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WA R

^

RECRUITING

PUBLICITY

BUREAU

GOVERNORS ISLAND ,

N . Y .

OFFICIA L

BUSINES S

CO

at

UJ

PllTALTT Ft * FlIVAT I UtB ,

A BULLETIN OF RECRUITING INFORMATION ISSUED BY DIRECTION OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL OF THE ARMTf

^"•

JUN E IS ,

1925

WEST POINT FIELD ARTILLERY WARMING U P

RPB—6-15-25—9,50 0

WJZ's Contribution to the U. S. Army

E ARL Y in 1922 Mr . Charles B . Pop ­

cnoe conceived the idea of a month­

ly Army night broadcasting pro ­

gra m t o be rendered t o th e public via

Station WJZ , operated by th e Radio

Corporation

of America

an d under his

management.

H e approached Major General Harr y

C.

Hale, then commanding th e 2nd Corps

Area,

with

headquarters

a t

Governors

Island, wh o became much interested.

Earl y

in th e summer

of that year,

a s a

result,

a

series

of

monthly

talks wa s

begun, featured before an d after by a

concert of th e 16th Infantr y Band. These

talks

covered

a wide

of military

subjects

range an d were rendered

by General

Hale personally until th e retur n of Gen ­

eral Bullard

from

South America some

months later. General Hale soon convinced General Bullard that this broadcasting was a good

thing fo r all concerned, to such a n ex

­

tent, indeed,

that th e program became an

official piece of military broadcasting and the relations between th e Army an d th e Radio Corporation of America were placed in the hands of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Corps Area headquarters. The programs have continued along th e above lines since. General Bullard soon becoming to o

  • bus}- to care fo r th e monthly speeches,

G-2 substituted other general officers, such as division commanders an d bureau chiefs from Washington. This plan is still in effect.

Among th e officers wh o have taken

part in these programs ar e

Major Gen ­

erals

Harr y C. Hale, Robert

Lee Bullard,

Ret.,

William Weigel, William J . Snow.

Mark L . Hershey, Eli A. Helmick, Robert

C.

Davis, Malin Craig, Merrit t W .

Ire ­

land, Kenzie W . Walker, Harr y Taylor,

and Tames G. Harbord, Ret., now Presi­

lent

of th e Radio Corporation of Ameri­

ca ; Brig. Generals William S . Graves, Amos Fries, Johnson Hagood, C. L . Ruggles, an d John Ross Delafield, Presi ­

dent of th e Reserve Officers' Association

of th e United States ; an d Colonels M .

  • B. Stewart and William N . Haskell. This

group of officers, included among which

are th e present an d former commanders

of various of ou r corps areas,

depart­

ments, an d wa r time divisions, a s well as The Adjutant General, th e chiefs of most of ou r branches an d th e Commandant of cadets a t West Point ha s given through the courtesy of WJZ , th e population of the Easter n coast of th e United States a better appreciation of what th e Army means t o America in time of peace a s well as in war.

Station WJ Z is the second oldest broad­ casting station in th e United States, being first erected early in 1921 a t Newark, N. J. , moving to New York City on May

15, 1923.

I t is a 1 k . w . station, operating

on

a wave

length of 455 meters

an d a t

present

located

on th e Aeolian Building,

33 West

42nd

Street,

Ne w York

City.

A Canvasser's Daily

Progress Record

By Major

MALCOLM

P . ANDKUSS, CAC,

Recruiting

Officer, Buffalo,

N.

V.

:i th e final analysis it is th e morale

enthusiasm of th e individual can - A vasser that spells success o r failure in recruiting production. If canvassing is

a m i

allowed to degenerate

into plain

routine

duty nf

a perfunctory

nature one of th e

vital elements of th e activity

is being

seriously overlooked an d must of neces­

The board

proper is stained a flemish oak

color with white vertical lines. Th e days of th e month an d th e number of enlist­ ments ar e also entered in white. Th e tabs on which th e names of th e canvassers ap­

pear ar e painted re d with black lettering

These tabs slide across th e board

in

un ­

dercut grooves. Th e board is hung on the

The

Board

sity sooner o r later result

in lost motion

and inefficiency. When w e speak of competition in a

recruiting sense we naturally think of th e number of enlistments procured b y th e efforts of the individual canvassers. Their mission, a s those of u s who ar e continu­ ally face t o face with th e problem well know, is a most difficult on e to accom­ plish an d w e should b e constantly think­ ing of ways an d means to assist them in

gaining their objective—keeping them

"pepped up, " to us e th e parlance of th e day. If yo u an d I ar e competing with each other in th e recruiting field it follows that we ar e intensely interested in ou r rela­ tive standing from day to day. If you ar e leading by one man o r so isn't it natural that I should go ou t and "scratch gravel " just a trifle harder ? Herein lies th e psychology of competition. In order t o take advantage of this truth the "Recruiting Canvassers' Daily Prog ­

ress Board " ha s been devised this district. I t consists of

fo r us e a finished

in

board, 30 inches by 40 inches, o n which

appear

th e names of canvassers, th e days

of th e month an d number of enlistments.

wall in th e orderly room next

to th e bul­

letin board an d is brought u p t o date

every morning.

I t is the center of interest

each morning an d ha s paid fo r it s cos '

many times over in results obtained.

(Note :

Ther e

ar e

a

number

of

blue

prints of th e board available an d a copy

will b e gladly furnished those interested.)

A white print, embodying th e same fea ­ tures a s described above, is hung on th e wall in th e main office an d furnishes a ready reference. This is mounted on a beaver board backing an d is operated by means of small re d pins. In order that th e sub-stations ma y be

kept in touch with th e production

situa­

tion a form is made u p covering each ten

day

period

an d a copy

sent

ou t t o each

out of town canvasser.

This

form

list-

all th e canvassers an d stations, th e num­

ber of applicants

brought in b y each,

th e

number accepted,

those enlisted, those

re ­

jected fo r physical o r other causes, elope­ ments, declinations, failures t o report, etc. Although this daily production activity involves a little extr a work i t is felt that the results obtained warran t its embodi­ ment in th e routine administration of th e office.

Page Tzvo

The Flag of the United States

W IT H a very few exceptions, the

 

Stars

and

stripes

is

the

oldest

national standard

and

ensign in

the world. Tha t of Denmark, the colors of

Savoy, a red swallow-tailed

flag

with

a

white cross, was adopted

in

1219, and

is

the

oldest

of

European

national

flags.

The second

in order

of

age

in Europe is

Switzerland, a red field with a

the flag of white Greek

cross, adopted

in

the

17th

century. In 1698, Peter the Great of

Russia established the Order

of

St.

An­

drew, the

symbol of

the patron

 

saint of

that

country,

an

X-like

cross

of

blue

which

has been

placed

on

a great

variety

of flags.

The standard of Spain was established

in 1785; the tri-color

of

France in 1794;

the standard of Great Britain, a blue field

bearing the conjoined crosses of St.

George, St. Andrew, and

St.

Patrick , in

1801.

Portugal's national flag came into

being in 1815, the ensign of the German

Empire in

1871, that of

the United King­

dom of Italy in 1861, and the flag of the

Netherlands.

1806, in which

year

it

was

last changed.

 

The national

ensigns

of

China and

Japan had their origin

at

a more remote

period than those of any other nation now

in existence.

The present flag of Japan,

however, dates

from

1859, and

the Chi­

nese standard was not announced to for­

eigners as a national ensign until 1802.

 

The Hags of the Thirteen Colonies, be­

fore

the birth and adoption

of

the Stars

and Stripes, were many and varied.

Tlu

red cross of

St.

George was

in

use

in

Developed Through Nearly A Cen­ tury and A Half of Conflict and Progress

Massachusetts until 1635 as the accepted

standard of the Puritans.

In November,

1634, complaint

was recorded that John

Endicott had defaced the English ensign

at Salem.

Endicott, a court assist­

ant,

hid

cut out

with

his

sword

part

of

the red

cross

a in the flag hanging

be­

fore the governor's gate, declaring that it

savored

of

popery.

For

this

insult

tu

the king's

colors he was removed

from

office

and disqualified to hold any public

of lice

fur

one year.

 

Endicott was not without sympathizers.

Soon after

some of the militia refused to

march under the symbol that to them was idolatrous. A grave controversy followed which was not concluded until December, 1635, when the military commissioners designated colors for each company, leav­ ing out the red cross in all of them. It was summarily agreed that the king's colors should be displayed from ships and from Castle Island, Boston, the lat­ ter belonging to the king, and this flag continued in such use until the establish­ ment of the Cromwellian commonwealth.

An interesting standard of this period,

the oldest purely American flag, was that which was designed in England about

1660 for

use by the troops

of

Middlesex,

Suffolk and Essex counties, Massachu­ setts. Under the folds of this historic flag

the

soldiers

of

the

three counties took

part

in King

Phillip's Indian War, and it

was carried to Concord by the Minute

Men of Bedford on the fateful morning

of

the

19th of

April, 1775, in response to

the cry

of

Paul Revere, "The British ar e

Coming!"

Other

 

flags there were, especially

through the early days of the Revolution.

The most notable of these were the varie­

ties

of

the pine-tree flag, some of which

bore the motto, "An Appeal to Heaven,"

the rattlesnake flag and an improvised

ensign raised over

Fort Johnson, South

Carolina, after

the

place had

been cap­

tured in resistance to the Stamp Act.

Under

the

latter flag,

a

blue

field

with

three white crescents—one for each com­ pany of the volunteer force which took Fort Johnson—the Declaration of In­ dependence was proclaimed to the people un August 8, 1776.

The origin of

the flag with thirteen al­

ternate red and white stripes, represent­ ing the United Colonies, with the sub­ joined crosses of St. Andrew and St.

George

in

a blue field, which

was raised

on Prospect Hill, Cambridge, on the first

day of January, 1776, has never been offi­

cially determined.

A monument of gran­

its was erected on the spot some years ago

to mark

the _ place where the Union flag

was first raised. This monument bears

the inscription :

"On this Hill the Union

Mag, with

its thirteen

stripes, the

em­

blem of

the United Colonies, First bade

defiance

to

an

enemy, January

1,

1776.

(Continued on Page Eleven)

Ma chine used by Quartermaster Corps for stitching stars on five flags a t one operation

Page Three

The March of the Mounted Riflemen

J " UN E

might

as

our

1, 1849—The whole outfit

today,

good

a

would

that

was

it

carefully examined

be

put

and

in

as

means

condition

permit ;

time

Wherein

the Expedition QM Tells

is rapidly

increasing. Fou r

men

ran

off

 

of the Journey From Ft. Kearny

to Ft.

Laramie

last night, taking

a complete outfit with

them.

This

us,

when

was not

very

unexpected to

we

consider

the

material of

and it required

 

but

little

experience

to

   

which

the

regiment

is

composed,

who

see tha t

the condition of

the mules was

 

{Continued from

June

1

Number)

 

merely

enlisted, it is well known,

for the

not

such

as

to

justify

 

the

command's

 

purpose

of

getting!

comfortably

tran­

leaving

for

the

Columbia

River

with

 

Having only Lieutenant

Fros t with me

sported

to California

at

the

expense of

any certainty

of arrivin g

there

without

as

acting

assistant

quartermaster,

who

the

Goverment,

and

not

from

any par­

accident.

 

was in charge of the regimental train,

tiality for

the profession

of

a soldier.

 

those

and similarly situated, I was compelled to

Jun e 7—Today

buffalo

were seen

for

Th e

brought

mules

from

were

principally

 

trust

much

to

the

agents, which

greatly

the first

time, which created no little ex­

the Rio Grande

 

in

the

fall

increased

my

responsibilities,

as

it

was

citement.

W e

had been hoping

for

se­

of

1848 and were wintered in the vicinity

expected that I would not only see that

veral days to be gratified

with

a

sight of

of

For t Leavenworth by contract.

They

had been badly taken

care of,

and when

the spring commenced there was not suf­

ficient

time to

put

dition for the match.

them in proper

con­

Many of them were

the property was taken troops properly transported.

care

of,

but

the

June 3—It became necessary, before

leaving For t Kearny, to increase

subsistence

stores,

which

called

for

the

ad­

them, for

the road was entirely destitute

of interest, and we were much pleased on

hearing the news that game was near us.

June 9—Mr. Wilco x

(th e guide) went

partl y broken down by former hard

ditional means of transportation . I was

over

the

bluffs

last

evening

on

a

service ; others were wild

and

it

seemed

almost

impossible to break them to

har­

ness. They had just completed a journey

therefore compelled to resort to ox teams,

being the only transportation

that

could

be obtained at the post—and we were

hunting excursion, this being a fine sec­ tion of country for buffalo and antelope,

but

returned,

after

traveling

twenty

of

three hundred

and ten

miles, in

very

very fortunate even to get this. I placed

miles on

the

prairie , without

being suc­

 

them under charge of a wagon-master,

cessful—a

disappointment

seldom known

unpleasant weather. Th e citizen and soldier teamsters were entirely incapable

of

driving, with the exception of

a

few

of the former

who had been in Mexico.

to

proceed

directly

on

to

For t

Larami e

in company with the emigrants without being governed by the movements of the

to

a hunter

spring.

along the

Platt e before this

This valley has been heretofore a great

Th e responsibility which was about to

expedition, as we were required to make

range

for

game of

all kinds.

Herd s of

devolve on me, t o transport the troops

short marches in consequence of the delay

buffalo,

consisting

of

thousands,

were

safely to the Columbia River, determined

of the beef-contractor,

and

it

would

en­

seen grazin g at one time a few years

me not to take the charge on myself with­

able them to get considerably the star t of

since ; but

such has been

the effect

pro­

' out letting the department know the con­

us.

duced on them by the immense emigra­

dition, at least, in which I found things.

June 5—Large trains could be seen this

with very small cottonwood

and willow,

tion

this

spring,

tha t

it

has

driven

the

Although I did not consider that anyone

morning wending their way along on both

game far

beyond the bluffs; and the buf­

was to blame, since the march commenced,

sides of the Platte . Th e river here is

falo

seldom

retur n

to

the

river

except

I preferred calling for a board of

nearly three miles wide, interspersed with

when forced

to do

so

for

want of water,

survey, and it was convened. The board inspected the animals, and passed their

islands, some of which are thinly covered

range is now on the head waters of the Blue

and

then

in

small numbers. Their

opinion upon them, and out of the whole

they are

entirely

and Kansa s

Rivers, and from

thence to

number, condemned one-third, as I was

but in many 'instances bare.

 

the Arkansas. I have no doubt, if the emi­

unoffkialy informed. Although this was

Our march was only eleven miles to­

changing

camping-grounds

since

leav­

gration

continues

a

few

more years

as

their opinion, I never was able to obtain a copy of the report, as they committed

day, as it has been but little more than

large

found

as

it

is

this

year,

not

one Platte , or

the

will be

along the border of

Kearny,

it

being necessary

to

near For t Kearny, where they have been

an informality, which caused the proceed­ ings to be annulled.

This was the aspect

of

affairs

when I

took charge of the department, and re ­

lieved

the officer

who had accompanied

ing For t wait for

the contractor, who was hourly

expected, before

we could proceed. This

gave the mules and horses an opportunity

of recovering from their march from

known

to

apparently

Within

approach

for

shelter

the

in

out-buildings,

the

winter.

the

last

four

days

the com­

mand had lost several men by the cholera

the troops to For t Kearny .

 

For t

Leavenworth.

 

and it had every indication of increasing

June 2—This day was passed in making our papers and arrangin g the train. The

Havin g arrived

in camp early

overhauled

the

wagons

which

today, I

contained

among them. On the fourt h

two men

died,

and

one on

the seventh and

Doctor

command moved about four miles above, to change their encampment, get better

the

the lumber

intended

for

such repairs as

we might require on the route, and found

Moses and Smith were seriously attacked

by

it,

who were

the only

two physicians

grazing, and be nearer

t o

water.

 

that

we had but very little

along with us,

along with

us

to atten d

the

three divi­

 

A n order

had

been issued by Colonel

there being but four

pair

of

hounds and

sions into which our troops were divided.

Lorin g separating

the

command

into

eleven tongues, which was a scanty allow­

I

had

seen so much of

it between Forts

thre e

divisions

of

two

companies

each,

ance for

the repairs of

one hundred and

Leavenworth and Kearny, that I did

which were

t o march

at

an

interval of

sixty wagons, that were to pass over

hope

the

command

would,

before

our

five

miles

between

the

first

and

third

rough roads

for

two thousand

miles.

I

reaching it, be entirely clear ; but it seem­

divisions, and encamp in the same order,

had no desire to send back for

timber,

ed

to

move

as

the

emigrants

did,

and we

until otherwise changed. This necessarily

which had been done previous to my

arrival ,

same

fifty

miles—rather

pre ­

were

destined

t o

keep

it

among

us

in

spite of every precaution until our arriv ­

separated

me

from

the

greate r

portion

ferring

to trust

to

a good

trai l

and

the

al

in

Oregon.

of the command, and confined

me

for

a

improvements

of

teams and

teamsters.

 

June

10—Today being the Sabbath, it

time to a division, changing from

one to

the other

as

my

services

were most

June 6—Whether from the alarm of the

cholera

or distaste

for

soldiering,

I

am

was

a

day

emigrants.

of

A s

general

rest

'among

the

the

command

had

been

required.

 

unable to say, but desertion

at

this time

considerably

delayed

since

leaving

For t

Page Four

 
 

UNITE D

STATE S

ARMY

RECRUITIN G

NEW S

Kearny,

it became necessary

to

make up

       

for

lost

follow

time ; and we therefore did not

the

good

g

example

pe

be

t

bet

by

our

fellow-travelers, deeming it more prudent

lodges,

proceeded

up

the

river,

and

stepped, nearly opposite to us. A deputa­

tion consisting of the old chief

80

of

his

party,

came over

and about

to

see

us.

miles to another

ford,

which we

found,

upon examination,

to

be

bottom

was very uneven

too

deep.

The

and filled with

after

to rest towards

if

time would

the

permit

of

it.

end

of

us,

1

our journey,

than

at

the

I his

old

sell

look

savage

had tried

to

make him-

as

respectable as possible, and

quicksand.

One squadron crossed,

much difficulty. It was thought to be

too deep to venture

the

train,

and

as

the

commencement

think,

however,

had given

a coloring, with

a

little

ver­

trail led further

 

one day

in

the

that purpose ;

week

should be taken

to '

it relieves

the

teams, and

prepares them anew for their labor.

million,

to

his

grey

profusely

about

his

i>nlv article of

dress

locks,

which

shoulders.

was

a green

hung

His

frock

up the river, the colonel

with

the

two

guides,

Lieut.

Frost

and

myself, followed

it about thirteen miles

Today five buffalo were seen. When

first

discovered they were running

from

coat,

not

to

his

of

the latest cut, that

ankles,

and

on

his

reached

shoulder

to where it crossed, leaving the command

at the middle ford, where they made their

for

the river

toward

across

our

the bluffs.

It

road,

and

making

created, as might

were an old pair of epaulettes that looked

is

if

they

had

seen

some service.

encampment

bottom of

the

the night.

upper

ford

Finding the

much more

have been expected,

a

very

great

excit­

ment ; from the highest to the lowest

all

the

seemed

chase,

to

be desirous

of

and

it

was

with

joining

in

some

diffi­

His

leggings, which were of

grey cloth,

were a substitute for pantaloons.

To

complete

his costume, his

cap was

made of

grizzly bear-skin, with

a

long

even, and less quicksand, we determined

to cross

at this

place, and

returned

again

to camp, which we reached at seven

o'clock

p.

m.,

in

time

to

get

clear

of

a

severe thunder storm that was fast gath­

culty that they were prevented.

Several

of

the officers

and

men

gave

chase, and some came up with them,

commenced. One of

the

red

feather,

supported

plate

from

in

his

front,

and

a

neck, made

by

a large

brass

medal

suspended

in

1809, with

the

ering.

June 13—Our tents were left to dry,

which prevented us from getting off early

when the firing

   

likeness

of

President

 

Madison

on

one

 

buffalo

was

singled

out,

circuitous

route,

received

and,

an

taking

a

additional

fire

as

he passed

towards the rear,

and

before being brought

to bay

small

troop

in

pursuit

of

there

him.

was

a

He

at

last came to a stand,

and

although

writh­

ing with

make at

pain,

he would

now

the nearest

horseman

and

then

who was

side. To

take

the whole group

together,

with

him at

the

head, would have been a

scene for

any painter ; for

all of

attempts

at

dress

this exceeded

any

I

seen among Indians. He

felt,

have ever

no doubt,

that he was dressed for the occasion; and

we should have felt ourselves highly hon­

ored

although

it

did

afford

us

a

little

this morning.

The divisions left at seven,

eight, and nine o'clock, making an hour

between each.

We proceeded to the upper

crossing, where we found that

the river

had

risen a

few

inches during the night.

This was much against us, being already

too high

to

risk the trains.

The

colonel's carriage was sent over,

and

reached

the

side

without

disposed

to

approach

him.

One

of

the

soldiers attacked him sword in hand, giv­

ing him

a blow

over

the head,

really

thought

any

made upon him.

impression

as

if

he

could be

I think I counted sixteen mounted men

amusement. This was the celebrated

Queue

de

Boeus, one of

from the plains.

the Sioux chiefs

These Indians were very anxious to let

us know

their

great

whites, and expressed

friendship

for

much pleasure

the

at

much difficulty.

opposite

We next tried

a loaded

wagon, drawn by six mules, which was

nearly one hour getting over.

here is

1,090 yards

wide, and

The river

I

began to

think at one time that the wagon would

not

reach the opposite bank

in

safety.

who, with revolvers, kept up a regular

fire

on this poor

animal. All seemed to be

eager of

having the satisfaction

of

say­

ing that

the}- had shot

the)'

were not

successful

at

a buffalo,

if

enough

to

kill

seeing so many white warriors. They

were very inquisitive in wishing to know

how far we had come, where we were

going, and how long we would be travel­

ing, and

ended

their

visit,

as

is

usual

After

this,

I

had

10 mules attached

to

each wagon, and half the supply train

driven

in at

one time ; and as long as the

leading wagon kept moving, the rest fol­

lowed very well, and got across much

nne. Lieut. Lindsay

at

to the ground,

and had

ing the victor.

last brought

the credit

of

him

be­

among them, by asking for provisions and

a

few presents,

which the Colonel gave

them. This was a war party who had been

better than anyone had supposed.

June IS—We left our encampment this

morning at five o'clock, crossing the "di­

June 11—A short lime before stopping

in pursuit of the Pawnees.

 

vide" between the

forks.

This

is

a

high

for

the

evening

we

saw

on

the oppo­

June 12—The night was cloudy, and the

level prairie, until you approach near the

site

side

of

the river

an encampment of

morning quite chilly. The command left

Platte, where you strike

Ash

Hollow, a

Sioux,

who

immediately

struck

their

at six o'clock, and traveled about twelve

 

(Continued on Page Fourteen)

 

Fort Laramie in 1849

Page

Five

Knobby

Plugs the Shoots

"K NOBB Y KNOWLK S

gave an

 

experimental puff

at

his

bat­

tered briar pipe, flicked the

burnt match toward the cuspidor—which,

as every

soldier

knows,

is

not

a recep­

tacle

for

match

 

sticks,

cigarette

butts

or

tobacco

ash

but

is merely

placed

to

indicate

the

general

direction

in

which

such tilings should

be thrown—and

leaned back against the wall.

 
 

"It' s

all

right

for

you

young

fellows

to

scoff

at

such

things,"

he

said,

"bill

none

of

you ever

went through

a

cam­

paign like

the

one

I'm

telling about.

I

claim

them

Filipinos are about

as

slick

as

any

Indian

ever

was."

 

Since

an

argument

on

the

compara­

tive

cunning

of

the

American

Indian

and the Filipino had

 

involved

them,

the

men

in

the

recrea­

tion

room

consider­

ed

it

decidedly

im­

proper

to get

up and

leave with many

glances

and

mum­

blings

of

disgust—

their

usual

custom

when

Knowlks be­

gan

one

of

his out­

rageous

peeps

into

the past.

Therefore

and

also

because

they

were

one

and

all unwilling to con­

ced e

th e mselvcs

beaten

without

 

a

struggle,

they

set­

 

tled

themselves

 

as

comfortably

 

as

pos­

 

sible—albeit

with

a

longing look

or

two

 

at

the

door—to

lis­

ten

as

the

old cam­

paigner unfolded his

yarn.

 

"I

 

*

*

*

 

"Knobby," said Bill Harriso n one day,

"I'm

getting

terribly

tired

of

pork

and

beans, and

beans and pork.

Seems like

we'll

all

turn

into a legume

if

we don't

get

a change

 

of

diet

soon.

I

know we

can't get any supplies

from

the base

un­

til

the

Army

comes along to chase them

clanged

Igorrotes

away,

but

I'd

rathe r

take

a long chance at a bolo than tur n into

a

bean !

What' s more, the other

fellows

feel

just

like

 

I

do

and

there's gonna be

mutiny or something like that if

we don't

get

something

else

to

eat !"

 

"Sh-h-h, "

I

cautioned.

 

"I've

thought

of that.

I'm

going to

slip away

tonight

and try

for

some fish

in

the

river. "

 
 

"Good

Lord! "

he

whispered.

"Don't

let

the

C.

O.

hear

you.

You know he's

ordered

everyone

to

stay

in

camp

ex­

cept

the

sentries

 

and

patrols. "

 

Page Six

 
 

By

JA Y BIRI>

 

"I know

it,"

I

agreed,

"but

something

has

got

to

be done

or

this

whole

outfit

wdl

run

amuck."

 

My company had

been left

 

in

an

out­

lying district

in Luzon

to hold

the

great

native population in check—just

as man)'

other companies and detachments were

doing elsewhere.

Unfortunately

for

us

the district through

which all

our

com­

munication with headquarters and the

base of

supply

passed

had broken

loose

again and a white man's life wasn't worth

a Yerilhin dime. The detachment of

thirty

men

in

that

section,

so

our

scouts

had informed

us, had been surprised

and

slaughtered by Igorrot e headhuntcrs who

now were having a wonderful time play­

ing catch

or

football

with their

victims'

stuck

a

cork into

the

end

of each

bamboo shoot­

thinktanks.

Such

innocent

 

pastimes

as

that didn't

arouse

no

enthusiasm

what­

ever

 

in

our

ranks ;

there was much

too

good a chance to become subject

to simi­

lar attentions ourselves.

 

As

yet

we

hadn't

seen

a

single

sign

of

a hostile

native, but

there

was

no tell­

ing when

they would

take

it

into their

heads

to

conic after

ours.

So

the

C.

O.

had

ordered

us

all

to

stay

 

within

the

camp, which

was only

a hundred

yards

from

a broad

river

and

close to enemy

territory ,

 

lest

a

bolo

should

reach

out

from

 

behind

a tree

and

cut us loose

from

the

ground—that

is,

with

the

exception

of

a

few

sentries

close to

the camp

and

one

or

two

strong

patrols

 

farther

out

to

make

 

certain

the

jungle

was

kept

clear

 

of

lurking

kris

or

bolo

wielders.

So anyone

caught

outside of

the sentry-

lines

was due

for

a court

martial or se­

vere company

punishment, unless some

highminded

and

conscientious

soldier

should mow him down with a bullet on

general

principles.

Which

would,

in

it­

self,

be an effective

way

to escape pun­

ishment, but would likely end all interest

in

future

events.

 

Nevertheless, I was determined to take

the

chance to obtain

an addition

to

our

diet,

for

since

the

outbreak

in

the

ad­

joining distric t

we had

run out

of

every­

thing edible but

many

slabs of

pork and

bags of beans.

Anyway, since Bill Har­

rison was due

for

a tour

of

sentry duty,

I

could slip away easily.

Bill had quite

an outfit

of

tackle,

and

being an

invet­

erate

fisherman

always carried

it about

with

him.

There

were

rolls

of

fine

silken

line,

a

lot

of

sinkers and

fifty

or

more

small

corks to

be

used

as bobbers.

Ther e

was

no

pole

but that

was

not an

obstacle

since

one

could

be

cut

from

the

nearest

bamboo

thicket.

 

So

that

night I

set out, carrying the

whole outfit, slipped

past

Bill's

post and

made

for

the

river.

Ther e

I crawled out

on

the limb of

a tree

that

hung

low

and

far

out

over

the

water, deciding there

was

no

need

of

a

pole,

and

soon

had

two

or

three

lines

baited

and

looking

for

fish.

I t

wasn't

long

before

I

had

quite a string of beauties, since they were

awful

hungry,

but

suddenly,

happening

to glance up,

I

lost

all interest

in fishing.

 

For

over

on the opposite

bank a near­

ly naked

savage had sneaked

softly

out

of

the

jungle,

swiftly

scanned

my

side

of

the

river,

and

abruptly

disappeared

just

as

a patr.ol

pissed

through the trees

behind me.

After

the soldiers had gone

on

out

of

sight he sneaked

out

again

this

time

accompanied

by

 

another

na­

tive.

The two searched

the other

shore

with

their

eyes, not

noticing me appar­

ently,

because

of

the

faint

light

of

the

moon

and

the

leaves

hanging

all

about

me.

Then

one

of

them

waved

a

hand

toward

the jungle

and twenty

or

thirty

others,

carryin g

long,

gleaming

bolos,

and longer pieces of bamboo cane, glided

down to the waters ' edge.

{Continued on Page Fifteen)

War Medals Await Missing Heroes

N IN E

bits of bronze and colored rib­

manding General, AEF , January 10, 1919.

Residence at time of enlistment: Detroit,

Mich. Emergency address: John J.

Mason, Toledo, Ohio. Reason for non­

delivery—can not locate any relative.

Oklahoma—Shaw nee

O'Brien, Frank, private, Company B,

33rd Infantry, United States Volunteers.

Posthumously awarded citation for gallan­

try in action in the Philippine Insurrec­

nogh,

County

Clare,

Ireland.

Address

bon and one silver star lie in the safe

given at time of discharge: 320 9th Ave.,

New York City. Later address shown as

Hotel Asbestos, Manville, N. J.

Michigan—Detroit

Pollan, Clayton R., captain, Section 537,

Ambulance Service. Awarded French

Medaille d'Honneur des Epidemies. Resi­

dence at time of enlistment: 220 May

Ave., Ft. Smith, Ark. Emergency ad­

of The Adjutant General in Wash ­

ington, awaiting the call of six heroes and

the parents of

four

others who fell on the

field of battle.

Of

all the

thousands of

awards for valor and distinguished serv­

ice in time of war only these ten have

been so far undelivered and the reason

is that their owners cannot be located.

Only

four

of

the

decorations

arc

tion, by the War Department, August 8,

dress : N. R. Pollan, father, same address.

American. The men to whom these have

been awarded will never wear them

for

1924. Residence at enlistment: San An­

tonio, Texas. Emergency address : George

Address given on December 30, 1924, as

708 Peterboro St., Detroit, Mich.

they earned the tokens

of

heroism with

Olden, cousin, Shawnee, Oklahoma. Rea­

Montana—Butte

 

their

lives.

But

the parents

or

nearest

son for non-delivery—can not locate any

Carle,

George

A.—No.

2261524,

ser­

relatives of

the dead

heroes have a

right

to the decorations

and

no

stone

will

be

relative.

geant. Company L, 362nd Infantry, 91st

Division. Diploma for the award of the

Belgian

Croix de Guerre.

Residence at

left

unturned by the Army recruiters tn

locate

them.

Strenuous

 

efforts

are

to

enlistment :

37

East

Broadway, Buttc.

address:

Charles

be made

to

locate the

six

other

heroes

 

Montana.

Emergency

also.

If

they hiv e moved

from

the

ad­

Carle, brother,

3236

Sanders

street,

dresses

given

on

enlistment

papers