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PART B Chapter 2 Contents

Acoustics 2.1 basis of design

This chapter describes the acoustic performance of 2.2 design requirements


concrete masonry used in buildings to:
n Reduce reflected noise within a building, and 2.3 standard designs
n Resist the passage of airborne and impact sounds
through walls, as necessary by the National 2.4 worked example
Construction Code (NCC) Building Code of
Australia (BCA)

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
2.1 BASIS OF DESIGN
2.1.1 Background Subjective dB Origin of Sound 2.1.2 Controlling Reflected
Reaction Noise
Noise travels from its source through the air, 200 Rocket launch at 100 m Absorbed
passing through walls, floors, ceilings, open sound The sound absorption characteristics
windows or doors and into living or office 190 of a material depend on the size, shape
Dissipated
Incid
spaces. It may be controlled by isolating the 180 ent s sound and configuration of its surface texture
ound
noise at its source by enclosing it within and on the frequency spectrum of the
walls that will absorb and dissipate it, or 170 incident sound. Materials with rough and
Through
by preventing the noise from reaching the 160 transmission open surface textures are generally more
living or office spaces by erecting sound- Reflected absorbent than those with smooth textures.
sound
resistant walls in its path. 150 NOTE: Such features may be incorporated into
The relative values walls, floors, ceilings or furniture.
When sound impinges on a wall it divides Threshold
of pain
140 of the divided
into reflected and absorbed sound. incident sound
Radiated
Noise reduction coefficients as high as 0.6
Absorbed sound is partly dissipated within 130 Loud air raid siren depend on the are attainable with some concrete masonry
Artillery fire
transmission
Threshold denseness of the
the wall and partly transmitted through the of comfort 120 Loud thunder wall surface, the units of very open texture and even higher
(1 W/m2)
wall. In addition to the sound transmitted Elevated train wall mass, porosity values are possible with specially-designed
through the wall material, the total sound Extremely 110 Woodworking shop and rigidity acoustic blocks. Such surfaces allow the
loud Rock band/loud motorcycle
detected on the quiet side may include 100 Loud car horn at 6 m
incident noise to enter the interior of
radiated transmission caused by the Power lawnmower
Figure 2.2 Sound Transmission, the wall. Part of the absorbed sound is
vibration of the wall or wall lining. Very loud 90 Printing plant Absorption and Reflection dissipated in the pores of the concrete,
Very loud radio while the balance passes through the air
Designers should consider both: 80 Noisy factory
Shouting
spaces in the wall to the other side. Since
n the control of reflected noise generated sound absorption is a surface effect, it is
Loud 70 Busy street
within a room, and Noisy photocopying room not influenced by the thickness of the wall.
n the reduction noise transmitted into a 60 Average radio/air terminal
Therefore, in a wall of constant thickness, it
Stadium
room from outside via the roof, ceilings, Noisy 50 Average conversation may be necessary to strike a compromise
walls, floors and openings. Restaurant/store between sound absorption and sound
Normal 40 Corridor resistance. Alternatively, wall systems may be
The Building Code of Australia considers Private office/study room
custom-designed incorporating an inner leaf
only the latter (reduction of noise 30 Soft radio/library
Quiet of sound absorbing masonry and an external
transmitted from outside a room). Quiet conversation/TV studio
20 Recording studio masonry leaf of high sound resistance.
Control of noise that is transmitted Whisper at 1 m
mechanically through the building structure
Very faint 10 'Sound-proof' room
Quiet human breathing
and noise originating from equipment or Threshold 0 Acoustical test room
of hearing
machinery are beyond the scope of this 10004000 Hz
Manual. The most effective treatments will (10-12 W/m2)
include dampening and isolating the source Figure 2.1 Intensity Levels of Some
from the structure. Familiar Sounds

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
Sound absorption is maximised with units See various references from Portland 2.1.3 Controlling Transmitted over lightweight alternatives. Although
consisting of lightweight aggregates or Cement Association (USA) and National Noise the mechanism is not well understood,
units with unpainted open texture and high Concrete Masonry Association (USA) in the resistance to sound transmission
There are three distinct modes of sound
internal porosity, such as no-fines concrete. Part B:Chapter 1, Clause 1.13.2. increases by approximately 6 dB for each
transmission through walls (see Figure 2.4).
Unrendered and unpainted concrete doubling of the frequency or for each
masonry absorbs more sound than surface- n At frequencies below the resonant doubling of the mass.
treated walls. A light spray painting reduces Porous surface Dense surface frequency of the wall, the stiffness of the
n At frequencies above the critical
sound absorption only marginally, although wall is of greatest importance, and the
Untreated Spray paint Brush paint frequency, the coincidence of the sound
paint that is brushed on tends to seal the mass and damping have little effect. As
surface 1 coat 2 coats 1 coat 2 coats waves control the behaviour. For masonry,
outer pores, reducing sound entry and 0.7 the frequency increases, the mass of the
the critical frequency is relatively
dissipation. 0.6 wall becomes more important and the
low when compared to other lighter
wall may start to resonate.

Noise Reduction Coefficients


Not all reflected sound is objectionable. 0.5 materials. A coincidence dip immediately
n At frequencies beyond those which cause above the critical frequency indicates a
It would be most undesirable to have a 0.4
resonance, the mass of the wall provides loss in airborne sound resistance.
room in which all sound generated from 0.3 a damping effect. It is in this region that
within was absorbed. Such a room would
0.2 concrete masonry (being a high mass
be described as acoustically dead and
0.1 system) provides a significant advantage
could have unpleasant psychological
effects on occupants. Sound-absorbing 0
materials are commonly used to quieten LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE UNITS
noisy rooms such as airport lounges or Stiffness Mass Coincidence
hotel bars. Excessive echoing within a Untreated Spray paint Brush paint
controlled controlled controlled
surface 1 coat 2 coats 1 coat 2 coats
building can interfere with hearing. Sound
Noise Reduction Coefficients

0.5
absorbing materials may be used to adjust
0.4
the reverberation time (echo time) of
auditoriums, theatres or concert halls to 0.3
achieve a satisfactory clarity and volume of 0.2 Critical

Sound Transmission Loss (dB)


sound for the particular type of performance 0.1
frequency
to be given. 0 Coincidence dip
A Noise Reduction Coefficient is a measure DENSEWEIGHT AGGREGATE UNITS
of the ability of a wall to absorb sound. Mass Law predicts
6 dB per octave
Figure2.3 shows the estimated Noise Figure 2.3 Estimated Noise Reduction
Reduction Coefficients for concrete masonry Coefficients for Concrete Masonry Walls Resonance
walls with various combinations of surface
texture and finish. Although these figures
provide a useful guide, in critical situations Frequency (Hz)
tests should be carried out on the actual
materials intended for use. Figure 2.4 Characteristic Sound-Transmission-Loss Curve [After EBS Technical Study 48]

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
In addition to providing walls with a high 2.1.4 Airborne Sound Resistance Cladding such as plasterboard or that of the bare wall alone but below which
resistance to sound transmission, the fibrous cement the sound transmission loss is degraded, is:
To achieve high sound transmission
following factors should be considered. Cladding can be applied in the following
resistance, the opposite properties from Fc = 108 /(M.d)1/2 for empty cavities or
n Doors and windows of lower acoustic forms.
those required for good sound absorption
performance than the walls will reduce n Directly fixed to the masonry surface Fc = 60 /(M.d)
1/2 for cavities filled with
are required. The following factors affect the
the resistance to sound transmission, as fibrous sound-
airborne sound resistance. n Mounted on furring channel directly to
will leaving them open, however slightly. aborbing material
the wall
Even very fine cracks or badly fitting Porosity
n Mounted on furring channel with resilient Where:
doors or windows will allow the passage Bare porous masonry will have a lower M = surface mass of the drywall (kg/m2)
sound transmission resistance than non- clips to the wall
of considerable noise.
porous masonry. The sound transmission n Mounted free standing on studs adjacent d = depth of cavity (m)
n Ducts and plenums provide paths for resistance of a masonry wall can typically to the wall.
noise transmission unless correctly Acoustic Insulation in Cavity
drop by 5 to 10 dB with small increases in Plaster cladding directly fixed to the wall Absorptive materials, such as polyester
treated. In critical cases, air conditioning porosity. Greater increases in porosity will
ducts may need to be baffled or lined using glue, screws or furring channels insulation, may be used in the cavity
result in sound transmission resistance can improve the high frequency sound between the masonry wall and cladding. The
internally with sound-absorbing material reductions of 20 dB or more. The sound transmission loss performance of the polyester insulation provides damping and
to prevent sound from travelling along transmission resistance of both porous and wall but may reduce its performance at absorbs the resonant energy, improving the
them from one space to another. non-porous masonry can be improved by low frequencies. Generally, the addition sound transmission resistance performance
n Suspended ceilings of sound absorbing surface treatments such as the application of mass to the wall will improve the by up to 4 dB. Absorptive materials are also
material are very effective when properly of render or claddings. To maintain an sound transmission resistance. However, valuable in mitigating the effects of sound
used. Although they can absorb a great adequate sound transmission resistance performance at low frequencies is generally leakage through small cracks or penetrations
deal of sound originating within a of a common wall it is important to apply degraded by resonance of the cladding in the wall. The deterioration in the sound
room, they are often responsible for the surface treatments across the whole wall, material (acting as a sprung mass) with transmission resistance of a wall is generally
transmission of this noise through the including that part of the wall above the the air in the gap between the cladding not as great when absorption is present in
ceiling spaces into adjacent rooms. This ceiling. material and the wall acting as a spring. If the cavity behind the cladding.
can be prevented by extending the walls Render the resonant frequency also coincides with
Resilient Impact Clips
acting as sound barriers up to the roof The use of render has a two-fold effect. It the natural resonant frequency of the wall
Resilient impact clips are masonry anchors
or underside of the floor above, or by increases the mass of a masonry wall and (called the coincidence frequency), then
with embedded rubber isolation treatment
providing some sound resistance layer it can fill any residual gaps which may be acoustic energy is transferred effectively
incorporated into the fixing bolt. The
above the absorbing panels. present in the wall surface, thus reducing through the wall and may reduce its sound
interposed rubber reduces the vibration
n Environmental noise from outside the its porosity. Render can increase the sound transmission resistance performance
transmitted from the cladding to the wall.
building can be controlled by providing transmission resistance of the wall by by up to 8 dB. The resonance can be
The use of resilient impact clips generally
external walls of high sound resistance. typically 2 to 5 dB. However the application damped by the inclusion of acoustically-
improves the sound transmission resistance
As in the case of internal walls, special of render can reduce the impact rating of insulating material within the cavity. The
by 3 to 7 dB. Where space permits, the
attention must be paid to doors, a masonry wall by typically 2 to 4 dB. This cross-over frequency Fc which is defined
application of cladding to free-standing stud
windows, gaps and cracks. is because the hard render finish provides as the frequency above which the sound
work, not fixed to the masonry wall, can
less cushioning to impacts than the softer transmission loss performance of the
provide even greater sound transmission
masonry surface. masonry wall plus cladding is better than
resistance improvements.

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
2.1.5 Impact Sound Resistance 2.1.6 Practical Considerations Typical penetrations in walls include
For Masonry Wall mechanical services ducts, refrigerant pipes,
When bedrooms or other quiet areas are
Constructions hydraulic reticulation lines, waste pipes
positioned adjacent to bathrooms, kitchens
and fire sprinklers and electrical cables. To
and the like, it is important to reduce the Where surface treatments such as cladding
maintain the sound transmission resistance
sound transmitted through the wall as a and render are applied to masonry walls
of masonry walls it is essential to provide
result of a blow to the other side of the wall to achieve a target sound transmission
an acoustically-rated seal around the
or attached furniture. resistance, the treatment should be applied
penetration.
full-height, from floor slab to soffit to ensure
The impact sound resistance of a wall
that no degradation in wall performance Chases in walls can introduce acoustic
is measured by generating noise with a
occurs. weaknesses. The two main effects are the
machine having multiple steel hammers,
removal of excessive amounts of material
which impact on a steel plate placed in Gaps between masonry units, which may
from the masonry units themselves,
contact with the wall. The sound passing result from poor laying techniques or when
potentially exposing the inner core, and
through the wall may be measured in a mortar shrinks during the drying process,
the disturbance of the mortar in the joints
manner similar to that used for airborne reduce the sound transmission resistance of
between masonry units. Both of these
sound resistance. the wall. Masonry walls have higher sound
effects can reduce the sound transmission
transmission resistance when full-mortar
Resistance to impact sound requires resistance of the wall and care must be
joints are used throughout the wall. Walls
properties different from those for resistance taken to ensure that chasing of pipes not
tested in laboratories generally have full
to airborne sound. A dense stiff material diminish the wall ratings. Wherever possible
joints and this must necessarily be replicated
will vibrate when it is struck, while a soft chases should not extend deeper than
in the field to ensure the same sound
material will simply absorb the blow without 25mm into the wall. All chases should be
transmission resistance.
transmitting it. For example, hard dense rendered over after the pipes or cables are
plaster or render has a lower impact sound Gaps around the vertical edges of a wall, installed.
resistance than the softer commercially and at the soffit junction can greatly
available plasterboards. Soft or resilient diminish the sound resistance of a wall. For
connections between the external skin and example a gap which is 0.l% of wall area
the body of the wall will also reduce the (corresponding to a 3 mm gap along the
amount of impact that is transmitted. length of a 3 m high wall) can reduce the
sound transmission resistance by typically
The impact sound resistance of a wall can
1020 dB. Gaps around the periphery of
generally be improved, over a bare wall, by
walls should be sealed using a high-density
the use of cladding fixed directly to steel
acoustically-rated mastic or similar sealant.
furring channels. The use of resilient impact
These sealants should have a typical density
clips can improve the impact insulation
of 1600 kg/m3. Sealants should be applied to
performance over a bare wall by typically
both faces of the wall and should be applied
3 dB. The use of free-standing cladding
to a depth equal to the width of the gap.
without any attachment to the masonry will
provide better results.

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
2.2 DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
2.2.1 National Construction (c) from parts of different classifications to compartment, laundry or kitchen of Class 9c Aged-care Buildings
Code Building Code of sole occupancy. another unit: n Any walls that separate sole occupancy
Australia Volume ONE Rw + Ctr (airborne) not less than 50, and units in a Class 9c building:
This objective is further expanded for
Requirements Impact sound resistance.
walls in NCCBCA Vol One Clause FF5.1 Rw (airborne) not less than 45
These requirements apply to: NCCBCA Vol One Clauses FF5.2 and FF5.5, Walls requiring impact sound resistance n Any walls that separate a sole occupancy
n Class 2 Buildings, containing two or which spell out the particular applications shall consist of two leaves separated unit in a Class 9c building from a kitchen
more sole-occupancy units, each being where there are requirements to provide by a gap of at least 20 mm and where or laundry:
a separate dwelling, other than a Class 1 both airborne sound resistance and impact necessary for structural purposes,
Rw (airborne) not less than 45, and
Building. Class 2 Building would include sound resistance. NCCBCA Vol One Clauses connected by resilient ties.
Impact sound resistance.
most blocks of home units FF5.3 and FF5.6 further state that the sound n Any walls that separate a sole occupancy
insulation must not be compromised by Walls requiring impact sound resistance
n Class 3 Buildings, residential buildings unit in a Class 2 or 3 building from a
doors or pipes. It is worth noting that the shall consist of two leaves separated
other than Class 1 and Class 2, being the stairway, public corridor, public lobby or
NCCBCA Vol One does not aim to reduce by a gap of at least 20 mm and where
common living place for a number of the like:
the noise entering a room from outside necessary for structural purposes,
unrelated people. They include boarding Rw (airborne) not less than 50 connected by resilient ties.
houses, guest houses, hostels or lodging the building, only to restrict sound passing
from room to room or room to public space n Any walls that separate a sole occupancy n Any walls that separate a sole occupancy
houses, the residential parts of hotels and
within the building. unit in a Class 2 or 3 building from a plant unit in a Class 9c building from a
motels, the residential parts of schools,
room or lift shaft: bathroom, sanitry compartment (not
accommodation for the aged, disabled Insitu Verification of Walls
or children and the staff accommodation Rw (airborne) not less than 50 en-suite) plantroom or utilities room:
NCCBCA Vol One Clause FV5.2 provides for
areas of health care buildings verification of walls constructed in a building n A door assembly incorporated in a wall Rw (airborne) not less than 45
n Class 9c Buildings, aged-care buildings. based on insitu tests to AS/NZS 1276.1 or that separates a sole occupancy unit in a n Walls required to have a sound insulation
ISO 717.1 Class 2 or 3 building from stairway, public shall be constructed to the underside of:
The sound transmission and insulation corridor, public lobby or the like:
requirements are set out in NCCBCA Vol Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions a floor above, or
Rw (airborne) not less than 30 a ceiling with the same acoustic rating, or
One Part F5, and the principal points are NCCBCA Vol One Clauses F5.0 to F5.7
summarised below. It should be noted that provide the means of satisfying the n Walls required to have a sound insulation a roof above.All design and detailing
some states have varied these requirements performance requirements. The particular shall be constructed to the underside of: shall comply with the requirements of
and the means of satisfying them. requirements of Clause F5.3 for walls may be a floor above, or AS3700 and the NCCBCA.
The objective set out in NCCBCA Vol One summarised as follows: a ceiling with the same acoustic rating, or
Clause FO5 is to: a roof above.
Class 2 and 3 Buildings
safeguard occupants from illness or loss n Any walls that separate sole occupancy
of amenity as a result of undue sound being units in a Class 2 or 3 building:
transmitted Rw + Ctr (airborne) not less than 50,
(a) between adjoining sole-occupancy units; n Any walls that separate a habitable room
and of a sole occupancy unit in a Class 2 or
(b) from common spaces to sole-occupancy 3 building from a bathroom, sanitary
units; and

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
2.2.2 National Construction Insitu Verification of Walls n Walls required to be detailed in
Code Building Code of NCCBCA Vol One Clause 3.8.2 V2.4.6 accordance with NCCBCA Vol Two
Australia Volume TWO provides for verification of walls constructed Clause 3.8.6.3, which make provision for
Requirements in a building based on insitu tests to the sealing of sound insulated walls at
AS/NZS 1276.1 or AS/NZS ISO 717.1 (Not junctions with perimeter wall and roof
These requirements apply to Class 1
applicable in Northern Territory) cladding. This clause also requires that
Buildings, single dwelling houses, terrace
masonry joints be filled and provides for
houses, town houses, row houses and villa Acceptable Construction Practice
sound insulated articulation joints.
houses, boarding houses, hostels, group NCCBCA Vol Two Clauses 3.8.6.1 to
houses and dual occupancy houses in 3.8.6.4 provide the means of satisfying the n NCCBCA Vol Two Clause 3.8.6.4 makes
which not more than twelve persons would performance requirements and may be provision for services in uninsulated walls.
normally reside and residential buildings of summarised as follows:
not more than three storeys and containing n Walls that separate a room (other than a
not more than two sole-occupancy units, bathroom, sanitary compartment, laundry
located one above the other and each with or kitchen) of one Class 1 building from
separate means of egress to the road or a habitable room in an adjoining Class 1
open space. building (dwelling):
The sound transmission and insulation Rw + Ctr (airborne) not less than 50
requirements are summarised below. It n Walls that separate a bathroom, sanitary
should be noted that some states have compartment, laundry or kitchen of one
varied these requirements and the means of Class 1 building from a habitable room
satisfying them. (other than a kitchen) in an adjoining
The objective set out in NCCBCA Vol Two Class 1 building (dwelling):
Clause P2.4.6 is to: Rw + Ctr (airborne) not less than 50, and
Discontinuous construction
provide insulation against the
(i.e. for masonry, a minimum of 20 mm
transmission of airborne and impact
cavity between two separate leaves,
generated sound sufficient to prevent illness
which if required for structural purposes,
or loss of amenity to the occupants. The
may be connected with resilient ties)
extent of the requirement is varied in some
states. The objective is further amplified,
The required sound insulation of walls must
not be compromised by the incorporation or
penetration of a pipe or other service element.

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
2.3 STANDARD DESIGNS
All design and detailing shall comply with manufacturers to obtain this data and
the requirements of AS 3700 and the specific recommendations. Some typical
NCCBCA. test results for sound transmission resistance
of masonry walls are demonstrate in the
All control joints, chases and openings
following Charts.
shall be insulated such that the acoustic
attenuation of the wall is maintained.
CHART INDEX
Mortar joints shall be as follows.
1 STC Results
n All bed joints and perpendicular joints Masonry walls with and without various
for solid or cored masonry shall be claddings
completely filled with Type M3 or
Type M4 mortar. 2 STC Test Results
Bare masonry walls
n All bed joints and perpendicular joints for
hollow masonry shall include ironed M3 3 STC Test Results
or M4 mortar to at least the full thickness Rendered masonry walls
of the face shell at their widest point.
4 STC Test Results
All masonry units shall comply with the Masonry walls with plaster cladding
General Specification set out in this manual
(Part C:Chapter 2).
Deemed-To-Satisfy Construction
The National Construction Code (NCC)
Building Code of Australia Volumes One
and Two provide a limited number of
construction types that are deemed to
satisfy the performance requirements for
airborne sound attenuation and impact
sound attenuation.
Sound Attenuation Tests
Masonry manufacturers also have a
significant body of test data on the
acoustic performance of various masonry
wall systems (some incorporating various
combinations of other components such
as render, plasterboard, resilient ties, furring
channels and insulation). It is recommended
that designers contact the masonry

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
STC TEST RESULTS Masonry Walls with and without Various Claddings
13 13 38 13
90 90 90

90-mm
BASALT CONCRETE
BRICK WALL STC 43 STC 47 STC 51

(a) Bare Wall (b) 13-mm Plasterboard (c) 13-mm Plasterboard Glued to One Side, 13-mm Plasterboard on 28-mm Furring Channels
Glued to Both Sides with 10-mm Resilient Mounts and Polyester Insulation on Other Side

10 13 13
140 140 10 13 140 140

140-mm
CALCIUM SILICATE FSTC 47 FSTC 39 FSTC 44 FSTC 51
BRICK WALL

(d) Bare Wall (e) 10-mm Plasterboard (f) 10-mm Plasterboard and13-mm (g) 13-mm Plasterboard,13-mm Resilient Channels
Glued to Both Sides Resilient Channels, Both Sides and 13-mm Polyester Insulation, Both Sides

16 16 13
190 190 16 13 190 190

STC 52
190-mm (insulation 1 side only)
HOLLOW CONCRETE
BLOCK WALL STC 50 STC 49 STC 49
(Small Cores) STC 49
(insulation both sides)

(h) Bare Wall (i) 16-mm Plasterboard (j) 16-mm Plasterboard and13-mm (k) 16-mm Plasterboard, 13-mm Resilient
Screwed to Both Sides Resilient Channels, Both Sides Channels and 19-mm Fibreglass Insulation

Note: These test results yield Sound Transmission Class (STC) which is similar to, but not identical to, Weighted Sound Index (Rw)

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
STC TEST RESULTS Bare Masonry Walls

DATA DETAILS
60
59 Surface Unit
58 Data density thickness
57 number STC (kg/m2) (mm) Unit material Notes Test reference
56 31
55 1 42 174 90 Basalt brick EBS1044
54 2 52 260 140 Dense hollow EBS1051
53
52 2, 27 3 50 253 140 Dense hollow EBS1192
51 4 42 151 110 Clinker brick EBS238
50 3, 26 5 45 195 110 Dense brick EBS257
49 7, 30 6 43 170 150 Dense hollow EBS287
48 29 13 7 49 214 200 Dense hollow EBS407
47 8 38 110 110 Lightweight concrete EBS449
46
45 5, 22 9 42 208 110 Dense hollow LCA 529-83
44 28 12 21 10 41 190 110 Scoria LCA 1122-88
43 16 6, 23, 24 25 11 16 156 110 Basalt/scoria LCA 1287-90
42 17 20, 4 1, 18 9
12 44 170 150 Dense hollow LCA 2192-1-75
Sound Transmission Class (STC)

41 10
40 13 48 230 200 Scoria LCA 2192-3-75
39 14 31 130 90 Scoria RTA T621-01F103
38 8, 19 15 37 150 90 Scoria RTA T621-01F120
37 15 16 43 140 90 Scoria/basalt RTA T621F168
36 17 42 120 110 Scoria lightweight RTA T621F171
35
18 42 174 90 Dense brick CMAA Internal Report
34
33 19 38 110 110 Concrete EBS No. 48 ref no. 7011-1
32 20 42 150 110 Concrete EBS No. 48 ref no. 6068-1
31 14
21 44 175 110 Concrete EBS No. 48 ref no. 6078-1
30
100 200 300 400 500 22 45 195 110 Concrete EBS No. 48 ref no. 6078-3
Wall Surface Density (kg/m2) 23 43 170 140 Clay Bagged EBS No. 48 ref no. 6017-1
24 43 171 140 Dense hollow Bagged CMAA Internal Report
25 43 210 140 Dense concrete CMAA Internal Report
26 50 253 140 Dense hollow CMAA Internal Report
27 52 260 140 Dense hollow CMAA Internal Report
28 44 156 190 Lightweight concrete CMAA Internal Report
29 48 156 190 Lightweight concrete Paint one side CMAA Internal Report
30 49 215 190 Dense concrete CMAA Internal Report
31 56 435 190 Lightweight concrete Paint one side CMAA Internal Report

Note: These test results yield Sound Transmission Class (STC) which is similar to, but not identical to, Weighted Sound Index (Rw)

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
STC TEST RESULTS Rendered Masonry Walls

DATA DETAILS
60
59 Surface Unit
58 Data density thickness
57 number STC (kg/m2) (mm) Unit material Render Test reference
56
55 1 49 224.0 90 Basalt brick 13-mm, 2 faces EBS1044
54 23 2 47 199.0 90 Basalt brick 13-mm, 1 face EBS1044
53
3 51 258.0 110 Dense hollow 13-mm, 2 faces EBS1469
52 5, 19
51 3 4 48 205.0 110 Clinker brick 13-mm, 2 faces EBS238
50 7 22 5 52 249.0 110 Dense brick 13-mm, 2 faces EBS257
49 1, 15 18 6 47 215.0 150 Dense hollow 13-mm, 2 faces EBS287
48 4, 17 7 50 192.4 110 Basalt/scoria 13-mm, 2 faces LCA 1293-90
47 2, 14 6, 20, 21 8 45 198.0 114 Boral concrete 13-mm, 2 faces LCA 2884-1-77
46 16 9 45 139.0 90 Scoria 13-mm, 2 faces RTA T621F126
45 9 8 13
44 10 10 44 209.0 190 Scoria 13-mm, 2 faces RTA T621F138
43 12 11 42 190.0 90 Scoria lightweight 13-mm, 2 faces RTA T621F167
42 11 12 43 145.0 90 Scoria lightweight 13-mm, 2 faces RTA T621F179
Sound Transmission Class (STC)

41
40 13 45 208.0 90 Dense hollow 13-mm, 2 faces CMAA Internal Report
39 14 47 199.0 90 Dense brick 13-mm, 1 face CMAA Internal Report
38 15 49 224.0 90 Dense brick 13-mm, 2 faces CMAA Internal Report
37 16 46 160.0 110 Concrete brick 13-mm, 2 faces EBS No. 48 ref no. 7011-2
36 17 48 205.0 110 Concrete brick 13-mm, 2 faces EBS No. 48 ref no. 6068-2
35 18 49 230.0 110 Concrete brick 13-mm, 2 faces EBS No. 48 ref no. 7112-01
34
33 19 52 250.0 110 Concrete brick 13-mm, 2 faces EBS No. 48 ref no. 6078-4
32 20 47 215.0 140 Dense concrete hollow 13-mm, 2 faces CMAA Internal Report
31 21 47 215.0 140 Dense concrete hollow 13-mm, 2 faces EBS No. 48 ref no. 6017-2
30
100 200 300 400 500 22 50 295.0 150 Woodwaste & cement, hollow 13-mm, 2 faces EBS No. 48 ref no. 7063
Wall Surface Density (kg/m2) 23 54 265.0 190 Dense concrete 13-mm, 2 faces EBS No. 48 ref no. 6079

Note: These test results yield Sound Transmission Class (STC) which is similar to, but not identical to, Weighted Sound Index (Rw)

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
STC TEST RESULTS Masonry Walls With Plaster Cladding

DATA DETAILS
60
59 8 Plaster-
58 10 Surface Unit board
57 9 11 Data density thickness thickness
56
no. STC (kg/m2) (mm) Unit material (mm) Notes Test reference
55
54 1 41 171.4 110 Basalt/scoria 10 Plasterboard glued LCA 1295-90
53 13
52 2 47 206.0 110 Scoria brick 10 Plasterboard glued LCA 1127-88
51 3 50 273.0 140 Dense hollow 10 Plasterboard glued LCA 1267-90
50 7 3 4 36 164.0 110 Basalt/scoria 10 1 face only LCA 1291-90
49 5 48 190.0 110 Dense hollow 10 1 face only LCA 1639-92
48 14 5 6 45 198.0 110 Scoria brick 10 1 face only LCA 1123-88
47 2 12 7 50 263.0 140 Dense hollow 10 1 face only LCA 1268-90
46 16
45 15 6 8 59 171.0 190 Lightweight concrete 13 Metal furring, insulation CMAA Internal Report
44 9 57 186.0 190 Lightweight concrete 13 Timber & metal furring, insul. CMAA Internal Report
43 10 58 190.0 190 Lightweight concrete 13 Timber & metal furring, insul. CMAA Internal Report
42
11 57 240.0 190 Lightweight concrete 13 Resilient timber studs, insul. CMAA Internal Report
Sound Transmission Class (STC)

41 1
40 12 47 220.0 140 Dense concrete 13 1 face, resilient studs CMAA Internal Report
39 13 53 225.0 190 Dense concrete 13 1 face, resilient studs, insul. EBS No. 48 ref no. 6029-1
38 14 48 140.0 110 Scoria lightweight 13 Plasterboard glued RTA T621F172
37 15 45 117.0 90 Scoria lightweight 13 Plasterboard glued RTA T621F175
36 4 16 46 168.0 90 Scoria brick 13 28-mm furring channel RTA T62-01F121
35
34
33
32
31
30
100 200 300 400 500
Wall Surface Density (kg/m2)

Note: These test results yield Sound Transmission Class (STC) which is similar to, but not identical to, Weighted Sound Index (Rw)

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT
2.4 WORKED EXAMPLE

DESIGN BRIEF Sole occupancy unit any room to


Design the internal walls of a home unit for the stairway, public corridor or the like [walls C]
sound transmission requirements of the NCCBCA.
Requires: Rw (airborne) not less than 50
UNIT 3 UNIT 4 Applicable regulation BCA Vol 1 F5.3(b)
Level 3 Living Bed Bed
Home unit is a Class 2 Building.
. applies
Therefore the NCCBCA Vol One Design: Use manufacturers test results

Level 2 Sole occupancy unit any room to Typical Data


sole occupancy unit any room [walls A]
Masonry weighted sound reduction index
Level 1 Requires: Rw + Ctr (airborne) not less than 50 Rw = 55 dBA
SECTION
A-A NCCBCA Vol One F5.5(a)(i)
Masonry weighted sound reduction index & spectrum
Design: Use manufacturers test results adaptation term
Living Bed Bed
Rw + Ctr = 50 dBA
A A
A
UNIT 3
Sole occupancy unit bathroom, laundry,
C kitchen to sole occupancy unit habitable room
Dining Hall
[walls B]
A
Kitchen Bath
A
C Requires: Rw + Ctr (airborne) not less than 50,
Bath UNIT 4
B B
and discontinuous construction
Corridor

(impact sound resistance)


UNIT 2
NCCBCA Vol One
C
Living Living F5.5(a)(ii). F5.5(a)(iii), F5.3(b)
A
Corridor

UNIT 1
Design: Use cavity masonry wall with
Living resilient ties and Rw based on
PLAN LEVEL THRE
E manufacturers test results

PART B:CHAPTER 2
Acoustics QUIT