Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 151

A Course Material on

Design of Reinforced Concrete


Elements

By

Mr. K.ChandraBose

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING

SASURIE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

VIJAYAMANGALAM 638 056


QUALITY CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the e-course material

Subject Code : CE6505

Scubject : Design of Reinforced Concrete Elements

Class : III Year Civil Engineering

being prepared by me and it meets the knowledge requirement of the university


curriculum.

Signature of the Author

Name: K.ChandraBose

Designation: Assistant Professor

This is to certify that the course material being prepared by Mr.K.ChandraBose is of


adequate quality. He has referred more than five books amont them minimum one is from
aborad author.

Signature of HD

Name: N.SathishKumar

SEAL
CE6505 DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE ELEMENTS LTPC
3 003
OBJECTIVES:
To introduce the different types of philosophies related to design of basic structural
elements such as slab, beam, column and footing which form part of any structural system
with reference to Indian standard code of practice.

UNIT I METHODS OF DESIGN OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES 9


Concept of Elastic method, ultimate load method and limit state method Advantages of Limit
State Method over other methods Design codes and specification Limit State philosophy as
detailed in IS code Design of beams and slabs by working stress method.
UNIT II LIMIT STATE DESIGN FOR FLEXURE 9
Analysis and design of singly and doubly reinforced rectangular and flanged beams - Analysis and
design of one way, two way and continuous slabs subjected to uniformly distributed load for
various boundary conditions.
UNIT III LIMIT STATE DESIGN FOR BOND, ANCHORAGE SHEAR & TORSION 9
Behaviour of RC members in bond and Anchorage - Design requirements as per current code -
Behaviour of RC beams in shear and torsion - Design of RC members for combined bending shear
and torsion.
UNIT IV LIMIT STATE DESIGN OF COLUMNS 9
Types of columns Braced and unbraced columns Design of short Rectangular and circular
columns for axial, uniaxial and biaxial bending.

UNIT V LIMIT STATE DESIGN OF FOOTING 9


Design of wall footing Design of axially and eccentrically loaded rectangular pad and sloped
footings Design of combined rectangular footing for two columns only.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
OUTCOMES:
The student shall be in a position to design the basic elements of reinforced concrete
structures.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Varghese, P.C., Limit State Design of Reinforced Concrete, Prentice Hall of India, Pvt.
Ltd., New Delhi, 2002.
2. Gambhir.M.L., "Fundamentals of Reinforced Concrete Design", Prentice Hall of India
Private Limited, New Delhi, 2006.
3. Subramanian,N.,Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures,Oxford University Press, New
Delhi, 2013.
REFERENCES:
1. Jain, A.K., Limit State Design of RC Structures, Nemchand Publications, Roorkee, 1998
2. Sinha, S.N., Reinforced Concrete Design, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company Ltd.,
New Delhi, 2002
3. Unnikrishna Pillai, S., Devdas Menon, Reinforced Concrete Design, Tata McGraw Hill
Publishing Company Ltd., 2009
4. Punmia.B.C., Ashok Kumar Jain, Arun Kumar Jain, Limit State Design of Reinforced
Concrete,Laxmi Publication Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 2007.
5. Bandyopadhyay. J.N., "Design of Concrete Structures"., Prentice Hall of India Pvt.
Ltd., New Delhi, 2008.
6. IS456:2000, Code of practice for Plain and Reinforced Concrete, Bureau of Indian
Standards, New Delhi, 2000
7. SP16, IS456:1978 Design Aids for Reinforced Concrete to Bureau of Indian Standards,
New Delhi, 1999
8. Shah V L Karve S R., "Limit State Theory and Design of Reinforced Concrete", Structures
Publilcations, Pune, 2013
Sl.No Contents Page No.

UNIT I METHODS OF DESIGN OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Design loads 2

1.3 Materials for Reinforced Concrete 4

1.4 Design codes and Hand books 6

1.5 Design Philosophies 7

1.6 Partial safety factor 8

1.7 Characteristic strength and loads 10

1.8 Working stress metnod design 11

1.9 Design Problems 14

UNIT II WATER TANKS

2.1 Pre-requisite Discussion 21

2.2 General specification for flexure design of beams 23

2.3 General Aspects of Serviceability 24

2.4 Limit state of serviceability for flexural members 25

2.5 Water Tanks 26

2.6 Cracking in structural members 26

2.7 Design Problems 28


UNIT III LIMIT STATE DESIGN FOR BOND, ANCHORAGE SHEAR
& TORSION

3.1 Design of torsion 36

3.2 Equilibrium torsion and compatibility torsion 36

3.3 Estimation of torsional stiffness 39


Sl.No Contents Page No.

3.4 Design Problems 40

UNIT IV LIMIT STATE DESIGN OF COLUMNS

4.1 Pre-requisite Discussion 48

4.2 Introduction 48

4.3 Classification of columns 49

4.4 Behaviour of tied and bspiral columns 50

4.5 Specifications for covers and reinforcement in column 50

4.6 Effective length of compression member 51

4.7 Specifications as per IS: 456-2000 52

4.8 Transverse reinforcement 53

4.9 Limit state design of collapse 55


Procedure for using of Non-dimensional Interaction Diagrams as Design
4.10 58
Aids to find steel
4.11 Design Problems 59

UNIT V LIMIT STATE DESIGN OF FOOTING

5.1 Pre-requisite Discussion 70

5.2 Types of foundations 70

5.2.1 Shallow foundations 70

5.2.2 Deep foundations 73

5.3 Bearing Capacity of Soil 74

5.4 Design of Isolated Column Footing 74

5.5 Specifications for Design of footings as per IS 456 : 2000 75

5.6 Design Problems 78


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

UNIT I METHODS OF DESIGN OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES


1.1 Introduction:

A structure refers to a system of connected parts used to support forces (loads). Buildings,
bridges and towers are examples for structures in civil engineering. In buildings, structure
consists of walls floors, roofs and foundation. In bridges, the structure consists of deck,
supporting systems and foundations. In towers the structure consists of vertical, horizontal and
diagonal members along with foundation.
A structure can be broadly classified as (i) sub structure and (ii) super structure. The portion of
building below ground level is known as sub-structure and portion above the ground is called as
super structure. Foundation is sub structure and plinth, walls, columns, floor slabs with or
without beams, stairs, roof slabs with or without beams etc are super structure.
Many naturally occurring substances, such as clay, sand, wood, rocks natural fibers are used to
construct buildings. Apart from this many manmade products are in use for building
construction. Bricks, tiles, cement concrete, concrete blocks, plastic, steel & glass etc are
manmade building materials.
Cement concrete is a composites building material made from combination of aggregates (coarse
and fine) and a binder such as cement. The most common form of concrete consists of mineral
aggregate (gravel & sand), Portland cement and water. After mixing, the cement hydrates and
eventually hardens into a stone like material. Recently a large number of additives known as
concrete additives are also added to enhance the quality of concrete. Plasticizers, super
plasticizers, accelerators, retarders, pazolonic materials, air entertaining agents, fibers, polymers
and silica furies are the additives used in concrete. Hardened concrete has high compressive
strength and low tensile strength. Concrete is generally strengthened using steel bars or rods
known as rebars in tension zone. Such elements are reinforced concrete concrete can be
moulded to any complex shape using suitable form work and it has high durability, better
appearance, fire resistance and economical. For a strong, ductile and durable construction the
reinforcement shall have high strength, high tensile strain and good bond to concrete and thermal
compatibility. Building components like slab walls, beams, columns foundation & frames are
constructed with reinforced concrete. Reinforced concreted can be in-situ concreted or precast
concrete.
For understanding behavior of reinforced concrete, we shall consider a plain concrete beam
subjected to external load as shown in Fig. 1.1. Tensile strength of concrete is approximately
one-tenth of its compressive strength.

K.ChandraBose 1 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Hence use of plain concrete as a structural material is limited to situations where significant
tensile stresses and strains do not develop as in solid or hollow concrete blocks , pedestal and in
mass concrete dams. The steel bars are used in tension zone of the element to resist tension as
shown in Fig 1.2 The tension caused by bending moment is chiefly resisted by the steel
reinforcements, while concrete resist the compression. Such joint action is possible if relative
slip between concrete and steel is prevented. This phenomena is called bond. This can be
achieved by using deformed bass which has high bond strength at the steel-concrete interface.
Rebars imparts ductility to the structural element, i.e RC elements has large deflection before
it fails due to yielding of steel, thus it gives ample warning before its collapse.

1.2 Design Loads

For the analysis and design of structure, the forces are considered as the Loads on the
structure. In a structure all components which are stationary, like wall, slab etc., exert forces
due to gravity, which are called as Dead Loads. Moving bodies like furniture, humans etc
exert forces due to gravity which are called as Live Loads. Dead loads and live loads are
gravity forces which act vertically down ward. Wind load is basically a horizontal force due to
wind pressure exerted on the structure. Earthquake load is primarily a horizontal pressure
exerted due to movement of the soil on the foundation of a structure. Vertical earthquake
force is about 5% to 10% of horizontal earthquake force. Fig. 1.3 illustrates the loads that are
considered in analysis and design.

K.ChandraBose 2 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Loads

Static Dynamic

Bead loads Live loads Load due Vibrator Fatigue


(Fixes) (movable) (to settlement)

Self due to occupancy environment Harmonic Impact shock blast


Weigth fixed (ex: water flow) or
furniture random
or
equipment
Internal Wind forces
Force

Machinery Ground
Induced vibration
Ex: Earthquake

Fig 1.3 Types of loads on Structure

IS875 -1987 part 1 gives unit weight of different materials, Part 2 of this code describes live
load on floors and roof. Wind load to be considered is given in part 3 of the code. Details of
earthquake load to be considered is described in 1893 2002 code and combination of loads is
given in part 5 of IS875 1987.

K.ChandraBose 3 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

1.3. Materials for Reinforced Concrete

Concrete

Concrete is a composite material consists essentially of

a) A binding medium cement and water called cement paste


b) Particles of a relatively inert filler called aggregate

The selection of the relative proportions of cement, water and aggregate is called mix design
Basic requirement of a good concrete are workability, strength, durability and economy.
Depending upon the intended use the cement may be OPC (33,43 & 53 Grade), Rapid hardening
cements Portland slag, Portland pozzolona etc. High cement content give rise to increased
shrinkage, creep and cracking. Minimum cement content is 300Kg/m3 and maximum being
450Kg/m3 as per Indian code. Mineral additives like fly ash , silica fume, rice husk ash,
metakoline and ground granulated blast furnace slag may be used to reduce micro cracks . The
aggregate used is primarily for the purpose of providing bulk to the concrete and constitutes 60
to 80 percent of finished product. Fine aggregates are used to increase the workability and
uniformly of concrete mixture. Water used for mixing and curing shall be clean and free from
oil, acids, alkalis, salts, sugar etc. The diverse requirements of mixability, stability,
transportability place ability, mobility, compatibility of fresh concrete are collectively referred
to as workability.

Compressive strength of concrete on 28th day after casting is considered as one of the measure
of quality. At least 4 specimens of cubes should be tested for acceptance criteria.

Grade of concrete

Based on the compressive strength of concrete, they are designated with letter H followed by
an integer number represented characteristic strength of concrete, measured using 150mm size
cube. Characteristic strength is defined us the strength of material below which not more than
5% of test results are expected to full. The concrete grade M10, M15 and M20 are termed as
ordinary concrete and those of M25 to M55 are termed as standard concrete and the concrete
of grade 60 and above are termed as high strength concrete. The selection of minimum grade
of concrete is dictated by durability considerations which are based on kind of environment to
which the structure is exposed, though the minimum grade of concrete for reinforced concrete
is specified as M20 under mild exposure conditions, it is advisable to adopt a higher grade. For
moderate, severe, very severe and extreme exposure conditions, M25, M30, M35 & M40
grades respectively are recommended. Typical stress-strain curves of concrete is shown in
Fig.1.4

K.ChandraBose 4 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Reinforcing steel

Steel bars are often used in concrete to take case of tensile stresses. Often they are called as
rebars, steel bar induces ductility to composite material i.e reinforced concrete steel is stronger
than concrete in compression also. Plain mild steel bars or deformed bars are generally used.
Due to poor bond strength plain bars are not used. High strength deformed bars generally cold
twisted (CTD) are used in reinforced concrete. During beginning of 21st century, Thermo-
mechanical tream (TMT) bars which has ribs on surface are used in reinforced concrete. Yield
strength of steel bars are denoted as characteristic strength. Yield strength of mild steel is
250MPa, yield strength of CTD &TMT bars available in market has 415 MPa or 500 MPa or
550MPa. TMT bars have better elongation than CTD bars. Stress-strain curve of CTD bars or
TMT bars do not have definite yield point, hence 0.2% proof stress is used as yield strength. Fig
1.5 shows stress strain curve of different steel grades. Steel grades are indicated by Fe followed
by yield strength. In the drawings of RCC, denotes MS bar and # denotes CTD or TMT bars

K.ChandraBose 5 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Fig 1-5 stress strain curve


1.4 Design codes and Hand books

A code is a set of technical specifications intended to control the design and construction. The
code can be legally adopted to see that sound structure are designed and constructed code
specifies acceptable methods of design and construction to produce safe and sound structures.

National building code have been formulated in different countries to lay down guidelines for
the design and construction of structures. International building code has been published by
international code council located in USA. National building code (NBC 2005) published in
India describes the specification and design procedure for buildings.

For designing reinforced concrete following codes of different countries are available

India IS456 2000 Plain and reinforced concrete code practice.

USA - ACI 318-2011 Building code requirements for Structural concrete (American concrete
institute)

UK - BS8110 part1 structural use of concrete code of practice for design and
construction. (British standard Institute)
Europe EN 1992(Euro code 2) - Design of concrete structures

Canada CAN/CSA A23.3-04 - Design of concrete structures (Reaffirmed in 2010),

Australia As 3600 -2001 concrete structures.

Germany Din 1045 Design of concrete structures

Russia SNIP

China - GB 50010 -2002 code for design of concrete structures to help the designers, each
country has produced handbook. In India following hand books called special publication are
available.

K.ChandraBose 6 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

SP 16-1980- Design Aid for Reforced concrete to IS456-1978

SP 23-1982- Hand book on concrete mixes

Sp 24 -1983 Explanatary hand book on IS456 1978

SP 34-1987 - Hand book on concrete reinforcement and detailing.

1.5 Design Philosophies

Structural design is process of determining the configuration (form and proportion) of a


structure subject to a load carrying performance requirement. Form of a structure describes
the shape and relative arrangements of its components. The determination of an efficient
form is basically a trial and error procedure.

In the beginning of 20th century (1900 to 1960) to late 50s of this century, members were
proportioned so that stresses in concrete and steel resulting from service load were within the
allowable stresses. Allowable stresses were specified by codes. This method of design is called
working stress method (WSM). This method of design resulted in conservative sections and

was not economical. This design principle satisfies the relation > .


Where R is resistance of structural element, RS is factor of safety and L is applied external load.

In 1950s ultimate load method or load factor method was developed. In this method, using
non linear stress strain curve of concrete and steel, the resistance of the element is
computed. The safety measure in the design is introduced by an appropriate choice of the load
factor (ultimate load/working load). Different load factors are assigned for different loads.
Following equations are used for finding ultimate load as per IS456 1964

U = 1.5 DL + 2.2 LL

U = 1.5 DL +2.2LL to 5WL or 1.5 DL +0.5LL +2.2 WL

Here DL = Dead load, LL = Live load WL= wind load or earthquake load. The design principle
should satisfy RLF etc or R U, Where, R= Resistance, LF= Load factor, L= load. Ultimate load
method generally results in more slender section, but leads to larger deformation. Due to the
disadvantage of larger deflection, this method was discontinued. To over come the
disadvantages of working stress method and ultimate method, a probabilistic design concept
called as Limit state method, was developed during 1970s. IS456 -1978 recommended this
method and is continued in 2000 version also. This method safe guards the risk of both
collapse and unserviceability. Limits state method uses multiple safety factory format, which
attempt to provide adequate safety at ultimate loads or well as a denote serviceability at

K.ChandraBose 7 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

service loads by considering all limit states, The acceptable limit for safety and serviceability
requirements before failure or collapse is termed as Limit state Two principal limit states are
considered i.e 1. Limit state of collapse 2. Limit state of serviceability. The limit state of
collapse include one or more of i) flexure, II) shear, III) torsion and IV) compression the limit
state of collapse is expressed as R>XiLi Where, and are partial safety factors, Here <1 &
>1. The most important limit state considered in design are of deflection, other limit state of

serviceability are crack and vibration. For deflection max
where max is maximum
deflection, l=span 4 is an integer numbers. For over all deflection is 250 and for short term
deflection =350.

1.6 Partial safety factor


To account for the different conditions like for material strength, load etc. Different partial
factors are used for material and load. M indicate safety factor for material & for load



    
Design strength = m
Design load = f x characteristic load

As per clause 36.4.2 page 68 of IS 456, m= 1.5 for concrete and m =1.15 for steel. Similarly
clause 36.4.1 page 68 of code gives f in table 18 for different values for different load
combinations and different limit states.

IS 456 2000 Recomendations

(i) Partial safety factors for materials to be multiplied with characteristic


strength is given below.

Values of partial safety factor rm

Material Limit state


Collapse Deflection Cracking
Concrete 1.5 1.0 1.3
Steel 1.15 1.0 1.0

  
Design strength  =


K.ChandraBose 8 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

(ii) Partial safety factors for loads to be multiplied with characteristic load is
given below.

Value of partial safety factors f

Load combination Ultimate limit Serviceability limit


state state
1) Dead load & live load 1.5(DL+LL) DL+LL
2) Dead seismic/wind load 0.9DL+1.5(E2/WL)
a) Dead load contributes to DL + EQ/WL
Stability
b) Dead load assists overturning 1.5(DL+E2/WL) DL+EQ/wL

3) Dead, live load and Seismic/wind load 1.2(DL+LL+EQ/WL) Dl+0.LL+0.8EQ/WL


DL-Dead load, LL- Live load WL- Wind load EQ- Earthquake load

(iii) The code has suggested effective span to effective depth ratios as given
below

Basic effective span to effective depth ratio (l/l) basic

Type of beam one /slab Span10m Span>10m


1)Cantilever 7 Deflection should be
Be calculated
2) Simply supported 20 (20X10)/span
3)continuous beam 26 (26X10)/span

The above values are to be modified for (i) the type and amount of tension steel (Fig 4 page 38
of T5456-2000)

(ii) The amount of compression steel (Fig 5 page 39 of I5456-2000)

(iv) The type of beam ie flanged beams etc (Fig 6 page 39 of I5456 2000).

K.ChandraBose 9 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

For slabs spanning in two directions, the l/d ratio is given below.

For slabs spanning in two directions, the l/d ratio is given below

Type of slab l/d for grade of steel


Fe250 Fe415
1)Simply supported 35 28
2) Continuous 40 32

1.7 Characteristic strength and loads


Limit state method is based on statistical concepts. Strength of materials and loads are highly
variable in a range of values. The test in laboratory on compressive strength of concrete has
indicated coefficient of variation of 10%. Hence in reinforced concrete construction, If is not
practicable to specify a precise cube strength. Hence in limit state design uses the concept of
characteristic strength fck indicates characteristics strength of concrete & by characteristic
strength of steel. In general fk indicates the characteristic strength of material.
fk = fm -1.646  (2.6) here fm = mean strength.
Similarly characteristic load is that value of load which has an accepted probability of not
being exceeded during the life span of structure. In practice the load specified by IS875 1987
is considered as characteristic load. Equation for characteristic load is
Lk = Lm + 1.64.

K.ChandraBose 10 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

1.8 WORKING STRESS METHOD DESIGN

GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF WORKING STRESS DESIGN


(a) General features

During the early part of 20th century, elastic theory of reinforced concrete sections outlined was
developed which formed the basis of the working stress or permissible stress method of design of
reinforced concrete members. In this method, the working or permissible stress in concrete and steel are
obtained applying appropriate partial safety factors to the characteristics strength of the materials. The
permissible stresses in concrete and steel are well within the linear elastic range of the materials.

The design based on the working stress method although ensures safety of the structures at working or
services loads, it does not provide a realistic estimate of the ultimate or collapse load of the structure in
contrast to the limit state method of design. The working stress method of design results in
comparatively larger and conservative sections of the structural elements with higher quantities of steel
reinforcement which results in conservative and costly design. Structural engineers have used this
method extensively during the 20th century and presently the method is incorporated as an alternative to
the limit state method in Annexure B of the recently revised Indian Standard Code Is : 456 2000 for
specific applications.

The permissible stresses in concrete under service loads for the various stress states of compressive,
flexure and bond is compiled in Table 2.1 (Table 21 of IS ; 456 2000)
The permissible stress in different types of steel reinforcement is shown in table 2.2 (Table 22 of IS 456
2000)

The permissible shear stress for various grades of concrete in beams is shown in Table 12.1 (Table 23 of
IS: 456 2000)

The maximum shear stress permissible in concrete for different grades is shown in Table 12.2 Table
12.2 (Table 24 of IS: 456 2000)

In the case of reinforced concrete slabs, the permissible shear stress in concrete is obtained by
multiplying the values given in Table 2.1 by factor k whose values depend upon the thickness of slab
as shown in Table 12.3 (Section 40.2.1.1. of IS; 456 2000)

Table 12.1Permissible Shear Stresses in Concrete (c N/mm2) (Table 23 of IS:456 2000)

100 As / bd Permissible shear stresses in concrete c


N/mm2
M15 M20 M25 M30 M35 M40 &

K.ChandraBose 11 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements IIIABOVE
Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering
0.15 0.18 0.18 0.19 0.20 0.20 0.20
0.25 0.22 0.22 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23
0.50 0.29 0.30 0.31 0.31 0.31 0.32
0.75 0.34 0.35 0.36 0.37 0.37 0.38
1.00 0.37 0.39 0.40 0.41 0.42 0.42
1.25 0.40 0.42 0.44 0.45 0.45 0.46
1.50 0.42 0.45 0.46 0.48 0.49 0.49
1.75 0.44 0.47 0.49 0.50 0.52 0.52
2.00 0.44 0.49 0.51 0.53 0.54 0.55
2.25 0.44 0.51 0.53 0.55 0.56 0.57
2.50 0.44 0.51 0.55 0.57 0.58 0.60
2.75 0.44 0.51 0.56 0.58 0.60 0.62
3.00 & above 0.44 0.51 0.57 0.60 0.62 0.63

Note: As is that area of longitudinal tension reinforcement which continues at least one effective depth
beyond the section being considered except at supports where the full area of tension reinforcement may
be used provided the detailing conforms to 26.2.3.

Table 12.2 Maximum Shear Stress (c, max N/mm2) (Table 24 of IS: 456 2000)

Concrete grade M 15 M 25 M 30 M 35 M 40 & above


(c max N/mm2) 1.6 1.8 1.9 2.3 2.5

The maximum shear stress permissible in concrete for different grades is shown in Table 12.2 (Table 24
of IS 456 2000)

In the case of reinforced concrete slabs, the permissible shear stress in concrete is obtained by
multiplying the3 values in Table 2.1 by a factor k whose values depend upon the thickness of slab as
shown in Table 12.3 (Section 40.2.1.1. of IS 456 2000)
(b) General design procedure

In the working stress design, the cross sectional dimensions are assumed based on the basic span /
depth ratios outlined in Chapter 5 (Table 5.1 and 5.2) (Section 23.2.1. of IS: 456 2000)

The working load moments and shear forces are evaluated at critical sections and the required effective
depth is checked by using the relation:

d = M / Q.b

Where d = effective depth of section


M = working load moment
b = width of section
Q = a constant depending upon the working stresses in concrete and steel, neutral axis depth
factor (k) and lever arm coefficient (f).

For different grades of concrete and steel the value of constant Q is compiled in Table 2.3. The depth
provided should be equal to or greater than the depth computed by the relation and the area of
reinforcement required in the section to resist the moment M is computed using the relation:

Ast = ( M/ st . j. d
K.ChandraBose 12 Academic Year 2015-2016
CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering
The number of steel bars required is selected with due regard to the spacing of bars and cover
requirements.

After complying with flexure, the section is generally checked for resistance against shear forces by
calculating the nominal shear stress c given by v = (V / bd)

Where V = Working shear force at critical section.

The permissible shear stress in concrete (c) depends upon the percentage reinforcements in the cross
section and grade of concrete as shown in Table 12.1

If c < v suitable shear reinforcements are designed in beams at a spacing sv given by the relation;

Sv = [ 0.87 fy Asv d / Vus]

Where sv = spacing of stirrups

Asv = cross sectional area of stirrups legs

fy = Characteristics strength of stirrup reinforcement

d = effective depth

Vs = [ V c .b .d]
If v < c, nominal shear reinforcements are provided in beams are provided in beams at a spacing given
by

Sv [ 0.87 fy Ast / 0.4 b]

In case of slabs, the permissible shear stress if k is a constant depending upon the thickness of the slab.
Also in the case of slabs the nominal shear stress (v) should not exceed half the value of c max shown in
Table 12.2. In such cases the thickness of the slab is increased and the slab is redesigned.

In the case of compression members, the axial load permissible on a short column reinforced with
longitudinal bars and lateral ties is given by

P = (cc Ac + sc Asc)

Where scc = permissible stress in concrete in direct compression (Refer Table 2.1)

Ac = cross sectional area of concrete excluding the area of reinforcements.

Ssc = permissible compressive stress in reinforcement

Asc = cross sectional area of longitudinal steel bars.

K.ChandraBose 13 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

1.9 Design Problems:


1. Design a R.C beam to carry a load of 6 kN/m inclusive of its own weight on an
effect span of 6m keep the breath to be 2/3 rd of the effective depth .the permissible
stressed in the concrete and steel are not to exceed 5N/mm2 and 140 N/mm2.take
m=18. (NOV-DEC 2012)
Step 1: Design constants.
Modular ratio, m =18.
A Coefficient n bc.m/(bc.m + st) 0.39
Lever arm Coefficient, j=1-(n/3) = 0.87
Moment of resistance Coefficient Q bc/2. n. j 0.84

Step 2: Moment on the beam.

M = (w.l2)/8 = (6x62)/8 = 27kNm

M = Qbd2

d2 = M/Qb = (27x106)/ (0.84x2/3xd)

d = 245mm.

Step 3: Balanced Moment.

Mbal = Qbd2 = 0.84x245x3652 = 27.41kNm. > M. it can be designed as singly

K.ChandraBose 14 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

reinforced section.

Step 4: Area of steel.

Ast = Mbal / (st.j.d) 616.72mm2

Use 20mm dia bars ast /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 616.72/314.15 = 1.96 say 2nos.

Provide 2#20mm dia bars at the tension side.

2. Design a doubly reinforced beam of section 240X500mm to carry a bending


moment of 80kNm.Assume clear cover at top a bottom as 30mm and take
m=18.adopt working stress method. Assume the permissible stressed in the
concrete and steel are not to exceed 5N/mm2 and 140 N/mm2.
Step 1: Design constants.
Modular ratio, m =18.
A Coefficient n bc.m/(bc.m + st) 0.39
Lever arm Coefficient, j=1-(n/3) = 0.87
Moment of resistance Coefficient Q bc/2. n. j 0.84

Step 2: Moment on the beam.

M = 80kNm

M = Qbd2

D = 500mm, b = 240mm

d = 500-30mm = 470mm

.Step 3: Balanced Moment.


Mbal = Qbd2 = 0.84x240x4702 = 44.53kNm. < M. it can be designed as doubly

K.ChandraBose 15 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

reinforced section.

Step 4: Area of Tension steel.

Ast = Ast1 + Ast2

Ast1 = Mbal / (st.j.d) (44.53x106)/(140x0.87x470) = 777.87mm2

Use 20mm dia bars ast /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 777.87/314.15 = 2.47 say 3nos.

Ast2 = (M-Mbal) / (st.(d-d1)) = (80x106-44.53x106)/(140x(470-30)) = 575.8mm2

Use 20mm dia bars ast /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 575.8/314.15 = 1.8 say 2nos.

Step 5: Area of Compression steel:

Asc = (M-Mbal) / (sc.(d-d1)) = (80x10 6-44.53x106)/(51.8x(470-30))=1580.65 mm2

Use 20mm dia bars ast /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 1580.65/314.15 = 5.5 say 6nos.

Provide 6#20mm dia bars as compression reinforcement.

3. Design a beam subjected to a bending moment of 40kNm by working stress


design. Adopt width of beam equal to half the effective depth. (NOV-DEC 2010)

Assume the permissible stressed in the concrete and steel are not to exceed
5N/mm2 and 140 N/mm2.take m=18.
Step 1: Design constants.
Modular ratio, m =18.

A Coefficient n bc.m/(bc.m + st) 0.39

K.ChandraBose 16 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Lever arm Coefficient, j=1-(n/3) = 0.87


Moment of resistance Coefficient Q bc/2. n. j 0.84

Step 2: Moment on the beam.

M = 40kNm

M = Qbd2

d2 = M/Qb = (40x106)/ (0.84x1/2xd)

d = 456.2 say 460 mm.

b = d = 0.5x460 = 230mm

Step 3: Balanced Moment.

Mbal = Qbd2 = 0.84x230x4602 = 40.88kNm. > M. it can be designed as singly


reinforced section.

Step 4: Area of steel.

Ast = Mbal / (st.j.d) (40.88x106)/(140x0.87x460) = 729.64mm2

Use 20mm dia bars ast /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 729.64/314.15 = 2.96 say 3nos.

Provide 3#20mm dia bars at the tension side.

4. Determine the moment of resistance of a singly reinforced beam 160X300mm


effective section, if the stress in steel and concrete are not to exceed 140N/mm2
and 5N/mm2.effectve span of the beam is 5m and the beam carries 4 nos of 16mm
dia bars. Take m=18.find also the minimum load the bam can carry. Use WSD
method. (NOV-DEC 2009)

K.ChandraBose 17 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Step 1: Actual NA.


b xa2/2 = m.Ast.(d- xa)
160. xa2/2 = 18 X 804.24(300 xa)
Xa = 159.42mm
Step 2: Critical NA.
xc bc.d/(st/.m + cbc) 117.39mm < Xa 159.42mm
it is Over reinforced Section.
Step 3: Moment of Resistance
M (b. xa/2 .cbc )(d- xa/3) = (160x159.42/2x5)(300-159.42/3) = 15.74kNm
Step 4: Safe load.

M = (w.l2)/8

W = (8 x 15.74)/52 = 5.03 kN/m

5. Design an interior panel of RC slab 3mX6m size, supported by wall of 300mm


thick. Live load on the slab is 2.5kN/m2.the slab carries 100mm thick lime
concrete (density 19kN/m3).Use M15 concrete and Fe 415 steel. (NOV-DEC
2009)

Step 1: Type of Slab.

ly/lx = 6/3 = 2 = 2.it has to be designed as two way slab.

Step 2:Effective depth calculation.


For Economic consideration adopt shorter span to design the slab.
d = span/(basic value x modification factor) = 3000/(20x0.95) = 270mm
D = 270 + 20 + 10/2 = 295mm
Step 3: Effective Span.
For shorter span:
Le = clear span + effective depth = 3000 + 270 = 3.27m (or)
Le =c/c distance b/w supports = 3000 + 2(230/2) =3.23m

K.ChandraBose 18 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Adopt effective span = 3.23m least value.


For longer span:
Le = clear span + effective depth = 6000 + 270 = 6.27m (or)
Le =c/c distance b/w supports = 6000 + 2(230/2) = 6.23m
Adopt effective span = 6.23m least value.
Step 4: load calculation
Live load = 2.5kN/m2
Dead load = 1x1x0.27x25 = 6.75kN/m2
Dead load = 1x1x0.1x19 = 1.9kN/m2
Floor Finish = 1kN/m2
Total load = 12.15kN/m2
Factored load = 12.15 x 1.5 = 18.225kN/m2
Step 5: Moment calculation.
Mx x . w . lx 0.103x18.225x3.23 = 9.49kNm
My y . w . lx 0.048 x18.225x3.23 = 4.425kNm
Step 6: Check for effective depth.
M = Qbd2
d2 = M/Qb = 9.49/2.76x1 = 149.39mm say 150mm.
For design consideration adopt d = 150mm.
Step 7: Area of Steel.
For longer span:
Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))
4.425x106 = 087x415xAstx150(1-(415 Ast)/(20x1000x150))
Ast = 180mm2
Use 10mm dia bars
Spacing ,S = ast/Astx1000 = (78.53/300)1000 = 261mm say 260mmc/c
Provide 10mm dia @260mm c/c.
For shorter span:

K.ChandraBose 19 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))

9.49x106 = 087x415xAstx150(1-(415
Ast)/(20x1000x150)) Ast = 200mm2
Use 10mm dia bars
Spacing ,S = ast/Astx1000 = (78.53/300)1000 = 281mm say 300mmc/c
Provide 10mm dia @300mm c/c.

6. A reinforced concrete rectangular section 300 mm wide and 600 mm overall depth
is reinforced with 4 bars of 25 mm diameter at an effective cover of 50 mm on the
tension side. The beam is designed with M 20 grade concrete and Fe 415 grade
steel. Determine the allowable bending moment and the stresses developed in steel
and concrete under this moment. Use working stress method. (MAY JUNE 2009)

Step 1: Actual NA.


b xa2/2 = m.Ast.(d- xa)
300. xa2/2 = 18 X 1963.50(550
xa) Xa = 117.81mm
Step 2: Critical NA.
xc bc.d/(st/.m + cbc) = 194.66mm > Xa =
117.81mm it is Under reinforced Section.
Step 3: Moment of Resistance
For steel:
M = (Ast.st )(d- xa/3) = (1963.5x230)(550-117.81/3) = 230.64kNm
For concrete:
M (b. xa/2 .cbc )(d- xa/3) = (300x117.81/2x7)(550-117.81/3) = 63.17kNm

K.ChandraBose 20 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

UNIT 2

LIMIT STATE DESIGN FOR FLEXURE


2.1 Pre-requisites

Beam
A structural member that support transverse (Perpendicular to the axis of the member)
load is called a beam. Beams are subjected to bending moment and shear force. Beams are
also known as flexural or bending members. In a beam one of the dimensions is very large
compared to the other two dimensions. Beams may be of the following types:
a. Singly or doubly reinforced rectangular beams

Fig 1: Singly reinforced rectangular beam

Fig 2: Doubly reinforced rectangular beam

K.ChandraBose 21 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

b. Singly or doubly reinforced T-beams

Fig 3: Singly reinforced T beam

Fig 4: Doubly reinforced T beam

c. Singly or doubly reinforced L-beams

K.ChandraBose 22 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Fig 5: Singly reinforced L beam

Fig 6: Doubly reinforced L beam


2.2 General specification for flexure design of beams
Beams are designed on the basis of limit state of collapse in flexure and checked for
other limit states of shear, torsion and serviceability. To ensure safety the resistance to
bending, shear, torsion and axial loads at every section should be greater than the appropriate
values at that produced by the probable most unfavourable combination of loads on the
structure using the appropriate safety factors. The following general specifications and
practical requirements are necessary for designing the reinforced cement concrete beams.

a. Selection of grade of concrete


Apart from strength and deflection, durability shall also be considered to
select the grade of concrete to be used. Table 5 of IS 456:2000 shall be referred for
the grade of concrete to be used. In this table the grade of concrete to be used is
recommended based on the different environmental exposure conditions.
b. Selection of grade of steel
Normally Fe 250, Fe 415 and Fe 500 are used. In earthquake zones and other
places where there are possibilities of vibration, impact, blast etc, Fe 250 (mild steel)
is preferred as it is more ductile.
c. Size of the beam
The size of the beam shall be fixed based on the architectural requirements,
placing of reinforcement, economy of the formwork, deflection, design moments and
shear. In addition, the depth of the beam depends on the clear height below the beam
and the width depends on the thickness of the wall to be constructed below the beam.
The width of the beam is usually equal to the width of the wall so that there is no
projection or offset at the common surface of contact between the beam and the wall.
The commonly used widths of the beam are 115 mm, 150 mm, 200 mm, 230
mm, 250 mm, 300 mm.
d. Cover to the reinforcement

K.ChandraBose 23 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Cover is the certain thickness of concrete provided all round the steel bars to
give adequate protection to steel against fire, corrosion and other harmful elements
present in the atmosphere. It is measured as distance from the outer concrete surface
to the nearest surface of steel. The amount of cover to be provided depends on the
condition of exposure and shall be as given in the Table 16 of IS 456:2000. The cover
shall not be less than the diameter of the bar.
e. Spacing of the bars
The details of spacing of bars to be provided in beams are given in clause
26.3.2 of IS 456. As per this clause the following shall be considered for spacing of
bars.
The horizontal distance between two parallel main bars shall usually be not less than
the greatest of the following
i. Diameter of the bar if the diameters are equal
ii. The diameter of the larger bar if the diameters are unequal
iii. 5mm more than the nominal maximum size of coarse aggregate

Greater horizontal spacing than the minimum specified above should be


provided wherever possible. However when needle vibrators are used, the horizontal
distance between bars of a group may be reduced to two thirds the nominal maximum
size of the coarse aggregate, provided that sufficient space is left between groups of
bars to enable the vibrator to be immersed.

Where there are 2 or more rows of bars, the bars shall be vertically in line and
the minimum vertical distance between the bars shall be of the greatest of the
following

i. 15 mm
ii. Maximum size of aggregate
iii. Maximum size of bars

Maximum distance between bars in tension in beams:

The maximum distance between parallel reinforcement bars shall not be greater than
the values given in table 15 of IS 456:2000.

2.3 General Aspects of Serviceability:


The members are designed to withstand safely all loads liable to act on it throughout
its life using the limit state of collapse. These members designed should also satisfy the
serviceability limit states. To satisfy the serviceability requirements the deflections and
cracking in the member should not be excessive and shall be less than the permissible values.
Apart from this the other limit states are that of the durability and vibrations. Excessive
values beyond this limit state spoil the appearance of the structure and affect the partition
walls, flooring etc. This will cause the user discomfort and the structure is said to be unfit for
use.

K.ChandraBose 24 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

The different load combinations and the corresponding partial safety factors to be
used for the limit state of serviceability are given in Table 18 of IS 456:2000.

2.4 Limit state of serviceability for flexural members:

Deflection
The check for deflection is done through the following two methods specified by IS
456:2000 (Refer clause 42.1)
1 Empirical Method
In this method, the deflection criteria of the member is said to be satisfied
when the actual value of span to depth ratio of the member is less than the
permissible values. The IS code procedure for calculating the permissible values
are as given below
a. Choosing the basic values of span to effective depth ratios (l/d) from the
following, depending on the type of beam
1. Cantilever = 8
2. Simply supported = 20
3. Continuous = 26
b. Modify the value of basic span to depth ratio to get the allowable span to depth
ratio.
Allowable l/d = Basic l/d x Mt x Mc x Mf
Where, Mt = Modification factor obtained from fig 4 IS 456:2000. It depends
on the area of tension reinforcement provided and the type of steel.
Mc = Modification factor obtained from fig 5 IS 456:2000. This depends on
the area of compression steel used.
Mf = Reduction factor got from fig 6 of IS 456:2000

K.ChandraBose 25 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Note: The basic values of l/d mentioned above is valid upto spans of 10m. The basic values
are multiplied by 10 / span in meters except for cantilever. For cantilevers whose span
exceeds 10 m the theoretical method shall be used.

2 Theoretical method of checking deflection


The actual deflections of the members are calculated as per procedure given in
annexure C of IS 456:2000. This deflection value shall be limited to the
following
i. The final deflection due to all loads including the effects of temperature, creep and
shrinkage shall not exceed span / 250.
ii. The deflection including the effects of temperature, creep and shrinkage occurring
after erection of partitions and the application of finishes shall not exceed
span/350 or 20 mm whichever is less.

2.6 Cracking in structural members


Cracking of concrete occurs whenever the tensile stress developed is greater than the
tensile strength of concrete. This happens due to large values of the following:

1. Flexural tensile stress because of excessive bending under the applied load
2. Diagonal tension due to shear and torsion
3. Direct tensile stress under applied loads (for example hoop tension in a circular
tank)
4. Lateral tensile strains accompanying high axis compressive strains due to
Poissons effect (as in a compression test)
5. Settlement of supports

In addition to the above reasons, cracking also occurs because of

1. Restraint against volume changes due to shrinkage, temperature creep and


chemical effects.
2. Bond and anchorage failures

Cracking spoils the aesthetics of the structure and also adversely affect the durability
of the structure. Presence of wide cracks exposes the reinforcement to the atmosphere due to
which the reinforcements get corroded causing the deterioration of concrete. In some cases,
such as liquid retaining structures and pressure vessels cracks affects the basic functional
requirement itself (such as water tightness in water tank).

Permissible crack width

The permissible crack width in structural concrete members depends on the type of
structure and the exposure conditions. The permissible values are prescribed in clause 35.3.2
IS 456:2000 and are shown in table below

K.ChandraBose 26 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Table: Permissible values of crack width as per IS 456:2000

No. Types of Exposure Permissible widths of crack


at surface (mm)

Protected and not exposed to aggressive


1 0.3
environmental conditions
2 Moderate environmental conditions 0.2

Control of cracking
The check for cracking in beams are done through the following 2 methods specified in
IS 456:2000 clause 43.1
1. By empirical method:
In this method, the cracking is said to be in control if proper detailing (i.e. spacing) of
reinforcements as specified in clause 26.3.2 of IS 456:2000 is followed. These specifications
regarding the spacing have been already discussed under heading general specifications. In
addition, the following specifications shall also be considered
i. In the beams where the depth of the web exceeds 750 mm, side face reinforcement
shall be provided along the two faces. The total area of such reinforcement shall
not be less than 0.1% of the web area and shall be distributed equally on two faces
at a spacing not exceeding 300 mm or web thickness whichever is less. (Refer
clause 25.5.1.3 IS456:2000)

ii. The minimum tension reinforcement in beams to prevent failure in the tension
zone by cracking of concrete is given by the following
As = 0.85 fy / 0.87 fy (Refer clause 26.5.1.1 IS 456:2000)

iii. Provide large number of smaller diameter bars rather than large diameter bars of
the same area. This will make the bars well distributed in the tension zone and will
reduce the width of the cracks.

2. By crack width computations


In the case of special structures and in aggressive environmental conditions, it is
preferred to compute the width of cracks and compare them with the permissible
crack width to ensure the safety of the structure at the limit state of serviceability. The
IS 456-2000 has specified an analytical method for the estimation of surface crack
width in Annexure-F which is based on the British Code (BS : 8110) specifications
where the surface crack width is less than the permissible width, the crack control is
said to be satisfied.

K.ChandraBose 27 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

2.7 Design Problems:


1. Given the following data of a simply supported T beam, check the deflection criteria by
empirical method
Width of the beam (b) = 230 mm
Effective depth (d) = 425 mm
Effective span = 8.0 m
Area of tension steel required = 977.5 mm2
Area of tension steel provided = 1256 mm2
Area of compression steel provided = 628 mm2
Type of steel = Fe 415
Width of flange (bf) = 0.9 m
Width of web (bw) = 0.3 m

Solution:



Basic = 20 for simply supported beam from clause 23.2.1

 
 
Allowable = Basic x Mt x Mc x Mf . (1)
1265 100
 = = 1.30 %
230 425

0.58      !


 =
   "# !!

0.58 415 977.5


 = = 187.3
1256

From fig 4, for Pt = 1.3%, fs = 187.5 N/mm2

Mt = 1.1 . (a)

628 100
& = = 0.65%
230 425
From fig 5, for Pc = 0.65%, Mc = 1.15 (b)

'( *.+*
') *.,*
From fig 6, for = = 0.33, Mf = 0.80 (c)

Substituting a, b and c in equation (1)




We get allowable = 20 x 1.1 x 1.15 x 0.80 = 20.2

K.ChandraBose 28 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

 - 
= 18.82 < allowable
 *../0 
Actual =

Hence OK

2. A rectangular beam continuous over several supports has a width of 300 mm and overall
depth of 600 mm. The effective length of each of the spans of the beam is 12.0 m. The
effective cover is 25 mm. Area of compression steel provided is 942 mm2 and area of
tension steel provided is 1560 mm2. Adopting Fe 500 steel estimate the safety of the
beam for deflection control using the empirical method

Solution:

 
 
Allowable = Basic x Mt x Mc x Mf . (1)



Basic = 26 as the beam is continuous

0.58      !


 =
   "# !!
0.58 500 1560
 = = 290
1560

From fig 4, for fs = 290, Pt = 0.90, Mt = 0.9.(a)

From fig 5, for Pc = 0.54%, Mc = 1.15 .(b)

'(
')
From fig 6, for = 1.0, Mf = 1 (c)

2* 2*
. 
345 2/
The equation (1) shall be multiplied by as the span of the beam is greater
than 10.0 m
 2*
x 26 x 0.9 x 1.15 x 1 = 22.4
 2/
Allowable =

 2/ 
= 20.86 < allowable
 *.060 
Actual =

Hence deflection control is satisfied.

K.ChandraBose 29 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

3. Find the effective depth based on the deflection criteria of a cantilever beam of 6m span.
Take fy = 415 N/mm2, Pt = 1%, Pc = 1%.

Solution:

 
 
Allowable = Basic x Mt x Mc x Mf



Basic = 7 for cantilever beam
789 :;<=>:;
789 3:?@>;
Assume = 1.0

fs = 0.58 x 415 x 1= 240.7

From fig 4, for fs = 240, Pt = 1%, Mt = 1.0

From fig 5, for Pc = 1%, Mc = 1.25

'(
')
From fig 6, for = 1.0, Mf = 1



Allowable = 7 x 1.0 x 1.25 x 1.0 = 8.75

 A***
!=
-.60 -.60
= = 685 mm

4. A simply supported beam of rectangular cross section 250mm wide and 450mm overall
depth is used over an effective span of 4.0m. The beam is reinforced with 3 bars of
20mm diameter Fe 415 HYSD bars at an effective depth of 400mm. Two anchor bars of
10mm diameter are provided. The self weight of the beam together with the dead load on
the beam is 4 kN/m. Service load acting on the beam is 10 kN/m. Using M20 grade
concrete, compute
a. Short term deflection
b. Long term deflection

Solution:

Data b = 250 mm, D = 450 mm, d = 400 mm, fy = 415 N/mm2


B
Ast = 3 x x 202 = 942 mm2, l = 4.0 m, D.L = 4 kN/m, Service load = 10 kN/m,
.
B
Total load = 14 kN/m, fck = 20, Asc = 2 x x 102 = 158 mm2
.

Es = 2.1 x 105 , Ec = 5000 C&D = 22360 N/mm2

K.ChandraBose 30 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

/-* /-*
= 13.3
+ EFGF + H 6
m= =

fcr = 0.7 C&D = 0.7 20 = 3.13 N/mm2

a. Short term deflection

To determine the depth of N.A


Equating the moment of compression area to that of the tension area, we get

H
b * x * = m * Ast * (d-x)
/
m is used to convert the steel into equivalent concrete area

HJ
= 13 * 942 * (400-x)
/
250 *

Solving, x = 155 mm from the top

/0* 200K
+ L250 155M x (155/2)2 + 13 x 942 (400 155)
2/
Cracked MOI Ir =
= 10.45 x 108 mm4

/0* H .0*K
= 18.98 x 108 mm4
2/
(2) Igr = Gross MOI =

(3) M = Maximum BM under service load

N  J 2. .J
= = 28 kN = 28 x 106 N-mm
- -
M=

(4) Cracked moment of inertia


OFP QRP +.2+ 2-.,- 2*S
= 26 x 106 N-mm
9 *.0 .0*
Mr = =

H
Lever arm = z = T! V
+

200
= T400 V = 348.34 mm
+

XP
(5) Ieff = W ZP [ ] G ^
2./YT Z V T\V T2Y\V T G(V

2*..0 2*S
_ Ja bca KeS.Ke bff
g
2./Y` d T V T2Y V L2M
JS bca ecc ecc

K.ChandraBose 31 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Ieff = 14.93 x 108 mm4

Further Ir < Ieff < Igr

(6) Maximum short term deflection

h( N  e 0 2. L.***MJ

iF Xj)) +-. //+A* 2..,+ 2*S
ai(perm) = = = 1.39 mm

0
+-.
Kw = for SSB with UDL

b. Long term deflection

(1) Shrinkage deflection (acs):

acs = K3 cs L2

K3 = 0.125 for simply supported beam from Annexure C-3.1


lF8
cs = Shrinkage curvature = k. T V
m
n& = Ultimate shrinkage strain of concrete (refer 6.2.4) = 0.0003
2** ,./
 =
/0* .**
= 0.942

2** 20-
& =
/0* .**
= 0.158

Pt - Pc = (0.942 0.158) = 0.784


This is greater than 0.25 and less than 1.0 Hence ok.

o9 YoF *.,./Y*.20-
Therefore k. = 0.72 = 0.72
Co9 *.,./

K4 = 0.58
*.0- *.***+
= 3.866 x 10-7
.0*
cs =

acs = K3 cs L2

= 0.125 x 3.866 x 10-7 x (4000)2

= 0.773 mm

(2) Creep deflection [acc(perm)]

Creep deflection acc(perm) = aicc(perm) ai(perm)

Where, acc(perm) = creep deflection due to permanent loads

K.ChandraBose 32 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

aicc(perm) = short term deflection + creep deflection

ai(perm) = short term deflection

N  K
aicc (perm) = kN ` d
iFj Xj))

i i
p&; = L2qrM
F
=
F
L2q2.AM

s = Creep coefficient = 1.6 for 28 days loading

aicc(perm) = 2.6 x short term deflection

= 2.6 x ai(perm)

= 2.6 x 1.39 = 3.614 mm

Creep deflection acc(perm) = 3.614 1.39 = 2.224 mm

Total long term deflection = shrinkage deflection + Creep deflection

= 0.773 + 2.224 = 3.013 mm

Total deflection = Short term deflection + Long term deflection

= 1.39 + 3.013 = 4.402 mm

5. A simply supported beam of rectangular section spanning over 6 m has a width of


300mm and overall depth of 600 mm. The beam is reinforced with 4 bars of 25 mm
diameter on the tension side at an effective depth of 550 mm spaced 50 mm centres. The
beam is subjected to a working load moment of 160 kN.m at the centre of the span
section. Using M-25 grade concrete and Fe-415 HYSD bars, check the beam for
serviceability limit state of cracking according to IS:456-2000 method. The beam is
protected and not exposed to aggressive environmental conditions.

a. Data:

b = 300 mm fck = 25 N/mm2


h = 600 mm fy = 415 N/mm2
d = 550 mm Es = 2 x 105 N/mm2
M = 160 kN.m spacing between bars s = 5 mm
Ast = 1963 mm2 cover = 50mm

For fck = 25 N/mm2, from table 21 IS 456


t&'& = 8.5 u/ww/

/-*
w=
+EFGF
= 11

K.ChandraBose 33 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

b. Neutral axis depth

Let x = depth of neutral axis


Then we have 0.5 b / = m Ast (d-x)
0.5 x 300 / = 11 x 1963 (550-x)
Solving, x = 220 mm

c. Cracked moment of area (Ir):

Ir = (bx3/3) + m Ast r2
Where r = (d-x) = (550-220) = 330 mm

+** //*K
Ir = T V + L11 1963 330/ M
+

= 34.1 x 108 mm4

d. Maximum width of cracks

Cover = Cmin = (50 - 12.5) = 37.5


acr = [(0.5 S)2 + C2min]1/2
= [(0.5 x 50)2 + 37.52]1/2
= 45
Crack width will be maximum at the soffit of the beam
Distance of the centroid of steel from neutral axis
= r = (d-x) = (50-220) = 330 mm

O8 zYH
Therefore n2 = T V y {
i8 YH

|  2A* 2*a ++*


Where,  = w y { = 11 y { = 170 N/mm2
XP +..2 2*S

26* A**Y//*
Therefore, n2 = T Vy { = 9.78 x 10-4
/ 2*f 00*Y//*

'9 LzYHMLzYHM
n} = n2 y {
+ i8 78 LYHM

+** LA**Y//*MLA**Y//*M
n} = L9.78 10Y. M y {
+ / 2*f 2,A+ L00*Y//*M

= 8.67 x 10-4

K.ChandraBose 34 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Maximum width of crack is expressed as:

+  Z
~&: = W F ^
2q/ FP Z
]

+ .0 -.A6 2*e
~&: = W efK.f ^
2q/
accJJc

= 0.113 mm < Permissible crack width of 0.3mm from clause 35.3.2


page 67. Hence ok.

K.ChandraBose 35 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

UNIT III LIMIT STATE DESIGN FOR BOND, ANCHORAGE SHEAR & TORSION

3.1DESIGN FOR TORSION

INTRODUCTION

Torsion when encountered in reinforced concrete members usually occurs in combination with flexure shear.
Torsion in its pure form (generally associated with metal shafts) is rarely encountered in reinforced concrete.

The interactive behavior of torsion with bending moment and flexural shear in reinforced concrete beams is
fairly complex, owing to the no homogeneous, nonlinear and composite nature of the material and the presence
of cracks. For convenience in design, codes prescribe highly simplified design procedures, which reflect a
judicious blend of theoretical considerations and experimental results.

These design procedures and their bases are described in this chapter, following a brief review of the general
behavior of reinforced concrete beams under torsion.

3.2 EQUILIBRIUM TORSION AND COMPATIBILITY TORSION

Torsion may be induced in a reinforced concrete member in various ways during the process of load transfer in
a structural system. In reinforced concrete design, the terms equilibrium torsion and compatibility torsion are
commonly used to refer to two different torsion inducing situations.

In equilibrium torsion, the torsion is induced by an eccentric loading, and equilibrium conditions alone suffice
in determining the twisting moments. In compatibility torsion, the torsion is induced by the application of an
angle of twist and the resulting twisting moment depends on the torsional stiffness of the member.

In some (relatively rare) situations, axial force (tension or compression) may also be involved.

It must be clearly understood that this is merely a matter of terminology, and that it does not imply for instance,
equilibrium conditions need not be satisfied in cases of compatibility torsion.

There are some situations (such as circular beams supported on multiple columns) where both equilibrium
torsion and compatibility torsion coexist.

EQUILIBRIUM TORSION

This is associated with twisting moments that are developed in a structural member is maintain static
equilibrium with the external loads, and are independent of the torsional stiffness of the member. Such torsion
must be necessarily considered design. The magnitude of the twisting moment does not depend on the torsional
stiffness of the member, and is entirely determinable from statics alone. The member has to be designed for the
full torsion, which is transmitted by the member to the supports. More ever, the end(s) of the member should be

K.ChandraBose 36 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering
suitably restrained to enable the member to resist effectively the torsion induced. Typically, equilibrium torsion
is induced in beams supporting lateral over hanging projections, and is caused by the eccentricity in the loading
(Figure). Such torsion is also induced in beams curved plan and subjected to gravity loads, and in beams where
the transverse loads are eccentric with respect to the shear centre of the cross section.
Cantilevered Shell Roof

Column (a) Beam supporting a lateral


overhanging
Beam subjected
to equilibrium
torsion

T/2

Total torque = T
T/2
T/2
(c) twisting moment
Diagram

(b)free body of beam

Compatibility Torsion
T/2
This is the name given to the type of torsion induced in a structural member rotations (twists) applied at one
or more points along the length of the member. It twisting moments induced are directly dependent on the
torsional stiffness of the member. These moments are generally statically in determine and their analysis
necessarily involves (rotational) compatibility conditions; hence the name compatibility torsion. For example,
in the floor beam system has shown in figure, the flexure of the secondary beam BD results in a rotation B at
the end B. As the primary (Spandrel) beam ABC is monolithically connected with the secondary beam BD at
the joint B., compatibility at B implies an angle of twist, equal to B in the spandrel beam ABC, and a bending
moment will develop at the end b of beam BD. The bending moment will be equal to, and will act in a direction

K.ChandraBose 37 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

opposite to the twisting moment, in order to satisfy static equilibrium. The magnitude of B and the twisting /
bending moment at b depends on the torsional stiffness of beam ABC and the flexural stiffness of beam BD.

The torsional stiffness of a reinforced concrete member is drastically reduced by torsional cracking. This results
in a very large increase in the angle of twist, and, in the case of compatibility torsion, a major reduction in the
induced twisting moment. For this reasons, the code (CL.40.1) permits the designer to neglect the torsional
stiffness of reinforced concrete members at the structural analysis stage itself, so that the need for detailed
design for torsion in such cases does not arise at the design stage. With reference to figure, this implies
assuming a fictitious hinge (i.e., no rotational restraint) at the end B of the beam BD, and assuming a continuous
support (spring, support, actually)at the joint D. Incidentally, this assumption helps in reducing the degree of
static indeterminacy of the structure (typically, a grid floor), thereby simplifying the problem of structural
analysis. Thus, the code states:

In general, where the torsional resistance or stiffness of members has not been taken into account in the analysis
of a structure no specific calculations for torsion will be necessary [CL40.1 of the code].

Of course, this simplification implies the acceptance of cracking and increased deformations in the torsional
member. It also means that during the first time loading, a twisting moment up to the cracking torque of the
K.ChandraBose 38 Academic Year 2015-2016
CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering
plain concrete section develops in the member, prior to torsional cracking. In order to control the subsequent
cracking and to impart ductility to the member, it is desirable to provide a minimum torsional reinforcement,
equal to that required to resist the cracking torque. In fact one of the intentions of the minimum stirrup
reinforcement specified by the code (CL. 25.5.1.6) is to ensure some degree of control of torsional cracking of
beams due to compatibility torsion.
If, however, the designer chooses to consider compatibility torsion in analysis and design, then it is important
that a realistic estimate of torsional stiffness is made for the purpose of structural analysis, and the required
torsional reinforcement should be provided for the calculated twisting moment.
3.3 Estimation of Torsional stiffness

Observed behavior of reinforced concrete members under torsion (see also section 7.3) shows that the
torsional stiffness is little influenced by the amount of torsional reinforcement in the linear elastic phase, and
may be taken as that of the plain concrete section. However, once torsional cracking occurs, there is a drastic
reduction in the torsional stiffness. The post cracking torsional stiffness is only a small fraction (less than 10
percent) of the pre cracking stiffness, and depends on the amount of torsional reinforcement, provided in the
form of closed stirrups and longitudinal bars. Heavy torsional reinforcement can, doubt, increase the torsional
resistance (strength) to a large extent, but this can be realized only at very large angles of twist (accompanied by
very large cracks).

Hence, even with torsional reinforcement provided, in most practical situations, the maximum twisting moment
in a reinforced concrete member under compatibility torsion is the value corresponding to the torsional cracking
of the member. The cracking torque is very nearly the same as the failure strength obtained for an identical
plain concrete section.

In the usual linear elastic analysis of framed structures, the torsional stiffness kt (torque per unit twist T/ ) of a
beam of length l is expressed as

KT = GC / l

Where GC is the torsional rigidity, obtained as a product of the shear modulus G and the geometrical parameter
C of the section (Ref. 7.1). It is recommended in the Explanatory Handbook to the code (Ref.7.2) that G may be
taken as 0.4 times the c is a property of the section having the same relationship to the torsional stiffness of a
rectangular section as the polar moment of inertia has for a circular section

K.ChandraBose 39 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

3.4 Design Problems

Problem 1:

Determine the anchorage length of 4-20T reinforcing bars going into the support
of the simply supported beam shown in Fig. 6.15.5. The factored shear force Vu = 280
kN, width of the column support = 300 mm. Use M 20 concrete and Fe 415 steel.

Solution 1:

bd for M 20 and Fe 415 (with 60% increased) = 1.6(1.2) = 1.92 N/mm2

s 0.87(415)
Ld = = (when s = 0.87 f y ) = 47.01 ...... (1)
4 bd 4(1.92)

M1
(Ld ) when s = f d + Lo
V

Here, to find M1, we need xu

K.ChandraBose 40 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

0.87 f y Ast 0.87(415) (1256)


xu = = = 209.94 mm
0.36 f ck b 0.36(20) (300)

xu,max = 0.48(500) = 240 mm

Since xu < xu,max ; M1 = 0.87 fy Ast (d 0.42 xu)

or M1 = 0.87(415) (1256) {500 0.42(209.94)} = 187.754 kNm

and V = 280 kN

We have from above, with the stipulation of 30 per cent increase assuming that
the reinforcing bars are confined by a compressive reaction:

M1
Ld 1.3 ( ) + L o ...... (2)
V

From Eqs.(1) and (2), we have

47.01 1.3 ( M 1 ) + L
o
V

187.754(10 6 )
or 47.01 1.3 { }; if L is assumed as zero.
o
280(10 3 )

or 18.54 mm

Therefore, 20 mm diameter bar does not allow Lo = 0.

Determination of Lo:

M1
1.3 ( ) + L 47.01
o
V

M1 187754
Minimum Lo = 47.01 - 1.3 ( ) = 47.01(20) - 1.3( ) = 68.485 mm
V 280

So, the bars are extended by 100 mm to satisfy the requirement as shown in
Fig.

K.ChandraBose 41 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 42 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 43 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 44 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 45 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 46 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 47 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

UNIT-4
Design of Columns

4.1 Pre-requisite Discussion:


A column is defined as a compression member, the effective length of which exceeds three
times the least lateral dimension. Compression members, whose lengths do not exceed three
times the least lateral dimension, may be made of plain concrete. A column forms a very
important component of a structure. Columns support beams which in turn support walls
and slabs. It should be realized that the failure of a column results in the collapse of
the structure. The design of a column should therefore receive importance.
4.2 Introduction:
A column is a vertical structural member supporting axial compressive loads, with or without
moments. The cross-sectional dimensions of a column are generally considerably less than its
height. Columns support vertical loads from the floors and roof and transmit these loads to
the foundations.

The more general terms compression members and members subjected to combined axial
load and bending are sometimes used to refer to columns, walls, and members in concrete
trusses or frames. These may be vertical, inclined, or horizontal. A column is a special case of
a compression member that is vertical. Stability effects must be considered in the design of
compression members.
4.3 Classification of columns
A column may be classified based on different criteria such as:

1. Based on shape

Rectangle
Square
Circular
Polygon
L type
T type
+ type

2. Based on slenderness ratio or height

Short column and Long column or Short and Slender Compression Members

A compression member may be considered as short when both the slenderness ratios namely
lex/D and ley/b are less than 12: Where
lex= effective length in respect of the major axis, D= depth in respect of the major axis,
ley= effective length in respect of the minor axis, and b = width of the member.

It shall otherwise be considered as a slender or long compression member.

K.ChandraBose 48 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

The great majority of concrete columns are sufficiently stocky (short) that slenderness can be
ignored. Such columns are referred to as short columns. Short column generally fails by
crushing of concrete due to axial force. If the moments induced by slenderness effects
weaken a column appreciably, it is referred to as a slender column or a long column. Long
columns generally fail by bending effect than due to axial effect. Long column carry less load
compared to long column.

3. Based on pattern of lateral reinforcement

Tied columns with ties as laterals


columns with Spiral steel as laterals or spiral columns

Majority of columns in any buildings are tied columns. In a tied column the longitudinal bars
are tied together with smaller bars at intervals up the column. Tied columns may be square,
rectangular, L-shaped, circular, or any other required shape. Occasionally, when high strength
and/or high ductility are required, the bars are placed in a circle, and the ties are replaced by a
bar bent into a helix or spiral. Such a column, called a spiral column. Spiral columns are
generally circular, although square or polygonal shapes are sometimes used. The spiral acts to
restrain the lateral expansion of the column core under high axial loads and, in doing so,
delays the failure of the core, making the column more ductile. Spiral columns are used more
extensively in seismic regions. If properly designed, spiral column carry 5% extra load at
failure compared to similar tied column.

4. Based on type of loading

Axially loaded column or centrally or concentrically loaded column (Pu)


A column subjected to axial load and unaxial bending (Pu + Mux) or (P + Muy)
A column subjected to axial load and biaxial bending (Pu + Mux + Muy)

5. Based on materials

K.ChandraBose 49 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Timber, stone, masonry, RCC, PSC, Steel, aluminium , composite column

RCC-Tied RCC spiral Composite columns

4.4 Behavior of Tied and Spiral Columns

Figure shows a portion of the core of a spiral column. Under a compressive load, the concrete
in this column shortens longitudinally under the stress and so, to satisfy Poissons ratio, it
expands laterally. In a spiral column, the lateral expansion of the concrete inside the spiral
(referred to as the core) is restrained by the spiral. This stresses the spiral in tension. For
equilibrium, the concrete is subjected to lateral compressive stresses. In a tied column in a
non seismic region, the ties are spaced roughly the width of the column apart and, as a result,
provide relatively little lateral restraint to the core. Outward pressure on the sides of the ties
due to lateral expansion of the core merely bends them outward, developing an insignificant
hoop-stress effect. Hence, normal ties have little effect on the strength of the core in a tied
column. They do, however, act to reduce the unsupported length of the longitudinal bars, thus
reducing the danger of buckling of those bars as the bar stress approaches yield. load-
deflection diagrams for a tied column and a spiral column subjected to axial loads is shown in
figure. The initial parts of these diagrams are similar. As the maximum load is reached,
vertical cracks and crushing develop in the concrete shell outside the ties or spiral, and this
concrete spalls off. When this occurs in a tied column, the capacity of the core that remains is
less than the load on the column. The concrete core is crushed, and the reinforcement buckles
outward between ties. This occurs suddenly, without warning, in a brittle manner. When the
shell spalls off a spiral column, the column does not fail immediately because the strength of
the core has been enhanced by the triaxial stresses resulting from the effect of the spiral
reinforcement. As a result, the column can undergo large deformations, eventually reaching a
second maximum load, when the spirals yield and the column finally collapses. Such a failure
is much more ductile than that of a tied column and gives warning of the impending failure,
along with possible load redistribution to other members. Due to this, spiral column carry
little more load than the tied column to an extent of about 5%. Spiral columns are used when
ductility is important or where high loads make it economical to utilize the extra strength.
Both columns are in the same building and have undergone the same deformations. The tied
column has failed completely, while the spiral column, although badly damaged, is still
supporting a load. The very minimal ties were inadequate to confine the core concrete. Had
the column ties been detailed according to ACI Code, the column will perform better as
shown.

4.5 Specifications for covers and reinforcement in column

For a longitudinal reinforcing bar in a column nominal cover shall in any case not be less
than 40 mm, or less than the diameter of such bar. In the case of columns of minimum
dimension of 200 mm or under, whose reinforcing bars do not exceed 12 mm, a nominal
cover of 25 mm may be used. For footings minimum cover shall be 50 mm.

K.ChandraBose 50 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Nominal Cover in mm to meet durability requirements based on exposure

Mild 20, Moderate 30, Severe 45, Very severe 50, Extreme 75

Nominal cover to meet specified period of fire resistance for all fire rating 0.5 to 4 hours is 40
mm for columns only

4.6 Effective length of compression member

Column or strut is a compression member, the effective length of which exceeds three times
the least lateral dimension. For normal usage assuming idealized conditions, the effective
length of in a given plane may be assessed on the basis of Table 28 of IS: 456-2000.
Following terms are required.

Following are the end restraints:

Effectively held in position and restrained against rotation in both ends

Effectively held in position at both ends, restrained against rotation at one end

Effectively held in position at both ends, but not restrained against rotation

Effectively held in position and restrained against rotation at one end, and at the other
restrained against rotation but not held in position

Effectively held in position and restrained against rotation in one end, and at the other
partially restrained against rotation but not held in position

Effectively held in position at one end but not restrained against rotation, and at the
other end restrained against rotation but not held in position

Effectively held in position and restrained against rotation at one end but not held in
position nor restrained against rotation at the other end

Table.Effective length of compression member

Theo. Reco.
Sl. Value of Value of
Figure
No. Degree of End Restraint of Compression Members Effective Effective
Length Length

Effectively held in position and restrained against


1 0.50 l 0.65l
rotation in both ends

Effectively held in position at both ends, restrained


2 0.70 l 0.80l
against rotation at one end

K.ChandraBose 51 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Effectively held in position at both ends, but not


3 1.0 l 1.0l
restrained against rotation

Effectively held in position and restrained against


4 rotation at one end, and at the other restrained 1.0 l 1.20l
against rotation but not held in position

Effectively held in position and restrained against


5 rotation in one end, and at the other partially - 1.5l
restrained against rotation but not held in position

Effectively held in position at one end but not


6 restrained against rotation, and at the other end 2.0 l 2.0l
restrained against rotation but not held in position

Effectively held in position and restrained against


7 rotation at one end but not held in position nor 2.0 l 2.0l
restrained against rotation at the other end

Unsupported Length

The unsupported length, l, of a compression member shall be taken as the clear distance
between end restraints (visible height of column). Exception to this is for flat slab
construction, beam and slab construction, and columns restrained laterally by struts (Ref.
IS:456-2000),

Slenderness Limits for Columns

The unsupported length between end restraints shall not exceed 60 times the least lateral
dimension of a column.

If in any given plane, one end of a column is unrestrained, its unsupported length, l, shall not
exceed 100b2/D, where b = width of that cross-section, and D= depth of the cross-section
measured in the plane under consideration.

4.7 Specifications as per IS: 456-2000

Longitudinal reinforcement

1. The cross-sectional area of longitudinal reinforcement, shall be not less than 0.8
percent nor more than 6 percent of the gross cross sectional area of the column.

2. NOTE - The use of 6 percent reinforcement may involve practical difficulties in


placing and compacting of concrete; hence lower percentage is recommended. Where

K.ChandraBose 52 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

bars from the columns below have to be lapped with those in the column under
consideration, the percentage of steel shall usually not exceed 4 percent.

3. In any column that has a larger cross-sectional area than that required to support the
load, the minimum percentage of steel shall be based upon the area of concrete
required to resist the direct stress and not upon the actual area.

4. The minimum number of longitudinal bars provided in a column shall be four in


rectangular columns and six in circular columns.

5. The bars shall not be less than 12 mm in diameter

6. A reinforced concrete column having helical reinforcement shall have at least six bars
of longitudinal reinforcement within the helical reinforcement.

7. In a helically reinforced column, the longitudinal bars shall be in contact with the
helical reinforcement and equidistant around its inner circumference.

8. Spacing of longitudinal bars measured along the periphery of the column shall not
exceed 300 mm.

9. In case of pedestals in which the longitudinal reinforcement is not taken in account in


strength calculations, nominal longitudinal reinforcement not less than 0.15 percent of
the cross-sectional area shall be provided.

Longitudinal Bar
1 12 mm
Lateral ties
2 1
Spacing or pitch of
5mm
lateral ties

Cover to Lateral
ties as per IS: 456-
2000

4.8 Transverse reinforcement

A reinforced concrete compression member shall have transverse or helical reinforcement so


disposed that every longitudinal bar nearest to the compression face has effective lateral
support against buckling.

K.ChandraBose 53 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

The effective lateral support is given by transverse reinforcement either in the form of
circular rings capable of taking up circumferential tension or by polygonal links (lateral ties)
with internal angles not exceeding 135. The ends of the transverse reinforcement shall be
properly anchored.

Arrangement of transverse reinforcement

If the longitudinal bars are not spaced more than 75 mm on either side, transverse
reinforcement need only to go round corner and alternate bars for the purpose of providing
effective lateral supports (Ref. IS:456).

If the longitudinal bars spaced at a distance of not exceeding 48 times the diameter of the tie
are effectively tied in two directions, additional longitudinal bars in between these bars need
to be tied in one direction by open ties (Ref. IS:456).

Pitch and diameter of lateral ties

1) Pitch-The pitch of transverse reinforcement shall be not more than the least of the
following distances:
i) The least lateral dimension of the compression members;
ii) Sixteen times the smallest diameter of the longitudinal reinforcement bar to be tied; and
iii) 300 mm.

2) Diameter-The diameter of the polygonal links or lateral ties shall be not less than
onefourth of the diameter of the largest longitudinal bar, and in no case less than 6 mm.

Helical reinforcement
1) Pitch-Helical reinforcement shall be of regular formation with the turns of the helix spaced
evenly and its ends shall be anchored properly by providing one and a half extra turns of the

K.ChandraBose 54 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

spiral bar. Where an increased load on the column on the strength of the helical reinforcement
is allowed for, the pitch of helical turns shall be not more than 7.5 mm, nor more than one-
sixth of the core diameter of the column, nor less than 25 mm, nor less than three times the
diameter of the steel bar forming the helix.

4.9 LIMIT STATE OF COLLAPSE: COMPRESSION

Assumptions
1. The maximum compressive strain in concrete in axial compression is taken as 0.002.

2. The maximum compressive strain at the highly compressed extreme fibre in concrete
subjected to axial compression and bending and when there is no tension on the
section shall be 0.0035 minus 0.75 times the strain at the least compressed extreme
fibre.

In addition the following assumptions of flexure are also required

3. Plane sections normal to the axis remain plane after bending.

4. The maximum strain in concrete at the outermost compression fibre is taken as 0.0035
in bending.

5. The relationship between the compressive stress distribution in concrete and the strain
in concrete may be assumed to be rectangle, trapezoid, parabola or any other shape
which results in prediction of strength in substantial agreement with the results of test.

6. An acceptable stress strain curve is given in IS:456-200. For design purposes, the
compressive strength of concrete in the structure shall be assumed to be 0.67 times the
characteristic strength. The partial safety factor y of 1.5 shall be applied in addition to
this.

7. The tensile strength of the concrete is ignored.

8. The stresses in the reinforcement are derived from representative stress-strain curve
for the type of steel used. Typical curves are given in IS:456-2000. For design
purposes the partial safety factor equal to 1.15 shall be applied.

Minimum eccentricity

As per IS:456-2000, all columns shall be designed for minimum eccentricity, equal to the
unsupported length of column/ 500 plus lateral dimensions/30, subject to a minimum of 20
mm. Where bi-axial bending is considered, it is sufficient to ensure that eccentricity exceeds
the minimum about one axis at a time.

Short Axially Loaded Members in Compression

The member shall be designed by considering the assumptions given in 39.1 and the
minimum eccentricity. When the minimum eccentricity as per 25.4 does not exceed 0.05
times the lateral dimension, the members may be designed by the following equation:

K.ChandraBose 55 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc

Pu = axial load on the member,


fck = characteristic compressive strength of the concrete,
Ac = area of concrete,
fy = characteristic strength of the compression reinforcement, and
As = area of longitudinal reinforcement for columns.

Compression Members with Helical Reinforcement

The strength of compression members with helical reinforcement satisfying the requirement
of IS: 456 shall be taken as 1.05 times the strength of similar member with lateral ties.

The ratio of the volume of helical reinforcement to the volume of the core shall not be less
than

Vhs / Vc > 0.36 (Ag/Ac 1) fck/fy

Ag = gross area of the section,


Ac = area of the core of the helically reinforced column measured to the outside diameter of
the helix,
fck = characteristic compressive strength of the concrete, and
fy = characteristic strength of the helical reinforcement but not exceeding 415 N/mm.

Members Subjected to Combined Axial Load and Uni-axial Bending

Use of Non-dimensional Interaction Diagrams as Design Aids


Design Charts (for Uniaxial Eccentric Compression) in SP-16
The design Charts (non-dimensional interaction curves) given in the Design Handbook, SP :
16 cover the following three cases of symmetrically arranged reinforcement :
(a) Rectangular sections with reinforcement distributed equally on two sides (Charts 27 38):
the two sides refer to the sides parallel to the axis of bending; there are no inner rows of
bars, and each outer row has an area of 0.5As this includes the simple 4bar configuration.
(b) Rectangular sections with reinforcement distributed equally on four sides (Charts 39
50): two outer rows (with area 0.3As each) and four inner rows (with area 0.1As each)
have been considered in the calculations ; however, the use of these Charts can be
extended, without significant error, to cases of not less than two inner rows (with a
minimum area 0.3As in each outer row).
(c) Circular column sections (Charts 51 62): the Charts are applicable for circular sections
with at least six bars (of equal diameter) uniformly spaced circumferentially.

Corresponding to each of the above three cases, there are as many as 12 Charts available
covering the 3 grades of steel (Fe 250, Fe 415, Fe 500), with 4 values of d1/ D ratio for each
grade (namely 0.05, .0.10, 0.15, 0.20). For intermediate values of d1/ D, linear interpolation
may be done. Each of the 12 Charts of SP-16 covers a family of non-dimensional design
interaction curves with p/fck values ranging from 0.0 to 0.26.

K.ChandraBose 56 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

From this, percentage of steel (p) can be found. Find the area of steel and provide the
required number of bars with proper arrangement of steel as shown in the chart.

Typical interaction curve

Salient Points on the Interaction Curve


The salient points, marked 1 to 5 on the interaction curve correspond to the failure strain
profiles, marked 1 to 5 in the above figure.
The point 1 in figure corresponds to the condition of axial loading with e = 0. For this
case of pure axial compression.
The point 11 in figure corresponds to the condition of axial loading with the
mandatory minimum eccentricity emin prescribed by the Code.
The point 3 in figure corresponds to the condition xu = D, i.e., e = eD. For e < eD, the
entire section is under compression and the neutral axis is located outside the section
(xu > D), with 0.002 < cu < 0.0035. For e > eD, the NA is located within the section
(xu < D) and cu = 0.0035 at the highly compressed edge.
The point 4 in figure corresponds to the balanced failure condition, with e = eb and xu
= xu, b . The design strength values for this balanced failure condition are denoted as
Pub and Mub.
The point 5 in figure corresponds to a pure bending condition (e = , PuR = 0); the
resulting ultimate moment of resistance is denoted Muo and the corresponding NA
depth takes on a minimum value xu, min.

K.ChandraBose 57 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

4.10 Procedure for using of Non-dimensional Interaction Diagrams as Design Aids to


find steel

Given:
Size of column, Grade of concrete, Grade of steel (otherwise assume suitably)
Factored load and Factored moment

Assume arrangement of reinforcement: On two sides or on four sides


Assume moment due to minimum eccentricity to be less than the actual moment
Assume suitable axis of bending based on the given moment (xx or yy)
Assuming suitable diameter of longitudinal bars and suitable nominal cover

1. Find d1/D from effective cover d1


2. Find non dimensional parameters Pu/fckbD and Mu/fckbD2
3. Referring to appropriate chart from S-16, find p/fck and hence the percentage of
reinforcement, p
4. Find steel from, As = p bD/100
5. Provide proper number and arrangement for steel
6. Design suitable transverse steel
7. Provide neat sketch

Members Subjected to Combined Axial Load and Biaxial Bending

The resistance of a member subjected to axial force and biaxial bending shall be obtained on
the basis of assumptions given in IS:456 with neutral axis so chosen as to satisfy the
equilibrium of load and moments about two axes. Alternatively such members may be
designed by the following equation:

[Mux/Mux1]n + [Muy/Muy1]n 1, where


Mux and My = moments about x and y axes due to design loads,

Mux1 and My1 = maximum uni-axial moment capacity for an axial load of Pu bending about
x and y axes respectively, and n is related to Pu /Puz, where Puz = 0.45 fck .Ac + 0.75 fy Asc

For values of Pu /Puz = 0.2 to 0.8, the values of n vary linearly from 1 .0 to 2.0. For values
less than 0.2 and greater than 0.8, it is taken as 1 and 2 respectively

NOTE -The design of member subject to combined axial load and uniaxial bending will
involve lengthy calculation by trial and error. In order to overcome these difficulties
interaction diagrams may be used. These have been prepared and published by BIS in SP:16
titled Design aids for reinforced concrete to IS 456-2000.
IS:456-2000 Code Procedure
1. Given Pu, Mux, Muy, grade of concrete and steel
2. Verify that the eccentricities ex = Mux/Pu and ey = Muy/Pu are not less than the
corresponding minimum eccentricities as per IS:456-2000
3. Assume a trial section for the column (square, rectangle or circular).

K.ChandraBose 58 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

4. Determine Mux1 and Muy1, corresponding to the given Pu (using appropriate curve from
SP-16 design aids)
5. Ensure that Mux1 and Muy1 are significantly greater than Mux and Muy respectively;
otherwise, suitably redesign the section.
6. Determine Puz and hence n
7. Check the adequacy of the section using interaction equation. If necessary, redesign
the section and check again.

Slender Compression Members: The design of slender compression members shall be


based on the forces and the moments determined from an analysis of the structure, including
the effect of deflections on moments and forces. When the effects of deflections are not taken
into account in the analysis, additional moment given in 39.7.1 shall be taken into account in
the appropriate direction.

4.11 Design Problems

1. Determine the load carrying capacity of a column of size 300 x 400 mm reinforced
with six rods of 20 mm diameter i.e, 6-#20. The grade of concrete and steel are M20
and Fe 415 respectively. Assume that the column is short.

fck = 20 MPa, fy= 415 MPa


Area of steel ASC = 6 x x 202/4 = 6 x 314 = 1884 mm2
Percentage of steel = 100Asc/bD = 100x1884/300x400 = 1.57 %
Area of concrete Ac = Ag Asc = 300 x 400 1884 = 118116 mm2
Ultimate load carried by the column
Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc
0.4x20x118116 + 0.67x415x1884
944928 + 523846 = 1468774 N = 1468. 8 kN
Therefore the safe load on the column = 1468.8 /1.5 = 979.2 kN

2. Determine the steel required to carry a load of 980kN on a rectangular column of


size 300 x 400 mm. The grade of concrete and steel are M20 and Fe 415 respectively.
Assume that the column is short.

fck = 20 MPa, fy= 415 MPa, P = 980 kN


Area of steel ASC = ?

Area of concrete Ac = Ag Asc = (300 x 400 ASC)

Ultimate load carried by the column


Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc
980 x 1.5 x 1000 = 0.4x20x (300 x 400 ASC) + 0.67x415 ASC
= 960000 - 8 ASC + 278.06 ASC
ASC =1888.5 mm2,
Percentage of steel = 100Asc/bD = 100x1888.5 /300x400 = 1.57 % which is more than 0.8%
and less than 6% and therefore ok.

Use 20 mm dia. bas, No. of bars = 1888.5/314 = 6.01 say 6

K.ChandraBose 59 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

3. Design a square or circular column to carry a working load of 980kN. The grade of
concrete and steel are M20 and Fe 415 respectively. Assume that the column is short.

Let us assume 1.0% steel (1 to 2%)


Say ASC = 1.0% Ag =1/100 Ag = 0.01Ag
fck = 20 MPa, fy= 415 MPa, P = 980 kN

Area of concrete Ac = Ag Asc = Ag -0.01Ag = 0.99 Ag

Ultimate load carried by the column


Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc
980 x 1.5 x 1000 = 0.4x20x 0.99 Ag + 0.67x415 x 0.01Ag
= 7.92 Ag + 2.78 Ag =10.7Ag
Ag = 137383 mm2

Let us design a square column:


B = D = Ag =370.6 mm say 375 x 375 mm

This is ok. However this size cannot take the minimum eccentricity of 20 mm as emin/D =
20/375 =0.053 > 0.05. To restrict the eccentricity to 20 mm, the required size is 400x 400
mm.

Area of steel required is Ag = 1373.8 mm2. Provide 4 bar of 22 mm diameter. Steel provided
is 380 x 4 = 1520 mm2

Actual percentage of steel = 100Asc/bD = 100x1520 /400x400 = 0.95 % which is more than
0.8% and less than 6% and therefore ok.

Design of Transverse steel:

Diameter of tie = diameter of main steel = 22/4 =5.5mm or 6 mm, whichever is greater.
Provide 6 mm.

Spacing: < 300 mm, < 16 x22 = 352mm, < LLD = 400mm. Say 300mm c/c

Design of circular column:

Here Ag = 137383 mm2


x D2/4 = Ag, D= 418.2 mm say 420 mm. This satisfy the minimum eccentricity of 20m
Also provide 7 bars of 16 mm, 7 x 201 = 1407 mm2

Design of Transverse steel:

Dia of tie = dia of main steel = 16/4 = 4 mm or 6 mm, whichever is greater. Provide 6 mm.

Spacing: < 300 mm, < 16 x16 = 256 mm, < LLD = 420mm. Say 250 mm c/c

4. Design a rectangular column to carry an ultimate load of 2500kN. The unsupported


length of the column is 3m. The ends of the column are effectively held in position

K.ChandraBose 60 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

and also restrained against rotation. The grade of concrete and steel are M20 and Fe
415 respectively.

Given:

fck = 20 MPa, fy= 415 MPa, Pu = 2500kN

Let us assume 1.0% steel (1 to 2%)


Say ASC = 1.0% Ag =1/100 Ag = 0.01Ag

Area of concrete Ac = Ag Asc = Ag -0.01Ag = 0.99 Ag

Ultimate load carried by the column


Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc
2500 x 1000 = 0.4x20x 0.99 Ag + 0.67x415 x 0.01Ag
= 7.92 Ag + 2.78 Ag =10.7Ag
Ag = 233645 mm2

If it is a square column:

B = D = Ag =483 mm. However provide rectangular column of size 425 x 550mm. The
area provided=333750 mm2

Area of steel = 2336 mm2, Also provide 8 bars of 20 mm, 6 x 314 = 2512 mm2

Check for shortness: Ends are fixed. lex = ley = 0.65 l = 0.65 x 3000 = 1950 mm

lex /D= 1950/550 < 12, and ley /b = 1950/425 < 12, Column is short

Check for minimum eccentricity:

In the direction of longer direction

emin, x = lux/500 + D/30 = 3000/500 + 550/30 = 24.22mm or 20mm whichever is greater.

emin, x = 24.22 mm < 0.05D = 0.05 x 550 =27.5 mm. O.K

In the direction of shorter direction

emin, y= luy/500 + b/30 = 3000/500 + 425/30 = 20.17 mm or 20mm whichever is greater.

emin, x = 20.17 mm < 0.05b = 0.05 x 425 =21.25 mm. O.K

Design of Transverse steel:

Dia of tie = dia of main steel = 20/4 = 5 mm or 6 mm, whichever is greater. Provide 6 mm
or 8 mm.

Spacing: < 300 mm, < 16 x20 = 320 mm, < LLD = 425mm. Say 300 mm c/c

K.ChandraBose 61 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

5. Design a circular column with ties to carry an ultimate load of 2500kN. The
unsupported length of the column is 3m. The ends of the column are effectively held
in position but not against rotation. The grade of concrete and steel are M20 and Fe
415 respectively.

Given:

fck = 20 MPa, fy= 415 MPa, Pu = 2500kN

Let us assume 1.0% steel (1 to 2%)


Say ASC = 1.0% Ag =1/100 Ag = 0.01Ag

Area of concrete Ac = Ag Asc = Ag -0.01Ag = 0.99 Ag

Ultimate load carried by the column


Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc
2500 x 1000 = 0.4x20x 0.99 Ag + 0.67x415 x 0.01Ag
= 7.92 Ag + 2.78 Ag =10.7Ag
Ag = 233645 mm2

x D2/4 = Ag, D = 545.4 mm say 550 mm.

Area of steel = 2336 mm2, Also provide 8 bars of 20 mm, 6 x 314 = 2512 mm2

Check for shortness: Ends are hinged lex = ley = l = 3000 mm

lex /D= 3000/550 < 12, and ley /b = 3000/425 < 12, Column is short

Check for minimum eccentricity:

Here, emin, x = emin, y = lux/500 + D/30 = 3000/500 + 550/30 = 24.22mm or 20mm whichever is
greater.

emin = 24.22 mm < 0.05D = 0.05 x 550 =27.5 mm. O.K

Design of Transverse steel:

Diameter of tie = dia of main steel = 20/4 = 5 mm or 6 mm, whichever is greater. Provide 6
mm or 8 mm.

Spacing: < 300 mm, < 16 x20 = 320 mm, < LLD = 550mm. Say 300 mm c/c

Similarly square column can be designed.

If the size of the column provided is less than that provided above, then the minimum
eccentricity criteria are not satisfied. Then emin is more and the column is to be designed as

K.ChandraBose 62 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

uni axial bending case or bi axial bending case as the case may be. This situation arises when
more steel is provided ( say 2% in this case).

Try to solve these problems by using SP 16 charts, though not mentioned in the syllabus.

6. Design the reinforcement in a column of size 450 mm 600 mm, subject to an axial
load of 2000 kN under service dead and live loads. The column has an unsupported
length of 3.0m and its ends are held in position but not in direction. Use M 20
concrete and Fe 415 steel.

Solution:
Given: lu= 3000 mm, b = 450 mm, D = 600 mm, P =2000kN, M20, Fe415

Check for shortness: Ends are fixed. lex = ley = l = 3000 mm

lex /D= 3000/600 < 12, and ley /b = 3000/450< 12, Column is short

Check for minimum eccentricity:

In the direction of longer direction

emin, x = lux/500 + D/30 = 3000/500 + 600/30 = 26 mm or 20mm whichever is greater.

emin, x = 26 mm < 0.05D = 0.05 x 600 =30 mm. O.K

In the direction of shorter direction

emin, y= luy/500 + b/30 = 3000/500 + 450/30 = 21 mm or 20mm whichever is greater.

emin, x = 21 mm < 0.05b = 0.05 x 450 =22.5 mm. O.K

Minimum eccentricities are within the limits and hence code formula for axially loaded short
columns can be used.

Factored Load

Pu = service load partial load factor


= 2000 1.5 = 3000 kN
Design of Longitudinal Reinforcement
Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc or
Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + (0.67 fy - 0.4fck) Asc

3
3000 10 = 0.4 20 (450 600) + (0.67 4150.4 20)Asc
3
= 216010 + 270.05Asc

K.ChandraBose 63 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

3 2
Asc = (30002160) 10 /270.05 = 3111 mm
In view of the column dimensions (450 mm, 600 mm), it is necessary to place intermediate
bars, in addition to the 4 corner bars:
2
Provide 425 at corners ie, 4 491 = 1964 mm
2
and 420 additional ie, 4 314 = 1256 mm
2 2
Asc = 3220 mm > 3111 mm

p = (1003220) / (450600) = 1.192 > 0.8 (minimum steel), OK.

Design of transverse steel


Diameter of tie = diameter of main steel = 25/4 =6.25 mm or 6 mm, whichever is greater.
Provide 6 mm.

Spacing: < 300 mm, < 16 x 20 = 320 mm, < LLD = 450mm. Say 300 mm c/c
Thus provide ties 8mm @ 300 mm c/c

Sketch:

Example: Square Column with Uniaxial Bending

7. Determine the reinforcement to be provided in a square column subjected to


uniaxial bending with the following data:
Size of column 450 x 450 mm
Concrete mix M 25
Characteristic strength of steel 415 N/mm2
Factored load 2500 kN
Factored moment 200 kN.m

Arrangement of reinforcement:
(a) On two sides
(b) On four sides
Assume moment due to minimum eccentricity to be less than the actual moment
Assuming 25 mm bars with 40 mm cover,

K.ChandraBose 64 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

d = 40 + 12.5 = 52.5 mm
d1/D = 52.5/450- 0.12

Charts for d1/D = 0.15 will be used

Pu/fckbD = (2500 x 1000)/ (25 x 450 x 450) = 0.494

Mu/fckbD2 =200 x 106 /(25 x 450 x 4502) = 0.088

a) Reinforcement on two sides,

Referring to Chart 33,


p/fck = 0.09

Percentage of reinforcement,
p = 0.09 x 25 = 2.25 %
As = p bD/100 = 2.25 x 450 x 450/100
= 4556 mm2

b) Reinforcement on four sides


from Chart 45,
p/fck = 0.10
p = 0.10 x 25 = 2.5 %
As = 2.5 x 450 x 450/100 = 5063 mm2

8. Example: Circular Column with Uniaxial Bending


Determine the reinforcement to be provided in a circular column with the following
data:
Diameter of column 500 mm
Grade of concrete M20
Characteristic strength 250 N/mm2
Factored load 1600 kN
Factored moment 125 kN.m

Lateral reinforcement :
(a) Hoop reinforcement
(b) Helical reinforcement

(Assume moment due to minimum eccentricity to be less than the actual moment).
Assuming 25 mm bars with 40 mm cover,
d1 = 40 + 12.5 = 52.5 mm
d1/D 52.5/50 = 0.105
Charts for d/D = 0.10 will be used.

(a) Column with hoop reinforcement

Pu/fck D D = (1600 x 1000)/ (20 x 500 x 500) = 0.32

Mu/fck D x D2 =125 x 106 /(20 x 500 x 5002) = 0.05

K.ChandraBose 65 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Referring to Chart 52, for fy = 250 N/mm2


p/fck = 0.87

Percentage of reinforcement,
p = 0.87 x 20 = 1.74 %
As = 1.74 x ( x 5002/4)/100 = 3416 mm2

(b) Column with Helical Reinforcement

According to 38.4 of the Code, the strength of a compression member with helical
reinforcement is 1.05 times the strength of a similar member with lateral ties. Therefore, the,
given load and moment should be divided by 1.05 before referring to the chart.

Pu/fck D D = (1600/1.05 x 1000)/ (20 x 500 x 500) = 0.31

Mu/fck D x D2 =125/1.05 x 106 /(20 x 500 x 5002) = 0.048

Hence, From Chart 52, for fy = 250 N/mm2,

p/fck = 0.078

p = 0.078 x 20 = 1.56 %
As = 1.56 x( x 500 x 500/4 )/100 = 3063 cm2

According to 38.4.1 of the Code the ratio of the volume of helical reinforcement to the
volume of the core shall not be less than

0.36 (Ag/Ac - 1) x fck /fy

where Ag is the gross area of the section and Ac is the area of the core measured to the outside
diameter of the helix. Assuming 8 mm dia bars for the helix,
Core diameter = 500 - 2 (40 - 8) = 436 mm

Ag/AC = 500/436 = 1.315

0.36 (Ag/Ac - 1) x fck /fy = 0.36(0.315) 20/250 =0.0091

Volume of helical reinforcement / Volume of core

= Ash x 428 /( /4 x 4362) sh

0.09 Ash / sh

where, Ash is the area of the bar forming the helix and sh is the pitch of the helix.
In order to satisfy the coda1 requirement,

0.09 Ash / sh 0.0091

K.ChandraBose 66 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

For 8 mm dia bar,


sh 0.09 x 50 / 0.0091 = 49.7 mm. Thus provide 48 mm pitch

Example: Rectangular column with Biaxial Bending

9. Determine the reinforcement to be provided in a short column subjected to biaxial


bending, with the following data:
size of column = 400 x 600 mm
Concrete mix = M15
Characteristic strength of reinforcement = 415 N/mm2
Factored load, Pu = 1600 kN
Factored moment acting parallel to the larger dimension, Mux =120 kNm
Factored moment acting parallel to the shorter dimension, Muy = 90 kNm
Moments due to minimum eccentricity are less than the values given above.

Reinforcement is distributed equally on four sides.


As a first trial assume the reinforcement percentage, p = 1.2%
p/fck = 1.2/15 = 0.08

Uniaxial moment capacity of the section about xx-axis :

d1/D = 52.5 /600 = 0.088

Chart for d/D = 0.1 will be used.

Pu/fck b D = (1600 x 1000)/ (15 x 400 x 600) = 0.444

Referring to chart 44

Mu/fck b x D2 = 0.09
Mux1 = 0.09 x 15 x 400 x 6002) = 194.4 kN.m

Uni-axial moment capacity of the section about yy axis :

d1/D = 52.5 /400 = 0.131


Chart for d1/D =0.15 will be used.
Referring to Chart 45,
Mu/fck b x D2 = 0.083
Mux1 = 0.083 x 15 x 600 x 4002) = 119.52 kN.m

Calculation of Puz :
Referring to Chart 63 corresponding to
p = 1.2, fy = 415 and fck = 15,
Puz/Ag = 10.3

Puz = 10.3 x 400 x 600 = 2472 kN

Mux/Mux1 = 120/194.4 =0.62


Muy/Muy1=90/119.52 = 0.75
Pu /Puz =1600/2472 = 0.65

K.ChandraBose 67 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Referring to Churn 64, the permissible value of Mux/Mux1 corresponding to Muy/Muy1 and Pu
/Puz is equal to 0.58
The actual value of 0.62 is only slightly higher than the value read from the Chart.

This can be made up by slight increase in reinforcement.

Using Boris load contour equation as per IS:456-2000

Pu /Puz = 0.65 thus, n = 1 + [(2-1) / (0.8 - 0.2)] (0.65-0.2) = 1.75

[0.62 ]1.75 + [0.75]1.75 = 1.04 slightly greater than 1 and slightly unsafe. This can be made up
by slight increase in reinforcement say 1.3%

Thus provide As = 1.3x400x600/100 = 3120 mm2

Provide 1.3 % of steel


p/fck = 1.3/15 = 0.086
d1/D = 52.5 /600 = 0.088 = 0.1

From chart 44
Mu/fck b x D2 = 0.095
Mux1 = 0.095 x 15 x 400 x 6002) = 205.2 kN.m

Referring to Chart 45,


Mu/fck b x D2 = 0.085
Mux1 = 0.085 x 15 x 600 x 4002) = 122.4 kN.m

Chart 63 : Puz/Ag = 10.4


Puz = 10.4 x 400 x 600 = 2496 kN

Mux/Mux1 = 120/205.2 =0.585


Muy/Muy1=90/122.4 = 0.735
Pu /Puz =1600/2496 = 0.641

Referring to Chart 64, the permissible value of Mux/Mux1 corresponding to Muy/Muy1 and Pu
/Puz is equal to 0.60

Hence the section is O.K.

Using Boris load contour equation as per IS:456-2000

Pu /Puz = 0.641 thus, n = 1 + [(2-1) / (0.8 - 0.2)] (0.641-0.2) = 1.735

[120/205.2]1.735 + [90/122.4]1.735 = 0.981 1 Thus OK

As = 3120 mm2. Provide 10 bars of 20 mm dia. Steel provided is 314 x 10 = 3140 mm2

K.ChandraBose 68 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Design of transverse steel: Provide 8 mm dia stirrups at 300 mm c/c as shown satisfying the
requirements of IS: 456-2000

10. Verify the adequacy of the short column section 500 mm x 300 mm under the
following load conditions:
Pu = 1400 kN, Mux = 125 kNm, Muy = 75 kNm. The design interaction curves of SP 16
should be used. Assume that the column is a short column and the eccentricity due to
moments is greater than the minimum eccentricity.

Solution:
2
Given: Dx = 500 mm, b = 300 mm, As = 2946 mm Mux = 125 kNm, Muy = 75 kNm, fck = 25
MPa, fy = 415 MPa

Applied eccentricities
3
ex = Mux/Pu = 125 10 /1400 = 89.3 mm ex/Dx = 0.179
3
ey = Muy/Pu = 75 10 /1400 = 53.6 mm ey/Dy = 0.179
These eccentricities for the short column are clearly not less than the minimum eccentricities
specified by the Code.

Uniaxial moment capacities: Mux1, Muy1


As determined in the earlier example, corresponding to Pu = 1400 kN,
Mux1 = 187 kNm
Muy1 = 110 kNm
Values of Puz and n
Puz = 0.45fck Ag + (0.75fy 0.45fck)Asc
= (0.45 25 300 500) + (0.75 415 0.45 25)2946
= (1687500 + 883800)N = 2571 kN
Pu/Puz = 1400/2571 = 0.545 (which lies between 0.2 and 0.8)
n = 1.575

Check safety under biaxial bending

[125/187]1.575 + [75/110]1

= 0.530 + 0.547
= 1.077 > 1.0
Hence, almost ok.

K.ChandraBose 69 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

UNIT V LIMIT STATE DESIGN OF FOOTING

5.1 . Pre-requisites
Most of the structures built by us are made of reinforced concrete. Here, the part of the structure
above ground level is called as the superstructure, where the part of the structure below the ground
level is called as the substructure. Footings are located below the ground level and are also referred
as foundations. Foundation is that part of the structure which is in direct contact with soil. The R.C.
structures consist of various structural components which act together to resist the applied loads
and transfer them safely to soil. In general the loads applied on slabs in buildings are transferred to
soil through beams, columns and footings. Footings are that part of the structure which are
generally located below ground Level. They are also referred as foundations. Footings transfer the
vertical loads, Horizontal loads, Moments, and other forces to the soil.
The important purpose of foundation are as follows;
1. To transfer forces from superstructure to firm soil below.
2. To distribute stresses evenly on foundation soil such that foundation soil neither fails nor
experiences excessive settlement.
3. To develop an anchor for stability against overturning.
4. To provide an even surface for smooth construction of superstructure.
Due to the loads and soil pressure, footings develop Bending moments and Shear forces.
Calculations are made as per the guidelines suggested in IS 456 2000 to resist the internal forces.

5.2. Types of Foundations


Based on the position with respect to ground level, Footings are classified into two types;
1. Shallow Foundations
2. Deep Foundations
Shallow Foundations are provided when adequate SBC is available at relatively short depth below
ground level. Here, the ratio of Df / B < 1, where Df is the depth of footing and B is the width of
footing. Deep Foundations are provided when adequate SBC is available at large depth below ground
level. Here the ratio of Df / B >= 1.

5.2.1 Types of Shallow Foundations


The different types of shallow foundations are as follows:
Isolated Footing
Combined footing
Strap Footing
Strip Footing
Mat/Raft Foundation
Wall footing

K.ChandraBose 70 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Some of the popular types of shallow foundations are briefly discussed below.
a) Isolated Column Footing
These are independent footings which are provided for each column. This type of footing is chosen
when

SBC is generally high


Columns are far apart
Loads on footings are less
The isolated footings can have different shapes in plan. Generally it depends on the shape of column
cross section Some of the popular shapes of footings are;

Square
Rectangular
Circular
The isolated footings essentially consists of bottom slab. These bottom Slabs can be either flat,
stepped or sloping in nature. The bottom of the slab is reinforced with steel mesh to resist the two
internal forces namely bending moment and shear force.
The sketch of a typical isolated footing is shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 1 Plan and section of typical isolated footing

b) Combined Column Footing


These are common footings which support the loads from 2 or more columns. Combined footings
are provided when
SBC is generally less
Columns are closely spaced
Footings are heavily loaded
In the above situations, the area required to provide isolated footings for the columns generally
overlap. Hence, it is advantageous to provide single combined footing.
footing. In some cases the columns
are located on or close to property line. In such cases footings cannot be extended on one side.
Here, the footings of exterior and interior columns are connected by the combined footing.

K.ChandraBose 71 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Fig. 2 Plan and section of typical combined footing

Combined footings essentially consist of a common slab for the columns it is supporting. These slabs
are generally rectangular in plan. Sometimes they can also be trapezoidal in plan (refer Fig. 2).
Combined footings can also have a connecting beam and a slab arrangement, which is similar to an
inverted T beam slab.
c) Strap Footing
An alternate way of providing combined footing located close to property line is the strap footing. In
strap footing, independent slabs below columns are provided which are then connected by a strap
beam. The strap beam does not remain in contact with the soil and does not transfer any pressure to
the soil. Generally it is used to combine the footing of the outer column to the adjacent one so that
the footing does not extend in the adjoining property. A typical strap footing is shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 3 Plan and section of typical strap footing

K.ChandraBose 72 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

d) Strip Footing
Strip footing is a continuous footing provided under columns or walls. A typical strip footing for
columns is shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 4 Plan and section of typical strip footing

e) Mat Foundation
Mat foundation covers the whole plan area of structure. The detailing is similar to two way
reinforced solid floor slabs or flat slabs. It is a combined footing that covers the entire area beneath
a structure and supports all the walls and columns. It is normally provided when
Soil pressure is low
Loads are very heavy
Spread footings cover > 50% area
A typical mat foundation is shown in Fig. 5.

Fig. 5 Plan and section of typical strip footing

5.2.2 Types of Deep Foundations


adequate SBC is available at large depth below GL. There are
Deep foundations are provided when adequate
different types of deep foundations. Some of the common types of deep foundations are listed
below.

Pile Foundation
Pier Foundation
Well Foundation

K.ChandraBose 73 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

5.3. Bearing Capacity of Soil


The safe bearing capacity of soil is the safe extra load soil can withstand without experiencing shear
failure. The Safe Bearing Capacity (SBC) is considered unique at a particular site. But it also depends
on the following factors:

Size of footing
Shape of footing
Inclination of footing
Inclination of ground
Type of load
Depth of footing etc.
SBC alone is not sufficient for design. The allowable bearing capacity is taken as the smaller of the
following two criteria
Limit states of shear failure criteria (SBC)
Limit states of settlement criteria
Based on ultimate capacity, i.e., shear failure criteria, the SBC is calculated as
SBC = Total load / Area of footing
Usually the Allowable Bearing Pressure (ABP) varies in the range of 100 kN/m2 to 400 kN/m2. The
area of the footing should be so arrived that the pressure distribution below the footing should be
less than the allowable bearing pressure of the soil. Even for symmetrical Loading, the pressure
distribution below the footing may not be uniform. It depends on the Rigidity of footing, Soil type
and Conditions of soil. In case of Cohesive Soil and Cohesion less Soil the pressure distribution varies
in a nonlinear way. However, while designing the footings a linear variation of pressure distribution
from one edge of the footing to the other edge is assumed. Once the pressure distribution is known,
the bending moment and shear force can be determined and the footing can be designed to safely
resist these forces.

5.4. Design of Isolated Column Footing


The objective of design is to determine
Area of footing
Thickness of footing
Reinforcement details of footing (satisfying moment and shear considerations)
Check for bearing stresses and development length
This is carried out considering the loads of footing, SBC of soil, Grade of concrete and Grade of steel.
The method of design is similar to the design of beams and slabs. Since footings are buried,
deflection control is not important. However, crack widths should be less than 0.3 mm.
The steps followed in the design of footings are generally iterative. The important steps in the design
of footings are;

Find the area of footing (due to service loads)


Assume a suitable thickness of footing

K.ChandraBose 74 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Identify critical sections for flexure and shear


Find the bending moment and shear forces at these critical sections (due to factored loads)
Check the adequacy of the assumed thickness
Find the reinforcement details
Check for development length
Check for bearing stresses
Limit state of collapse is adopted in the design pf isolated column footings. The various design steps
considered are;

Design for flexure


Design for shear (one way shear and two way shear)
Design for bearing
Design for development length
The materials used in RC footings are concrete and steel. The minimum grade of concrete to be used
for footings is M20, which can be increased when the footings are placed in aggressive environment,
or to resist higher stresses.

Cover: The minimum thickness of cover to main reinforcement shall not be less than 50 mm for
surfaces in contact with earth face and not less than 40 mm for external exposed face. However,
where the concrete is in direct contact with the soil the cover should be 75 mm. In case of raft
foundation the cover for reinforcement shall not be less than 75 mm.
Minimum reinforcement and bar diameter: The minimum reinforcement according to slab and
beam elements as appropriate should be followed, unless otherwise specified. The diameter of main
reinforcing bars shall not be less 10 mm. The grade of steel used is either Fe 415 or Fe 500.

5.5. Specifications for Design of footings as per IS 456 : 2000

The important guidelines given in IS 456 : 2000 for the design of isolated footings are as follows:
34.1 General
Footings shall be designed to sustain the applied loads, moments and forces and the induced
reactions and to ensure that any settlement which may occur shall be as nearly uniform as possible,
and the safe bearing capacity of the soil is not exceeded (see IS 1904).
34.1.1 In sloped or stepped footings the effective cross-section in compression shall be limited by
the area above the neutral plane, and the angle of slope or depth and location of steps shall be such
that the design requirements are satisfied at every section. Sloped and stepped footings that are
designed as a unit shall be constructed to assure action as a unit.
34.1.2 Thickness at the Edge of Footing
In reinforced and plain concrete footings, the thickness at the edge shall be not less than 150 mm for
footings on soils, nor less than 300 mm above the tops of piles for footings on piles.

K.ChandraBose 75 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

34.1.3 In the case of plain concrete pedestals, the angle between the plane passing through the
bottom edge of the pedestal and the corresponding junction edge of the column with pedestal and
the horizontal plane (see Fig. 20) shall be governed by the expression:

tan  < 0.9 100   + 1


where
 = calculated maximum bearing pressure at the base of the pedestal in N/mm2
 = characteristic strength of concrete at 28 days in N/mm2.
34.2 Moments and Forces
34.2.1 In the case of footings on piles, computation for moments and shears may be based on the
assumption that the reaction from any pile is concentrated at the centre of the pile.
34.2.2 For the purpose of computing stresses in footings which support a round or octagonal
concrete column or pedestal, the face of the column or pedestal shall be taken as the side of a
square inscribed within the perimeter of the round or octagonal column or pedestal.
34.2.3 Bending Moment
34.2.3.1 The bending moment at any section shall be determined by passing through the section a
vertical plane which extends completely across the footing, and computing the moment of the
forces acting over the entire area of the footing on one side of the said plane.
34.2.3.2 The greatest bending moment to be used in the design of an isolated concrete footing
which supports a column, pedestal or wall, shall be the moment computed in the manner prescribed
in 34.2.3.1 at sections located as follows:
a) At the face of the column, pedestal or wall, for footings supporting a concrete column, pedestal or
wall;
b) Halfway between the centre-line and the edge of the wall, for footings under masonry walls; and
c) Halfway between the face of the column or pedestal and the edge of the gussetted base, for
footings under gussetted bases.
34.2.4 Shear and Bond
34.2.4.1 The shear strength of footings is governed by the more severe of the following two
conditions:
a) The footing acting essentially as a wide beam, with a potential diagonal crack extending in a plane
across the entire width; the critical section for this condition shall be assumed as a vertical
section located from the face of the column, pedestal or wall at a distance equal to the effective
depth of footing for footings on piles.
b) Two-way action of the footing, with potential diagonal cracking along the surface of truncated
cone or pyramid around the concentrated load; in this case, the footing shall be designed for
shear in accordance with appropriate provisions specified in 31.6.

K.ChandraBose 76 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

34.2.4.2 In computing the external shear or any section through a footing supported on piles, the
entire reaction from any pile of diameter Dp whose centre is located DP/2 or more outside the
section shall be assumed as producing shear on the section; the reaction from any pile whose centre
is located DP/2 or more inside the section shall be assumed as producing no shear on the section, For
intermediate positions of the pile centre, the portion of the pile reaction to be assumed as producing
shear on the section shall be based on straight line interpolation between full value at DP/2 outside
the section and zero value at DP/2 inside the section.
34.2.4.3 The critical section for checking the development length in a footing shall be assumed at the
same planes as those described for bending moment in 34.2.3 and also at all other vertical planes
where abrupt changes of section occur. If reinforcement is curtailed, the anchorage requirements
shall be checked in accordance with 26.2.3.
34.3 Tensile Reinforcement
The total tensile reinforcement at any section shall provide a moment of resistance at least equal to
the bending moment on the section calculated in accordance with 34.2.3.
34.3.1 Total tensile reinforcement shall be distributed across the corresponding resisting section as
given below:
a) In one-way reinforced footing, the-reinforcement extending in each direction shall be distributed
uniformly across the full width of the footing;
b) In two-way reinforced square footing, the reinforcement extending in each direction shall be
distributed uniformly across the full width of the footing; and
c) In two-way reinforced rectangular footing, the reinforcement in the long direction shall be
distributed uniformly across the full width of the footing. For reinforcement in the short
direction, a central band equal to the width of the footing shall be marked along the length of the
footing and portion of the reinforcement determined in accordance with the equation given
below shall be uniformly distributed across the central band:
Reinforcement in central band width
=
Total reinforcement in short direction ( + 1
where is the ratio of the long side to the short side of the footing. The remainder of the
reinforcement shall be uniformly distributed in the outer portions of the footing.
34.4 Transfer of Load at the Base of Column
The compressive stress in concrete at the base of a column or pedestal shdl be considered as being
transferred by bearing to the top of the supporting Redestal or footing. The bearing pressure on the
loaded area shall not exceed the permissible bearing stress in direct compression multiplied by a
value equal to

*+
*,
but not greater than 2, where A1 = supporting area for bearing of footing, which in sloped or stepped
footing may be taken as the area of the lower base of the largest frustum of a pyramid or cone
contained wholly within the footing and having for its upper base, the area actually loaded and
having side slope of one vertical to two horizontal; and A2 = loaded area at the column base.

K.ChandraBose 77 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

34.4.1 Where the permissible bearing stress on the concrete in the supporting or supported member
would be exceeded, reinforcement shall be provided for developing the excess force, either by
extending the longitudinal bars into the supporting member, or by dowels (see 34.4.3).
34.4.2 Where transfer of force is accomplished by, reinforcement, the development length of the
reinforcement shall be sufficient to transfer the compression or tension to the supporting member
in accordance with 26.2.
34.4.3 Extended longitudinal reinforcement or dowels of at least 0.5 percent of the cross-sectional
area of the supported column or pedestal and a minimum of four bars shall be provided. Where
dowels are used, their diameter shall no exceed the diameter of the column bars by more than 3
mm.
34.4.4 Column bars of diameters larger than 36 mm, in compression only can be dowelled at the
footings with bars of smaller size of the necessary area. The dowel shall extend into the column, a
distance equal to the development length of the column bar and into the footing, a distance equal to
the development length of the dowel.
34.5 Nominal Reinforcement
34.5.1 Minimum reinforcement and spacing shall be as per the requirements of solid slab.
34.5.2 The nominal reinforcement for concrete sections of thickness greater than 1 m shall be 360
mm per metre length in each direction on each face. This provision does not supersede the
requirement of minimum tensile reinforcement based on the depth of the section.

5.6. Numerical Problems


Example 1

Design an isolated footing for an R.C. column of size 230 mm x 230 mm which carries a vertical load
of 500 kN. The safe bearing capacity of soil is 200 kN/m2. Use M20 concrete and Fe 415 steel.
Solution
Step 1: Size of footing
Load on column = 600 kN
Extra load at 10% of load due to self weight of soil = 60 kN
Hence, total load, P = 660 kN
. 223
Required area of footing, - = = = 5. 5 64
/01 433

Assuming a square footing, the side of footing is 7 = 0 = 5. 5 = 8. 94 6


Hence, provide a footing of size 1.85 m x 1.85 m

;
Net upward pressure in soil, : = +.<= > +.<= = 175.3 BC/E, < 200 BC/E, Hence O.K.

Hence, factored upward pressure of soil, pu = 263 kN/m2 and, factored load, Pu = 900 kN.

K.ChandraBose 78 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Step 2: Two way shear


Assume an uniform overall thickness of footing, D = 450 mm.
Assuming 12 mm diameter bars for main steel, effective thickness of footing d is
d = 450 50 12 6 = 382 mm
The critical section for the two way shear or punching shear occurs at a distance of d/2 from the face
of the column (See Fig. 6), where a and b are the sides of the column.

Fig. 6 Critical section in two way shear

Hence, punching area of footing = (a + d)2 = (0.23 + 0.382)2 = 0.375 m2


here a = b =side of column
Punching shear force = Factored load (Factored upward pressure x punching area of footing)
= 900 (263 x 0.375)
= 801.38 kN
Perimeter of the critical section = 4 (a+d) = 4 (230+ 382)
= 2448 mm
Therefore, nominal shear stress in punching or punching shear stress V is computed as
.HIJKLIM NKOPQ RSQJO
FG =
TOQL6OUOQ V ORROJULWO UKLJXIONN
938. 59 8333
= = 3. 92 [/664
4ZZ9 V 594

Allowable shear stress = kS . C


where F1 = 3. 4\ RJX = 3. 4\ 43 8. 84 [/664
3.45
and, XN = 3. \ + ^1  = _3. \ + ` = 8. 3 ; Hence, adopt ks=1
3.45
Thus, Allowable shear stress = kS . C = 1 x 1.12 = 1.12 N/mm2

Since the punching shear stress (0.86 N/mm2) is less than the allowable shear stress (1.12 N/mm2),
the assumed thickness is sufficient to resist the punching shear force.

Hence, the assumed thickness of footing D = 450 mm is sufficient.


The effective depth for the lower layer of reinforcement, d = 450 50 6 = 396 mm, and
the effective depth for the upper layer of reinforcement, d = 450 50 12 6 = 382 mm.

K.ChandraBose 79 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Step 3: Design for flexure


The critical section for flexure occurs at the face of the column (Fig. 7).

Fig. 7 Critical section for flexure

The projection of footing beyond the column face is treated as a cantilever slab subjected to
factored upward pressure of soil.
Factored upward pressure of soil, pu = 263 kN/m2
Projection of footing beyond the column face, l = (1850 230)/2 = 810 mm
Hence, bending moment at the critical section in the footing is
TH b4 425 V 3.984
aH = = = 92. 49 X[ 6 /m width of footing
4 4

The area of steel Ast can be determined using the following moment of resistance relation for under
reinforced condition given in Annex G 1.1 b of IS 456 :2000.
Rf -NU
ad = 3. 9e Rf -NU g h8 j
i g RJX

Considering 1m width of footing,


Z8\ k lmn
92. 49 k 832 = 3. 9e k Z8\ k lmn k 594 o8 p
8333 k 594 k 43

Solving the above quadratic relation, we get


Ast = 648.42 mm2 and 17,761.01 mm2
Selecting the least and feasible value for Ast, we have
Ast = 648.42 mm2
The corresponding value of pt = 0.17 %
Hence from flexure criterion, pt = 0.17 %
Step 4: One way shear
The critical section for one way shear occurs at a distance d from the face of the column (Fig. 8).

K.ChandraBose 80 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Fig. 8 Critical section for one way shear

For the cantilever slab, total Shear Force along critical section considering the entire width B is
Vu = pu B (l d)
= 263 x 1.85 x (0.81 0.382)
= 208.24 kN
The nominal shear stress is given by
GH 439. 4Z V 8333
FG = =
0 g
& 3. 53 q/664
89\3 V 594
From Table 61 of SP 16, find the pt required to have a minimum design shear strength C = V = 0.30
N/mm2 with fck = 20 N/mm2.
For pt = 0.175 % the design shear strength C is 0.30 N/mm2 = V = 0.30 N/mm2.
Hence from one way shear criterion, pt = 0.175 %
Comparing pt from flexure and one way shear criterion, provide pt = 0.175 % (larger of the two
values)
r 3.8e\
Hence, -NU = 833n s t = 833
8333 k 594 & 22u vv4
Provide 12 mm dia bars at 140 mm c/c.
Therefore, Ast provided = 808 mm2 > Ast required (609 mm2). Hence O.K.

Step 5: Check for development length


Sufficient development length should be available for the reinforcement from the critical section.
Here, the critical section considered for Ld is that of flexure.
The development length for 12 mm dia bars is given by
Ld = 47 = 47 x 12 = 564 mm.
Providing 60 mm side cover, the total length available from the critical section is
8 8
w x 23 = 89\3 453 23 = e\3 vv y wt . Hence O.K.
4 4

Step 6: Check for bearing stress


The load is assumed to disperse from the base of column to the base of footing at rate of 2H : 1V.
Hence, the side of the area of dispersion at the bottom of footing = 230 + 2 (2 x 450) = 2030 mm.
Since this is lesser than the side of the footing (i.e., 1850 mm)
A1 = 1.85 x 1.85 = 3.4225 m2

K.ChandraBose 81 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

The dimension of the column is 230 mm x 230 mm. Hence, A2= 0.230 x 0.230 = 0.0529 m2
l8 5. Z44\
z = z = 9. 3Z > 2
l4 3. 3\4u
l
Hence, Limit the value of {l8 = 4
4

Permissible bearing stress = 3. Z\ }~ {l8


l
4

= 0.45 x 20 x 2 = 18 N/mm2
l~nx sx mnmm = lx xn ~v sxm =
x~nt xt u33 k 8333 q
453 k 453
= 8e. 38 vv 4

Since the Actual bearing stress (17.01 N/mm2) is less than the Permissible bearing stress (18 N/mm2),
the design for bearing stress is satisfactory.

Appropriate detailing should be shown both in plan and elevation for the footing as per the
recommendations given in SP 34.

Example 2
Design an isolated footing for an R.C. column of size 300 mm x 300 mm which carries a vertical load
of 800 kN together with an uniaxial moment of 40 kN-m. The safe bearing capacity of soil is 250
kN/m2. Use M25 concrete and Fe 415 steel.
Solution
Step 1: Size of footing
Load on column = 800 kN
Extra load at 10% of load due to self weight of soil = 80 kN
Hence, total load, P = 880 kN
Let us provide a square isolated footing, where L=B
Equating the maximum pressure of the footing to SBC of soil,

+ =
l
993 Z3 V 2
i.e., + = 4\3
04 05

On solving the above equation, and taking the least and feasible value, B = 2 m
Hence, provide a square footing of size 2 m x 2 m
The maximum and minimum soil pressures are given by
933 Z3 V 2 X[ X[
T6PV = + = 453 4 < 250 4 . .
44 45 6 6
933 Z3 V 2 X[
T6LI = = 8e3 4 y . .
4 4 4 5 6
Hence, factored upward pressures of soil are,
pu,max = 345 kN/m2 and pu,min = 255 kN/m2

K.ChandraBose 82 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Further, average pressure at the center of the footing is given by


pu,avg = 300 kN/m2
and, factored load, Pu = 900 kN, factored uniaxial moment, Mu = 60 kN-m
Step 2: Two way shear
Assume an uniform overall thickness of footing, D = 450 mm
Assuming 16 mm diameter bars for main steel, effective thickness of footing d is
d = 450 50 16 8 = 376 mm
The critical section for the two way shear or punching shear occurs at a distance of d/2 from the face
of the column (Fig. 9), where a and b are the dimensions of the column.

Fig. 9 Critical section in two way shear

Hence, punching area of footing = (a + d)2 = (0.30 + 0.376)2 = 0.457 m2


where a = b = side of column
Punching shear force = Factored load (Factored average pressure x punching area of footing)
= 1200 (300 x 0.457)
= 1062.9 kN
Perimeter along the critical section = 4 (a+d) = 4 (300+ 376)
= 2704 mm
Therefore, nominal shear stress in punching or punching shear stress V is computed as
.HIJKLIM NKOPQ RSQJO
FG =
TOQL6OUOQ V ORROJULWO UKLJXIONN
8324. u 8333
= = 8. 3\ [/664
4e3Z V 5e2
Allowable shear stress = kS . C
where F1 = 3. 4\ RJX = 3. 4\ 4\ = 8. 4\ [/664
3.53
and, XN = 3. \ + ^1  = _3. \ + 3.53` = 8. 3 ; Hence, adopt ks=1
Thus, Allowable shear stress = kS . C = 1 x 1.25 = 1.25 N/mm2

Since the punching shear stress (1.05 N/mm2) is less than the allowable shear stress (1.25 N/mm2),
the assumed thickness is sufficient to resist the punching shear force.
Hence, the assumed thickness of footing D = 450 mm is sufficient.

K.ChandraBose 83 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

The effective depth for the lower layer of reinforcement, , d = 450 50 8 = 392 mm, and
the effective depth for the upper layer of reinforcement, d = d = 450 50 16 8 = 376 mm.

Step 3: Design for flexure


The critical section for flexure occurs at the face of the column (Fig. 10).

Fig. 10 Critical section for flexure

The projection of footing beyond the column face is treated as a cantilever slab subjected to
factored upward pressure of soil.
Factored maximum upward pressure of soil, pu,max = 345 kN/m2
Factored upward pressure of soil at critical section, pu = 306.75 kN/m2
Projection of footing beyond the column face, l = (2000 300)/2 = 850 mm
Bending moment at the critical section in the footing is
= nx }~ k mnx~ } }v ~n~x m~n
5Z\ + 532. e\ 4 k 5Z\ + 532. e\ 3. 9\
= 3. 9\ k k
4 5Z\ + 532. e\ 5
Mu = 119.11 kN-m/ m width of footing
The area of steel Ast can be determined using the following moment of resistance relation for under
reinforced condition given in Annex G 1.1 b of IS 456 :2000.
Rf -NU
ad = 3. 9e Rf -NU g h8 j
i g RJX

Considering 1m width of footing,

88u. 88 k 832 = 3. 9e k Z8\ k lmn k 5e2 o8


Z8\ k lmn
p
8333 k 5e2 k 4\

Solving the quadratic equation,


Ast = 914.30 mm2 and 21,735.76 mm2
Selecting the least and feasible value, Ast = 914.30 mm2

K.ChandraBose 84 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

The corresponding value of pt = 0.24 %


Hence from flexure criterion, pt = 0.24 %

Step 4: One way shear


The critical section for one way shear occurs at a distance of d from the face of the column (Fig. 11).

Fig. 11 Critical section for one way shear

Factored maximum upward pressure of soil, pu,max = 345 kN/m2


Factored upward pressure of soil at critical section, pu = 327.1 kN/m2
For the cantilever slab, total Shear Force along critical sectionconsidering the entire width B is
= nx }~ k t k
5Z\ + 54e. 8
= k 3. 9\ 3. 5e2 k 4
4
Vu = 318.58 kN
The nominal shear stress is given by
589. \9 k 8333
= = = 3. Z4 q/vv4
t 4333 k 5e2
From 19 of IS 456 :2000, find the pt required to have a minimum design shear strength C = V = 0.42
N/mm2 with fck = 25 N/mm2.
For pt = 0.365 % the design shear strength C is 0.42 N/mm2 = V = 0.42 N/mm2.
Hence from one way shear criterion, pt = 0.365 %
Comparing pt from flexure and one way shear criterion, provide pt = 0.365 % (larger of the two
values)
r 3.52\
Hence, lmn = 833n s t = 833
8333 k 5e2 = 85e4. Z vv4
Provide 16 mm dia bars at 140 mm c/c.
Therefore, Ast provided = 1436 mm2 > Ast required (1372.4 mm2). Hence O.K.

Step 5: Check for development length


Sufficient development length should be available for the reinforcement from the critical section.
Here, the critical section considered for Ld is that of flexure.

K.ChandraBose 85 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

The development length for 16 mm dia bars is given by


Ld = 47 = 47 x 16 = 752 mm.
Providing 60 mm side cover, the total length available from the critical section is

w x 23 = 4333 533 23 = eu3 vv y wt Hence O.K.


8 8
4 4

Step 6: Check for bearing stress


The load is assumed to disperse from the base of column to the base of footing at rate of 2H : 1V.
Hence, the side of the area of dispersion at the bottom of footing = 300 + 2 2 x 450 = 2100 mm.
Since this is lesser than the side of the footing i.e., 2000 mm,
A1 = 2 x 2 = 4 m 2
The dimension of the column is 300 mm x 300 mm.
Hence, A2= 0.30 x 0.30 = 0.09 m2
l8 Z
z = z = 2. 2e > 2
l4 3. 3u
l
Hence, Limit the value of {l8 = 4
4

Permissible bearing stress = 3. Z\ }~ {l8


l
4

= 0.45 x 25 x 2 = 22.5 N/mm2

x~nt xt 8433 k 8333


Actual bearing stress = lx xn ~v sxm = 533 k 533
= 85. 55 q/vv 4

Since the Actual bearing stress (13.33 N/mm2) is less than the Permissible bearing stress (22.5
N/mm2), the design for bearing stress is satisfactory.

Appropriate detailing should be shown both in plan and elevation for the footing as per the
recommendations given in SP 34.

K.ChandraBose 86 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

UNIT 1

Part A

1. What are the assumptions made in the working stress method? (NOV-DEC 2012)
a) At any cross-section, plane sections before bending remain plain after bending.
b) All tensile stresses are taken up by reinforcement and none by concrete, except
as otherwise specifically permitted.
c) The stress-strain relationship of steel and concrete, under working loads, is a
straight line.
d) The modular ratio m has the value -280/3bc.

2. Difference between Elastic method and limit state method. (NOV-DEC 2010)
Advantages of limit state method over the other methods
a. In the limit state method of analysis, the principles of both elastic as well as
plastic theories used and hence suitable for concrete structures.
b. The structure designed by limit state method is safe and serviceable under
design loads and at the same time it is ensured that the structure does not collapse
even under the worst possible loading conditions.
c. The process of stress redistribution, moment redistribution etc., are considered
in the analysis and more realistic factor of safety values are used in the design.
Hence the design by limit state method is found to be more economical.

d. The overall sizes of flexural members (depth requirements) arrived by limit


state method are less and hence they provide better appearance to the structure
e. Because of the modified assumptions regarding the maximum compressive strains in
concrete and steel, the design of compressive reinforcement for double reinforced
beams and eccentrically loaded columns by limit state method gives realistic
valued which is not so in other methods.

3. Draw stress-strain curve for concrete in working stress design and mention the
salient points. (NOV-DEC 2010)

K.ChandraBose 87 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

4. Define characteristic strength in limit state method. (NOV-DEC 2009) (APRIL


MAY 2012)
The term characteristic strength means that value of the strength of the
material below which not more than 5 percent of the test results are expected to
fall.

5. What is meant by balanced section? (NOV-DEC 2009) (NOV-DEC 2012)


When the maximum stress in steel and concrete simultaneously reach their
allowable values, the section is said to be balanced section.in this section the
actual neutral axis depth is equal to the critical neutral axis.
6. Define : Limit state". (APRIL MAY 2012)
The acceptable limit for the safety and serviceability requirements before
failure occurs is called a limit state. The aim of design is td achieve acceptable
probabilities that the structure will not become unfit for the use for which it is
intended, that is, that it will not reach a limit state.
7. What are the expressions recommended by the IS 456-2000 for Modulus of

Elasticity and Flexural Strength? (MAY JUNE 2009)


lexural strength f 0.7.fck /mm2
Where fck is the characteristic cube compressive strength of concrete in N/mm2.


Where, E, is the short term static modulus of elasticity in N/mm2

K.ChandraBose 88 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

8. Write the formula for the neutral axis depth factor 'K in working stress design.
(MAY JUNE 2009)
Neutral axis depth factor K bc.m/(bc.m + st)
Where bc permissible stress in concrete. bc permissible stress in steel.
M = modular ratio.

Part B

1. Explain the limit state philosophy as detailed in the current IS code. (NOV-DEC
2012)
The Answer is in Page No.67 of IS 456:2000.

In the method of design based on limit state concept, the structure shall be
designed to withstand safely all loads liable to act on it throughout its life; it shall
also satisfy the serviceability requirements, such as limitations on deflection and
cracking. The acceptable limit for the safety and serviceability requirements
before failure occurs is called a limit state. The aim of design is td achieve
acceptable probabilities that the structure will not become unfit for the use for
which it is intended, that is, that it will not reach a limit state. 351.1 All relevant
limit states shall be considered in design to ensure an adequate degree of safety
and serviceability. In general, the structure shall be designed on the basis of the
most critical limit state and shall be checked for other limit states.

K.ChandraBose 89 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

35.1.2 For ensuring the above objective, the design should be based on
characteristic values for material strengths and applied loads, which take into
account the variations in the material strengths and in the loads to be supported.
The characteristic values should be based on statistical data if available; where
such data are not available they should be based on experience. The design
values are derived from the characteristic values through the use of partial safety
factors, one for material strengths and the other for loads. In the absence of special
considerations these factors should have the values given in 36 according to the
material, the type of loading and the limit state being considered.

2. Design a R.C beam to carry a load of 6 kN/m inclusive of its own weight on an
effect span of 6m keep the breath to be 2/3 rd of the effective depth .the permissible
stressed in the concrete and steel are not to exceed 5N/mm2 and 140 N/mm2.take
m=18. (NOV-DEC 2012)
Step 1: Design constants.
Modular ratio, m =18.
A Coefficient n bc.m/(bc.m + st) 0.39
Lever arm Coefficient, j=1-(n/3) = 0.87
Moment of resistance Coefficient Q bc/2. n. j 0.84

Step 2: Moment on the beam.

M = (w.l2)/8 = (6x62)/8 = 27kNm

M = Qbd2

d2 = M/Qb = (27x106)/ (0.84x2/3xd)

d = 245mm.

Step 3: Balanced Moment.

K.ChandraBose 90 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Mbal = Qbd2 = 0.84x245x3652 = 27.41kNm. > M. it can be designed as singly


reinforced section.

Step 4: Area of steel.

Ast = Mbal / (st.j.d) 616.72mm2

Use 20mm dia bars ast /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 616.72/314.15 = 1.96 say 2nos.

Provide 2#20mm dia bars at the tension side.

3. Design a doubly reinforced beam of section 240X500mm to carry a bending


moment of 80kNm.Assume clear cover at top a bottom as 30mm and take
m=18.adopt working stress method. (NOV-DEC 2010)
Assume the permissible stressed in the concrete and steel are not to exceed
5N/mm2 and 140 N/mm2.
Step 1: Design constants.
Modular ratio, m =18.
A Coefficient n bc.m/(bc.m + st) 0.39
Lever arm Coefficient, j=1-(n/3) = 0.87
Moment of resistance Coefficient Q bc/2. n. j 0.84

Step 2: Moment on the beam.

M = 80kNm

M = Qbd2

D = 500mm, b = 240mm

d = 500-30mm = 470mm

.Step 3: Balanced Moment.

K.ChandraBose 91 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Mbal = Qbd2 = 0.84x240x4702 = 44.53kNm. < M. it can be designed as doubly


reinforced section.

Step 4: Area of Tension steel.

Ast = Ast1 + Ast2

Ast1 = Mbal / (st.j.d) (44.53x106)/(140x0.87x470) = 777.87mm2

Use 20mm dia bars ast /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 777.87/314.15 = 2.47 say 3nos.

Ast2 = (M-Mbal) / (st.(d-d1)) = (80x106-44.53x106)/(140x(470-30)) = 575.8mm2

Use 20mm dia bars ast /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 575.8/314.15 = 1.8 say 2nos.

Step 5: Area of Compression steel:

Asc = (M-Mbal) / (sc.(d-d1)) = (80x106-44.53x106)/(51.8x(470-30))=1580.65 mm2

Use 20mm dia bars ast /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 1580.65/314.15 = 5.5 say 6nos.

Provide 6#20mm dia bars as compression reinforcement.

4. Design a beam subjected to a bending moment of 40kNm by working stress


design. Adopt width of beam equal to half the effective depth. (NOV-DEC 2010)

Assume the permissible stressed in the concrete and steel are not to exceed
5N/mm2 and 140 N/mm2.take m=18.
Step 1: Design constants.
Modular ratio, m =18.

K.ChandraBose 92 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

A Coefficient n bc.m/(bc.m + st) 0.39


Lever arm Coefficient, j=1-(n/3) = 0.87
Moment of resistance Coefficient Q bc/2. n. j 0.84

Step 2: Moment on the beam.

M = 40kNm

M = Qbd2

d2 = M/Qb = (40x106)/ (0.84x1/2xd)

d = 456.2 say 460 mm.

b = d = 0.5x460 = 230mm

Step 3: Balanced Moment.

Mbal = Qbd2 = 0.84x230x4602 = 40.88kNm. > M. it can be designed as singly


reinforced section.

Step 4: Area of steel.

Ast = Mbal / (st.j.d) (40.88x106)/(140x0.87x460) = 729.64mm2

Use 20mm dia bars ast /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 729.64/314.15 = 2.96 say 3nos.

Provide 3#20mm dia bars at the tension side.

5. Determine the moment of resistance of a singly reinforced beam 160X300mm


effective section, if the stress in steel and concrete are not to exceed 140N/mm2
and 5N/mm2.effectve span of the beam is 5m and the beam carries 4 nos of 16mm
dia bars. Take m=18.find also the minimum load the bam can carry. Use WSD
method. (NOV-DEC 2009)

K.ChandraBose 93 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Step 1: Actual NA.


b xa2/2 = m.Ast.(d- xa)
160. xa2/2 = 18 X 804.24(300 xa)
Xa = 159.42mm
Step 2: Critical NA.
xc bc.d/(st/.m + cbc) 117.39mm < Xa 159.42mm
it is Over reinforced Section.
Step 3: Moment of Resistance
M (b. xa/2 .cbc )(d- xa/3) = (160x159.42/2x5)(300-159.42/3) = 15.74kNm
Step 4: Safe load.

M = (w.l2)/8

W = (8 x 15.74)/52 = 5.03 kN/m

6. Design an interior panel of RC slab 3mX6m size, supported by wall of 300mm


thick. Live load on the slab is 2.5kN/m2.the slab carries 100mm thick lime
concrete (density 19kN/m3).Use M15 concrete and Fe 415 steel. (NOV-DEC
2009)

Step 1: Type of Slab.

ly/lx = 6/3 = 2 = 2.it has to be designed as two way slab.

Step 2:Effective depth calculation.


For Economic consideration adopt shorter span to design the slab.
d = span/(basic value x modification factor) = 3000/(20x0.95) = 270mm
D = 270 + 20 + 10/2 = 295mm
Step 3: Effective Span.
For shorter span:
Le = clear span + effective depth = 3000 + 270 = 3.27m (or)
Le =c/c distance b/w supports = 3000 + 2(230/2) =3.23m

K.ChandraBose 94 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Adopt effective span = 3.23m least value.


For longer span:
Le = clear span + effective depth = 6000 + 270 = 6.27m (or)
Le =c/c distance b/w supports = 6000 + 2(230/2) = 6.23m
Adopt effective span = 6.23m least value.
Step 4: load calculation
Live load = 2.5kN/m2
Dead load = 1x1x0.27x25 = 6.75kN/m2
Dead load = 1x1x0.1x19 = 1.9kN/m2
Floor Finish = 1kN/m2
Total load = 12.15kN/m2
Factored load = 12.15 x 1.5 = 18.225kN/m2
Step 5: Moment calculation.
Mx x . w . lx 0.103x18.225x3.23 = 9.49kNm
My y . w . lx 0.048 x18.225x3.23 = 4.425kNm
Step 6: Check for effective depth.
M = Qbd2
d2 = M/Qb = 9.49/2.76x1 = 149.39mm say 150mm.
For design consideration adopt d = 150mm.
Step 7: Area of Steel.
For longer span:
Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))
4.425x106 = 087x415xAstx150(1-(415 Ast)/(20x1000x150))
Ast = 180mm2
Use 10mm dia bars
Spacing ,S = ast/Astx1000 = (78.53/300)1000 = 261mm say 260mmc/c
Provide 10mm dia @260mm c/c.
For shorter span:
Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))

K.ChandraBose 95 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

9.49x106 = 087x415xAstx150(1-(415 Ast)/(20x1000x150))


Ast = 200mm2
Use 10mm dia bars
Spacing ,S = ast/Astx1000 = (78.53/300)1000 = 281mm say 300mmc/c
Provide 10mm dia @300mm c/c.

7. Differentiate between working stress method and limit state method. (APRIL
MAY 2012)
In the limit state method of analysis, the principles of both elastic as well as
plastic theories used and hence suitable for concrete structures.
The structure designed by limit state method is safe and serviceable under
design loads and at the same time it is ensured that the structure does not
collapse even under the worst possible loading conditions.
The process of stress redistribution, moment redistribution etc., are considered
in the analysis and more realistic factor of safety values are used in the design.
Hence the design by limit state method is found to be more economical.
The overall sizes of flexural members (depth requirements) arrived by limit
state method are less and hence they provide better appearance to thestructure
Because of the modified assumptions regarding the maximum compressive
strains in concrete and steel, the design of compressive reinforcement for double
reinforced beams and eccentrically loaded columns by limit state method gives
realistic valued which is not so in other methods.

8. Explain the following terms :


a. characteristic strength and characteristic loads.
The Answer is in Page No.67 of IS 456:2000.
b. partial safety factors.
The Answer is in Page No.68 of IS 456:2000.
c. Balanced section and under reinforced section. (APRIL MAY 2012)

K.ChandraBose 96 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

When the maximum stress in steel and concrete simultaneously reach their
allowable values, the section is said to be balanced section.in this section the
actual neutral axis depth is equal to the critical neutral axis.

When the percentage of steel in the section is less than that required for a
balanced section. In this section the actual neutral axis depth is equal to the critical
neutral axis.
9. Derive the expressions for the depth of Neutral axis and Moment of resistance of a
Rectangular Singly reinforced balanced beam section under flexure and obtain the
design constants K, j and Q for M 20 grade concrete and Fe 415 grade steel. Use
working stress method. (MAY JUNE 2009)
10. A reinforced concrete rectangular section 300 mm wide and 600 mm overall depth
is reinforced with 4 bars of 25 mm diameter at an effective cover of 50 mm on the
tension side. The beam is designed with M 20 grade concrete and Fe 415 grade
steel. Determine the allowable bending moment and the stresses developed in steel
and concrete under this moment. Use working stress method. (MAY JUNE 2009)

Step 1: Actual NA.


b xa2/2 = m.Ast.(d- xa)
300. xa2/2 = 18 X 1963.50(550 xa)
Xa = 117.81mm
Step 2: Critical NA.
xc bc.d/(st/.m + cbc) = 194.66mm > Xa = 117.81mm
it is Under reinforced Section.
Step 3: Moment of Resistance
For steel:
M = (Ast.st )(d- xa/3) = (1963.5x230)(550-117.81/3) = 230.64kNm
For concrete:
M (b. xa/2 .cbc )(d- xa/3) = (300x117.81/2x7)(550-117.81/3) = 63.17kNm

K.ChandraBose 97 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

UNIT 2

Part A

1. Explain the check for deflection control in the design of slabs? (NOV-DEC 2012)
The deflection of a structure or part thereof shall not adversely affect the
appearance or efficiency of the structure or finishes or partitions. The
deflection shall generally be limited to the following:
a) The final deflection due to all loads including the effects of temperature,
creep and shrinkage and measured from the as-cast level of the , supports of
floors, roofs and all other horizontal members, should not normally exceed
span/250.
b) The deflection including the effects of temperature, creep and shrinkage
occurring after erection of partitions and the application of finishes should
not normally exceed span/350 or 20 mm whichever is less.

2. When do you do for doubly reinforced beams? (NOV-DEC 2012) (NOV-


DEC2010) (APRIL MAY 2012)
The section reinforced in both tension and compression zone is known as
doubly reinforced section. The doubly reinforced beams are adopt when
the balanced moment is smaller than the Actual moment.

3. What type of slabs are usually used in practice, under reinforced or over
reinforced? (NOV-DEC 2009)
The depth of slab chosen from deflection requirements will be usually
greater than the depth required for balanced design. Hence the area of steel
required will be less than the balanced amount. So, the slab is designed as under
reinforced section.
4. Why is necessary to provide transverse reinforcement in one way slab? (APRIL
MAY 2012)
Since the one way slab bends in one direction and also in shorter direction,

K.ChandraBose 98 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

so it is necessary to provide transvers reinforcement in one way slabs. These slabs


adopted when availability of two supports in one direction.

5. Distinguish between under reinforced and over reinforced sections. (MAY JUNE
2009)
A beam reaches its permissible stress in steel under the working moment
before concrete reaches its stress is called as Under reinforced section.
A beam reaches its permissible stress in concrete under the working
moment before steel reaches its stress is called as Over reinforced section.

6. Sketch the edge and middle strips of a two way slab. (MAY JUNE 2009)

Part B

1. Design a one way slab with a clear span of 5m, simply supported on 230mm
thick masonry walls and subjected to a live load of 4kN/m2 and a surface
finish of 1kN/mm2.Assume Fe 415 steel. Assume that the slab is subjected
to moderate exposure conditions. (NOV-DEC 2012)
Step 1: Type of Slab.
ly/lx = 5/1 = 5>2.it has to be designed as one way
slab.

K.ChandraBose 99 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Step 2:Effective depth calculation.


d = span/(basic value x modification factor) = 5000/(20x0.95) = 270mm
D = 270 + 20 + 10/2 = 295mm
Step 3: Effective Span.
Le = clear span + effective depth = 5000 + 270 = 5.27m
(or) Le =c/c distance b/w supports = 5000 + 2(230/2) =
5.23m Adopt effective span = 5.23m least value.
Step 4: load calculation
Live load = 4kN/m2
Dead load = 1x1x0.27x25 = 6.75kN/m2
Floor Finish = 1kN/m2
Total load = 11.75kN/m2
Factored load = 11.75 x 1.5 = 17.625kN/m2
Step 5: Moment calculation.
M = wl2/8 = (17.625x5.232)/8 = 60.26kNm
Step 6: Check for effective depth.
M = Qbd2
d2 = M/Qb = 60.26/2.76x1 = 149.39mm say 150mm.
For design consideration adopt d =
150mm.
Step 7: Area of Steel.
Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))
60.26x106 = 087x415xAstx150(1-(415
Ast)/(20x1000x150)) Ast = 300mm2
Use 10mm dia bars
Spacing ,S = ast/Astx1000 = (78.53/300)1000 = 261mm say 260mmc/c
Provide 10mm dia @260mm c/c.

2. Design a simply supported RC beam having an effective span of 5m.the beam has

K.ChandraBose 100 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

to carry a load of 25 kN/m. sketch the reinforcement details. (NOV-DEC 2010)


(NOV-DEC 2012)
Step 1: Effective length.
Effective span,le = 5m
Step 2: Size of the beam.
Effective depth = le/10 = 5000/10 = 500mm
Assume, b = 2/3d = 2/3x500 = 333.2mm say 340mm
Step 3: Load Calculation
Live load = 25kN/m
Dead load = 1x.340x.500x25 = 4.25kN/m
Total load = 29.25kN/m
Factored load = 29.25x1.5 = 43.85kN/m
Step 4: Moment Calculation.
M = wl2/8 = (43.85x52)/8 = 137.08kNm
Step 5: Check for effective depth.
M = Qbd2
d2 = M/Qb = 137.08/2.76x.340 = 382.2mm say 380mm.
d = 380mm > 500mm
Hence it is safe.
Step 5: Check for effective depth.
Mbal = Qbd2 = 2.97x340x5002 = 252.06kNm > M
Hence it can be designed as singly reinforced beam section.
Step 6: Area of Steel
Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))
137.08x106 = 087x415xAstx500(1-(415 Ast)/(20x340x500))
Ast = 846.15mm2
Use 20mm dia bars
No of bars = Ast/ast = 846.15/314.15 = 2.45 say 3nos
Provide 3#20mm dia as tension reinforcement.

K.ChandraBose 101 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

3. Design a RC beam 350X700mm effective section, subjected to a bending moment


of 300kNm.Adopt M20concrete and Fe415 steel. (NOV-DEC 2009)
Step 1: Size of the beam.
b = 350mm & D = 700mm
d = 700-25-20/2 =665mm
Step 2: Moment Calculation.
M = 300kNm
Step 3: Check for effective depth.
Mbal = Qbd2 = 2.97x350x6652 = 459kNm > M
Hence it can be designed as singly reinforced beam section.
Step 7: Area of Steel
Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))
459x106 = 087x415xAstx665(1-(415 Ast)/(20x350x665))
Ast = 369.38 mm2
Use 20mm dia bars
No of bars = Ast/ast = 369.39/314.15 = 1.45 say 2nos
Provide 2#20mm dia as tension reinforcement.

4. Design a one way slab for a clear span 4m simply supported on 230mm thick wall.
Subjected to a live load of 4kN/m2 and floor finish of 1kN/m2.use M20 concrete
and F415 steel. (NOV-DEC 2009)
Step 1: Type of Slab.
ly/lx = 4/1 = 4>2.it has to be designed as one way slab.
Step 2:Effective depth calculation.
d = span/(basic value x modification factor) = 4000/(20x0.95) = 270mm
D = 270 + 20 + 10/2 = 295mm
Step 3: Effective Span.
Le = clear span + effective depth = 4000 + 270 = 4.27m (or)

K.ChandraBose 102 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Le =c/c distance b/w supports = 4000 + 2(230/2) = 4.23m Adopt


effective span = 4.23m least value.
Step 4: load calculation
Live load = 4kN/m2
Dead load = 1x1x0.27x25 = 6.75kN/m2
Floor Finish = 1kN/m2
Total load = 11.75kN/m2
Factored load = 11.75 x 1.5 = 17.625kN/m2
Step 5: Moment calculation.
M = wl2/8 = (17.625x4.232)/8 = 60.26kNm
Step 6: Check for effective depth.
M = Qbd2
d2 = M/Qb = 60.26/2.76x1 = 149.39mm say 150mm.
For design consideration adopt d = 150mm.
Step 7: Area of Steel.
Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))
60.26x106 = 087x415xAstx150(1-(415 Ast)/(20x1000x150)) Ast
= 300mm2
Use 10mm dia bars
Spacing ,S = ast/Astx1000 = (78.53/300)1000 = 261mm say 260mmc/c
Provide 10mm dia @260mm c/c.
5. Deign a rectangular beam of cross section 230 x 600 mm and of effective span
6m.imposed load on the beam is 40 kN/m. Use M20 concrete and Fe415 steel.
(APRIL MAY 2012)
Step 1: Size of the beam.
b = 230mm & D = 600mm d
= 600-25-20/2 =565mm
Step 4: load calculation
Live load = 40kN/m2

K.ChandraBose 103 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Dead load = 1x.23x.565x25 = 3.245kN/m2


Total load = 43.24kN/m2
Factored load = 43.24 x 1.5 = 64.86kN/m2
Step 2: Moment Calculation.
M = wl2/8 = (64.86x62)/8 = 291.9kNm
Step 3: Check for effective depth.
Mbal = Qbd2 = 2.97x230x5652 = 218kNm < M
Hence it can be designed as Doubly reinforced beam section.
Step 7: Area of Steel

Ast = Ast1 + Ast2

Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))


218x106 = 087x415xAstx565 (1-(415 Ast)/ (20x230x565))
Ast = 1365mm2

Use 20mm dia bars, ast = /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 1365/314.15 = 4.47 say 5nos.

Ast2 = (M-Mbal)/(0.87fy(d-d1)) = (291x106-218x106)/(361x(565-20)) =371.03mm2

Use 20mm dia bars, ast = /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 371.03/314.15 = 1.8 say 2nos.


Step 5: Area of Compression steel:

Asc = (M-Mbal) / (fsc.(d-d1)) = (291x106-218x106) / (351.8x(470-30))= 1580.65


mm2

Use 20mm dia bars, ast = /4 (202) = 314.15mm2

No. of bars = Ast/ast = 1580.65/314.15 = 5.5 say 6nos.

Provide 6#20mm dia bars as compression reinforcement.

K.ChandraBose 104 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

6. A hall has clear dimensions 3 m x 9m with wall thickness 230 mm the live load on
the slab is 3kN/m2 and a finishing load of 1kN/m2 may be assumed. Using M20
concrete and Fe415 steel, design the slab. (APRIL MAY 2012)
Step 1: Type of Slab.
ly/lx = 9/3 = 3>2.it has to be designed as one way slab.
Step 2:Effective depth calculation.
d = span/(basic value x modification factor) = 3000/(20x0.95) = 270mm
D = 270 + 20 + 10/2 = 295mm
Step 3: Effective Span.
Le = clear span + effective depth = 3000 + 270 = 3.27m (or)
Le =c/c distance b/w supports = 3000 + 2(230/2) = 3.23m
Adopt effective span = 3.23m least value.
Step 4: load calculation
Live load = 4kN/m2
Dead load = 1x1x0.27x25 = 6.75kN/m2
Floor Finish = 1kN/m2
Total load = 11.75kN/m2
Factored load = 11.75 x 1.5 = 17.625kN/m2
Step 5: Moment calculation.
M = wl2/8 = (17.625x3.232)/8 = 60.26kNm
Step 6: Check for effective depth.
M = Qbd2
d2 = M/Qb = 60.26/2.76x1 = 149.39mm say 150mm. For
design consideration adopt d = 150mm.
Step 7: Area of Steel.
Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))
60.26x106 = 087x415xAstx150(1-(415 Ast)/(20x1000x150)) Ast
= 300mm2
Use 10mm dia bars

K.ChandraBose 105 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Spacing ,S = ast/Astx1000 = (78.53/300)1000 = 261mm say 260mmc/c


Provide 10mm dia @260mm c/c.

7. Design a two way slab panel for the following data.


Size = 7mx5m
Width of Supports = 230 mm
Edge condition = interior
Live load = 4kN/m2
Floor finish = 1kN/m2
Consider M 20 grade concrete and Fe 415 grade steel. (MAY JUNE 2009)
Step 1: Type of Slab.

ly/lx = 7/5 = 1.4>2.it has to be designed as two way slab.


Step 2:Effective depth calculation.
For Economic consideration adopt shorter span to design the slab.
d = span/(basic value x modification factor) = 5000/(20x0.95) = 270mm
D = 270 + 20 + 10/2 = 295mm
Step 3: Effective Span.
For shorter span:
Le = clear span + effective depth = 5000 + 270 = 5.27m (or) Le
=c/c distance b/w supports = 5000 + 2(230/2) = 5.23m

Adopt effective span = 5.23m least value. For


longer span:
Le = clear span + effective depth = 7000 + 270 = 7.27m (or) Le
=c/c distance b/w supports = 7000 + 2(230/2) = 7.23m Adopt
effective span = 7.23m least value.
Step 4: load calculation
Live load = 4kN/m2
Dead load = 1x1x0.27x25 = 6.75kN/m2

K.ChandraBose 106 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Floor Finish = 1kN/m2


Total load = 11.75kN/m2
Factored load = 11.75 x 1.5 = 17.625kN/m2
Step 5: Moment calculation.
Mx = x . w . lx = 0.103x17.625x5.23 = 9.49kNm My =
y . w . lx = 0.048 x17.625x5.23 = 4.425kNm
Step 6: Check for effective depth.
M = Qbd2
d2 = M/Qb = 9.49/2.76x1 = 149.39mm say 150mm. For
design consideration adopt d = 150mm.
Step 7: Area of Steel.
For longer span:
Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))
4.425x106 = 087x415xAstx150(1-(415 Ast)/(20x1000x150)) Ast
= 180mm2
Use 10mm dia bars
Spacing ,S = ast/Astx1000 = (78.53/300)1000 = 261mm say 260mmc/c
Provide 10mm dia @260mm c/c.
For shorter span:
Mu = 0.87 fy Ast d (1- (fy ast)/(fck b d))
9.49x106 = 087x415xAstx150(1-(415 Ast)/(20x1000x150))
Ast = 200mm2
Use 10mm dia bars
Spacing ,S = ast/Astx1000 = (78.53/300)1000 = 281mm say 300mmc/c
Provide 10mm dia @300mm c/c.

K.ChandraBose 107 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 108 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 109 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 110 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

16 MARKS

Problem 1:

Determine the anchorage length of 4-20T reinforcing bars going into the support
of the simply supported beam shown in Fig. 6.15.5. The factored shear force Vu = 280
kN, width of the column support = 300 mm. Use M 20 concrete and Fe 415 steel.

Solution 1:

bd for M 20 and Fe 415 (with 60% increased) = 1.6(1.2) = 1.92 N/mm2

s 0.87(415)
Ld = = (when s = 0.87 f y ) = 47.01 ...... (1)
4 bd 4(1.92)

M1
(Ld ) when s = f d + Lo
V

Here, to find M1, we need xu

K.ChandraBose 111 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

0.87 f y Ast 0.87(415) (1256)


xu = = = 209.94 mm
0.36 f ck b 0.36(20) (300)

xu,max = 0.48(500) = 240 mm

Since xu < xu,max ; M1 = 0.87 fy Ast (d 0.42 xu)

or M1 = 0.87(415) (1256) {500 0.42(209.94)} = 187.754 kNm

and V = 280 kN

We have from above, with the stipulation of 30 per cent increase assuming that
the reinforcing bars are confined by a compressive reaction:

M1
Ld 1.3 ( ) + L o ...... (2)
V

From Eqs.(1) and (2), we have

47.01 1.3 ( M 1 ) + L
o
V

187.754(10 6 )
or 47.01 1.3 { }; if L is assumed as zero.
o
280(10 3 )

or 18.54 mm

Therefore, 20 mm diameter bar does not allow Lo = 0.

Determination of Lo:

M1
1.3 ( ) + L 47.01
o
V

M1 187754
Minimum Lo = 47.01 - 1.3 ( ) = 47.01(20) - 1.3( ) = 68.485 mm
V 280

So, the bars are extended by 100 mm to satisfy the requirement as shown in
Fig.

K.ChandraBose 112 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 113 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 114 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 115 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 116 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 117 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 118 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 119 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 120 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 121 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Problems
1. Determine the load carrying capacity of a column of size 300 x 400 mm reinforced
with six rods of 20 mm diameter i.e, 6-#20. The grade of concrete and steel are M20
and Fe 415 respectively. Assume that the column is short.

fck = 20 MPa, fy= 415 MPa


Area of steel ASC = 6 x x 202/4 = 6 x 314 = 1884 mm2
Percentage of steel = 100Asc/bD = 100x1884/300x400 = 1.57 %
Area of concrete Ac = Ag Asc = 300 x 400 1884 = 118116 mm2
Ultimate load carried by the column
Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc
0.4x20x118116 + 0.67x415x1884
944928 + 523846 = 1468774 N = 1468. 8 kN
Therefore the safe load on the column = 1468.8 /1.5 = 979.2 kN

2. Determine the steel required to carry a load of 980kN on a rectangular column of


size 300 x 400 mm. The grade of concrete and steel are M20 and Fe 415 respectively.
Assume that the column is short.

fck = 20 MPa, fy= 415 MPa, P = 980 kN


Area of steel ASC = ?

Area of concrete Ac = Ag Asc = (300 x 400 ASC)

Ultimate load carried by the column


Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc
980 x 1.5 x 1000 = 0.4x20x (300 x 400 ASC) + 0.67x415 ASC
= 960000 - 8 ASC + 278.06 ASC
ASC =1888.5 mm2,
Percentage of steel = 100Asc/bD = 100x1888.5 /300x400 = 1.57 % which is more than 0.8%
and less than 6% and therefore ok.

Use 20 mm dia. bas, No. of bars = 1888.5/314 = 6.01 say 6

K.ChandraBose 122 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

3. Design a square or circular column to carry a working load of 980kN. The grade of
concrete and steel are M20 and Fe 415 respectively. Assume that the column is short.

Let us assume 1.0% steel (1 to 2%)


Say ASC = 1.0% Ag =1/100 Ag = 0.01Ag
fck = 20 MPa, fy= 415 MPa, P = 980 kN

Area of concrete Ac = Ag Asc = Ag -0.01Ag = 0.99 Ag

Ultimate load carried by the column


Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc
980 x 1.5 x 1000 = 0.4x20x 0.99 Ag + 0.67x415 x 0.01Ag
= 7.92 Ag + 2.78 Ag =10.7Ag
Ag = 137383 mm2

Let us design a square column:


B = D = Ag =370.6 mm say 375 x 375 mm

This is ok. However this size cannot take the minimum eccentricity of 20 mm as emin/D =
20/375 =0.053 > 0.05. To restrict the eccentricity to 20 mm, the required size is 400x 400
mm.

Area of steel required is Ag = 1373.8 mm2. Provide 4 bar of 22 mm diameter. Steel provided
is 380 x 4 = 1520 mm2

Actual percentage of steel = 100Asc/bD = 100x1520 /400x400 = 0.95 % which is more than
0.8% and less than 6% and therefore ok.

Design of Transverse steel:

Diameter of tie = diameter of main steel = 22/4 =5.5mm or 6 mm, whichever is greater.
Provide 6 mm.

Spacing: < 300 mm, < 16 x22 = 352mm, < LLD = 400mm. Say 300mm c/c

Design of circular column:

Here Ag = 137383 mm2


x D2/4 = Ag, D= 418.2 mm say 420 mm. This satisfy the minimum eccentricity of 20m
Also provide 7 bars of 16 mm, 7 x 201 = 1407 mm2

Design of Transverse steel:

Dia of tie = dia of main steel = 16/4 = 4 mm or 6 mm, whichever is greater. Provide 6 mm.

Spacing: < 300 mm, < 16 x16 = 256 mm, < LLD = 420mm. Say 250 mm c/c

4. Design a rectangular column to carry an ultimate load of 2500kN. The unsupported


length of the column is 3m. The ends of the column are effectively held in position

K.ChandraBose 123 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

and also restrained against rotation. The grade of concrete and steel are M20 and Fe
415 respectively.

Given:

fck = 20 MPa, fy= 415 MPa, Pu = 2500kN

Let us assume 1.0% steel (1 to 2%)


Say ASC = 1.0% Ag =1/100 Ag = 0.01Ag

Area of concrete Ac = Ag Asc = Ag -0.01Ag = 0.99 Ag

Ultimate load carried by the column


Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc
2500 x 1000 = 0.4x20x 0.99 Ag + 0.67x415 x 0.01Ag
= 7.92 Ag + 2.78 Ag =10.7Ag
Ag = 233645 mm2

If it is a square column:

B = D = Ag =483 mm. However provide rectangular column of size 425 x 550mm. The
area provided=333750 mm2

Area of steel = 2336 mm2, Also provide 8 bars of 20 mm, 6 x 314 = 2512 mm2

Check for shortness: Ends are fixed. lex = ley = 0.65 l = 0.65 x 3000 = 1950 mm

lex /D= 1950/550 < 12, and ley /b = 1950/425 < 12, Column is short

Check for minimum eccentricity:

In the direction of longer direction

emin, x = lux/500 + D/30 = 3000/500 + 550/30 = 24.22mm or 20mm whichever is greater.

emin, x = 24.22 mm < 0.05D = 0.05 x 550 =27.5 mm. O.K

In the direction of shorter direction

emin, y= luy/500 + b/30 = 3000/500 + 425/30 = 20.17 mm or 20mm whichever is greater.

emin, x = 20.17 mm < 0.05b = 0.05 x 425 =21.25 mm. O.K

Design of Transverse steel:

Dia of tie = dia of main steel = 20/4 = 5 mm or 6 mm, whichever is greater. Provide 6 mm
or 8 mm.

Spacing: < 300 mm, < 16 x20 = 320 mm, < LLD = 425mm. Say 300 mm c/c

K.ChandraBose 124 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

5. Design a circular column with ties to carry an ultimate load of 2500kN. The
unsupported length of the column is 3m. The ends of the column are effectively held
in position but not against rotation. The grade of concrete and steel are M20 and Fe
415 respectively.

Given:

fck = 20 MPa, fy= 415 MPa, Pu = 2500kN

Let us assume 1.0% steel (1 to 2%)


Say ASC = 1.0% Ag =1/100 Ag = 0.01Ag

Area of concrete Ac = Ag Asc = Ag -0.01Ag = 0.99 Ag

Ultimate load carried by the column


Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc
2500 x 1000 = 0.4x20x 0.99 Ag + 0.67x415 x 0.01Ag
= 7.92 Ag + 2.78 Ag =10.7Ag
Ag = 233645 mm2

x D2/4 = Ag, D = 545.4 mm say 550 mm.

Area of steel = 2336 mm2, Also provide 8 bars of 20 mm, 6 x 314 = 2512 mm2

Check for shortness: Ends are hinged lex = ley = l = 3000 mm

lex /D= 3000/550 < 12, and ley /b = 3000/425 < 12, Column is short

Check for minimum eccentricity:

Here, emin, x = emin, y = lux/500 + D/30 = 3000/500 + 550/30 = 24.22mm or 20mm whichever is
greater.

emin = 24.22 mm < 0.05D = 0.05 x 550 =27.5 mm. O.K

Design of Transverse steel:

Diameter of tie = dia of main steel = 20/4 = 5 mm or 6 mm, whichever is greater. Provide 6
mm or 8 mm.

Spacing: < 300 mm, < 16 x20 = 320 mm, < LLD = 550mm. Say 300 mm c/c

Similarly square column can be designed.

If the size of the column provided is less than that provided above, then the minimum
eccentricity criteria are not satisfied. Then emin is more and the column is to be designed as

K.ChandraBose 125 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

uni axial bending case or bi axial bending case as the case may be. This situation arises when
more steel is provided ( say 2% in this case).

Try to solve these problems by using SP 16 charts, though not mentioned in the syllabus.

6. Design the reinforcement in a column of size 450 mm 600 mm, subject to an axial
load of 2000 kN under service dead and live loads. The column has an unsupported
length of 3.0m and its ends are held in position but not in direction. Use M 20
concrete and Fe 415 steel.

Solution:
Given: lu= 3000 mm, b = 450 mm, D = 600 mm, P =2000kN, M20, Fe415

Check for shortness: Ends are fixed. lex = ley = l = 3000 mm

lex /D= 3000/600 < 12, and ley /b = 3000/450< 12, Column is short

Check for minimum eccentricity:

In the direction of longer direction

emin, x = lux/500 + D/30 = 3000/500 + 600/30 = 26 mm or 20mm whichever is greater.

emin, x = 26 mm < 0.05D = 0.05 x 600 =30 mm. O.K

In the direction of shorter direction

emin, y= luy/500 + b/30 = 3000/500 + 450/30 = 21 mm or 20mm whichever is greater.

emin, x = 21 mm < 0.05b = 0.05 x 450 =22.5 mm. O.K

Minimum eccentricities are within the limits and hence code formula for axially loaded short
columns can be used.

Factored Load

Pu = service load partial load factor


= 2000 1.5 = 3000 kN
Design of Longitudinal Reinforcement
Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + 0.67 fy Asc or
Pu = 0.4 fck Ac + (0.67 fy - 0.4fck) Asc

3
3000 10 = 0.4 20 (450 600) + (0.67 4150.4 20)Asc
3
= 216010 + 270.05Asc

K.ChandraBose 126 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

3 2
Asc = (30002160) 10 /270.05 = 3111 mm
In view of the column dimensions (450 mm, 600 mm), it is necessary to place intermediate
bars, in addition to the 4 corner bars:
2
Provide 425 at corners ie, 4 491 = 1964 mm
2
and 420 additional ie, 4 314 = 1256 mm
2 2
Asc = 3220 mm > 3111 mm

p = (1003220) / (450600) = 1.192 > 0.8 (minimum steel), OK.

Design of transverse steel


Diameter of tie = diameter of main steel = 25/4 =6.25 mm or 6 mm, whichever is greater.
Provide 6 mm.

Spacing: < 300 mm, < 16 x 20 = 320 mm, < LLD = 450mm. Say 300 mm c/c
Thus provide ties 8mm @ 300 mm c/c

Sketch:

Example: Square Column with Uniaxial Bending

7. Determine the reinforcement to be provided in a square column subjected to


uniaxial bending with the following data:
Size of column 450 x 450 mm
Concrete mix M 25
Characteristic strength of steel 415 N/mm2
Factored load 2500 kN
Factored moment 200 kN.m

Arrangement of reinforcement:
(a) On two sides
(b) On four sides
Assume moment due to minimum eccentricity to be less than the actual moment
Assuming 25 mm bars with 40 mm cover,

K.ChandraBose 127 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

d = 40 + 12.5 = 52.5 mm
d1/D = 52.5/450- 0.12

Charts for d1/D = 0.15 will be used

Pu/fckbD = (2500 x 1000)/ (25 x 450 x 450) = 0.494

Mu/fckbD2 =200 x 106 /(25 x 450 x 4502) = 0.088

a) Reinforcement on two sides,

Referring to Chart 33,


p/fck = 0.09

Percentage of reinforcement,
p = 0.09 x 25 = 2.25 %
As = p bD/100 = 2.25 x 450 x 450/100
= 4556 mm2

b) Reinforcement on four sides


from Chart 45,
p/fck = 0.10
p = 0.10 x 25 = 2.5 %
As = 2.5 x 450 x 450/100 = 5063 mm2

8. Example: Circular Column with Uniaxial Bending


Determine the reinforcement to be provided in a circular column with the following
data:
Diameter of column 500 mm
Grade of concrete M20
Characteristic strength 250 N/mm2
Factored load 1600 kN
Factored moment 125 kN.m

Lateral reinforcement :
(a) Hoop reinforcement
(b) Helical reinforcement

(Assume moment due to minimum eccentricity to be less than the actual moment).
Assuming 25 mm bars with 40 mm cover,
d1 = 40 + 12.5 = 52.5 mm
d1/D 52.5/50 = 0.105
Charts for d/D = 0.10 will be used.

(a) Column with hoop reinforcement

Pu/fck D D = (1600 x 1000)/ (20 x 500 x 500) = 0.32

Mu/fck D x D2 =125 x 106 /(20 x 500 x 5002) = 0.05

K.ChandraBose 128 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Referring to Chart 52, for fy = 250 N/mm2


p/fck = 0.87

Percentage of reinforcement,
p = 0.87 x 20 = 1.74 %
As = 1.74 x ( x 5002/4)/100 = 3416 mm2

(b) Column with Helical Reinforcement

According to 38.4 of the Code, the strength of a compression member with helical
reinforcement is 1.05 times the strength of a similar member with lateral ties. Therefore, the,
given load and moment should be divided by 1.05 before referring to the chart.

Pu/fck D D = (1600/1.05 x 1000)/ (20 x 500 x 500) = 0.31

Mu/fck D x D2 =125/1.05 x 106 /(20 x 500 x 5002) = 0.048

Hence, From Chart 52, for fy = 250 N/mm2,

p/fck = 0.078

p = 0.078 x 20 = 1.56 %
As = 1.56 x( x 500 x 500/4 )/100 = 3063 cm2

According to 38.4.1 of the Code the ratio of the volume of helical reinforcement to the
volume of the core shall not be less than

0.36 (Ag/Ac - 1) x fck /fy

where Ag is the gross area of the section and Ac is the area of the core measured to the outside
diameter of the helix. Assuming 8 mm dia bars for the helix,
Core diameter = 500 - 2 (40 - 8) = 436 mm

Ag/AC = 500/436 = 1.315

0.36 (Ag/Ac - 1) x fck /fy = 0.36(0.315) 20/250 =0.0091

Volume of helical reinforcement / Volume of core

= Ash x 428 /( /4 x 4362) sh

0.09 Ash / sh

where, Ash is the area of the bar forming the helix and sh is the pitch of the helix.
In order to satisfy the coda1 requirement,

0.09 Ash / sh 0.0091

K.ChandraBose 129 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

For 8 mm dia bar,


sh 0.09 x 50 / 0.0091 = 49.7 mm. Thus provide 48 mm pitch

Example: Rectangular column with Biaxial Bending

9. Determine the reinforcement to be provided in a short column subjected to biaxial


bending, with the following data:
size of column = 400 x 600 mm
Concrete mix = M15
Characteristic strength of reinforcement = 415 N/mm2
Factored load, Pu = 1600 kN
Factored moment acting parallel to the larger dimension, Mux =120 kNm
Factored moment acting parallel to the shorter dimension, Muy = 90 kNm
Moments due to minimum eccentricity are less than the values given above.

Reinforcement is distributed equally on four sides.


As a first trial assume the reinforcement percentage, p = 1.2%
p/fck = 1.2/15 = 0.08

Uniaxial moment capacity of the section about xx-axis :

d1/D = 52.5 /600 = 0.088

Chart for d/D = 0.1 will be used.

Pu/fck b D = (1600 x 1000)/ (15 x 400 x 600) = 0.444

Referring to chart 44

Mu/fck b x D2 = 0.09
Mux1 = 0.09 x 15 x 400 x 6002) = 194.4 kN.m

Uni-axial moment capacity of the section about yy axis :

d1/D = 52.5 /400 = 0.131


Chart for d1/D =0.15 will be used.
Referring to Chart 45,
Mu/fck b x D2 = 0.083
Mux1 = 0.083 x 15 x 600 x 4002) = 119.52 kN.m

Calculation of Puz :
Referring to Chart 63 corresponding to
p = 1.2, fy = 415 and fck = 15,
Puz/Ag = 10.3

Puz = 10.3 x 400 x 600 = 2472 kN

Mux/Mux1 = 120/194.4 =0.62


Muy/Muy1=90/119.52 = 0.75
Pu /Puz =1600/2472 = 0.65

K.ChandraBose 130 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Referring to Churn 64, the permissible value of Mux/Mux1 corresponding to Muy/Muy1 and Pu
/Puz is equal to 0.58
The actual value of 0.62 is only slightly higher than the value read from the Chart.

This can be made up by slight increase in reinforcement.

Using Boris load contour equation as per IS:456-2000

Pu /Puz = 0.65 thus, n = 1 + [(2-1) / (0.8 - 0.2)] (0.65-0.2) = 1.75

[0.62 ]1.75 + [0.75]1.75 = 1.04 slightly greater than 1 and slightly unsafe. This can be made up
by slight increase in reinforcement say 1.3%

Thus provide As = 1.3x400x600/100 = 3120 mm2

Provide 1.3 % of steel


p/fck = 1.3/15 = 0.086
d1/D = 52.5 /600 = 0.088 = 0.1

From chart 44
Mu/fck b x D2 = 0.095
Mux1 = 0.095 x 15 x 400 x 6002) = 205.2 kN.m

Referring to Chart 45,


Mu/fck b x D2 = 0.085
Mux1 = 0.085 x 15 x 600 x 4002) = 122.4 kN.m

Chart 63 : Puz/Ag = 10.4


Puz = 10.4 x 400 x 600 = 2496 kN

Mux/Mux1 = 120/205.2 =0.585


Muy/Muy1=90/122.4 = 0.735
Pu /Puz =1600/2496 = 0.641

Referring to Chart 64, the permissible value of Mux/Mux1 corresponding to Muy/Muy1 and Pu
/Puz is equal to 0.60

Hence the section is O.K.

Using Boris load contour equation as per IS:456-2000

Pu /Puz = 0.641 thus, n = 1 + [(2-1) / (0.8 - 0.2)] (0.641-0.2) = 1.735

[120/205.2]1.735 + [90/122.4]1.735 = 0.981 1 Thus OK

As = 3120 mm2. Provide 10 bars of 20 mm dia. Steel provided is 314 x 10 = 3140 mm2

K.ChandraBose 131 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Design of transverse steel: Provide 8 mm dia stirrups at 300 mm c/c as shown satisfying the
requirements of IS: 456-2000

10. Verify the adequacy of the short column section 500 mm x 300 mm under the
following load conditions:
Pu = 1400 kN, Mux = 125 kNm, Muy = 75 kNm. The design interaction curves of SP 16
should be used. Assume that the column is a short column and the eccentricity due to
moments is greater than the minimum eccentricity.

Solution:
2
Given: Dx = 500 mm, b = 300 mm, As = 2946 mm Mux = 125 kNm, Muy = 75 kNm, fck = 25
MPa, fy = 415 MPa

Applied eccentricities
3
ex = Mux/Pu = 125 10 /1400 = 89.3 mm ex/Dx = 0.179
3
ey = Muy/Pu = 75 10 /1400 = 53.6 mm ey/Dy = 0.179
These eccentricities for the short column are clearly not less than the minimum eccentricities
specified by the Code.

Uniaxial moment capacities: Mux1, Muy1


As determined in the earlier example, corresponding to Pu = 1400 kN,
Mux1 = 187 kNm
Muy1 = 110 kNm
Values of Puz and n
Puz = 0.45fck Ag + (0.75fy 0.45fck)Asc
= (0.45 25 300 500) + (0.75 415 0.45 25)2946
= (1687500 + 883800)N = 2571 kN
Pu/Puz = 1400/2571 = 0.545 (which lies between 0.2 and 0.8)
n = 1.575

Check safety under biaxial bending

[125/187]1.575 + [75/110]1

= 0.530 + 0.547
= 1.077 > 1.0
Hence, almost ok.

K.ChandraBose 132 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 133 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 134 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

K.ChandraBose 135 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

16 Mark Question and Answers

K.ChandraBose 136 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

2. Design an isolated footing for an R.C. column of size 230 mm x 230 mm which carries a vertical load
of 500 kN. The safe bearing capacity of soil is 200 kN/m2. Use M20 concrete and Fe 415 steel.
Solution
Step 1: Size of footing
Load on column = 600 kN
Extra load at 10% of load due to self weight of soil = 60 kN
Hence, total load, P = 660 kN
. 223
Required area of footing, - = = = 5. 5 64
/01 433

Assuming a square footing, the side of footing is 7 = 0 = 5. 5 = 8. 94 6


Hence, provide a footing of size 1.85 m x 1.85 m

;
Net upward pressure in soil, : = +.<= > +.<= = 175.3 BC/E, < 200 BC/E, Hence O.K.

Hence, factored upward pressure of soil, pu = 263 kN/m2 and, factored load, Pu = 900 kN.

K.ChandraBose 137 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Step 2: Two way shear


Assume an uniform overall thickness of footing, D = 450 mm.
Assuming 12 mm diameter bars for main steel, effective thickness of footing d is
d = 450 50 12 6 = 382 mm
The critical section for the two way shear or punching shear occurs at a distance of d/2 from the face
of the column (See Fig. 6), where a and b are the sides of the column.

Fig. 6 Critical section in two way shear

Hence, punching area of footing = (a + d)2 = (0.23 + 0.382)2 = 0.375 m2


here a = b =side of column
Punching shear force = Factored load (Factored upward pressure x punching area of footing)
= 900 (263 x 0.375)
= 801.38 kN
Perimeter of the critical section = 4 (a+d) = 4 (230+ 382)
= 2448 mm
Therefore, nominal shear stress in punching or punching shear stress V is computed as
.HIJKLIM NKOPQ RSQJO
FG =
TOQL6OUOQ V ORROJULWO UKLJXIONN
938. 59 8333
= = 3. 92 [/664
4ZZ9 V 594

Allowable shear stress = kS . C


where F1 = 3. 4\ RJX = 3. 4\ 43 8. 84 [/664
3.45
and, XN = 3. \ + ^1  = _3. \ + ` = 8. 3 ; Hence, adopt ks=1
3.45
Thus, Allowable shear stress = kS . C = 1 x 1.12 = 1.12 N/mm2

Since the punching shear stress (0.86 N/mm2) is less than the allowable shear stress (1.12 N/mm2),
the assumed thickness is sufficient to resist the punching shear force.

Hence, the assumed thickness of footing D = 450 mm is sufficient.


The effective depth for the lower layer of reinforcement, d = 450 50 6 = 396 mm, and
the effective depth for the upper layer of reinforcement, d = 450 50 12 6 = 382 mm.

K.ChandraBose 138 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Step 3: Design for flexure


The critical section for flexure occurs at the face of the column (Fig. 7).

Fig. 7 Critical section for flexure

The projection of footing beyond the column face is treated as a cantilever slab subjected to
factored upward pressure of soil.
Factored upward pressure of soil, pu = 263 kN/m2
Projection of footing beyond the column face, l = (1850 230)/2 = 810 mm
Hence, bending moment at the critical section in the footing is
TH b4 425 V 3.984
aH = = = 92. 49 X[ 6 /m width of footing
4 4

The area of steel Ast can be determined using the following moment of resistance relation for under
reinforced condition given in Annex G 1.1 b of IS 456 :2000.
Rf -NU
ad = 3. 9e Rf -NU g h8 j
i g RJX

Considering 1m width of footing,


Z8\ k lmn
92. 49 k 832 = 3. 9e k Z8\ k lmn k 594 o8 p
8333 k 594 k 43

Solving the above quadratic relation, we get


Ast = 648.42 mm2 and 17,761.01 mm2
Selecting the least and feasible value for Ast, we have
Ast = 648.42 mm2
The corresponding value of pt = 0.17 %
Hence from flexure criterion, pt = 0.17 %
Step 4: One way shear
The critical section for one way shear occurs at a distance d from the face of the column (Fig. 8).

K.ChandraBose 139 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Fig. 8 Critical section for one way shear

For the cantilever slab, total Shear Force along critical section considering the entire width B is
Vu = pu B (l d)
= 263 x 1.85 x (0.81 0.382)
= 208.24 kN
The nominal shear stress is given by
GH 439. 4Z V 8333
FG = =
0 g
& 3. 53 q/664
89\3 V 594
From Table 61 of SP 16, find the pt required to have a minimum design shear strength C = V = 0.30
N/mm2 with fck = 20 N/mm2.
For pt = 0.175 % the design shear strength C is 0.30 N/mm2 = V = 0.30 N/mm2.
Hence from one way shear criterion, pt = 0.175 %
Comparing pt from flexure and one way shear criterion, provide pt = 0.175 % (larger of the two
values)
r 3.8e\
Hence, -NU = 833n s t = 833
8333 k 594 & 22u vv4
Provide 12 mm dia bars at 140 mm c/c.
Therefore, Ast provided = 808 mm2 > Ast required (609 mm2). Hence O.K.

Step 5: Check for development length


Sufficient development length should be available for the reinforcement from the critical section.
Here, the critical section considered for Ld is that of flexure.
The development length for 12 mm dia bars is given by
Ld = 47 = 47 x 12 = 564 mm.
Providing 60 mm side cover, the total length available from the critical section is
8 8
w x 23 = 89\3 453 23 = e\3 vv y wt . Hence O.K.
4 4

Step 6: Check for bearing stress


The load is assumed to disperse from the base of column to the base of footing at rate of 2H : 1V.
Hence, the side of the area of dispersion at the bottom of footing = 230 + 2 (2 x 450) = 2030 mm.
Since this is lesser than the side of the footing (i.e., 1850 mm)
A1 = 1.85 x 1.85 = 3.4225 m2

K.ChandraBose 140 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

The dimension of the column is 230 mm x 230 mm. Hence, A2= 0.230 x 0.230 = 0.0529 m2
l8 5. Z44\
z = z = 9. 3Z > 2
l4 3. 3\4u
l
Hence, Limit the value of {l8 = 4
4

Permissible bearing stress = 3. Z\ }~ {l8


l
4

= 0.45 x 20 x 2 = 18 N/mm2
l~nx sx mnmm = lx xn ~v sxm =
x~nt xt u33 k 8333 q
453 k 453
= 8e. 38 vv 4

Since the Actual bearing stress (17.01 N/mm2) is less than the Permissible bearing stress (18 N/mm2),
the design for bearing stress is satisfactory.

Appropriate detailing should be shown both in plan and elevation for the footing as per the
recommendations given in SP 34.

``

3. Design an isolated footing for an R.C. column of size 300 mm x 300 mm which carries a vertical load
of 800 kN together with an uniaxial moment of 40 kN-m. The safe bearing capacity of soil is 250
kN/m2. Use M25 concrete and Fe 415 steel.
Solution
Step 1: Size of footing
Load on column = 800 kN
Extra load at 10% of load due to self weight of soil = 80 kN
Hence, total load, P = 880 kN
Let us provide a square isolated footing, where L=B
Equating the maximum pressure of the footing to SBC of soil,

+ =
l
993 Z3 V 2
i.e., + = 4\3
04 05

On solving the above equation, and taking the least and feasible value, B = 2 m
Hence, provide a square footing of size 2 m x 2 m
The maximum and minimum soil pressures are given by
933 Z3 V 2 X[ X[
T6PV = + = 453 4 < 250 4 . .
44 45 6 6
933 Z3 V 2 X[
T6LI = = 8e3 4 y . .
4 4 4 5 6
Hence, factored upward pressures of soil are,
pu,max = 345 kN/m2 and pu,min = 255 kN/m2

K.ChandraBose 141 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

Further, average pressure at the center of the footing is given by


pu,avg = 300 kN/m2
and, factored load, Pu = 900 kN, factored uniaxial moment, Mu = 60 kN-m
Step 2: Two way shear
Assume an uniform overall thickness of footing, D = 450 mm
Assuming 16 mm diameter bars for main steel, effective thickness of footing d is
d = 450 50 16 8 = 376 mm
The critical section for the two way shear or punching shear occurs at a distance of d/2 from the face
of the column (Fig. 9), where a and b are the dimensions of the column.

Fig. 9 Critical section in two way shear

Hence, punching area of footing = (a + d)2 = (0.30 + 0.376)2 = 0.457 m2


where a = b = side of column
Punching shear force = Factored load (Factored average pressure x punching area of footing)
= 1200 (300 x 0.457)
= 1062.9 kN
Perimeter along the critical section = 4 (a+d) = 4 (300+ 376)
= 2704 mm
Therefore, nominal shear stress in punching or punching shear stress V is computed as
.HIJKLIM NKOPQ RSQJO
FG =
TOQL6OUOQ V ORROJULWO UKLJXIONN
8324. u 8333
= = 8. 3\ [/664
4e3Z V 5e2
Allowable shear stress = kS . C
where F1 = 3. 4\ RJX = 3. 4\ 4\ = 8. 4\ [/664
3.53
and, XN = 3. \ + ^1  = _3. \ + 3.53` = 8. 3 ; Hence, adopt ks=1
Thus, Allowable shear stress = kS . C = 1 x 1.25 = 1.25 N/mm2

Since the punching shear stress (1.05 N/mm2) is less than the allowable shear stress (1.25 N/mm2),
the assumed thickness is sufficient to resist the punching shear force.
Hence, the assumed thickness of footing D = 450 mm is sufficient.

K.ChandraBose 142 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

The effective depth for the lower layer of reinforcement, , d = 450 50 8 = 392 mm, and
the effective depth for the upper layer of reinforcement, d = d = 450 50 16 8 = 376 mm.

Step 3: Design for flexure


The critical section for flexure occurs at the face of the column (Fig. 10).

Fig. 10 Critical section for flexure

The projection of footing beyond the column face is treated as a cantilever slab subjected to
factored upward pressure of soil.
Factored maximum upward pressure of soil, pu,max = 345 kN/m2
Factored upward pressure of soil at critical section, pu = 306.75 kN/m2
Projection of footing beyond the column face, l = (2000 300)/2 = 850 mm
Bending moment at the critical section in the footing is
= nx }~ k mnx~ } }v ~n~x m~n
5Z\ + 532. e\ 4 k 5Z\ + 532. e\ 3. 9\
= 3. 9\ k k
4 5Z\ + 532. e\ 5
Mu = 119.11 kN-m/ m width of footing
The area of steel Ast can be determined using the following moment of resistance relation for under
reinforced condition given in Annex G 1.1 b of IS 456 :2000.
Rf -NU
ad = 3. 9e Rf -NU g h8 j
i g RJX

Considering 1m width of footing,

88u. 88 k 832 = 3. 9e k Z8\ k lmn k 5e2 o8


Z8\ k lmn
p
8333 k 5e2 k 4\

Solving the quadratic equation,


Ast = 914.30 mm2 and 21,735.76 mm2
Selecting the least and feasible value, Ast = 914.30 mm2

K.ChandraBose 143 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

The corresponding value of pt = 0.24 %


Hence from flexure criterion, pt = 0.24 %

Step 4: One way shear


The critical section for one way shear occurs at a distance of d from the face of the column (Fig. 11).

Fig. 11 Critical section for one way shear

Factored maximum upward pressure of soil, pu,max = 345 kN/m2


Factored upward pressure of soil at critical section, pu = 327.1 kN/m2
For the cantilever slab, total Shear Force along critical sectionconsidering the entire width B is
= nx }~ k t k
5Z\ + 54e. 8
= k 3. 9\ 3. 5e2 k 4
4
Vu = 318.58 kN
The nominal shear stress is given by
589. \9 k 8333
= = = 3. Z4 q/vv4
t 4333 k 5e2
From 19 of IS 456 :2000, find the pt required to have a minimum design shear strength C = V = 0.42
N/mm2 with fck = 25 N/mm2.
For pt = 0.365 % the design shear strength C is 0.42 N/mm2 = V = 0.42 N/mm2.
Hence from one way shear criterion, pt = 0.365 %
Comparing pt from flexure and one way shear criterion, provide pt = 0.365 % (larger of the two
values)
r 3.52\
Hence, lmn = 833n s t = 833
8333 k 5e2 = 85e4. Z vv4
Provide 16 mm dia bars at 140 mm c/c.
Therefore, Ast provided = 1436 mm2 > Ast required (1372.4 mm2). Hence O.K.

Step 5: Check for development length


Sufficient development length should be available for the reinforcement from the critical section.
Here, the critical section considered for Ld is that of flexure.

K.ChandraBose 144 Academic Year 2015-2016


CE6505-Design of RC Elements III Year/ V Semester Civil Engineering

The development length for 16 mm dia bars is given by


Ld = 47 = 47 x 16 = 752 mm.
Providing 60 mm side cover, the total length available from the critical section is

w x 23 = 4333 533 23 = eu3 vv y wt Hence O.K.


8 8
4 4

Step 6: Check for bearing stress


The load is assumed to disperse from the base of column to the base of footing at rate of 2H : 1V.
Hence, the side of the area of dispersion at the bottom of footing = 300 + 2 2 x 450 = 2100 mm.
Since this is lesser than the side of the footing i.e., 2000 mm,
A1 = 2 x 2 = 4 m 2
The dimension of the column is 300 mm x 300 mm.
Hence, A2= 0.30 x 0.30 = 0.09 m2
l8 Z
z = z = 2. 2e > 2
l4 3. 3u
l
Hence, Limit the value of {l8 = 4
4

Permissible bearing stress = 3. Z\ }~ {l8


l
4

= 0.45 x 25 x 2 = 22.5 N/mm2

x~nt xt 8433 k 8333


Actual bearing stress = lx xn ~v sxm = 533 k 533
= 85. 55 q/vv 4

Since the Actual bearing stress (13.33 N/mm2) is less than the Permissible bearing stress (22.5
N/mm2), the design for bearing stress is satisfactory.

Appropriate detailing should be shown both in plan and elevation for the footing as per the
recommendations given in SP 34.

K.ChandraBose 145 Academic Year 2015-2016


REFERENCES

BOOKS:

KRISHNA RAJU, N., DESIGN OF RC STRUCTURES, CBS PUBLISHERS AND


DISTRIBUTORS, DELHI, 2006

VARGHESE, P.C., LIMIT STATE DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES


PRENTICE HALL OFINDIA PVT LTD NEW DELHI, 2007.

WEB:

CE IIT, KHARAGPUR

VTU EDUSAT PROGRAMMES

IS CODES:

IS456:2000, CODE OF PRACTICE FOR PLAIN AND REINFORCED CONCRETE, BUREAU


OF INDIAN
STANDARDS, NEW DELHI, 2000
SP16, IS456:1978 DESIGN AIDS FOR REINFORCED CONCRETE TO BUREAU OF
INDIAN STANDARDS, NEW DELHI, 1999