

b. Investment Promotion

a. Updating of investment collateral for promotion e.g. ( Canne Film


Festival Kapampangan Awardee charges P750k for 30-seconder,
P5M for 30-60 minuter)
b. Attract and facilitate investment in other strategic industries aside
from Ayala township, Aboitiz geothermal power generation, e.g.
encourage SM to locate a store every 30 minutes apart, encourage
Century Properties to include a world-class convention center in its
City of San Fernando property development
c. 5 strategic growth areas under Porac comprehensive land use plan
(CLUP)

c. Strategic growth areas under Porac comprehensive land use plan

Conservation areas forest reserves (Mt. Dorst Forest reserve, Clark


Special Economic Zone); areas with critical slope occupied by the Aeta
tribe 9 Camias, Diaz, Pio, Sapang Uwak, Inararo); potential tourist ports
( Mt. Dorst, Mt. Catuo, Mt. Negros, Peac 1151, Mt. Pinatubo, Hacienda
Dolores, Pio church, poblacion church)
Production areas- agricultural lands, quarrying zones, agro-industrial
enterprises and other SMEs industries (lowland barangays Mancatian,
Manibaug Pasig, Libutad, Manuali, Pias, Planas, Salu, Sinura; upland
barangays Camias, Diaz, Inararo, Sapang Uwak and Villa Maria)
New town growth node around Hacienda Dolores- mixed use
residential-commercial-institutional-light industrial development
Poblacion growth node- existing civic center complex, public market,
agro-industrial development ( Poblacion, BaboPangulo, Pio) to merge
with Hacienda Dolores new town growth node
Sta. Cruz growth node existing built-up areas ( Sta. Cruz, Manibaug
Paralaya and Manibaug Libutad) will be the catchment area of the
continuous urbanization of Angeles City
Cangatba growth node- built-up in Sta. Rita-Porac provincial road
(Poblacion-Cangatba-babosacan) to form second growth node
Planas growth node to complement the existing Sweet Crystal agro-
industrial development and the planned industrial development in
adjacent Floridablanca

2. Preparation of other land use plans (for 2nd district, in the absence of data
from other districts) for Floridablanca as part of Subic-Clark area
development, Guagua, Lubao and Sta. Rita.

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3. Metro Clark Bulk Surface water project involves the identification of bulk
water sources for development and use of the Clark Freeport Zone and
adjacent communities (Metro Clark Areas).

4. Design and Build Services for the Clark 230 KV Power Transmission Line
Project Phase 3A involves the Design and Build, Furnishing, Delivering,
Installing, Testing and Commissioning of 2 x 100 MVA, 230/69 KV at Clark
New Substation and 2 x 100 MVA, 69/22.9 KV for Clark Load End Substation
Three Phase, 60 Hz with On-load Tap Changer ONAN/ONAF/OFAF Power
Transformers, their associated equipment, protection and control equipment
and Three Phase 60 Hz Double Circuit 69 KV Transmission Lines from Clark
Substation to Clark Load End Substation.

5. Clark International Airport Terminal II Building

6. Facilitate Business Process Outsourcing and Call Center investments

7. Localization of the SCADC-initiated Master Plan of the Subic-Clark Corridor,


i.e., preparation of Comprehensive land Use Plans for the municipalities of
Floridablanca and Porac

8. Improve access between the industry core and the other economic clusters of
the province through rehabilitation of key road sections, construction of new
road sections.

9. Infrastructure to be financed through increased provincial capital outlay funds


to Php 1 billion, the regular infrastructure program of the Department of
Public Works and Highways, and other funding institutions.

10. Improvement of peace and security conditions in the municipalities and cities
adjacent to CSEFZ and the Clark-Subic Corridor through higher police
visibility, capacity building of force multipliers including barangay security
forces.

11. Avail of training in aircraft servicing at the Clark Polytechnic College

2.5 Infrastructure (Provincial Development Agenda Point #8)

Strategies:
- Rehabilitation of the roads leading to central business districts
- Construction/rehabilitation of drainage along major municipal and barangay
thoroughfares
- Enforcement of traffic laws and the installation of signages
- Construction/rehabilitation of vertical infrastructure to modernize commerce

Program/Projects/Activities:

A. Program: Rehabilitation of Roads leading to central business districts

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A.1. Project: Location :Poblacion, Guagua


1. Upgrading of St. Paul St., Sta. Filomena
2. Upgrading of roads at Purok 4 LM (St. Anne & Trinity Sts.), Sta.
Filomena
3. Construction of bridge under Pampanga Hazard Urgent Mitigation
Project
(PHUMP), Sta. Filomena
4. Canalization, Sta. Filomena
5. Bancalpathwalk concreting in Sitio Fatima
6. Sto. Cristo road concreting at Purok 1
7. Waiting shed at Golangco junction
8. San Juan construction of pathways Purok 1-7

A.2. Project: Location: Betis, Guagua


1. Road at Purok 4, Villa Rosemarie, San Miguel
2. Sta. Ursula road to boost furniture and woodcraft industry
3. San Juan Nepomuceno upgrading of Dalan Betis, Betis-Lawas portion
in front of barangay hall to Purok 6, with waiting shed at junction.
Used electric steel post from Provincial Engineering Office for
installation along Dalan Betis-Lawas with cement for posts foundation
from Congressional funds
4. Road at Sta. Ines

A.3. Project: Location: Sta. Cruz, Porac-Concreting of 6 streets;


1. Ponciano
2. 2015 GAA Clement St. (450 meters)
3. Sto. Tomas (450 meters)
4. Rosal (450 meters)
5. Santiago (250 meters)
6. Aster (300 meters)

A.4. Project: Canalization, BaboSacan

A.5. Projects: Location- Lubao


1. Sto. Tomas-const. of reinforced concrete channel bridge
2. San Juan road reconstruction in Purok 2, 5 & 6
3. Sta. Barbara, Lubao completion of road concreting

B. Program: Construction/Rehabilitation of drainage along major municipal


and barangay thoroughfares

B.1. Project Locations:


1. Sta. Cruz, Porac
2. Pulung Santol, Porac
3. Plaza, Lubao
4. Balubad, Porac
5. Sto. Tomas, Sasmuan
6. Sto. Nio, Guagua

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C. Program: Enforcement of traffic laws and the installation of signages

D. Program: Construction/Rehabilitation of infrastructure to modernize


commerce

D.1. Project Lists:


1. Rehabilitate Porac market
2. Concreting of Porac market parking area
3. Rehabilitate Guagua market: Dry goods section, Vegetable
section, Fish &meat section
4. Acquisition of GSIS-acquired Cervantes market for conversion into
common public transport terminal & market extension (relocation for
sidewalk vendors)
5. Construction/rehabilitation of Public market
6. New airport terminal in CSEFPZ

2.6 Culture, Arts and Heritage (Provincial Development Agenda Point #10)

Goal: to conserve and promote Kapampangan culture, arts and heritage

Strategies:

- Cultural mapping program


- Advocacy promotion on policy heritage conservation

2.7 Tourism (Provincial Development Agenda Point #11)

Strategies:

Cultural mapping program


Advocacy promotion on policy heritage conservation
CHEERS tourism through public-private partnership (PPP) with
Kapampangan tour operators

C culinary tours

H heritage tours

E ecotourism

E educational tours

R recreational tourism

S shopping tours

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Programs, Projects or Activities:

1. Cultural mapping program is ongoing for the 2nd district

2. Promotion of heritage conservation

Heritage conservation program through PPP with Arte Sta. Rita, Angeles
University, IMA, Holy Angels University, Betis Childrens Choir, etc.

Restoration of Guagua town plaza

C culinary tours

- Iconic cuisine: Everybodys Caf in San Fernando, Razons in


Guagua
- New high-end restaurants: C, Red Crab, Claude Tayags Bale
Dutung, Abes Farm
- New Folk Restaurant: Barriotic in Floridablanca
- Attract investments in fresh fish restaurants in the vicinity of fishports
(BankeroanLubao) or fish markets (Sta. Lucia, Sasmuan). For this
purpose, upgrading of Lubao plaza road must be expedited and
Pasac River must be dredged.
- Ecotourism cuisine in the coastal wetlands: Catch your own lunch ( A
fishpond operator can provide this experience in his fishpond either
coastal Lubao or coastal Sasmuan or near the fish landing). Savor
each bite of unrivalled joy that comes from fragrant rice varieties, fish
grilled on a river bank just minutes from life, vegetables harvested
fresh from the earth dikes.
- Culinary excellence- rice cakes perfumed in pandan and coconut,
Pampanga sweetness unparalleled ( polvoron in Sasmuan, duman &
turon & sans rival in Sta. Rita, calamay & suman in Guagua, banana
chips &uraro in Porac), breakfast rolls enriched in egg yolks and pork
lard, tocino, the remaining hints of the galleon trade with Mexico-
tamales, empanada, lechon, cocido. The indescribable delight of fresh
carabao milk transformed into a tibok-tibok.

H heritage tours

- Local festivities
- Tourist spots and historical sites
- Arts & Crafts: The traditions of carving (Betis), silver smithing (Apalit),
clay pottery ( Sto. Tomas), guitar making (San Antonio, Guagua)

E ecotourism

- Candaba Swamp, located some two kilometers from the town proper,
the Candaba Swamp transforms from an agricultural area in the dry
season to a haven of migratory birds in the rainy season. It has
become a popular tourist attraction and it serves as a suitable

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breeding habitat for endemic wildlife species.


- Coastal cruises in Lubao & Sasmuan, birdwatching in Sasmuan &
Candaba
- Mountain trekking ( Mt. Pinatubo and Mt. Dorst Forest preserve in
Porac, Mt. Arayat in Arayat). For Mt. Pinatubo and Mt. Dorst, this
should be supported by construction of roads and connecting trails
leading to the volcano
- Spring development of Magsaysay Dam, Sta. Rita

E educational tours: institutionalization of Pampanga tours in school


curricula

- Lubao educational tour: Macapagal Museum, Lubao Church,


Materials Recovery facility (MRF)
- Proposed SCTEX tour: Understand lahar (Mancatian, Manibaug
Pasig, Mitla Proper &/or San Jose Mitla in Porac) and the reasons
why the central plain is a plain (Floridablanca and Porac farms).
Experience the indelible link that ties natural bounty to agricultural
productivity
- Construct welcome arch for Sepung Bulaon, Porac

R recreational tourism

- Golf in Clark & Prado Siongco, Lubao


- Wakeboarding in Prado Sionco, Lubao
- Other water sports in Manibaug Pasig, Porac and Clark
- Gaming c/o PAGCOR casinos

S shopping tours

- Provide a rich and varied shopping experience of take-home food,


goodies and souvenirs with true local flavor & show of craftsmanship
- Establish one-stop-shop for Kapampangan products and delicacies in
Jose Abad Santos Avenue, Bacolor

3. ENVIRONMENT
(Provincial Development Agenda Point #6)

3.1 Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems

Strategies:

o Protection and rehabilitation of rivers and creeks


o Dredging and clearing of waterways
o Control offshore development
o Protection and rehabilitation of coastal areas
o Formulation of water and sea zoning plan
o Environment consciousness

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Programs, Projects or Activities:

1. Protection and rehabilitation of rivers and creeks


- 2014 DPWH repair left & right dike of Porac-Gumain River, Lubao P50M
- 2014 DPWH repair of eroded section of Gumain River along Brgy. Sto.
Cristo &Brgy. Sta. Rita, Lubao P50M
- 2014 DPWH restoration of deteriorated west lateral dike, Guagua, Sta.
Rita and Porac P40M
- 2015 National Expenditure Program(NEP) Construction of slope
protection & armoring of Sapang Maragul, Guagua Sta. Rita section
P20M
- 2015 NEP improvement of deteriorated top of west meg dike P44M
- 2015 NEP construction of groundseal of Pasig Potrero River P20M
- 2015 NEP restoration of slope protection along Mancatian River P20M
- 2015 NEP construction/rehab of slope protection San Juan Nepomuceno,
Guagua P15M
- 2015 NEP rehab/reconstruction of slope protection along Natividad
Creek, Lambac, Pangulo, Guagua
- 2015 NEP armoring, rehabilitation Gumain River at San Pedro,
Floridablanca
- 2015 NEP construction/repair/rehab of slope protection Santol Creek,
San Antonio, Floridablanca P15M
- 2015 NEP Gutad, Floridablanca bank protection along Caulaman River,
Sitio Gana P9M
- 2014 improvement of western megadike along pasig-potrero river
- 2014 GAA-DPWH restoration or Porac River Slope Protection, Valdez
and Poblacion, Floridablanca P25 thousand
- 2014 GAA restoration of Caulaman River slope protection Sto. Rosario
Dampe and Bodega P25M
- 2015 GAA slope protection rip rapping/revetment P2M
- 2014 GAA restoration of Santol Creek slope protection, maligaya P10M
- Restoration of sapang maragul slope protection , guagua P5M
- Slope protection of Sapang Maragul P3M
- Restoration of San Jose Gumi slope protection, Lubao P10M
- Restoration of Porac-Gumain slope protection, Sta. Rita Lubao P20M
- Rehabilitation of creek in purok 3, Salu, Porac (as per Porac CLUP)
- Desilting of interior canal Sta. Ursula Guagua
- Slope protection Prado Siongco, lubao
- Slope protection San Roque, Guagua
- Slope protection along Porac River, San Antonio Floridablanca
- Slope protection San Juan Baustista, Guagua
- Slope protection San Isidro, Floridablanca p2M
- Slope protection Del Carmen, Floridablanca
- Slope protection Maligaya,Floridablanca P10M
- Slope protection Sto. Cristo, Lubao P20M
- Creek rip rapping Salu, Porac P1m
- Leaning/digging/ riprapping of control along riverside Hacienda Dolores

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Porac
- 2015 GAA-DPWH rehabilitation of bridge manibaug, porac
- 2015 NEP armoring/ rehab of Uyong Creek Siran to Rizal Magsaysay
North section
- 2015 NEP improvement of road dike and slope protection along Natividad
Creek San Jose, Guagua
- Slope protection Prado Siongco,Lubao
- Slope protection Porac River Ascomo, Guagua p40M
- Slope protection San Roque, Guagua
- Const/rehab of slope protection San Juan 1 Guagua P5M
- 2014 slope protection of Mancatian Bridge P20M
- 2014 Ground seal and river training along Pasig Potrero River P20M

2. Dredging and clearing or creation of waterways (priority: Pasac River in


Sasmuan)
- Estimated cost of provincial dredger P50M
- PPP with San Miguel group for Pampanga Bay reclamation and dredging
- 2014 DPWH Third River Flood Control construction Sasmuan P20M
- Emergency dredging of Pasac River DPWH P42M
- 2015NEP cleaning and rehab of Mangaso Creek San Antonio Sasmuan
- Drainage for Cabangcalan, Floridablanca

3. Control offshore development


- Relocation of informal settlers along river banks especially high risk
BancalSinubli, Lubao
- Conduct geodetic survey in San Antonio Sasmuan to make river
accreation alienable and disposable

4. Protection and rehabilitation of coastal areas


- Restoration of Bancal Pugad seawall Lubao P3m
- Restoration of Mabuanbuan seawall Lubao P3m
- Fish Sanctuary in BangkongMapaladBatang 2 Sasmuan
- Dike road widening of BancalSinubli, Lubao
- Upgarade barangay hall of Batang and Mabuanbuan, Sasmuan and
BancalPugad and Sinubli, Lubao with mangrove nursery in Batang 2
Sasmuan through PPP, private sector willing to do it, provided provincial
government dedges Pasac River

5. Formulation of the water and sea zoning plan with technical assistance from
Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources
6. Climate change awareness in cooperation with Climate Change Commission

3.2 Urban Ecosystems

Strategies:
o Urban space cleaning and greening
o Appropriate sanctions and erring entitires
o Flood control

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Programs, Projects or Activities:

1. Urban space cleaning and greening


2. Continuous tree planting in critical areas
3. Planting of flowers on the sides of roads where tourist buses pass
4. Desilting and clearing or creation of waterways
- River clean up of Pasac River, Sasmuan
- Clean up of plaza creeks Lubao
- Barangay wide canalization Pulung Santol,Porac
- Canalization Sto. Tomas Sasmuan
- Upgrading and concreting slab of barangay canal SiranGuagua
- Canalization San Rafael, Guagua
- Lined canal at Balubad,Porac P11.8M
5. Appropriate sanctions on erring entities
6. Strict implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act
7. Relocation of informal settlers along railroad tracks
- 2015 GAA const. of multi purpose building for relocation of informal
settlers from railroad tracks Sto.Tomas, Lubao P2M

8. Regulate deep well construction

9. Urban Flood Control Projects


10. Reforestation and mangrove projects
11. Pampanga Hazard Urgent Mitigation Project (DPWH)
12. Restoration of Sasmuan road slope protection Sta. Lucia Sasmuan P1M
13. Riprapping of floodways at San Quintin St. Sepung Bulaon,Porac(CLUP)
14. Upgrading of flood prone road San Agustin Guagua
15. Sabo dam project proposed for foreign funding

3.3 Mineral, Forest and Geothermal Ecosystems

Strategies:
- Conduct regular monitoring/inspection of all quarry areas
- Information, education, communication (IEC) about Anti-overloading Law
and related provincial ordinances
- Accreditation of motor vehicles/heavy equipment used in quarrying
- Reforestation and afforestation activities
- Conduct study on mining and geothermal resources

Programs, Projects or Activities:

1. Conduct regular monitoring/inspection of all quarry areas


2. IEC about anti-overloading law and related provincial ordinances
3. Accreditation of motor vehicles/heavy equipment used in quarrying
4. Reforestation and afforestation activities
5. Preserve/restore and maintain forest areas, while maximizing their economic
potential through massive reforestation and income generating eco-parks eg.
Mt.Dorst Forest Preserve near M. Pinatubo

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6. Conduct study on mining and geothermal resources

3.4 Solid Waste Management

Strategies:

- Strict compliance with R.A. 9003


- Completion of the provincial waste management plan
- Establishment of barangay cluster MRFs
- Environment consciousness

Programs, Projects, Activities

1. Strict Compliance with R,.A. 9003


2. Completion of the Solid Waste Management Plan
3. Establishment of barangay cluster MRFs and assistance for mini-dump trucks

4. DISASTER RISK REDUCTION MANAGEMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE


ADAPTATION

Strategies:

o Establishment of permanent evacuation centers


o Training programs on disaster and emergency preparedness

Programs, Projects or Activities:

1. Extend setback levee to Arayat through the flood control program of the DPWH
2. Upgrade strategic roads especially in severely flood susceptible areas such as in
Guagua market area in coordination with the PHUMProject
3. Information campaign on fire hazards
4. Ensure provision of fire hydrants in strategic locations within built up areas and in
resettlement areas
5. Detailed Geohazard Assessment of cities/municipalities in the province of
Pampanga
6. Establishment of permanent evacuation centers
7. 2014 GAA for Location area in San Matias, Guagua. Provincial government
needs to augment funding
8. Improvement of evacuation center at Palmayo, Floridablanca and Pio, Porac
P1M
9. Proposed evacuation center Betis,Guagua
10. Infrastructure and training programs on disaster and emergency preparedness. It
is necessary to pool resources, educate people and find new ways to protect
lives and communities
11. Census and profiling of families in high risk barangays
12. DPWH integrated disaster risk reduction 7 climate change adaptation measures

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in the low lying areas of Pampanga bay P37m foreign assisted


13. 2014 GAA flood mitigation facilities along Guagua River Basin P10M
14. 2014 DPWH PHUMP flood control works in Porac-Gumain and Pasac Delta
areaP463M(JICA)
15. Bridge between San Pedro and Sta. Cruz, Guagua
16. Environment consciousness in cooperation with Climate Change Commission
17. Relief operation for disaster victims, including Christmas relief for vulnerable
communities e.g. railroad tracks of San Pedro, Guagua
18. Canalization of PulungSantol, Porac

5. GOVERNANCE (Provincial Development Agenda Point #1)

5.1 Revenue Generation

Strategies:
o Intensification of Collecting Real Property Taxes (RPTs)
o Intensive Tax Collection Campaign
o Full Implementation of the Computerization Program

Programs/Projects/Activities
1. Intensification of Collecting Real Property Taxes (RPTs)
o Updating of market valuation of real properties
o Tax mapping of municipalities

2. Intensive Tax Collection Campaign


o Change existing procedures, regulations to motivate citizens to
pay their taxes promptly

3. Full Implementation of the Computerization Program

5.2 Resource Allocation and Utilization

Strategies:

o Tax incentives to entice investors and entrepreneurs; subsidies to


local government units as needed
o Programs/Projects/Activities
o Programs/Projects/Activities

Programs/Projects/Activities
1. Enact Provincial Investment Incentive Code
2. Subsidy to barangays with no IRA
3. Availability of transportation and road network in far-flung coastal areas for
effectiveness of access to basic services

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4. Make river accretion in Sasmuan A&D and subsidize geodetic survey

5.3 Local Legislation

Strategies:

- Computerization in all offices in the provincial capitol


- Legislation of the Health and Sanitation Code for strict implementation
- Legislation of Private-Public Partnership Code
- Legislation of the Provincial Incentive Code
- Creation of Anti-Drug Abuse Council

Programs/Projects/Activities

1. Computerization

o Network/interlink all offices in the provincial capitol


o Maintain existing computers to extend their lifespan

2. Preparation of the following codes


o Health and Sanitation Code and Sanggunian enactment
o Private-Public Partnership
o Investment Incentives

3. Creation of the following:


o AIDS/HIV Council by Sanggunian enactment
o Anti-Drug Abuse Council by Sanggunian enactment

5.4 Planning and Development

Strategies:
o Updating of the Provincial Development and Physical Framework Plan
o Formulation of the Provincial Development Investment Plan
o Creation of the project monitoring team for 20% development fund

Activities:
1. This document is the draft update of the PDPFP. Approval of the
Sangguniang Panlalawigan and the RLUC is needed
2. Sanggunian enactment prescribing policies and guidelines for the optimal
utilization of the 20% development fund and creation of the project monitoring
team for the fund.

5.5 Human Resource Development

Strategies:

o Fill-up positions with competent applicants


o Abolish redundant and irrelevant positions

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o Conduct capability development training for provincial employees

Programs, Projects, Activities

1. Fill-up positions with competent applicants


Assess the extent of brain drain in the organization which involves
the inflow and outflow of highly trained and experienced technical and
the professional people
Appropriate matching of jobs and skills
Appropriate matching of jobs and skills
Appropriate health assessment of new entrants so as not to
contaminate the whole organization
Assessment of organizational incentives system
Assess performance of qualitative terms rather than quantitative
Open and competitive recruitment procedures

2. Abolish redundant and irrelevant positions


Formulate and implement Human Resource Development Plan
Assessment of task network which involves examining the division of
responsibilities among units and the quality of communications, both
horizontally and vertically
Effective interactions in task network
Proper utilization of personnel

3. Conduct capability development training for provincial employees


Political commitment to capacity development
Coordination among the policy makers and the implementers
Proposed local government academy curriculum
Computer literacy program from basic to programming
Geographic information system and AutoCAD
Basic writing and communication skills
Records management
Strategic performance management system
Proper accomplishment of administrative forms
Basic customer service skills
Public service ethics and accountability
Supervisory development course
Training of hospital administration

5.6 Transparency

Strategies
- Conduct of assemblies and forums for sustainable communication to the
public
- Posting of accomplishments through billboards, website and broadcast
media for updated information about the LGU services, plans, programs
and special events

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6. PRIVATE-PUBLIC PARTNERSHIP
(Provincial Development Agenda Point #12)

Strategies:
o Accreditation of non-government organizations (NGOs), civil society
organizations (CSOs) and private partners

Programs/Projects/Activities
1. Accreditation of NGOs, CSOs and private partners
2. Acknowledge and emphasize the importance of participation by
national and non-governmental organizations in development
planning

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Table 6 1. DRRM/CCA PPAs

Issues/Problems Goals Objectives/Targets Strategies PPAs


1. A large number of - Protect the - Prevent loss of - Improve - Establishment of
the provinces safety and lives and disaster emergency response
population is health of properties response unit (trauma) during
exposed to natural exposed capabilities of disasters
hazards particularly and - Reduce impacts LGUs
flood, landslide, vulnerable of hazards on - Provision of
liquefaction, ground population exposed - Improve Emergency Shelter
shaking/earthquake population access to Assistance/Financial
health Assistance to
- Reduce health facilities, safe Affected Families
risks resulting housing and
from flood settlement - Provision of
hazards structures, Medicines, Medical
and social Supplies, Hygiene,
support Water and Sanitation
structures
- Provision of relief
goods

- Granting of
Food/Cash for Work
for Affected Families
(after disaster)
2. Half of the - Sustainable - Reduce impacts - Availability of - Change cropping,
provinces crop, of hazards on technological livestock and
agricultural areas livestock crops, farm innovative aquaculture
(including livestock and fish animals and solutions practices
and fisheries) are production fishponds and
exposed to high interventions - Educate farmers on
susceptible areas of - Prevent loss of the use of new
flood and agriculture-based - Strengthen technology options
liquefaction hazards livelihood institutional such as climate
support to proof crops and
agriculture better adapted
such as breed of animals
insurance
program - Crop insurance
program on high risk
areas

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Table 6 1. DRRM/CCA PPAs

Issues/Problems Goals Objectives/Targets Strategies PPAs


3. Landslide - To make - Accessibility of - Improve - Construction of
occurrences on the residents evacuation/ disaster Evacuation Centers
slopes of Mt. Arayat safe from resettlement response and Core Houses
landslide centers capabilities of
hazard LGUs - (Construction of San
- Exposure Isidro Magalang
reduction via - Engineering Permanent
structural and intervention in Evacuation Center)
non-structural the landslide
measures area - Extend setback levee
to Arayat through the
flood control program
of the Department of
Public Works and
highways

- Initiate tree planting


activities
4. Climate Change - Build climate - Adapt to climate - Exposure - Construction of
Related Risks change risk change by reduction via monitoring and early
resiliency reducing its risks structural and warning systems:
Increased coastal non-structural measures to identify
and urban - Effective measures, exposed areas
flooding leading management effective land-
to widespread of climate use planning - Assist vulnerable
damage to change risks and selective areas and
infrastructure, for relocation households
livelihoods and sustainable
settlements development - Reduction in - Diversify livelihoods
the
vulnerability of
lifeline
infrastructure
and services

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Table 6 1. DRRM/CCA PPAs

Issues/Problems Goals Objectives/Targets Strategies PPAs


Increased risks of - Heat health - Raise awareness on
heat related warning heat stress/stroke
mortality systems and other heat
related diseases
- New work
practices to
avoid heat
stress among
outdoor
workers
Increased risks of - Disaster - Construction of water
drought related preparedness infrastructure and
water and food including early reservoir
shortage leading warning and development
to malnutrition local coping
strategies - Provide information
campaign materials
- Adaptive/integ on effective water
rated water consumption and
resource water re-use
management

- Diversification
of water
sources
including
water re-use

- Improved
agricultural
practices,
irrigation
management
and resilient
agriculture

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

TABLE 6 2. LIST OF PROJECTS


Amount Implementing Implementation Remark/
PROJECT TITLE
(in million) Agencies Period Status
1. Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) DSWD

2. Integrated Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change 4,225.63 DPWH 2013-2016
Adaptation (DRR+CCA) Measures in the Low Lying
Areas of Pampanga Bay

3. Public-Private Partnership (PPP) for School 3,257.00 DEPED 2012-2015


Infrastructure Project (SIP), Central Luzon Component

4. Clark International Airport Terminal 2 Project 4,000.00 CIAC 2014-2018

5. High Speed Rail Link to the Metro Manila Area (Clark-


Angeles)

6. San Fernando to Mabalacat Service Road

7. MCA Water Sector Study

8. Metro Clark Light Rail

9. New Radial Access to the Clark Logistics Area

10. Rail Extensions to Subic and Tarlac

11. Pasig Potrero Rivers Development (transport)

12. MCA Power Sector Study

13. Master Plan for SCTEx Exits in MCA

14. Manila-Bataan Coastal Expressway Project DPWH 2017-2030

15. National Irrigation Sector Rehabilitation and 474.00 DA/NIA


Improvement Project - Central Luzon Component

16. North Rail Project 45,000.00 NORTHRAIL

17. Pampanga Circumferential Road Development Project 1,900.00 DPWH 2015-2042

18. Pampanga Delta Development Program (PDDP) Flood 8,000.00 DPWH 2014-2018
Control Component

19. Abacan River Comprehensive Development Project 3,000.00 DPWH 2014-2018

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

20. Acquisition of new site for the Regional Education 320.00 DepED 2015-2042
Learning Center (RELC)

21. Appropriate Irrigation Technologies for Enhanced 654.00 DA/NIA 2014-2018


Agricultural Production

22. Aquatic Fisheries Development Programs 450.00 DA

23. Bacolor Rehabilitation Program Infrastructure 1,939.03 DPWH


Component

24. Community Based Low-cost Housing Provision in 343.00 PAM/BAC 2014-2018


Pampanga

25. Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program, Irrigation 1020.00 DAR 2014-2018


Component (CARP-IC) in Pampanga

26. Design and Build Services for the Clark 230 KV Power 622.00 NGCP/CDC 2014-2018
Transmission Line Project Phase 3A

27. Dinalupihan-Angeles Road (DAR) Widening and 750.00 DPWH 2014-2018


Upgrading

28. Gumain Reservoir Project 13,729.00 DPWH 2014-2018

29. Flood Control Works in other major river systems in 5,000.00 DPWH 2014-2018
Central Luzon

30. Mega Dike Maintenance Dredging Project 750.00 DPWH 2014-208

31. Metro Clark Bulk Surface Water Project 640.00 DPWH 2014-2018

32. New Construction of Small Scale Irrigation under BSWM 614.00 DA/BSWM 2014-2018

33. Rehabilitation of Existing Irrigation Systems in Central 1,000.00 NIA 2014-2018


Luzon

34. Rehabilitation/Improvement of Angeles-Porac- 500.00 DPWH 2014-2018


Dinalupihan Road

35. Restoration and Rehabilitation of Elementary Schools in 341.66 DepED 2014-2020


Bacolor

36. Road Upgrading in Pampanga 590.85 DPWH 2014-2018

37. San Simon-Angeles-Mabalacat Service Road Project 444.00 DPWH 2014-2018

38. Jose Abad Santos Avenue Eastern Section 1,000.00 DPWH 2014-2018

Chapter 6: STRATE GIES, P ROGRAMS, P ROJECTS & ACTIVITIES Page | 239


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

39. Land acquisition, distribution and support services 500.00 DAR 2014-2018

40. Socialized Housing for Government & Private Rank & 500.00 LGU-AC 2014-2018
File Employee of Angeles City

41. Social Welfare Incentive Program for Elderly, Pre-school 381.92 DSWD 2014-2020
and Primary Students in Bacolor

42. Watershed Community Development Program in Central 500.00 DENR 2014-2018


Luzon

43. Common Post-Harvest Processing, Handling and 300.00 DA 2014-2018


Storage Facilities and Service Centers.

44. Development of Porac, Gumain Watershed 826.51 DENR 2014-2018

45. Maintenance and Rehabilitation Works for River Dike 679.00 DPWH 2014-2018
and Slope

46. National Greening Program 752.11 DENR 2014-2018

47. Pampanga Septage Treatment and Disposal Facility 510.00 LGU PAM 2014-2018
Project

48. Repair and rehabilitation of existing groundwater 398.00 NIA 2014-2018


irrigation systems and establishment of groundwater
pump project (Pampanga component)

49. Repair, rehabilitation, restoration and preventive 1579.00 NIA 2014-2018


maintenance of existing National and Communal
Irrigation Facilities (RRENIS/CIS)

50. Arayat National Park Development Project 100.00 DENR 2014-2018

51. Construction of a Circumferential Road at Barangay 100.00 DPWH 2012-2021


Calulut, San Fernando City

52. Development of Porac Ecotourism Park (Miyamit Falls, 56.00 DENR 2015-2042
View Deck, Hotsprings)

53. Pampanga Integrated Coastal Management Project 4.28 DENR 2014-2018

54. Preventive Maintenance of National Arterial Road in the 22.18 DPWH 2014-2018
Province of Pampanga

55. Preventive Maintenance of National Secondary Road in 26.38 DPWH 2014-2018


the Province of Pampanga

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

56. East Circumferential Road Project in Angeles City 117.00 DPWH 2014-2018

57. Academic Research on the State of the English 5.00 CHED 2014-2018
Language as Competitive Edge in Employment

58. Agricultural Extension Intensification 20.00 DA 2014-2018

59. Agricultural Production Support Program 5.00 DA 2014-2018

60. Agricultural Research Development Program 5.00 DA 2014-2018

61. Annual tracking of TVET Program graduates and 5.00 TESDA 2014-2018
evaluation for its continuing relevance and flexibility in
the local and global labor market

62. Bamboo Industry Development Project-Regionwide 14.00 DTI 2014-2018

63. Business Permits and Licensing System (BPLS). 20.00 DILG/DTI 2014-2018

64. Creation of a Regional Ombudsman 50.00 Office of the 2014-2018


Ombudsman

65. Delineation, titling of ancestral domains/lands 50.00 NCIP 2014-2018

66. Establishment of a peace and security information 10.00 2014-2018


network

67. Establishment of a Regional Budget Allocation Fund 25.00

68. Establishment of a Regional Packaging and Design 25.00 DTI-DOST


Center

69. Establishment of Botica ng Barangay 50.00 DOH

70. Proposed Pasac-Culcul Extension to Minalin Tail Dike 21.00 DPWH 2015-2042

71. Establishment of Integrated Waste Management 23.40 DENR


Systems in Central Luzon

72. Proposed Saplad David-Mataguiti-San Juan Road w/ 2


Bridges (Minalin-Macabebe)

73. Proposed Resettlement for families along Pampanga NHA/DPWH 2015-2042


River

74. Proposed Government Hospital, Sto. Tomas (P) DOH 2015-2042

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

75. Financial assistance and scholarship to deserving poor 25.00 DSWD


students

76. Freshwater Fishes (Tilapia and Pangasius) Development 10.00 DA


Program

77. Global Gateways Program 1.00

78. Intensified Social Marketing and Advocacy Program of 5.00 TESDA


TVET at the enterprise and community level

79. Mango Development Program 5.00 DA

80. Monitoring and Testing of Water Potability 10.00 DOH

81. Monitoring and Testing of Water Potability 5.00 CHED

82. Promotion of Contract Growing Arrangements Between 5.00 DA


Farmers And Processors

83. Quality Fish Brood Stock/Fingerling Production 10.00 DA/BFAR

84. Re-design of TVET scholarship programs for efficiency 5.00 TESDA


and relevance

85. Skills Training cum Classroom Construction 10.00 TESDA

86. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) Development 25.00 DTI

87. Strengthening of Barangay Peace and Order Councils 10.00 DILG

88. Strengthening of Local Tourism Offices 10.00 LGU/DOT

89. Strict implementation of the TESDA Quality Monitoring 5.00 TESDA


System

90. Tourism Information Development Project 10.00 DOT

91. Asphalt-paving of Apalit-Arayat Setback Levee 12.50 DPWH

92. Balikatan Sagip Patubig Program (BSPP) 46.00 NIA

93. Completion/Continuation of Unfinished/On-going Bridges 30.00 DPWH

94. Construction of Academic Classrooms for Public 43.00 DEPED


Elementary and Secondary Schools in Pampanga

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

95. Construction of East Road 2 (Next Frontier Road 214.00 DPWH


Projects) in Pampanga

96. Construction of Mawacat Bridge and Improvement of 35.00 DPWH


Road

97. Construction of Priority Small Scale Irrigation Systems/Small 168.00 NIA


Water Impounding Projects (SWIP), Small Diversion Dam
Projects (SDD)

98. Corn Program 13.50 DA

99. Development of Eco-Tourism Resort Palakol Summer 150.00 DOT 2015-2042


Place

100. Rehab Slope Protection/Diversion Dike Pampanga LGU/DPWH


River (Cupang, Arayat)

101. DOST's "Love Pampanga" Center 70.00 DOST

102. Eco-Agri-Tourism (Agri-Plantation and Development) 30.15 DENR/LGU

103. Employment Facilitation 15.90 DOLE

104. Establishment of 150 ha Urban Reforestation and 200 28.54 LGU


kms Bamboo plantation

105. Establishment of Fish Processing Plants for Value- 86.73 DTI


added Products

106. Establishment of New Plantation (200 has) for District 13.04 LGU
2

107. Extension of Slope Protection Works along Dolores 17.00 DPWH


Creek

108. Fishery Program 17.56 DA/BFAR

109. Fish ports in Batang 2 Sasmuan, Masantol, Sta. Cruz 50.00 LGU
Lubao, Apalit, Candaba

110. Flood Control/Seawall and Drainage Projects 100.00 DPWH

111. High Value Commercial Crops Program 17.00 DA

112. Hydrologic Study of the Megadike, Pasig-Potrero River 10.00 DPWH


and Maliwalu Creek Watersheds

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

113. Improvement of IE-5 Drainage System 26.00 LGU

114. Improvement of Monitoring System and Capacity 150.00 LGU


Development for Proper Water Management in NISs
and CISs

115. Improvement of U-turn and shoulder along MA Roxas 16.00 LGU


Highway

116. Introduction of Water Saving Irrigation Technology 150.00 LGU

117. Irrigation Water Resources Augmentation Pump 130.00 NIA


Establishment Project

118. Logistic Services Project in Pampanga 34.78 LGU

119. Nutrition Program in the Province of Pampanga 12.75 LGU

120. Opening of New Road around SCTEx and 80.00 LGU/DPWH


Improvement of Consuelo-Apalit-MMV,Pabanlag-
Nabuclod

121. Participatory Irrigation Development Project APL-1 41.00 LGU


Infrastructure Development

122. Post Harvest Programs 32.70 LGU

123. Procurement of Pumps, Drilling Rigs and Related 206.00 LGU


Equipment

124. Proposed Drainage Improvement along J. Abad 20.00 LGU


Santos Ave.- MA Roxas Highway

125. Proposed Mabalacat Gate Area Improvement 12.00 CDC

126. Proposed Security Gates (CFZ) 32.00 CDC

127. Reforestation of Denuded Forest of Mount Arayat 16.70 DENR


National Park

128. Rehabilitation/Reconstruction/Upgrading of Damaged 28.82 DPWH


Paved National Roads

129. Relocation of CDC Day Care and MWR Facilities 40.00 LGU/PAM

130. Rice Production Program 269.00 DA

131. Road Widening Project-IT Area in Pampanga 20.00 LGU

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

132. Sector Loan on Rehabilitation of Irrigation Facilities 222.00 NIA

133. Rechanneling San Fernando River 50.00 DPWH 2015-2042

134. Restoration of San Isidro-Quebiawan Creek, CSF DPWH 2015-2042

135. Proposed Culubasa-Buenavista Road w/ Bridge DPWH 2015-2042

136. Circumferential Road Development Project Connection 200.00 DPWH 2017-2022


to NLEx-SCTEx in Angeles City

137. Proposed Mabalacat By-Pass Road 107.00 DPWH 2015-2042

138. Tourism Management & Promotion Program 15.00 DOT

139. Bacolor Traffic Management Project 50.00 LGU

140. Completion of the Unfinished portion of the Gugu Dike 50.00 DPWH

141. Comprehensive Disaster Risk Management Project 74.70 LGU

142. Concrete Slope Protection of Bacolor Creek 82.50 DPWH

143. Concreting and upgrading of Barangay Roads 246.00 LGU

144. Construction of Bacolor Bridges 145.00 DPWH

145. Construction of Bacolor Drainage Canals 171.28 DPWH

146. Construction of the Bacolor National High School for 50.75 DepED
the Arts

147. Rehabilitation of Pampanga Sports Complex DPWH 2015-2042

148. Dike Roads Improvement Project 50.00 LGU

149. Educational Facilities Improvement Project 40.00 LGU

150. Farm Rehabilitation and Enhancement Project 31.40 LGU

151. Installation of Floodwater Pumps in the Southern Part 50.00 LGU


of Bacolor

152. Land Development and Quality Management Project 24.00 LGU

153. Management Information System Project 13.00 LGU

Chapter 6: STRATE GIES, P ROGRAMS, P ROJECTS & ACTIVITIES Page | 245


PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

154. Relocation of Barangay Boundaries in Bacolor 56.00 LGU

155. Repair/Rehabilitation of Gugu Dike 50.00 DPWH

156. Restoration and Rehabilitation of DHVTSU 265.47 DHVTSU

157. Restoration and Rehabilitation of Rural Health Centers 21.20 DOH


and Barangay Health Stations in Bacolor

158. Restoration and Rehabilitation of Secondary Schools 86.98 DepED


in Bacolor

159. Rivers, Wetlands and Freshwater Fishery 17.30 DENR


Development Project

160. Solid Waste Management Project 17.40 DENR/EMB

161. Topographic Mapping of Bacolor 13.32 LGU

162. Rehabilitation of Pampanga Convention Center LGU/DPWH 2015-2042

163. Tourism Development and Promotion Project 28.70 DOT

164. Ancestral Domain Devt Program 100.00 DENR

165. Proposed Mexico By-Pass Road 123.00 DPWH 2015-2042

166. Early childhood care and development 200.00 DOH

167. Elementary Science and Math Centers Project 100.00 DEPED

168. Improvement Of Physical Access To Tourist 200.00 DOT


Destinations

169. Proposed Sinura-Calibutbut Road DPWH 2015-2042

170. Subic-Clark Inter-Regional Tourism Hub 100.00 DOT

171. Toxic and Hazardous Waste Disposal Facility Project 100.00 EMB/DOH

172. Tourism Road Infrastructure Program (Angeles City) DPWH/DOT

173. Mt. Pinatubo Access Road DOT/LGU 2015-2042

174. Proposed NLEX-SCTEx Mabalacat Extension DPWH

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

175. Proposed Apalit By-Pass Road 39.00 DPWH 2015-2042

176. Asphalting Tail Dike Road 310.00 DPWH

177. Widening San Matias-Minalin Road LGU/DPWH 2015-2042

178. Channeling of Pasig-Potrero River to Divert Water DPWH 2015-2042


Flow to West Megadike

179. Widening Sindalan - Anao Road LGU/DPWH 2015-2042

180. Rehabilitation of Tourism Facilities 200.00 DOT

181. Proposed Magalang By-Pass Road 130.00 DPWH 2015-2042

182. Proposed Porac-Angeles Alternate route DPWH 2015-2042

183. Proposed San Jose -Castuli FMR DA 2014-2020

184. Proposed Calantas-Planas FMR DA 2014-2020

185. Widening of Guagua-Sta.Rita-Porac Road DPWH 2015-2042

186. Proposed Service Road Parallel to Megadike, CSF DPWH 2012-2021

187. Proposed Tourism Road City of San Fernando DPWH 2012-2021

188. Proposed Sta. Monica-San Pedro Bridge, Sasmuan DPWH 2015-2042

189. Proposed Sindalan-Baliti-Mc Arthur by Pass Road DPWH 2015-2042

190. Proposed parallel road to Porac-Angeles Road LGU/DPWH


(Megadike Calsadang Bayu Manibaug Paralaya
Manibaug Libutad - Sta. Cruz), Porac

191. Proposed Pampanga River Development Project LGU/DPWH 2015-2042

192. Construction of Flyover along Telabastagan- 142.00 DPWH 2015-2042


Friendship road intersecting Angeles-Porac-
Dinalupihan Road, Cutcut, Angeles City

193. Proposed Dawe-San Francisco Road w/ Bridge, DPWH 2015-2042


Minalin

194. Proposed Paligui-San Vicente Road w/ 100m Bridge, 303.00 DPWH 2015-2042
Apalit

195. Proposed Mexico NLEX Interchange (Brgy. Suclaban) DPWH 2015-2042

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PROVINCE OF PAMPANGA
PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT & PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN
(2015 2042)

196. Circumferential Road: Angeles-Arayat, Magalang, DPWH


Mawaque, Pandacaqui, SM Pampanga via Pandan
(East bound Sector)

197. Circumferential Road:Angeles- LGU/DPWH


Friendship,Telabastagan, Manibaug, Porac, Salu-
Balubad I & II via Porac, Porac (West bound Sector)

198. Interconnection of Barangay Road: Sabanilla/San LGU/DPWH


Miguel to San Rafael via Beverly, Mexico

199. Interconnection of Barangay Road: San Antonio Traffic LGU/DPWH


Diversion Route (Highway to Tinajero Street via St.
Josephs Subd. Thru a proposed opening at
Manggahan), Mexico

200. Inter-linking of Farm to Market roads to create new LGU/DPWH


Access Roads: Mexico
- Pangatlan to Sta. Cruz thru Looban
- Pangatlan to Nueva Victoria
-Nueva Victoria to San Vicente Mabalukuk to Sta.
Cruz
- Divisoria to San Vicente to Sta. Cruz
- Tangle to Pandacaqui
- Gandus to Capaya, Angeles City
- Masamat to Del Carmen, CSFP
- San Juan to San Jose Malino Abacan Road Dike
- Caingin, Laug to Sta. Maria Gubat

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