Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 27

See

discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at:


https://www.researchgate.net/publication/245185556

Thermal expansion of pipe-in-


pipe systems

Article in Marine Structures October 2004


DOI: 10.1016/j.marstruc.2004.12.002

CITATIONS READS

5 374

1 author:

A. Bokaian
23 PUBLICATIONS 640 CITATIONS

SEE PROFILE

Some of the authors of this publication are also working on these related
projects:

r bruschi, earthquake View project

All content following this page was uploaded by A. Bokaian on 03 October 2015.

The user has requested enhancement of the downloaded file.


ARTICLE IN PRESS

Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500


www.elsevier.com/locate/marstruc

Thermal expansion of pipe-in-pipe systems


A. Bokaian
PCL, 42 Southwood Close, Worcester Park, Surrey KT4 8QH, UK
Received 6 June 2003; received in revised form 7 September 2004; accepted 7 December 2004

Abstract

This paper presents a comprehensive mathematical model for the thermal expansion of
pipe-in-pipe and bundle systems that are used in the offshore oil and gas industry. The inner
pipe and the outer pipes are assumed to have structural connections through bulkheads at
extremities and spacers or centralisers to prevent contact of the inner and the outer pipes. The
aim is to calculate the displacement and forces on the bulkheads and axial force in the inner
pipe.
In addition to protective pipe-in-pipes, short and long pipe-in-pipes are dened and the
limits between the two are clearly delineated. Analytical methods are extended to study the
effects of exponential temperature gradients along both the inner and the outer pipes, the pipe-
in-pipe length, tie-in spoolpieces, inner pipe weight, seabed and spacer friction and relative
axial stiffness of the inner and the outer pipes on the thermal expansion characteristics. The
iterative approach to solve thermal expansion characteristics proposed can be replaced by
analytical calculation in most practical situations. Simple analytical formulae are suggested
when the outer pipe temperature is constant. Analytical solutions indicate good agreement
with nite element numerical results.
r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords: Pipe-in-pipe; Bundle; Thermal expansion; Carrier pipe; Jacket pipe; Inner pipe; Outer pipe

Tel.:/fax: +44 208 330 3983.


E-mail address: bokaian@hotmail.com.

0951-8339/$ - see front matter r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
doi:10.1016/j.marstruc.2004.12.002
ARTICLE IN PRESS
476 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

Nomenclature

A parameter as dened in text


Ac outer pipe steel cross-sectional area
Ap inner pipe steel cross-sectional area
Dc outer pipe nominal outer diameter
Dp inner pipe nominal outer diameter
Ec Youngs modulus of elasticity of outer pipe
Ep Youngs modulus of elasticity of inner pipe
Fs tie-in spool friction force (symmetric expansion)
Fs1 upstream tie-in spool friction force
Fs2 downstream tie-in spool friction force
L pipe-in-pipe length
Lo limit length between short and long pipe-in-pipe
L1 length at upstream end over which spacers friction act
L2 length at downstream end over which spacers friction act
Nc force in outer pipe (symmetric expansion)
Nc1 force in outer pipe at upstream bulkhead location
Nc2 force in outer pipe at downstream bulkhead location
NT,p1 thermal force in inner pipe at upstream end
NT,p2 thermal force in inner pipe at downstream end
NE end cap force on bulkhead
NE,p end cap force on inner pipe
Neff,p effective axial force in inner pipe
NT,c thermal force on outer pipe (symmetric expansion)
Ntot,p total force in inner pipe
NT,p thermal force in inner pipe
NT,p1 thermal force in inner pipe at upstream end
NT,p2 thermal force in inner pipe at downstream end
Nn,c force due to Poissons effect in outer pipe (symmetric expansion)
Nn,p force due to Poissons effect in inner pipe (symmetric expansion)
N d; force in inner pipe due to displacement of bulkheads
pd,p inner pipe internal design pressure
pamb outer pipe external hydrostatic pressure
pans annulus pressure
Ta ambient temperature
Td,c outer pipe design temperature
Td,p inner pipe design temperature (symmetric expansion)
Ti,c inlet temperature of outer pipe
Ti,p inlet temperature of inner pipe
To,c outlet temperature of outer pipe
To,p outlet temperature of inner pipe
Tz,c temperature in outer pipe at distance z from inlet
Tz,p temperature in inner pipe at distance z from inlet
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 477

tc outer pipe wall thickness


tp inner pipe wall thickness
Wpip submerged weight of pipe-in-pipe
Wp weight of inner pipe in air
x anchor length (symmetric expansion)
x1 anchor length at upstream end
x2 anchor length at downstream end
z distance measured from bulkhead
n Poissons ratio of steel
a thermal expansion coefcient of steel
bc decay constant for outer pipe temperature prole
bp decay constant for inner pipe temperature prole
f soil friction strain in outer pipe (symmetric expansion)
E end cap strain
dtot total displacement (symmetric expansion)
dtot1 total displacement at upstream end
dtot2 total displacement at downstream end
d1 ; d2 upstream and downstream bulkhead displacement, respectively
sh;c hoop stress in outer pipe
sh;p hoop stress in inner pipe
c outer pipe tensile strain
n;p strain in inner pipe due to Poissons effect
n;c strain in outer pipe due to Poissons effect
net net strain in outer pipe (symmetric expansion)
net1 net strain in outer pipe at upstream end
net1a net strain in outer pipe at upstream end in rst segment
net1b net strain in outer pipe at upstream end in second segment
net2 total net strain in outer pipe at downstream end
T;c thermal strain in outer pipe (symmetric expansion)
T;p thermal strain in inner pipe (symmetric expansion)
tot total strain in pipe-in-pipe (symmetric expansion)
tot1 total strain in outer pipe at upstream end
tot2 total strain in outer pipe at downstream end
m seabed longitudinal friction coefcient
ms spacer friction coefcient
mo reduced longitudinal seabed friction coefcient
m1 increased longitudinal seabed friction coefcient
SN T sum of thermal force of inner and outer pipes (symmetric expansion)
SN T1 sum of thermal forces of inner and outer pipes at upstream end
SN T2 sum of thermal forces of inner and outer pipes at downstream end
SN n sum of Poissons forces of inner and outer pipes as dened in text
ARTICLE IN PRESS
478 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

1. Introduction

The main features of a pipe-in-pipe are a concentric insulated inner pipe


or owline (sometimes called production or carrier pipe) and a protective
outer pipe (sometimes known as sleeve or jacket pipe) [18]. Insulation material
is applied to the inner pipe to prevent the heat loss [912]. This is done by
placing thermal insulation materials within the annulus of the two pipes. The
outer pipe protects the insulation material from external hydrostatic pressure
and mechanical damage. Pipe-in-pipe insulation dictates that the outer
pipe wall temperature is low, therefore conventional and relatively inex-
pensive corrosion coatings and cathodic protection systems may be employed [9].
Pipe-in-pipe may be installed by reeling [1116] rather than conventional lay
barge.
Pipe-in-pipe systems can be divided into two categories, namely, compliant and
non-compliant systems [5]. The compliant systems have a connection between the
inner and outer pipes at close intervals either every two pipe joints by tulip [1720],
or by donut plate [21]. In this case, the inner and the outer pipes expand uniformly
along the pipeline and load transfer is continuous. In non-compliant systems, the
inner and the outer pipes have structural connections through the bulkheads [1,5].
The bulkheads may either be placed at the pipeline extremities or at discrete
locations, usually at intervals of a few kilometres along the pipeline length to transfer
axial loads. The inner and outer pipes move relative to each other. Water stops may
also be required in the event of a wet buckle to limit sea water ingress within the
annulus [4,11,12].
In addition, in both categories, spacers or centralisers are used to prevent contact
of the inner and the outer pipes [11,12]. The centralisers are used mainly to maintain
the owline concentric within the outer pipe and are typically spaced 13 m apart.
However an alternative system has been used whereby insulation foam is employed
along the pipelines length [4].
This paper is concerned with non-compliant systems and investigates a
structurally symmetric pipe-in-pipe with equidistant regular spacers along its
length and a bulkhead at each end. Some nite element results of pipe-in-pipe
are reported in [5] whilst some limited analytical formulations can be found in
[2123]. This paper presents a complete mathematical model for the bulkhead forces
and axial displacements, inner pipe axial force and outer pipe tension under
temperature variation of both the inner and the outer pipes. The concept of
protective, short and long pipe-in-pipe is dened and investigated in great detail. The
mathematical model presented herein is also of direct relevance to the thermal
expansion of pipeline bundles which generally consist of one or more production
pipes (along with other lines such as heat-up lines and methanol lines) placed
together within a larger diameter pipe (sleeve) with an external insulation layer.
The sleeve in turn is placed into an outer pipe, known as carrier, with spacers
positioned throughout to ensure that inner lines are well kept in position within the
outer pipe [24,25]. A comparison is presented between analytical results and nite
element solutions.
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 479

2. Theory

2.1. Uniform temperature

The pipe-in-pipe system considered is assumed to have two identical tie-in


spoolpieces [2629] at the two ends. This ensures a static point at the centre of the
pipe-in-pipe system, as shown in Fig. 1b. From the force equilibrium on the
bulkhead, the following equality applies:

N T;p N n;p  N E F s N d N c 0 (2.1)

in which, N T;p is the thermal force in inner pipe, N n;p the force due to Poissons effect
in inner pipe, N E the end cap force on bulkhead, F s the tie-in spool frictional
resistance, N d; the force in inner pipe due to displacement of bulkheads, and N c the
tension force in outer pipe.
Throughout this paper, sufces p and c denote inner pipe and the outer pipe,
respectively.
The thermal force in the inner pipe is calculated as [30,31]:

N T;p E p Ap aT d;p  T a , (2.2)

where, E p is the inner pipe Youngs modulus of elasticity, Ap the inner pipe steel
cross-sectional area, a the coefcient of thermal expansion of steel pipeline, T d;p the
strain

tot
T,c
c
v,c z
net distance along pipe-in-pipe

f
x (anchor length) pote
ntial

(a) Strain in outer pipe


displaced
outer pipe bulkhead bulkhead
Nc (outer pipe tension)

NT,p (inner pipe temperature force)


spacer
N (inner pipe deflection force)

inner pipe

NE (end cap force)

Nv,p (inner pipe Poissons force)

FS (tie-in spool seabed friction force) Anchor region x (anchor length) (expansion)
seabed friction force on outer pipe
L/2

(b) Forces on bulkhead, inner and outer pipes

Fig. 1. Thermal expansion of symmetric pipe-in-pipe system. (a) Strain in outer pipe. (b) Forces on
bulkhead, inner and outer pipes.
ARTICLE IN PRESS
480 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

inner pipe design temperature, and T a the ambient temperature which is assumed to
be equal to installation temperature.
The force in the inner pipe due to Poissons effect is evaluated from [30,31]:
N n;p sh;p Ap n, (2.3)
where, n is the Poissons ratio, and sh;p the hoop stress in inner pipe which is
calculated from [32]:
 
Dp  tp
sh;p pd;p  pans (2.4)
2tp
in which, Dp is the inner pipe nominal outer diameter, tp the inner pipe wall
thickness, pd;p the inner pipe internal design pressure, and pans the annulus design
pressure.
The end cap force on the bulkhead is evaluated from the following relationship:
N E pd;p  inner area of inner pipe
pans  annular area between inner and outer pipes
 pamb  outer area of bulkhead; 2:5
where, pamb is the outer pipe external hydrostatic pressure.
The end cap force N E is shared by both the inner and the outer pipes in proportion
to the axial stiffness as:
E p Ap
N E;p NE, (2.6)
E p Ap E c Ac
where, N E;p is the end cap force on inner pipe, E c the outer pipe Youngs modulus of
elasticity, and Ac the outer pipe steel cross-sectional area.
The end cap strain is:
NE
E . (2.7)
E p Ap E c Ac
The tie-in spoolpiece frictional resistance F s is obtained by multiplying its
submerged weight by the seabed longitudinal friction coefcient.
The tensile force in the inner pipe can be evaluated from:
N d 2E p Ap d=L (2.8)
where d is the bulkhead displacement (see Fig. 1b), and L the pipe-in-pipe length.
If the outer pipe suffers an increased temperature because of heat convection from
the inner pipe, the thermal strain in the outer pipe may similarly be written as:
T;c aT d;c  T a , (2.9)
where T d;c is the outer pipe design temperature.
The hoop stress in the outer pipe is similarly calculated as:
 
D c  tc
sh;c pans  pamb , (2.10)
2tc
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 481

where Dc is the outer pipe nominal diameter, tc the outer pipe wall thickness, and
pamb the outer pipe external hydrostatic pressure.
The total strain acting along the outer pipe is dened as (tensile strain positive
otherwise compressive):
tot T;c n;c c , (2.11)
where, T;c is the thermal strain in outer pipe, n;c the outer pipe strain due to
Poissons effect nsh;c =E c ; and c the tensile strain in outer pipe as a result of
bulkhead displacement N c =E c Ac :
As shown in Fig. 1a, the strain in the outer pipe as a result of soil friction f [30,31]
and the net strain net are:
mW pip
f z,
E c Ac

net tot  f , (2.12)


where, m is the longitudinal seabed friction coefcient, W pip the pipe-in-pipe
submerged weight, and z the distance measured from bulkhead.
The anchor length at each end of the pipe-in-pipe system x is obtained by equating
the net strain to:
mW pip Nc mW pip
net tot  f tot  x T;c n;c  x 0. (2.13)
E c Ac E c Ac E c Ac
From the above relationship N c may be rewritten as:
N c mW pip x  T;c n;c E c Ac mW pip x  N T;c N n;c , (2.14)
where
N T;c E c Ac T;c E c Ac aT d;c  T a ; and N n;c E c Ac n;c nsh;c Ac :
(2.15)
The bulkhead displacement d may be written in terms of x as:
Z x Z x 
mW pip mW pip 2 mW pip 2
d net dz tot  z dz tot x  x x .
0 0 E c Ac 2E c Ac 2E c Ac
(2.16)
Rewriting Eq. (2.1) in terms of the above relationships results in an equation for x:
E c Ac L E c Ac  
x2 L x N T;p N n;p  N E F s  N T;c N n;c 0.
E p Ap mW pip E p Ap
(2.17)
Effects of spacer friction: The effects of friction between the inner pipe and the
spacers imposes a compressive distributed force with intensity of ms W p on the inner
pipe (see Fig. 2b) where W p is the weight per unit length of inner pipe in air and ms
the friction coefcient between inner pipe and spacers.
This means in Fig. 1b and Eqs. (2.1) and (2.17), ms LW p =2 should be deducted
from N T;p : Furthermore the above friction force creates a tension in the outer pipe.
ARTICLE IN PRESS
482 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

(Ti,p Ta)

(Ti,p Ta)epz
(To,p Ta)
displaced
bulkhead spacer outer pipe bulkhead

EpAp(Ti,p Ta) EpAp(To,p Ta)

L1 L2
x1 x2

(a) Variable temperature

(Td,p Ta)

inner pipe

EpAp(Td,p Ta) EpAp(Td,p Ta)

x Anchor region L /2 spacer friction

(b) Constant temperature

Fig. 2. Inner pipe temperature variation and spacer friction force. (a) Variable temperature. (b) Constant
temperature.

Its effect can be incorporated in the above formulae by using the reduced seabed
friction coefcient dened as:
 
ms W p
m0 m 1  . (2.18)
m W pip
Eq. (2.17) may be rewritten as:
E c Ac L E c Ac
x2 L x SN T ms W p L=2 SN n  N E F s 0
E p Ap mo W pip E p Ap
(2.19)
in which
SN T N T;p N T;c sum of thermal forces on bulkhead

SN n N n;p  N n;c sum of Poissons forces on bulkhead (2.20)


The solution to Eq. (2.19) may be written as:
q
SN T ms W p L=2SN n N E F s E p Ap
L 1 1 4 m0 LW pip E c Ac
x (2.21)
2 E p Ap =E c Ac
The necessary and sufcient condition for the solution to exist is 0oxpL=2: This
leads to:
F s pSN T  ms W p L=2  SN n N E ,
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 483

1=m0 W pip E c Ac =E p Ap SN T  SN n N E  F s
LXLo 1
, (2.22)
4 E c Ac =2E p Ap 1 ms =m0 W p =W pip

where Lo is the limit length between short and long pipe-in-pipe.


The total force N tot;p and the effective axial force N eff ;p in the inner pipe are:
N tot;p N T;p  ms W p L=2 N d N n;p ,

N eff ;p N tot;p  N E;p . (2.23)


The bulkhead displacement and the inner and the outer pipe forces are simplied
as:
m0 W pip 2 m0 W pip E p Ap 2
d x ; Nd x ,
2E c Ac L E c Ac

N c m0 W pip x  N T;c N n;c . (2.24)

2.1.1. Short pipe-in-pipes


Eq. (2.21) delineates the limit between the long and short pipe-in-pipe systems. For
the latter, the forces and displacements based on the anchor length of L=2 will not be
enough to balance the forces on the bulkhead. As a result, an additional amount of
bulkhead displacement must occur to result in a balance of forces on the bulkhead.
The force due to the extra displacement is not inuenced by the soil friction as this is
generating its maximum value m0 W pip L=2 on each side. With reference to Fig. 3a, the
bulkhead displacement and the inner pipe force become, respectively:
Z L=2 Z L=2    
m W pip m W pip L L
d net dz tot  0 z dz tot  0 ,
0 0 E c Ac E c Ac 4 2
 
m0 W pip L
N d E p Ap tot  . (2.25)
E c Ac 4
From Eq. (2.11), the strain in the outer pipe may be written as:
c tot  T;c  n;c . (2.26)
Using the above expressions and substituting N c E c Ac c into Eq. (2.1) leads to:
SN T  ms W p L=2  SN n N E  F s E p Ap =E c Ac m0 W pip L=4
tot .
E p Ap E c Ac
(2.27)
Based on the above equation d; N d; and the force in the outer pipe at bulkhead
location become:
 
SN T  ms W p L=2  SN n N E  F s  m0 W pip L=4 L
d ,
E p Ap E c Ac 2
ARTICLE IN PRESS
484 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

strain
tot

net

anchor
upstream point downstream
bulkhead f bulkhead

L /2 L /2

(a) Uniform temperature

tot

net

anchor
point

x1 L-x1

(b) Temperature gradient in inner Pipe

net
tot

anchor
point
x1 L-x1

(c) Inner and outer pipe temperature variation

Fig. 3. Thermal expansion of short pipe-in-pipes. (a) Uniform temperature. (b) Temperature gradient in
inner pipe. (c) Inner and outer pipe temperature variation.

SN T  ms W p L=2  SN n N E  F s  m0 W pip L=4


Nd ,
1 E c Ac =E p Ap
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 485

Nc
E c Ac =E p Ap N T;p  ms W p L=2  N n;p N E  F s  N T;c N n;c m0 W pip L=4
.
1 E c Ac =E p Ap
2:28

2.1.2. Protective pipe-in-pipes


In most engineering situations, E p Ap 4E c Ac : However in some cases the
opposite may be true. This happens when the primary purpose of the outer pipe
is to protect the inner pipe from the effects of dropped objects in areas close to
the platforms [33]. For a long protective pipe-in-pipe, the anchor length may be
written as:

SN T  ms W p L=2  SN n N E  F s
x . (2.29)
m0 W pip

2.2. Temperature gradient

The ow through a pipe-in-pipe system causes a temperature gradient along the


length of the system, as shown in Figs. 2a. The exponential distribution represents a
realistic simulation of the temperature variation in the inner pipe due to heat loss and
may be written as [34,35]:

T z;p  T a T i;p  T a ebp z , (2.30)

where, z is the distance measured from inner pipe inlet (upstream end), T i;p the inlet
temperature (at hot end of inner pipe), T z;p the temperature at distance z from inlet,
and bp the heat loss coefcient (decay constant) for inner pipe. bp is a function of the
pipeline and coating conductivity properties, internal uid properties and external
convection and may be written as:

1 T i;p  T a
bp ln , (2.31)
L T o;p  T a

where, To,p is the outlet temperature (at cold end of inner pipe).
The thermal force in the inner pipe varies from a maximum of N T;p1
E p Ap aT i;p  T a at the inlet to a minimum of N T;p2 E p Ap aT o;p  T a at the
outlet. The difference is balanced by the frictional forces generated by the spacers on
the inner pipe, as shown in Fig. 2a, according to which:

E p Ap aT i;p  T o;p ms W p L2  L1 ,
L1 L2 L, 2:32

where, L1 ; L2 is the upstream and downstream length, respectively, over which two
opposing spacer friction forces act (see Fig. 2a).
ARTICLE IN PRESS
486 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

From the above relationships:




E p Ap a
L1 L  T i;p  T o;p 2,
ms W p


E p Ap a
L2 L T i;p  T o;p 2,
ms W p
L2 4L1 . 2:33
Throughout this paper, sufxes 1 and 2 refer to the upstream and the downstream
end of the pipe-in-pipe system, respectively.
The equilibrium of forces on the bulkheads results in:
N T;p1 ms W p L1 N n;p  N E F s1 N d N c1 0,

N T;p2 ms W p L2 N n;p  N E F s2 N d N c2 0, (2.34)


where
d1 d2
N d E p Ap . (2.35)
L
By subtracting the above two relationships, the following expression is
obtained:
N c1  N c2 N T;p1  N T;p2  ms W pip L1  L2  F s1  F s2 . (2.36)
For the case of a long pipe-in-pipe system, two cases are considered. Case 1 relates
to L1 4x1 : Case 2 denes the opposite situation of L1 ox1 ; as shown for example in
Fig. 2a.

2.2.1. Uniform outer pipe temperature


(a) Long pipe-in-pipe
Case 1 : x1 oL1 In this case, the net strain, the outer pipe force and the bulkhead
displacement at the upstream end become, respectively:
m0 W pip
net1 T;c n;c c1  z; 0ozoL1 ,
E c Ac

N c1 m0 W pip x1  T;c n;c E c Ac m0 W pip x1  N T;c N n;c ,

m0 W pip x21
d1 . (2.37)
2E c Ac
The anchor point and the bulkhead displacement at the downstream end may
similarly be written as:
m0 W pip
net2 T;c n;c c2  x2 0,
E c Ac
Z x2
m0 W pip 2
d2 net2 dz x . (2.38)
0 2E c Ac 2
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 487

Eq. (2.38) may be rewritten as:


N c2 m0 W pip x2  N T;c N n;c . (2.39)
Substitution of N c1 and N c2 in Eq. (2.36) by their equivalents results in:
N T;p1  N T;p2 ms W p L1  L2 F s1  F s2
x2 x1 (2.40)
m0 W pip
Using Eqs. (2.37) and (2.38), the inner pipe force may be written as:
m0 W pip E p Ap 2
Nd x x22 . (2.41)
2L E c Ac 1
By substituting N d; from Eq. (2.41) and N c1 from Eq. (2.37) into Eq. (2.34) and
making use of Eq. (2.40), the following relationship is obtained for x1 :

E c Ac N T;p1  N T;p2 ms W p L1  L2 F s1  F s2
x21 L x1
E p Ap m0 W pip
L E c Ac
SN T1 SN n  N E F s1 ms W p L1
m0 W pip E p Ap

1 N T;p1  N T;p2 ms W p L1  L2 F s1  F s2 2
0, 2:42
2 m0 W pip

where SN T1 N T;p1 N T;c is the sum of thermal forces on the upstream
bulkhead.
For a uniform temperature pipe-in-pipe system but with different tie-in spool
weights, L1 L2 L=2 and the above relationships are simplied as:
F s1  F s2
x2 x1 ,
m0 W pip

 
E c Ac F s1  F s2 L E c Ac
x21 L x1
E p Ap m0 W pip m0 W pip E p Ap
 SN T1 SN n  N E F s1 ms W p L=2
 
1 F s1  F s2 2
0. 2:43
2 m0 W pip
The above solution is valid when x1 oL1 and x1 x2 pL:
Case 2 : x1 4L1 With reference to Fig. 2a, the net strain at the upstream end is:
m0 W pip
net1a T;c n;c c1  z; 0ozoL1 ,
E c Ac

m0  m1 W pip L1 m1 W pip
net1b T;c n;c c1   z; L1 ozox1 , (2.44)
E c Ac E c Ac
ARTICLE IN PRESS
488 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

where, m1 is the enhanced seabed friction coefcient dened as:


 
m Wp
m1 m 1 s . (2.45)
m W pip
The anchor point and the bulkhead displacement at the upstream end are:
m0  m1 W pip L1 m1 W pip
net1b T;c n;c c1   x1 0,
E c Ac E c Ac
Z x1 Z L1 Z x1
d1 net1 dz net1a dz net1b dz
0 o L1

W pip L2 m
m0  3m1 1 m1 L1 x1 1 x21 . 2:46
E c Ac 2 2
From Eq. (2.44), the outer pipe force at the upstream end may be written as:
N c1 m1 W pip x1 m0  m1 W pip L1  N T;c N n;c . (2.47)
Substitution of N c1 from the above equation and N c2 from Eq. (2.39) into Eq.
(2.36) leads to:
m1
x2 x1
m0
N T;p1  N T;p2 ms W p L1  L2 F s1  F s2 m0  m1 W pip L1
,
m0 W pip
|{z}
A

2:48
where A refers to the second term on right-hand side of Eq. (2.48).
Using Eq. (2.48), the inner pipe force becomes:

E p Ap W pip mm1 2 1 m A2
Nd x1 m1 L1 Ax1 m0  3m1 L21 0 . (2.49)
E c Ac L m0 2 2
By substituting N d; from the above and N c1 from Eq. (2.47) into the balance of
forces on the upstream bulkhead of Eq. (2.34), the following equation is obtained for
the calculation of x1 :
 
mm0 2 E c Ac
x1 m 1 L 1 A L x1
m E p Ap

E c Ac L
SN T1 SN n  N E F s1 ms W p L1
E p Ap W pip

1
m0  m1 W pip L1 m0  3m1 L21 m0 A2 0. 2:50
2
The solution is valid when x1 4L1 and x1 x2 pL: Note that m0 m1 2m and
m1  m0 2ms W p =W pip :
(b) Short pipe-in-pipe
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 489

In cases where x1 x2 4L (see Fig. 3b), by equating the anchor point strain at the
downstream end from Eq. (2.38) to that at the upstream end from Eq. (2.44) and by
substituting x2 L  x1 ; the following relationship is obtained:
 
N c1  N c2 W pip m0 m1 x1 m0 L1  L  m1 L1 . (2.51)
By equating the above relationship with that of 2.36, the following expression is
obtained for x1 :
N T;p1  N T;p2  ms W p L1  L2  F s1  F s2 mo L2 m1 L1
x1 .
2mW pip 2m
(2.52)
The bulkheads displacements become:
Z x1 Z L1 Z x1
d1 net1 dz net1a dz net1b dz
0 0 L1
2 
m0  m1 W pip L1 m  m1 W pip L1 m W pip 2
T;c n;c c1  0 x1  1 x,
2E c Ac E c Ac 2E c Ac 1
Z Lx1 Z Lx1  
m W pip
d2 T;c n;c c2  0
net2 dz z dz
0 0 E c Ac
2 
m0 W pip L m0 W pip L
T;c n;c c2 L  T;c n;c c2
2E c Ac E c Ac
m W pip 2
 x1  0 x . 2:53
2E c Ac 1
Thus the inner pipe force may be written in terms of x1 and Nc2 as:
E p Ap
Nd d1 d2
L
  
E p Ap W pip m0  m1 L21  m0 L2 2
mx1 N T;c N n;c N c2 .
E c Ac L 2
2:54
Substitution of N d; in the balance of forces on the downstream bulkhead of Eq.
(2.34) and the subsequent use of Eq. (2.51) result in the following expressions for
N c1 and N c2 :
E c Ac
E p Ap N T;p2  ms W p L2  N n;p N E  F s2 W pip 2mx1  m0 L2  m1 L1
N T;c N n;c
N c1
1 EEpc A
Ap
c

n h 2 2
i o
1 m0 L m1 m0 L1
W pip L 2  mx21 2mx1  m0 L2  m1 L1
,
1 EEpc A
Ap
c
ARTICLE IN PRESS
490 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

E c Ac
E p Ap N T;p2  ms W p L2  N n;p N E  F s2  N T;c N n;c
W pip =Lm0 L2 m1  m0 L21 =2  mx21
N c2 . (2.55)
1 EEpc A
Ap
c

N d can be rewritten as:


h i
m0 L2 m1 m0 L21
SN T2  ms W p L2  SN n N E  F s2  W pip =L 2  mx21
Nd .
1 E c Ac =E p Ap
(2.56)

2.2.2. Outer pipe temperature gradient


In most cases, the temperature in the outer pipe is the almost the same as the
ambient temperature. However if there is any variation, this may similarly be
approximated as (see Fig. 4):

T z;c  T a T i;c  T a ebc z , (2.57)

where T i;c is the inlet temperature (at hot end of outer pipe), T z;c the temperature
at distance z from inlet, and bc the heat loss coefcient for outer pipe similarly
strain

tot1
strain
T,c1 tot2
c-1 T,c1
v,c c2
v,c
net1 net2

f
f
pote
ntial
l
ntia
pote
(a) Strain in outer pipe

(Ti,c Ta) (Ti,c Ta)ec z


(To,c Ta)
z
(b) Outer pipe temperature profile
displaced
bulkhead outer pipe bulkhead
spacer inner pipe

1 x1 x2 2
anchor region
L
(c) Thermal expansion

Fig. 4. Pipe-in-pipe expansion under temperature variation. (a) Strain in outer pipe. (b) Outer pipe
temperature prole. (c) Thermal expansion.
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 491

dened as:
1 T i;c  T a
bc ln . (2.58)
L T o;c  T a
(a) Long pipe-in-pipe
Case 1 : x1 oL1
With reference to Fig. 4(a), the upstream anchor point and bulkhead displacement
are obtained from:
net1 tot1  f T;c n;c c1  f 1 aT i;c  T a ebc x1
m W pip
n;c c1  0 x1 0,
E c Ac

Z x1   
1 1 m W pip 2
d1 net1 dz aT i;c  T a  x1 e bc x1
0 x , (2.59)
0 bc bc 2E c Ac 1

where tot1 is the total strain at upstream end, dened similar to Eq. (2.11).
The rst equation may be rewritten as:
N c1 m0 W pip x1  aT i;c  T a ebc x1 E c Ac  N n;c . (2.60)
With the above relationship, Eq. (2.34) for the equilibrium of forces on the
upstream bulkhead is reduced to:
d1 d2
 aT i;c  T a ebc x1 E c Ac  N T;p1 m0 W pip x1 E p Ap
L
SN n  N E F s1 ms W p L1 0. 2:61

The temperature in the outer pipe may alternatively be written as:


T z;c  T a T o;c  T a ebc z , (2.62)

where z is the distance from inner pipe outlet and T z;c the temperature at distance z
from outlet.
The anchor point and the bulkhead displacement at the downstream end may
similarly be calculated from:
m0 W pip
net2 tot2  f aT o;c  T a ebc x2 n;c c2  x2 0,
E c Ac
Z x2   
1 1 m W pip 2
d2 net2 dz aT o;c  T a    x2 e bc x2
0 x ,
0 bc bc 2E c Ac 2
(2.63)
where tot2 is the total strain at downstream end.
From Eq. (2.63), the outer pipe force at the downstream end becomes:
N c2 m0 W pip x2  aT o;c  T a ebc x2 E c Ac  N n;c . (2.64)
ARTICLE IN PRESS
492 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

The balance of forces on the downstream bulkhead results in:


d1 d2
 aT o;c  T a ebc x2 E c Ac  N T;p2 m0 W pip x2 E p Ap
L
SN n  N E F s2 ms W pip L2 0. 2:65
Substitution of d1 from Eq. (2.59) and d2 from Eq. (2.63) into Eqs. (2.61) and
(2.65) results in the following two relationships in terms of x1 and x2 :
 
E c Ac m0 W pip 1 x1 bc x1
 aT i;c  T a ebc x1 x1  aT i;c  T a e
E p Ap E p Ap Lbc L
 
1 x2 bc x2 m0 W pip 2 aT i;c  T o;c
 aT o;c  T a  e x x22
Lbc L 2E c Ac L 1 Lbc
N T;p1 SN n  N E F s1 ms W p L1
0, 2:66a
E p Ap
 
E c Ac m0 W pip
bc x2 1 x1 bc x1
 aT o;c  T a e x2  aT i;c  T a e
E p Ap E p Ap Lbc L
 
1 x2 bc x2 m0 W pip 2 aT i;c  T o;c
 aT o;c  T a  e x x22
Lbc L 2E c Ac L 1 Lbc
N T;p2 SN n  N E F s2 ms W p L2
0. 2:66b
E p Ap
The above pair of equations can be solved iteratively [36]. The solution is valid
when x1 oL1 and x1 x2 pL:
In most practical cases bc x1 51 and bc x2 51: Based on this, an alternative but
slightly approximate method which simplies the solution to the above equations, is
to expand the exponential terms as [37]:
1
ebc x1  1  bc x1 bc x1 2 ,
2
1
e bc x2
 1 bc x2 bc x2 2 . 2:67
2
If the outer pipe temperature rapidly declines to ambient, then the d2 and Nc2 are
simplied as:
m0 W pip 2
d2 x,
2E c Ac 2

N c2 m0 W pip x2  N T;c N n;c . (2.68)


The balance of forces on the downstream bulkhead is also simplied as:
d1 d2
SN T2 m0 W pip x2 E p Ap SN n  N E F s2 ms W p L2 0,
L
(2.69)
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 493

where SN T2 N T;p2 N T;c is the sum of thermal forces on downstream


bulkhead.
The solution is valid when T o:c  T a ebc x2  0:
Case 2: x1 4L1
The net strain at the upstream end may be written as:
m0 W pip
net1a aT i;c  T a ebc z n;c c1  E c Ac z; 0ozoL1 ;
m0 m1 W pip L1 m1 W pip
net1b aT i;c  T a ebc z n;c c1  E c Ac  E c Ac z; L1 ozox1 :
(2.70)
The upstream anchor point and bulkhead displacement can be calculated from:
m0  m1 W pip L1 m1 W pip
net1b aT i;c  T a ebc x1 n;c c1   x1 0,
E c Ac E c Ac

Z x1 Z L1 Z x1
d1 net1 dz net1a dz net1b dz
0 0 L1
  
1 1 W pip
aT i;c  T a  x1 ebc x1 m  m1 L21 m1 x21 . 2:71
bc bc 2E c Ac 0
Eq. (2.70) may be rewritten as:
N c1 m1 W pip x1  aT i;c  T a ebc x1 E c Ac  N n;c m0  m1 W pip L1 . (2.72)
With the above, Eq. (2.34) is reduced to:
d1 d2
 aT i;c  T a ebc x1 E c Ac  N T;p1 m1 W pip x1 E p Ap
L
SN n  N E F s1 ms W p L1 m0  m1 W pip L1 0. 2:73
Eqs. (2.63) and (2.65) remain valid for the downstream bulkhead displacement
and balance of forces.
Substitution of d1 from Eq. (2.71) and d2 from Eq. (2.63) into Eq. (2.73) results in
the following expression in terms of x1 and x2 :
 
bc x1 E c Ac m1 W pip 1 x1 bc x1
 aT i;c  T a e x1  aT i;c  T a e
E p Ap E p Ap bc L L
 
1 x2 bc x2 W pip
 aT o;c  T a  e m x2 m0 x22 m0  m1 L21
bc L L 2E c Ac L 1 1
aT i;c  T o;c

bc L
N T;p1 SN n  N E F s1 ms W p L1 m0  m1 W pip L1
0. 2:74
E p Ap
Eqs. (2.66b) and (2.74) can similarly be solved in terms of x1 and x2 : The solution
is valid when x1 4L1 and x1 x2 pL:
(b) Short pipe-in-pipe
ARTICLE IN PRESS
494 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

With reference to Fig 3c, by equating the anchor point strain at the upstream end
from Eq. (2.70) to that at the downstream end from Eq. (2.63), and by substituting
x2 L  x1 ; the following relationship is obtained:
N c1 m0  m1 W pip L1 m1 W pip
aT i;c  T a ebc x1 n;c   x1
E c Ac E c Ac E c Ac
N c2 m0 W pip
aT o;c  T a ebc Lx1 n;c  L  x1 . 2:75
E c Ac E c Ac

Using Eq. (2.61), the above relationship is reduced to:


N c1  N c2 W pip m0 m1 x1 m0 L1  L  m1 L1 (2.76)

which is identical to Eq. (2.51) for uniform temperature. Equating the above
relationship with Eq. (2.36) results in the following equation for x1 :

N T1  N T2  ms W p L1  L2  F s1  F s2 m1 L1 m0 L2


x1 .
2mW pip 2m
(2.77)

The bulkheads displacements are:


Z x1 Z L1 Z x1
d1 net1 dz net1a dz net1b dz
0 0 0
aT i;c  T o W pip L21
1  ebc x1 mo  m1
b 2E c Ac
 c
m0 m1 W pip L1 m W pip 2
n;c c1 x1  1 x ,
E c Ac 2E c Ac 1

Z x2 Z Lx1 
m0 W pip
d2 net2 dz aT o;c  T a ebc z n;c c2  z dz
0 0 E c Ac
T i;c  T a bc Lx1
aebc L e  1 n;c c2 L  x1
bc
m W pip
 0 L  x1 2 . 2:78
2E c Ac

Using Eq. (2.35), the inner pipe force becomes:

E p Ap
Nd d1 d2
L

aT i;c  T o;c E p Ap W pip m0  m1 L21  m0 L2
E p Ap mx21
Lbc E c Ac L 2
N n;c N c2 . 2:79
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 495

Substitution of N d in Eq. (2.34) and the subsequent use of Eq. (2.76) result in the
following relationships for N c1 and N c2 :

E c Ac =E p Ap N T;p2  ms W p L2  N n;p N E  F s2


W pip 2mx1  m0 L2  m1 L1  E c Ac aT i;c  T o;c =Lbc N n;c
N c1
1 E c Ac =E p Ap
1 2

W pip L m0 L m1  m0 L21 =2  mx21 2mx1  m0 L2  m1 L1
,
1 E c Ac =E p Ap

E c Ac =E p Ap N T;p2  ms W p L2  N n;p N E  F s2  E c Ac aT i;c  T o;c =Lbc N n;c


W pip =Lm0 L2 m1  m0 L21 =2  mx21
N c2 .
1 E c Ac =E p Ap
(2.80)

Thus Nd may be rewritten as:


 
E c Ac aT i;c T o;c
Lbc N T;p2  ms W pip L2  SN n N E  F s2
W pip =Lm0 L2 m1  m0 L21 =2  mx21
Nd . (2.81)
1 E c Ac =E p Ap

It should be noted that the rst quotient in the numerator represents the average
temperature in the outer pipe.

3. Application

The above mathematical model was applied to two pipe-in-pipe systems whose
characteristics are summarised in Table 1. A long pipe-in-pipe of length 11,000 m
and short one of 6000 m are considered. All thermal expansion cases discussed in this
paper are considered. The ndings are tabulated in Tables 2 and 3 along with
corresponding nite element analysis results.

4. Conclusions

Based on simple columb friction between the inner pipe and the spacers, analytical
formulas were developed for thermal expansion of non-compliant pipe-in-pipe
systems. It was concluded that the anchor length ratio increases with both a decrease
in pipe-in-pipe length and an increase in the square root of the resultant force that
tends to displace the bulkhead whereas for a long protective pipe-in-pipe with thin
outer pipe wall thickness, the anchor length is directly proportional to this force.
ARTICLE IN PRESS
496 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

Table 1
Pipe-in-pipe data

Parameter Symbol Unit Value

1000 Inner pipe


(a) Geometric and material properties
Outer diameter Dp mm 273.1
Wall thickness tp mm 14.3
Coating thickness mm 3
Coating density kg/m3 900
Steel Young modulus of elasticity Ep N/m2 2.07  1011
Steel density kg/m3 7850
Poissons ratio of steel n dimensionless 0.3
Coefcient of thermal expansion of steel a 1/1C 11.7  106
Fluid density kg/m3 900
Design pressure pd,p bar 400
1400 Outer pipe
Outer diameter Dc mm 355.6
Wall thickness tc mm 12.7
Coating thickness mm 2.5
Coating density kg/m3 1000
Steel Young modulus of elasticity Ec N/m2 2.07  1011
Mass per unit length of insulation, spacers and kg/m 3
other appurtenances
Spacers friction coefcient ms dimensionless 0.22
Mass of tie-in spoolpiece te 11.52
Annulus design pressure pans bar 1
(b) Environmental and soil data
Water depth m 300
Sea water density kg/m3 1025
Longitudinal seabed friction coefcient m dimensionless 0.6
Ambient (installation) temperature Ta 1C 5

Table 2
Hoop stress

Parameter Symbol Unit Value

Inner pipe sh MPa 361.1


Outer pipe sc MPa 39.4

For short pipe-in-pipe systems, the effect of outer pipe temperature variation on
the inner pipe axial force and outer pipe tension can be replaced by its average over
the pipe-in-pipe length. The inner pipe axial force increases with increase in the
resultant force on the bulkhead.
For the case of exponentially varying outer pipe temperature, iterative methods
should be employed to calculate the thermal expansion characteristics. The iteration
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 497

Table 3
Pipe-in-pipe thermal expansion characteristics

Parameter Symbol Unit Value

Temperature data
(a) Uniform temperature
Inner pipe design temperature Td,p 1C 95
Outer pipe design temperature Td,c 1C 15

Long pipe-in-pipe
Pipe-in-pipe length L m 11,000
Anchor length x m 4110
Limit between short and long pipe-in-pipe Lo m 8491oL

Results dimensionless Analytical Finite element

Bulkhead displacement d mm 1190 1189


Inner pipe force N d; kN 521 520.5
Total axial force in inner pipe Ntotal,p kN 1865 1863
Effective axial force in inner pipe Neff,p kN 2588 2584
Outer pipe force at bulkhead location Nc kN 1148 1146

Short pipe-in-pipe
Pipe-in-pipe length L km 6000oLo

Results dimensionless Analytical Finite element

Bulkhead displacement d mm 1184 1186


Inner pipe force N d; kN 950 954
Total axial force in inner pipe Ntotal,p kN 931 937
Effective axial force in inner pipe Neff,p kN 1653 1658
Outer pipe force at bulkhead location Nc kN 1224 1227

Note: Compressive force negative otherwise positive

Parameter Symbol Unit Value

Temperature data
(b) Inner pipe non-uniform temperature outer pipe uniform temperature
Inner pipe inlet temperature Ti,p 1C 95
Inner pipe outlet temperature To,p 1C 85
Outer pipe design temperature Td,c 1C 15
Long pipe-in-pipe
Pipe-in-pipe length L km 11,000
Heat loss coefcient bp 1/m 1.071  105
Limit between short and long pipe-in-pipe(1) Lo m 7760oL
Upstream length over which spacers friction acts L1 M 4803
Reduced friction coefcient mo dimensionless 0.4
Results dimensionless Analytical Finite element

Anchor length at upstream end x1 M 4569 4565


Anchor length at downstream end x2 Mm 3158 3154
Bulkhead displacement at upstream end d1 mm 1471 1469
Bulkhead displacement at downstream end d2 mm 703 700
Inner pipe force N d; kN 476 472
Outer pipe force at upstream bulkhead location Nc1 kN 1331 1328
Outer pipe force at downstream bulkhead location Nc2 kN 768 765
ARTICLE IN PRESS
498 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

Table 3 (continued)

Parameter Symbol Unit Value

Short pipe-in-pipe
Pipe-in-pipe length L km 6000oLo
Heat loss coefcient bp 1/m 1.963  105
Upstream length over which spacers friction acts L1 m 2303
Results dimensionless Analytical Finite element

Anchor length at upstream end x1 m 4177 4181


Inner pipe force Nd kN 1202 1208
Inner pipe total deection d1 d2 mm 2996 3000
Outer pipe force at upstream bulkhead location Nc1 kN 2108 2112
Outer pipe force at downstream bulkhead location Nc2 kN 549 554
Note: (1) Based on inner pipe minimum uniform temperature of 85 1C
Parameter Symbol Unit Value

Temperature data
(c) Inner pipe non-uniform temperature outer pipe non-uniform temperature
Inner pipe inlet temperature Ti,p 1C 95
Inner pipe outlet temperature To,p 1C 85
Outer pipe inlet temperature Ti,c 1C 15
Outer pipe outlet temperature To,c 1C 10
Long pipe-in-pipe
Pipe-in-pipe length L m 11,000
Inner pipe heat loss coefcient bp 1/m 1.071  105
Outer pipe heat loss coefcient bc 1/m 6.301  105
Limit between short and long pipe-in-pipe(1) Lo m 6331oL
Upstream length over which spacers friction acts L1 m 4803
Results dimensionless Analytical Finite element

Anchor length at upstream end x1 mm 4449 4445


Anchor length at downstream end x2 mm 2910 2907
Bulkhead displacement at upstream end d1 mm 1456 1453
Bulkhead displacement at downstream end d2 mm 579 576
Inner pipe force N d; kN 445 442
Outer pipe force at upstream bulkhead location Nc1 kN 1364 1362
Outer pipe force at downstream bulkhead location Nc2 kN 801 798
Short pipe-in-pipe
Pipe-in-pipe length L km 6000oLo
Inner pipe heat loss coefcient bp 1/m 1.963  105
Outer pipe heat loss coefcient bc 1/m 1.155  105
Upstream length over which spacers friction acts L1 m 2303
Anchor length at upstream end x1 m 4177
Results dimensionless Analytical Finite element

Inner pipe total deection d1 d2 mm 2890 2894


Inner pipe force N d; kN 1159 1163
Outer pipe force at upstream bulkhead location Nc1 kN 2150 2154
Outer pipe force at downstream bulkhead location Nc2 kN 592 596

Note: (1) Based on inner and outer pipe minimum uniform temperature of 85 and 10 1C, respectively.
ARTICLE IN PRESS
A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500 499

can be replaced by analytical calculation in most practical situations. Simple


analytical formulae can describe thermal expansion characteristics when the outer
pipe temperature is constant. Analytical ndings indicated good agreement with
nite element results.

References

[1] Curson N. Designing high temperature high pressure pipelines (HPHT). Subsea pipeline technologies
for deepwater, Houston, Wyndham Warwick Hotel, Texas. December 1112, 1997. p. 119.
[2] Curson N. Design and installation of subsea pipelines for HP/HT uid transportation. HP/HT eld
development technology. Aberdeen, 1995. p. 119.
[3] Dixon M. Analysis methods for pipe-in-pipe systems. Offshore pipelines 96 conference, three-day
seminar arranged by IIR limited. London; 30th September, 1st and 2nd October 1996. p. 115.
[4] Tam CKW, Rivett SM, Young RC. Pipeline design for HP/HT eld developments. Progress in
HP/HT elds conference, the Airport Thistle Hotel, Aberdeen. 20 and 21 May 1998. p. 134.
[5] Sriskandarajah T, Ragupathy P, Anurudran G. Challenges in the design of HP/HT pipelines. 23rd
annual offshore pipeline technology conference (OPT 2000). The Holmenkollen Park Hotel Rica,
Oslo. 28 and 29 February 2000. p. 133.
[6] Inglis B, Morrison A. Analysing pipe-in-pipe solutions for HP/HT conditions. Offshore pipelines 96
conference, three-day seminar arranged by IIR limited. London; 30th September, 1st and 2nd
October 1996. p. 132.
[7] Judd SR. Pipe-in-pipe systems-the installation contractors experience. Offshore pipelines 96
conference, three-day seminar arranged by IIR limited. London; 30th September1st and 2nd
October 1996. p. 118.
[8] McKinnon C. Case-studies of HP/HT for pipeline detail design. Three-day seminar arranged by IIR
limited. London; 30th September1st and 2nd October 1996. p. 118.
[9] Welsh S. Suitable systems for high temperature owline insulation. Offshore pipelines 96 conference,
three-day seminar arranged by IIR limited. London, 2nd October 1996.
[10] Welch S, Summereld P. Second generation pipe-in-pipe technologies. OPT 99. p. 124.
[11] Tough GT, Denniel S, Al Sharif M, Hutchinson J. Nile-design and qualication of reeled pipe-in-pipe
for deepwater. Proceedings offshore technology conference. OTC 13257, Houston, Texas, USA. 30th
April3 May 2001. p. 19.
[12] Tough G, Al-Sharif M, Hutchinson J. Innovations key reeled pipe-in-pipe owline. Oil Gas J
2001:4652.
[13] Modi A, Hill N, Sheehan T. Cook eld development-the rst reeled pipe-in-pipe system in the UK
sector of the North Sea. Offshore pipeline technology conference. 26th and 27th February 2001.
p. 130.
[14] Mollison MI. Reeled installation of pipe-in-pipe insulated pipelines. 1991 Offshore mechanics and
artic engineering (OMAE), vol. V, Pipeline Technology. 1991. p. 13744.
[15] Endal G, Williams KA, Kvello O, Hammer G. The Gullfaks satellites project: reel installation of 6/
10 pipe-in-pipe owline. Offshore mechanics and arctic engineering (OMAE), 98-3903, Lisbon,
Portugal. July 69, 1998. p. 18.
[16] Bell M, Daly R. Reeled PIP SCR. Proceedings offshore technology conference, OTC 13184, Houston,
Texas, USA. 30 April3 May 2001. p. 110.
[17] Sahota BS, Ragupathy P, Wilkins R. Critical aspects of shell ETAP HP/HT pipe-in-pipe pipeline
design and construction. Proceedings of the ninth (1999) international offshore and polar engineering
conference, Brest, France. May 30June 4, 1999. p. 6473.
[18] Kaye D, LeMarchand D, Blondin P, Carr M. Lateral buckling design of the dunbar double wall
insulated pipeline. 18th Annual offshore pipeline technology conference, Copenhagen, 1995.
[19] Popineau D, Guyonnet P, Le Marchand D. Dunbar double wall insulated pipeline. Advances in
subsea pipeline engineering and technology, ASPECT 94, Aberdeen, 1994.
[20] Ling M, Dubibe JM, Alwyn goes with the ow. Offshore Engineer, April 1998. p. 13640.
ARTICLE IN PRESS
500 A. Bokaian / Marine Structures 17 (2004) 475500

[21] Suman JC, Karpathy SA. Design method addresses subsea pipeline thermal stresses. Oil Gas J
1993:859.
[22] Harrison GE, Kershenbaum NY, Choi HS. Expansion analysis of subsea pipe-in-pipe owline.
Proceedings of the seventh (1997) international offshore and polar engineering conference, Honolulu,
USA, May 2530, 1997. p. 2938.
[23] Guijt W. Design considerations of high-temperature pipelines. Proceedings of the ninth (1999)
international offshore and polar engineering conference, Brest, France, May 30June 4, 1999.
p. 6839.
[24] Rooduyn E. The design and installation of fully integrated owline bundle production systems. Fifth
International deepwater and marginal eld development conference, 1990.
[25] Fyrileiv O, Venas A. Finite element analysis of pipeline bundles on uneven seabed. Proceedings of the
eighth (1998) international offshore and polar engineering conference, Montreal, Canada, May
2429, 1998. p. 4652.
[26] Jinsi BK. Offshore risers must be designed to resist pipeline movement. Oil Gas J 1996:4251.
[27] Rich SK, Keevill CD, Tam CKW. Expansion absorption methods for HP/HT pipelines. Offshore
pipeline technology conference (OPT 99). The Okura Hotel, Amsterdam, 25 and 26 February 1999.
p. 116.
[28] Rich SK, Alleyne AG. System design for buried high temperature and pressure pipelines. Proceedings
of the offshore technology conference, OTC 8672, Houston, Texas, USA, 47 May 1998. p. 3417.
[29] Rich SK, Alleyne AG. Buried expansion loops control offshore line expansion, buckling. Offshore
Pipe Line Technology, April 1999. p. S2933.
[30] Peng LC. Stress analysis methods for underground pipe lines, Part 1basic calculations. Pipe Line
Industry, April 1972. p. 6670; Part 2soil-pipe interaction. Pipe Line Industry, May 1972. p. 659.
[31] Fekete LA. Structural design of pipe lines subject to temperature change. Part 1, Pipe Line Industry,
August 1974. p. 579; Part 2, Pipe Line Industry, September 1974. p. 505.
[32] DET NORSKE VERITAS, DNV Offshore Standard OS-F101, Submarine Pipeline Systems, 2000.
[33] Oliver KD, Rodger AA, Corbett GG. Assessment of pipeline integrity under impact from dropped
objects. Fourth international conference offshore structures-hazards, safety and engineering, 1995.
[34] Choi HS. Expansion analysis of offshore pipelines close to restraints. Proceedings of the fth (1995)
international offshore and polar engineering conference, The Hague, The Netherlands, June 1116,
1995. p. 818.
[35] Palmer A, Ling MTS. Movement of submarine pipelines close to platforms. Proceedings of the 13th
offshore Technology conference, OTC 4067, 1981. p. 1724. Also ASME J Energy Resources Technol
1982;104:31924.
[36] Burden RL, Faires JD, Reynolds AC. Numerical analysis, 2nd ed. Boston, MA: Prindle, Weber &
Schmidt; 1981. p. 43961.
[37] Abramowitz M, Stegun IA. Handbook of mathematical functions, 9th ed. New York: Dover
Publications; 1972.

View publication stats