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Brick masonry

BRICKS
Size
Bonding
Quality
Free from flaws
Frogs
Joints
Raise
Continous
Cure
Bond Rules
Brick Quality
Bondage
Brick bats
Vertical joints
Centre line of Header and stretcher
Use of stretcher
Terms
Stretcher
Header
Closer
Queen Closer
King Closer
Bevelled closer
Bat
Types of Bonding
Stretcher bond
Header bond
English bond
Single Flemish bond
Double Flemish bond
Garden Wall bonds
English Garden Wall bonds
Flemish Garden Wall bonds
Facing bond
Dutch bond
Raking bond
Herring bone bond
Diagonal bond
Zig zag bond
English cross bond
Brick on edge or soldier course
Bonds in columns
Bonds at junctions
Stretcher bond
Header bond
English bond
Single Flemish bond & Double Flemish
bond
Garden Wall bonds
English Garden Wall bonds

Flemish Garden Wall bonds


Dutch bond
Raking bond
Herring bone bond

Diagonal bond
Zig zag bond
English cross bond
Advantages

The use of material such as bricks and stones can


increase the thermal mass of a building.
Most types of masonry typically will not require painting
and so can provide a structure with reduced life-cycle
costs.
Masonry is very heat resistant and thus provides good
fire protection.
Masonry walls are more resistant to projectiles, such as
debris from hurricanes or tornadoes.
Masonry structures built in compression preferably with
lime mortar can have a useful life of more than 500 years
as compared to 30 to 100 for structures of steel or
reinforced concrete
Disadvantages

Extreme weather causes degradation of masonry


wall surfaces due to frost damage. This type of
damage is common with certain types of brick,
though rare with concrete blocks.
Masonry tends to be heavy and must be built upon a
strong foundation, such as reinforced concrete, to
avoid settling and cracking.
Save for concrete, masonry construction does not
lend itself well to mechanization, and requires more
skilled labor than stick-framing.
Brick masonry is construction in which uniform
units ("bricks"), small enough to be placed with one
hand, are laid in courses with mortar joints to form
walls.
Bricks are kiln baked from various clay and shale
mixtures. The chemical and physical characteristics
of the ingredients vary considerably.
These characteristics and the kiln temperatures
combine to produce brick in a variety of colors and
harnesses.
In some regions, individual pits yield clay or shale
which, when ground and moistened, can be formed
and baked into durable brick. In other regions, clay
or shale from several pits must be mixed.