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MathWordProblems

LessonPlan

Client:TanikaThompson
Date:07/14/2017

Overview & Purpose

Students who lack place value understanding may add and subtract without regard to place value.

Encourage students to use strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and the

relationship between addition and subtraction as shown in previous tasks.

Education Standards

Georgia Standards

Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic.

MGSE3.OA.8 Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these

problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the

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reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including

rounding. 14

STANDARDS FOR MATHEMATICAL PRACTICE (SMP)

Materials Needed

1.MathJournals(orpaper)

2.Manipulatives/. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

4.. Use appropriate tools strategically.

5. Attend to precision.

6. Look for and make use of structure.

7. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

Objectives

Students will:

Select one more more math operations to use in a word problem;

Produce multi-step word problems that their classmates can solve;

Solve word problems created by their classmates.

Activity

I suggest that the teacher use the ASSURE Model in the lesson plan because teachers can

used it in the classroom. The Instructional System Design can be use to draft and create suitable

learning environment for students. In addition, teachers can use this process in different lessons

such as, writing, and to improving teaching and learning skills. The ASSURE Model includes

Robert Gagnes events of instruction to assure effective use of media in instruction.

A-Analyze Learners

S-State Standards & Objectives

S-SelectStrategies,Technology,Media

U-Utilizetechnology,media&materials

R-Requirelearnersparticipation

E-EvaluateandRevise

Analyze Learners

Students cant complete the word problem, furthermore the students cant solve the answer

correctly. If they did set it up correctly they may have struggled with the actual addition and

subtraction.

State Standards & Objectives

(Georgia Standards)

Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic.

MGSE3.OA.8 Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these

problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the

reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including

rounding. 14

(Objectives)

Select one more more math operations to use in a word problem;

Produce multi-step word problems that their classmates can solve;

Solve word problems created by their classmates.

Select Strategies,Technology, Media

STANDARDS FOR MATHEMATICAL PRACTICE (SMP)

(Select Strategies)

1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

4.. Use appropriate tools strategically.

5. Attend to precision.

6. Look for and make use of structure.

7. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

Artifact I

Part I (SMP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7) I propose that the teacher will begin by asking students to respond

to the following questions in their math journal. Ask one of your students to sort the change in

her piggy bank. They have 122 pennies, 97 nickels, 118 dimes, and 308 quarters. How many

coins did the student sort in all? Once the student are finished, the class will discuss the

strategies they used to determine the answer. There should also be discussion about how

subtraction could be used to verify results. This information may also be used to create an

anchor chart.

Artifact II

Part II (SMP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8) Although students are not formally introduced to decimals in the

standards until 2nd grade, it is acceptable and developmentally appropriate for students to

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encounter these life skills by adding and subtracting dollars and cents in 3rd grade. Students

should not be expected to add and subtract decimals out of this context.

In small groups, students will complete the Figuring Out Addition and Subtraction recording

sheet. Students should be encouraged to solve their problems in multiple ways, using pictures,

numbers, and words.

1. Your school cafeteria sells popsicles for seventy-five cents, nutty buddies for eighty five cents,

and ice cream cones for sixty cents. If a student spends ten dollars in the current month for these

treats, what could the student have bought?

List as many combinations as you can find.

The student is saving for a computer that cost $750. He received $123 for his birthday in May

and saved $347 from cutting grass during June and July. How much money does the student still

need to purchase the computer?

(Technology)

1.Pictures,internet, words and numbers to solve the word problems

Media & Materials

Computers with internet access for BrainPOP

Class set of copies for the Activity and Primary Source Activity

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Utilize Technology, Media & Participation

1. Define and explain 8 common mathematics strategies used in print and online media.

2. Identify real-life examples of common mathematics strategies.

3. Create a concept map using the Make-a-Map tool to share their understanding of

mathematics strategies.

Requires Learner Participation

In small groups, students will complete the Figuring Out Addition and Subtraction recording

sheet. Students should be encouraged to solve their problems in multiple ways, using pictures,

numbers, and words.

Evaluate and Revise

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

1. Explain one strategy that can be used when adding?

2.Explain one strategy that can be used when subtracting?

3.What strategies can be used to solve real world problems accurately?

4. How are addition and subtraction related?

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An explanation supported by your own learning in this class as of why you think the

artifact(s) you developed is the right solution. The reason these artifacts is the right

solution because it process these 5 factors presented below.

1. Understand the problem. It's important that students understand the nature of a problem

and its related goals. Encourage students to frame a problem in their own words.

2. Describe any barriers. Students need to be aware of any barriers or constraints that may

be preventing them from achieving their goal. In short, what is creating the problem?

Encouraging students to verbalize these impediments is always an important step.

3. Identify various solutions. After the nature and parameters of a problem are understood,

students will need to select one or more appropriate strategies to help resolve the

problem. Students need to understand that they have many strategies available to them

and that no single strategy will work for all problems. Here are some problem-solving

possibilities:

Create visual images. Many problem-solvers find it useful to create mind

pictures of a problem and its potential solutions prior to working on the problem.

Mental imaging allows the problem-solvers to map out many dimensions of a

problem and see it clearly.

Guesstimate. Give students opportunities to engage in some trial-and-error

approaches to problem-solving. It should be understood, however, that this is not

a singular approach to problem-solving but rather an attempt to gather some

preliminary data.

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Create a table. A table is an orderly arrangement of data. When students have

opportunities to design and create tables of information, they begin to understand

that they can group and organize most data relative to a problem.

Use manipulatives. By moving objects around on a table or desk, students can

develop patterns and organize elements of a problem into recognizable and

visually satisfying components.

Work backward. It's frequently helpful for students to take the data presented at

the end of a problem and use a series of computations to arrive at the data

presented at the beginning of the problem.

Look for a pattern. Looking for patterns is an important problem-solving strategy

because many problems are similar and fall into predictable patterns. A pattern,

by definition, is a regular, systematic repetition and may be numerical, visual, or

behavioral.

Create a systematic list. Recording information in list form is a process used

quite frequently to map out a plan of attack for defining and solving problems.

Encourage students to record their ideas in lists to determine regularities, patterns,

or similarities between problem elements.

4. Try out a solution. When working through a strategy or combination of strategies, it will

be important for students to

Keep accurate and up-to-date records of their thoughts, proceedings, and

procedures. Recording the data collected, the predictions made, and the strategies

used is an important part of the problem solving process.

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Try to work through a selected strategy or combination of strategies until it

becomes evident that it's not working, it needs to be modified, or it is yielding

inappropriate data. As students become more proficient problem-solvers, they

should feel comfortable rejecting potential strategies at any time during their

quest for solutions.

Monitor with great care the steps undertaken as part of a solution. Although

it might be a natural tendency for students to rush through a strategy to arrive at

a quick answer, encourage them to carefully assess and monitor their progress.

Feel comfortable putting a problem aside for a period of time and tackling it

at a later time. For example, scientists rarely come up with a solution the first

time they approach a problem. Students should also feel comfortable letting a

problem rest for a while and returning to it later.

5. Evaluate the results. It's vitally important that students have multiple opportunities to

assess their own problem-solving skills and the solutions they generate from using those

skills. Frequently, students are overly dependent upon teachers to evaluate their

performance in the classroom. The process of self-assessment is not easy, however. It

involves risk-taking, self-assurance, and a certain level of independence. But it can be

effectively promoted by asking students questions such as How do you feel about your

progress so far? Are you satisfied with the results you obtained? and Why do you

believe this is an appropriate response to the problem?Teacher Vision. (2017).

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How your plan address one or more of the ACRL Visual and Literacy Competency

Standards? I will address one ACRL Visual and Literacy Competency Standard by using

standard two below.

Standard Two

The visually literate student finds and accesses needed images and visual media effectively and

efficiently.

Performance indicators:

1. The visually literate student selects the most appropriate sources and retrieval systems for

finding and accessing needed images and visual media.

Learning Outcomes:

a. Identifies interdisciplinary and discipline-specific image sources

b. Articulates the advantages and disadvantages of various types of image sources and retrieval

systems

c. Recognizes how the image search process is affected by image rights and use restrictions

d. Uses specialized online or in-person services to select image sources (e.g., online research

guides, image and reference librarians, curators, archivists, disciplinary experts)

e. Selects the most appropriate image sources for the current project

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2. The visually literate student conducts effective image searches.

Learning Outcomes:

a. Develops a search strategy appropriate to the image need and aligned with available resources

b. Recognizes the role of textual information in providing access to image content, and identifies

types of textual information and metadata typically associated with images (e.g., captions or

other descriptions, personal or user-generated tags, creator information, repository names, title

keywords, descriptions of visual content)

c. Recognizes that images are often organized differently than text-based information and that

this affects the way images can be accessed (e.g., absence of full-text search, variations in

controlled vocabularies, lack of subject terms)

d. Identifies keywords, synonyms, and related terms for the image needed, and maps those terms

to the vocabulary used in the image source

e. Uses images to find other images through exploration, social linking, visual search engines, or

browsing

f. Performs image and topical research concurrently, with each informing the other in an iterative

resource-gathering process

g. Assesses the quality, quantity, and appropriateness of images retrieved, and revises the search

strategy as necessary

3. The visually literate student acquires and organizes images and source information.

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Learning Outcomes:

a. Retrieves or reproduces the needed image using appropriate technologies or systems (e.g.,

download functions, copy and paste, scanning, cameras)

b. Accesses physical objects as needed to support the image research objective (e.g., site visits to

archives, repositories, museums, galleries, libraries)

c. Organizes images and the information that accompanies them for personal retrieval, reuse, and

scholarly citation

A reflection regarding challenges to complete this assignment?

The challenges i had to complete the assignment was choosing a standard that fit my

lesson plan because through the process to find the right standard they all looked a little similar

in terms of math subjects but i had to make sure it said word problems. As a result, that is why I

had to read each standard carefully so i dont put the wrong standard with my lesson plan.

References

ASSURE.(2013).Retrieved July 2, 2017, from

http://www.instructionaldesign.org/models/assure.html

Teacher Vision. (2017). Retrieved July 14, 2017, from

https://www.teachervision.com/problem-solving/problem-solving

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