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CHAPTER 1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

Introduction

Managing students behavior has been a great challenge and

concern of teachers and parents. Schools have faced the challenges

related to disruptive and antisocial students behavior such as

fighting, verbal abuse, bullying, rule violation and destruction of

school property (Osher, Bear,Spague and Doyle, 2010). Their

disruptive behavior could hamper the atmosphere for teaching and

learning in school; and could lead to loss of time for classroom

learning, threaten school safety and ruin students chances of

becoming successful in their academic pursuit and life in general.

Osher, Bear, Spague and Doyle, (2010) identified teacher

burnout as one of the effects of disruptive behavior of students. For

a school to be very productive and effective, the discipline of both

the learners and educators are very important. A problem on

discipline may affect the activities that go on in the school and in

turn the outcome is hampered. Blomberge (2012) expressed that

school that is safe, supportive and gives an opportunity for children

to learn and grow is a top concern for everyone in education. Over

the past 30 years, numerous studies have been conducted globally on

the effects of physical punishment predicting negative outcomes

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throughout childhood and adulthood. It increases the childrens risk

for increased aggression, increased delinquency and anti-social

behavior, physical injury and child welfare. Classes are the most

important inthe educational processes because all educational events

take place there.

Kiumi, Bosire and Sang (2009) also stated that the learning

outcome of a school depends on the quality of students discipline

because it gives direction to learners. Working with students is a

never-ending process. Teachers truly care about their students and

want to provide them with the best possible learning experiences.

However, unlike some professionals, educators have difficulty

gaining a sense of satisfaction from what they do. Teachers can

never be satisfied that a pupil has reached his or her optimal level.

The teacher must always strive to improve each pupils situation. No

wonder teaching is such a demanding profession and one where the

teacher finds it extremely hard to close the classroom door at four in

the afternoon and forget about school until the next morning.

Teachers play a vital role in shaping the lives of the students. How

we treat them in school could have a lasting effect; whether positive

or negative.

The Department of Education promotes positive discipline in

teaching as the new way of managing students misbehavior instead

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of corporal punishments. The Department Education implements the

DepEd Child Protection Policy against corporal punishment, defined

in United Nations Committee, as any punishment in which physical

force is used and intended to cause some degree of pain and

discomfort. In the Philippines, the Department of Education aims to

put an end to the practice of corporal punishment and other

humiliating and degrading forms of punishment. It has been

consistently demonstrated that corporal punishment predicts

negative outcomes to students and increases students risks for

increased aggression, increased delinquency, anti-social behavior,

physical injury, lower self-esteem and poorer academic success.

Hence, positive discipline supports student development and

respects their right to healthy development, protection from violence

and active participation in their learning. It is a must to perform the

duties as teachers with full awareness of the consequences of their

action where the lives of the learners depend on. Thus, this research

study seeks to proposed copings styles and management strategies

that promote positive behavior.

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Statement of the Problem

1. What is the profile of the teachers respondent in terms of:


1.1 Grade Level
1.2 Years of Service

2. What are the indicators of pupils misbehavior in class?


3. What are the different coping styles and management
strategies in dealing with pupils misbehavior in the class?
4. How the different strategies are described in terms of
effectiveness?
5. Is there a significant difference in management strategies of
teachers in terms of:
5.1 Grade Level
5.2 Years of Service

Significance of the Study

This study may be essential to the public schools to develop

seminar and program for teachers. Moreover, it may also be

essential for teachers in the public schools in identifying the

different misbehavior of pupils inside the classroom, coping styles

and management strategies and effectiveness of strategies.

Furthermore it may also be beneficial for future researchers to

explore various aspects of behavior management. Lastly, the

different coping styles and management strategies on pupils

misbehavior in the class.

Scope and Limitation

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This study focused on the pupils coping styles and the

effectiveness of the management strategies in a selected elementary

school in Pasay City. The respondents of this study were fifty (50)

public elementary teachers. The questionnaire was consists of three

(3) categories with items related to: different pupils misbehavior

consist of (20) items, coping styles and management strategies (10)

items and effectiveness of strategies consist of (5) items.

Definition of Terms

Terms here are conceptually and operationally defined for

better understanding of the readers.

Assertive Discipline - is an approach to classroom management

developed by Lee and Marlene Canter; involves a high level of

teacher control in the class; is also called the "take-control"

approach to teaching, as the teacher controls their classroom in a

firm but positive manner.

Behaviour management - is a process that guides people to change

their actions within a specific context; is usually used to change

negative behaviors and habits such as those that occur in education

and behavioral health.

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Behavior modification - is a treatment approach, based on the

principles of operant conditioning that replaces

undesirable behaviors with more desirable ones through positive or

negative reinforcement.

Classroom Management - is a term used by teachers to describe the

process of ensuring that classroom lessons run smoothly despite

disruptive behaviour by students; also implies the prevention of

disruptive behaviour.

Misbehaviour - are the actions of someone who is behaving wrong

that distracts a teacher and other pupils from learning.

Preventive approaches is an approach to classroom management

involve creating a positive classroom community with mutual

respect between teacher and student.

Reactive Strategies - are interventions which are used only once the

behavior occurs; are consequences (or reactions) to the behavior; to

cut short the behavior, to minimize the damage.

Positive Behaviour - is a behavior that tends to satisfy the desire of

the respondent.

CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

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Foreign Literature

Teachers Role in Classroom Situation

Edmonson (2012) considered teachers themselves occupy an

important position/role in the educational system considering that

their responsibility essentially pertains to the efficient and effective

teaching and classroom management. Teachers reutilized the details

and mechanics of classroom management. Routines should look

upon as definitely contributing to the education of the student. The

management of the classroom provides great variety of tasks which

pupils can do so as to get practice in cooperation, acceptance of

responsibility and in many character traits that presumably have

carry-over values.

Emmer and Stough (2012) claimed that in any school room

situation, the way the teacher organize the situation is of crucial

importance, it affects what the pupils learn, how rapidly they learn,

and how they used what they learn. The more learning situation

meets the childrens interest and satisfies their present and future

needs, the more likely it is to be effective. Ordinarily, to make

instruction meaningful and to fulfil the interest and needs of the

children, the teacher must have available and rich supply of

instructional materials on how a teacher manages their practices is

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important for it helps the pupil become reasonably proficient in

skills.

Cantors (n.d.) believed that as a teacher, you have the right to

determine what is best for your students, and to expect compliance.

No pupil should prevent you from teaching, or keep another student

from learning. Student compliance is imperative in creating and

maintaining an effective and efficient learning environment. To

accomplish this goal, teachers must react assertively, as opposed to

aggressively or non-assertively.

Houghton, et.al, (2010) realized that teachers' conditional

praising is one of the effective elements in making the students

interested in doing the educational activities and exercises. He also

depicted in their inquiry that when teacher's praising and

appreciation of the student is increased at an individual level,

positive effects are seen on the student's behavioral and educational

performance. The adaptability of the teacher-student relation and

selecting a suitable policy for changing and improving unsuitable

behaviors, has positive impact on the students' attention to the

educational activities system (Parsa, Kyle, Sherrill, et. al., 2009)

Schorling (2011) believed the most teachers have many tasks

in teaching that should be done quickly. One of the most often

neglected phases of teacher s responsibility is that making the

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classroom a pleasant place in which to work. Successful teachers are

usually resourceful in providing an environmental appropriate to the

activities in which the pupils participate. They recognize the

important of giving every classroom a unique personality.

Cantors (n.d) believed that as a teacher, you have the right to

determine what is best for your students, and to expect compliance.

No pupil should prevent you from teaching, or keep another student

from learning. Student compliance is imperative in creating and

maintaining an effective and efficient learning environment. To

accomplish this goal, teachers must react assertively, as opposed to

aggressively or non-assertively.

Evertson and Weinstein (2012) stated that teachers should be

able to use appropriate interventions to assist students with

behaviour problems. The last two actions proposed by Evertson and

Weinstein (2012) indicated that effective behaviour management

improves student learning. Hence, behaviour management is an

ongoing interaction between teachers and their students. Brophy

(2013) presents a similar definition.

Pupils Misbehavior

Jones (2015) defines pupils misbehaviour as any behaviour

that undermines the teachers ability to establish learning experience

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in the classroom. Misbehaviour involves little more than talking,

moving around the room without permission and simply wasting

time. Almost all teachers report that disruptive behaviour interferes

while theyre teaching.

Classrooms with misbehaving students are likely to be

characterized by distractions that inhibit adaptive. Challenging

childrens capacity to regulate their attention and to persist through

difficult tasks. When elevated levels of misbehavior also

compromise perceptions of safety and support, children can become

less engaged in school, less eager to learn, and less able to focus

attention on learning (Brand, Felner , Shim , Seitsinger , & Dumas ,

2013).

Classroom misbehavior may also relate to academic

achievement through teachers instructional practices. The amount

of instruction that students experience during the school day is an

important predictor of learning, and may depend in part on the

behavioral characteristics of children within a classroom (Berliner

2010).

Coping Styles and Mangement Strategies

McManus (2010) suggested tha t the useful coping approach to

pupils misbehavior is to be found by identifying and analyzing

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pupils motives. The correct identification of the causes of pupils

misbehavior can guide teachers to the proper coping styles and

strategies. Some of pupils misbehaviors are the same but can serve

different motives and each pupil may have different purpose from

time to time

Hart and Risley, (2013) believes that one of the most stressful

parts of many teachers professional lives is to find the most

effective management strategies to cause behaviour change and

preventing the increase of classroom misbehaviour. Various

strategies of classroom management have effects on levels of pupils

responsibility and misbehaviour in classes.

This review of literature on Assertive Classroom Discipline is

a key component to successfully educating students. As students

come: from diverse family situations, this can bring challenges

regarding what is socially appropriate in the classroom. Therefore,

this review of literature on Assertive Discipline will investigate how

this method can be implemented in the classroom to promote

positive behavior.

Canter (2010) emphasize providing appropriate feedback and

reinforcement for good behavior. It is the belief of the Canters' that

teachers have the right to make the determination of what is best for

the students in terms of behavior and expect compliance from the

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students. Assertive teachers are those who react confidently and

quickly in situations that require behavior management. These

teachers have a few clearly stated classroom rules and give firm,

clear, concise directions to students who are in need (Carey, 2013).

We need to develop a rapport with our students in order to gain their

confidence and trust. "A good teacher should be able to handle all

social skills on her own and within the confines the classroom".

The Assertive Discipline approach evolves from behavior

modification theory. When you help a student reasons his/her way

towards better behavior now, you are giving the student a valuable

tool for a similar situation in the future (Carlson, 2014). Assertive

Discipline is a behavioral approach to classroom discipline that is

characterized by the direct interaction between the teacher and

student In this approach, the teachers manipulate reinforces,

punishers, and consequences as tools to allow students to use their

own problem solving skills. Jones, (2015)

Classrooms are complex societies where students and teachers

live and interact with each other. Teachers are the leaders of these

societies and the way they exercise their behavior management

abilities greatly affect the quality of interactions that take place

between teachers and students as well as the interactions that take

place between and among the students themselves. These

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interactions have a great impact on the academic growth of the

students assigned to a given teacher's classroom. Teachers have

varied opinions regarding what they believe are effective techniques

for managing children's behavior in a classroom setting. In fact,

behaviour management may be the most discussed topic among

teachers at all grade levels and career stages. A number of studies

suggest that a direct link exists between teachers' ability to manage

classroom behavior and their students' learning. For example,

Baugous and Bendery (2014) suggested students are on task more in

classrooms that have fewer management problems; it has been

reported that such management problems tend to distract both

teachers and students making it difficult for either to focus on

learning experiences. Behaviour management is about creating

inviting and appealing environments for student learning. Behaviour

management strategies are tools that the teachers can use to help

create such an environment, ranging from activities to improve

teacher-student relationships to rules to regulate student behaviour.

Only when the efforts of management fail should teachers have to

resort to reactive, controlling strategies. Therefore, it is important

to distinguish between preventive and reactive classroom

management strategies. That is, there is a difference between

strategies used to prevent behaviour problems and strategies used to

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respond to problem behaviour. The establishment of rules and

procedures and favourable teacher-student relationships are

considered preventive strategies, whereas disciplinary interventions

such as giving warnings or punishments are considered reactive

strategies. Although it is generally assumed that preventive

strategies are more effective than reactive strategies, reactive

strategies are sometimes needed to reduce disruptive or other

undesired student behaviour when preventive strategies do not work

(Marzano et al., (2013)

Prater(2015) reported, the optimal teaching and learning

environment is one where the teacher puts an emphasis on

preventing misbehavior will likely increase student time-on-task

and, of course, learning. Rimm-Kaufmann, La Paro, Downer,and

Pianta (2010) found that high classroom quality was most

consistently related to a low number of misbehavior problems.

Additionally, management problems can affect the amount and

quality of interactions in the classroom. It has been reported that

teachers are less apt to have positive interactions with behaviorally

challenging students and even avoid contact with these students as

stress levels increase Abidin and Kmetz, (2011) classic work

described a similar type of teacher behavior as retreating; that is,

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the teacher failed to react when students' violated previously written

or stated rules for conduct.

Teachers play a fundamental role in the cognitive and social-

emotional development of children by giving them the opportunity

to learn. Effective management strategies set the stage for this

learning. Without it, classrooms are disorganized and chaotic, and

very little academic learning can happen. Elias and Schwab, 2013).

Teachers must establish order, engage students, or elicit their

cooperation in order to create a classroom environment in which

students learn, and which the teacher can manage (Burden, 2003).

The importance of management strategies are widely documented

indicating that teachers' effective managing of students' behavior

and learning is critical to achieving positive educational outcomes.

Evertson and Weinstein, (2012).

Effective behavior management requires more than actions

taken to create and maintain a learning environment conducive to

successful instruction. Because it is a complex social,

psychological, and emotional process, involving interactions and

relationships between teachers and students, management strategies

also includes establishing personal relationships with students and

working within them. Teachers' behavior management is usually

described in terms of punishments for inappropriate behavior and,

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less frequently, in terms of recognition and rewards for good

behavior. (Lewis, 2013)

Reupert and Woodcock (2010) suggested the reward strategies

(e.g. stickers) after student's desirable behavior, preventive

strategies to avoid the occurrence of behavioral issues (e.g.,

establishing routines, seating arrangements, and class rules), initial

correction strategies that include actions involving mild or low

intrusive correction responses (e.g., proximity control, signaling,

and directive statements , and later correction strategies that are

more assertive and forceful steps (e.g., time out and behavioral

contracts).

However, there are many management styles, and in this

sense, a classroom is a small organization whose management is

dictated not only by the teacher the direct manager but also by

school policies, cultural codes, and requirements set forth by the

educational system. And while there are methods that have been

proven effective frontal instruction and various behavioral

techniques they may not be consistent with a teacher's personality

and educational view. Overall, teachers' ideas of best management

practice involve significantly more empowerment of students than is

currently the case in classrooms. They prefer to utilize fewer control

methods such as rules, rewards, and consequences, and seek to

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manage classrooms by organizing students to make their own

decisions or by influencing each student to decide to behave well.

However, when asked about their everyday classroom experience,

teachers mentioned factors that inhibit them from implementing

their ideas of best disciplinary practice. Lewis and Burman,(2015)

For many teachers, dealing with student misbehavior in the

classroom takes up a considerable proportion of teaching time,

which in turn affects the quality of the students learning

characteristics and behaviors affect the classrooms in which they

learn, as well as their experiences within these contexts. The

behavioral characteristics of classmates may affect an individual

childs achievement-related behaviors, the amount, structure, and

type of instruction the child receives. Creemers and Reezigt,( 2011)

Local Literature

Teachers Role in Classroom Situation

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Lardizabal (2014) believed the most teachers have many tasks

in teaching that should be done quickly. One of the most often

neglected phases of teacher s responsibility is that making the

classroom a pleasant place in which to work. Successful teachers are

usually resourceful in providing an environmental appropriate to the

activities in which the pupils participate. They recognize the

important of giving every classroom a unique personality

Salonga (2014) claimed that in any school room situation, the

way the teacher organize the situation is of crucial importance, it

affects what the pupils learn, how rapidly they learn, and how they

used what they learn. The more learning situation meets the

childrens interest and satisfies their present and future needs, the

more likely it is to be effective. Ordinarily, to make instruction

meaningful and to fulfill the interest and needs of the children, the

teacher must have available and rich supply of instructional

materials on how a teacher manages their practices is important for

it helps the pupil become reasonably proficient in skills.

In the Philippines, the issue of discipline in the classroom

continues to surface as one of the most challenging problems in

education today. Schools are not typically equipped

to deal withmoderate to severe behavioral problem, and many teache

rs feelunprepared to address the myriad challenges students bring to

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class. Todays classrooms are much more complicated than in years

past because some students do not respect teachers, more

studentscome to school with behavioral problems than ever before a

ndteachers are not sufficiently trained to deal with todays

behavioral problems. ( Amparo, 2012)

The teacher holds a fundamental and greater task of

teaching values and sufficient knowledge of transforming everylearn

er to become educationally inclined and globally competitive

the students are the core of the educative process and must

need effective and efficient teachers and school administrators in

promoting.good/quality/education./This implies that students need te

achers guidance and supervision in the classroom in achieving their

goals. Teachers have to consider issues such as students

backgrounds, interests and the most suitable teaching methods.

Teachers should also provide best learning environment such as a

warm, cooperative, relaxed atmosphere and suitable materials for

the students so that they can easily acquire the topic. Without strong

behaviormanagementits very difficult for students to thrive academi

cally and socially in a non-stimulating environment. ( Cruz, 2013)

18
Pupils Misbehavior

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Pupils misbehaviors such as disruptive talking, chronic

avoidance of work, clowning, interfering with teaching activities,

harassing classmates, verbal insults, rudeness to teacher, defiance,

and hostility , ranging from infrequent to frequent, mild to severe, is

a thorny issue in everyday classroom. Teachers usually reported that

these disturbing behaviors in the classroom are intolerable and

stress-provoking, and they had to spend a great deal of time and

energy to manage the classroom. Obviously, student misbehaviors

retard the smoothness and effectiveness of teaching and also impede

the learning of the student and his/her classmates. (Santos, 2014)

Inside classroom, it is also valuable to identify the common ones

and the disruptive ones from the teachers perspectives. Existing

research findings showed that, among various types of student

problem behaviors, talking out of turn, hindering others, and

idleness were commonly reported by teachers as the most frequent

and troublesome misbehaviors (Santos, 2014)

The main reasons for the conflict between teachers and their

students were the existence of poor and insufficient communication

between.the,parties,involved /and/teacher dominance in such interact

ions. It is revealed that inappropriate conflict solving strategies

negatively affect the students psychology, social behavior as well

as their academic success. It is absolutely necessary to manage the

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teacher.student.conflict.correctly.in.order.to.create.a positive school

climate and conduct the education process effectively ( Lardizabal,

2014)

Coping Styles and Mangement Strategies

The necessity of classroom management is an inevitable task

that teachers will have to acquire if they intend to have well

managed classrooms free from disruptions. Teachers need toundersta

nd that the basis teaching depends on effectivelymanaging the

classroom and ensuring that lessons are presented smoothly. To

continue teaching without attending to disruptive behavior is a

purposeless teaching discourse since no effective learning is

possible. Section 4 of the Republic Act No. 0566 states that DepEd

and in collaboration with relevant partners shall conduct teacher

education and training programs to meet the demands for quality

teachers and school leaders and the standards of the curriculum.

However, only few teachers are given trainings and seminars in

managing a classroom. (Tangko, 2012)

Teachers enter the profession with little or no coursework

concerning effective management of student behavior. Thus, it is not

surprising that teachers identify classroom management as a

primary concern. This problem requires instructional support and

training in classroom management to be more equipped with the

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needed.information.Effective teaching and learning cannot take plac

e in apoorly managed classroom.If students are disorderly anddisres

pectful, and no apparent rules and procedures guidebehavior, the

classroom will be full of complete chaos. In these situations,

both.teachers.and.students ,suffer.Teachers.struggles .to teach and stu

dents most likely learn much less than.they should. Well

managed classrooms provide an environment in which teaching and

learning can flourish. (Amparo, 2012)

Theoretical Framework

Assertive discipline is a structured, systematic approach

designed to assist educators in running an organized, teacher-in-

charge classroom environment. Lee and Marlene Canter (2010),

when consulting for school systems, found out that many teachers

were unable to manage the undesirable behavior that occurred in

their classrooms. Based on their investigation and the foundations

of assertiveness training and applied behavior analysis, they

developed a common sense, easy-to-learn approach to help teachers

become the captains of their classrooms and positively influence

their students' behavior. Today, it is the most widely used behavior

management program in the world. The teacher has the right to

determine what is best for your students, and to expect compliance.

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No pupil should prevent teachers from teaching, or keep another

student from learning. Student compliance is imperative in creating

and maintaining an effective and efficient learning environment. To

accomplish this goal, teachers must react assertively, as opposed to

aggressively or non-assertively.

Assertive teachers react confidently and quickly in

situations that require the management of student behavior. They

are supported by a few clearly stated classroom rules that have been

explained, practiced, and enforced consistently. They give firm,

clear, concise directions to students who are in need of outside

guidance to help them behave appropriately. Students who comply

are reinforced, whereas those who disobey rules and directions

receive negative consequences. Additionally, educators have the

right to request and expect assistance from parents and

administrators in their efforts. Assertive discipline provides

strategies for gaining this support. For example, to gain the support

of administration, write your rules, positive consequences, and a list

of penalties. The list of negative consequences moves from official

warning/cease-and-desist order, to removal from the classroom. In

between are sequentially more punitive outcomes for failure to

comply with the teacher direction. More than being a director,

assertive teachers build positive, trusting relationships with their

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students and teach appropriate classroom behavior (direct

instruction, describing, modelling, practicing, reviewing,

encouraging, and rewarding) to those who don't show it at present.

They are demanding, yet warm in interaction; supportive of the

youngsters; and respectful in tone and mannerisms when addressing

misbehavior. Assertive teachers listen carefully to what their

students have to say, speak politely to them, and treat everyone

fairly but not necessarily equally.

Canter discovered that lack of training teachers on discipline

techniques is part of the problem why indiscipline is on the rise in

schools. This prompted him to study how effectively teachers deal

with student behavior. He found that the master teachers were

assertive; they taught students how to behave. They established

clear rules for the classroom, they communicated those rules to

students and they taught the students how to follow them. They also

have mastery of skills in positive reinforcement, and they praise

every student at 10 least once a day. Assertive teachers believe in

their abilities and their rights, they are firm and take charge of their

classroom in the best interest of learners. They know how and when

to instill good behavior. Finally when students choose to break the

rules, these teachers used firm and consistent negative

consequences- but only as a last resort.

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The key ideas of Canter s Theory (2010) is that the students

have the right and need a caring educator who will provide warmth,

attention and support. Educators also have rights; they must teach in

an environment that is conducive to learning and enjoy support from

both parents and learners. Canter believes that teachers have the

right to determine what is best for the learners and they expect them

to comply. He emphasizes on teachers using rules and consequences

which are stated clearly for students to understand. The rules should

be specific and easily understood by learners. No student has the

right to prevent a teacher from teaching or keep a fellow learner

from learning. Therefore, students compliance helps to create and

maintain an effective and efficient learning environment (Canter,

2010)

Thus teachers must be assertive and communicate their needs

freely. In explaining this further Canter and Canter (2010) express

that teachers have the educational rights in their classrooms to

establish optimal learning environments, to request and expect

appropriate behavior from students and also receive help from

administrators and parents when it is needed. Students on the other

hand have the basic rights to have teachers who help to limit 11

inappropriate behavior and the right to choose how to behave

understanding fully what the consequences of their action will be.

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Canter and Canter (2010) stated that Learners have the right to an

educator who will be firm, consistent, provide positive

encouragement and motivate good behavior. Learners also have the

right to learning that calmly and consistently enforces rules of

conduct to learning where an educator makes calm but firm

declarations. To achieve discipline at the time it occurred teachers

need to have a plan to make learners responsible for their behavior

and its consequences. An assertive educator responds to a childs

misbehavior by communicating that clearly to the child by

disapproval of such behavior and then stating to the child what is

required of him/her to do. Assertive discipline includes;

identification of expected behaviors, expressive affirmation or

disapproval of behavior, use of firm tone of voice, maintain eye

contact, use non-verbal gestures in support of verbal statements and

be assertive in confrontations with students (Canter, 1996). Teachers

in practicing assertive discipline should set limits and

consequences, use follow-up procedures that are consistent and ask

school administrator and parents for support in an effort to help

students.

Conceptual framework

The conceptual framework shows the variables of the study.

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Coping Styles
Pupils' and
Management Effectiveness
Misbehaviour Strategies on of Behaviour
in the Pupils' Management
Classroom Misbehaviour Strategies
( Assertive
Discipline
Theory)
Figure 1. Conceptual Framework

Figure 1 the relationship of pupils misbehaviour in the class

is the problem or the basis of the study. The coping styles and

management strategies on pupils misbehaviour guided by the

assertive discipline theory ( Canters and Canters, 2010) as the

process or a way to solve the problem; and the effectiveness of

behaviour management strategies to identify the effectiveness of the

coping styles and management strategies on the pupils

misbehaviour.

CHAPTER III

METHODOLOGY

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This chapter discussed the procedures used in this study. This

chapter includes the research design, research locale, population and

sampling, research instruments and techniques, data gathering

procedure and data analysis procedure.

Research Design

This study used quantitative and qualitative methods. A

survey method in the form of structured questionnaire was used to

identify the indicators of pupils misbehaviour in the classroom, the

coping styles and management strategies and the effectiveness of the

strategies.

The quantitative research techniques used the 4- point Scale

to determine the pupils misbehavior in the classroom, coping styles

and management strategies and the effectiveness of the strategies.

The qualitative method, used interviews to also explore the pupils

misbehavior in the classroom, the coping styles and management

strategies and the effectiveness of the strategies.

Research Locale

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This study was conducted in Kalayaan Elementary School

located at Kalayaan Village, Pasay City.

Population and Sampling

The respondents of the survey included fifty (50) public

elementary school teachers . However, six teachers only were

interviewed to determine the pupils misbehavior in the classroom,

coping styles and management strategies and the effectiveness of the

strategies.

Research Instruments and Techniques

The instruments used in this study included the 4-point Scale

survey and semi structured interviews questionnaires, as the

primary tools in gathering data. The main purpose of the survey and

the interview was to identify the misbehavior of the pupils in the

classroom, the coping styles and management strategies of the

strategies and the effectiveness of the strategies.

Data Analysis

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The researchers carefully analyzed and interpreted the data

gathered in this study. Frequency and percentage, mean and ANOVA

were used.

Specifically, the following will be used:

1. Frequency and Percentage - refers to the proportion of an

item by 100. This was used to present the profile and number

of respondents doing their corresponding response. The

formula for this is as follows:

a. Wherein: P= Percentage

F= Frequency

i. N = total number of respondents

F
b. P x 100
N

2. Ranking- refers to the percentages arranged from the highest

to the lowest, and the highest percentage will be ranked first.

3. Weighted Mean refers to an average of the total numbers

computed by adding item value and dividing by the total

number. The formula used for the mean is as follows:

fx
X =
n

Wherein: X= weighted mean

X= value of item

n= total number of respondents

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F=frequency

fx = summation of frequency and item value

4point scale- was used to determine the numerical descriptive

rating of each item.

4. ANOVA- used to compare the means of the two variables

(year of service/ grade level)

CHAPTER IV

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PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION


OF DATA

This chapter presented the data analysis and interpretation of

the findings from the given questionnaires of the chosen 50 public

teachers. The sequencing of data was based on the statement of the

problem presented in chapter 1.

Table 4.1 Respondents Profile Based on Grade Level


Grade Level Frequency (f) Percentage %
Grade 1 11 22
Grade 2 6 12
Grade 3 9 18
Grade 4 9 18
Grade 5 8 16
Grade 6 7 14
Total 50 100

Table 4.1 show the respondents of profile based on grade level

handled. The respondents are 50 public teachers from grade levels 1

to 6. There are eleven grade one public teachers; six grade two

public teachers; nine grade three public teachers; nine grade four

public teachers; eight grade five public teachers; and seven grade

six public teachers.

Table 4.2 Respondents Profile Based on Years of Service


Years of Service Frequency (f) Percentage %
5 years and below 3 6

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6-10 years 10 20
11-15 years 16 32
16-20 years 8 16
21 years and above 13 26
Total 50 100

Table 4.2 shows the respondents profile based on years of

service. The respondents are 50 public elementary teachers, profiled

in terms of years of service by 5 years and below, 6-10 years, 11-15

years, 16-20 years, and 21 years and above. There are three public

elementary teachers that served 5 years and below in service; ten

public elementary teachers that served 6-10 years in service; sixteen

public elementary teachers that served 11-15 years in service; eight

public elementary teachers that served 16-20 years in service; and

thirteen public elementary teachers that served 21 years and above

in service.

Table 4.3 Indicators of Pupils Misbehaviour in Class

Weighted
Indicators of Pupils Mean Interpre Ranking
Misbehavior in Class tation
1. The student overpowers 2.32 Rarely 6.5
others in the classroom.
2. The student enters the 1.64 Never 18
classroom screaming.
3. The student sleeps while 1.56 Never 19
the teacher discusses.
4. The students chat with 2.58 Often 4

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one another while the


teacher discusses.
5. The student 1.46 Never 20
unnecessarily argues
with the teacher.
6. The student ignites 2.36 Rarely 5
quarrel among the other
students.
7. The student shouts 2.08 Rarely 11
loudly to create thrill in
the classroom.
8. The student wanders in 1.80 Rarely 16
veranda to diverge other
students attention.
9. The student plays with 2.28 Rarely 8
his or her hands, feet etc.
10. The student uses 1.82 Rarely 15
rough language with
other students and
teacher.
11. The student consistently 2.90 Often 1
reports others for their
misbehavior or mistake.
12. The student 1.70 Never 17
deliberately destroys
things or materials.
13. The student 2.20 Rarely 9
deliberately ignores
teacher directions.
14. The student shifts 2.82 Often 2
from one chair to
another.
15. The student 2.74 Often 3
repeatedly makes
complaints against other
students.

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16. The student pushes 2.1200 Rarely 10


other students inside the
classroom.
17. The student strikes 1.9400 Rarely 12.5
student inside the
classroom.
18. The student does 1.8800 Rarely 14
homework while the
teacher discusses.
19. The student 2.3200 Rarely 7
repeatedly starts to
answer before the teacher
finishes the questions.
20. The student comes 1.9400 Rarely 13
in the classroom
habitually late.
Total Mean 2.12 Rarely
Legend 1=1.00-1.75 (Never), 2= 1.76-2.50 (Rarely), 3=2.51-3.25
(Often), 4=3.26-4.00 ( Very Often)

Table 4.3 shows the indicators of pupils misbehavior in class.

There are four indicators of the pupils misbehavior that teachers

often encountered which include student consistently reporting

others for their misbehavior or mistake which ranked first with a

mean of 2.90; student shifting from one chair to another with a mean

of 2.82; student repeatedly making complaints against other students

with a mean of 2.74; and students chatting with one another while

the teacher discusses with a mean of 2.58.

On the other hand the pupils misbehavior that teachers never

encountered include student deliberately destroying things or

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materials with a mean of 1.70; student entering the classroom

screaming with a mean of 1.64; student sleeping while the teacher

discusses with a mean of 1.56; and student unnecessarily arguing

with the teacher with 1.46 in mean.

Creemers and Reezigt (1996) describe the behavioral

characteristics of the class which may affect an individual childs

achievement-related behaviors, the amount, structure, and type of

instruction the child receives.

Table 4.4 Different Coping Styles and Management Strategies

Weighted
Coping Styles and Mean Interpretatio Ranking
Management Strategies n
Indicators
1. The teacher plans 3.62 Strongly 4
appropriate and Agree
clear
consequences.
2. The teacher 3.36 Strongly 7
consistently Agree

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applies
consequences
with students who
break the rules.
3. The teacher 3.74 Strongly 3
advises parent Agree
know the
classroom rules
and consequences.
4. The teacher 3.80 Strongly 2
organizes class Agree
meeting to discuss
vital behavior
lessons with
students.
5. The teacher 3.60 Strongly 5
listens to the Agree
student to
understand what
make them
believe.
6. The teacher 3.84 Strongly 1
guides student to Agree
make good
behavior.
7. The teacher gives 3.38 Strongly 6
reward to the Agree
students for their
good behavior.
8. The teacher 3.04 Agree 8
singles out
students when
they are
disrupting in the
class.
9. The teacher sends 2.90 Agree 9
the student to the
guidance office.
10. The teacher 2.10 Disagree 10
sends student on
suspension.
Total Mean 3.33 Strongly

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Agree

Legend 1=1.00-1.75(Strongly Disagree), 2=1.76-2.50 (Disagree) 3=2.51-


3.25 (Agree) 4=3.26-4.00 (Strongly Agree)

Table 4.4 shows that teachers strongly agreed that they guide

student to make good behavior with 3.84 mean; organize class

meeting to discuss vital behavior lessons with students with 3.80

mean; advise parents to know the classroom rules and consequences

with 3.74 mean; plan appropriate and clear consequences with 3.62

mean; and listen to the student to understand what make them

believe with 3.60 mean. However, sending student on suspension

obtained 2.10 mean interpreted as disagree.

For teachers, dealing with student misbehavior in the

classroom takes up a considerable proportion of teaching time,

which in turn affects the quality of the students behaviors and

affects the classrooms in which they learn, as well as their

experiences within these contexts (Creemers and Reezigt, 2011).

Table 4.5 Effectiveness of Management Strategies

Weighted
Effectiveness of Mean Interpretation Ranking
Strategies Indicators
1. Rewarding students 3.38 Very effective 5
when they behave
well.
2. Correcting students 3.62 Very effective 3.5

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by using positive
interventions such
as giving them more
class work to do and
helping them
develop individual
behavior plans.
3. Creating rules and 3.62 Very effective 4
consequences for
students.
4. Counselling 3.70 Very effective 2
students and giving
them guidance.
5. Supporting students 3.78 Very effective 1
to make positive
changes by teaching
them social skills
and moral values for
responsible
behavior.
Total Mean 3.62 Very Effective

Legend:
1=1.00-1.75 (Not at all Effective), 2= 1.76-2.50 (Slightly Effective),
3=2.51-3.25 (Moderately Effective), 4= 3.26-4.00 ( Very effective)

Table 4.5 shows that teachers considered that the following

strategies are all very effective. Supporting students to make

positive changes by teaching them social skills and moral values for

responsible behavior ranked first with a mean of 3.78; counselling

students and giving them guidance which ranked second with a mean

of 3.70; correcting students by using positive interventions such as

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giving them more class work to do and helping them develop

individual behavior plans ranked 3.5 with a mean of 3.62; creating

rules and consequences for students ranked fourth with a mean of

3.62 and rewarding students when they behave well ranked fifth

with a mean of 3.38.

To support this data, Reupert and Woodcock (2010) suggested

the reward strategies (e.g. stickers) after student's desirable

behavior, preventive strategies to avoid the occurrence of behavioral

issues.

On the other hand, teachers must establish order, engage

students, or elicit their cooperation in order to create a classroom

environment in which students learn, and which the teacher can

manage (Burden, 2013).

Lastly, the importance of management strategies are widely

documented (Evertson& Weinstein, 2012), indicating that teachers'

effective managing of students misbehavior can help the students

perform well.

Table 4.6 Differences: Rating on Coping Styles and Management


Strategies based on Teachers Years of Service

Coping Styles and Years of Mea F Sig. Remark


Management Service n
Strategies

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1. The teacher 5 years 3.33 1.155 .343 Not


plans and below Significant
appropriate
and clear 6-10years 3.80
consequences 11-15 3.75
. years
16-20years 3.50
21 years 3.46
and above
Total 3.62
7. The teacher 5 years 3.33 1.570 .199 Not
consistently and below Significant
applies
consequences 6-10years 3.60
with students 11-15 3.50
who break years
the rules.
16-20years 3.00
21 years 3.23
and above
Total 3.36
13. The 5 years 3.36 1.051 .392 Not
teacher and below Significant
advises
parent know 6-10years 3.80
the classroom 11-15 3.68
rules and years
consequences
. 16-20years 3.50
21 years 3.92
and above
Total 3.74
19. The 5 years 3.33 1.378 .257 Not
teacher and below Significant
organizes
class meeting 6-10years 3.80
to discuss 11-15 3.81
vital years

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behaviour 16-20years 3.75


lessons with
students. 21 years 3.92
and above
Total 3.80
25. The 5 years 3.33 .516 .724 Not
teacher and below Significant
listens to the
student to 6-10years 3.70
38
understand 11-15 3.56
what make years
them believe.
16-20years 3.50
21 years 3.69
and above
Total 3.60
31. The 5 years 3.33 1.779 .150 Not
teacher and below Significant
guides
student to 6-10years 3.90
make good 11-15 3.81
behaviour. years
16-20years 3.87
21 years 3.92
and above
Total 3.84
37. The 5 years 3.00 .489 .744 Not
teacher gives and below Significant
reward to the
students for 6-10years 3.30
their good 11-15 3.37
behaviour. years
16-20years 3.37
21 years 3.53
and above
Total 3.38
43. The 5 years 2.66 .281 .888 Not

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teacher and below Significant


singles out
students 6-10years 3.20
when they 11-15 3.00
are years
disrupting in
the class. 16-20years 3.00
21 years 3.07
and above
Total 3.04
5 years 2.66 2.415 .063 Not
9. The and below Significant
teacher
sends the 6-10years 3.40
student to 11-15 3.06
the years
guidance
office. 16-20years 2.62
21 years 2.53
and above
Total 2.90
15. The 5 years 2.66 .339 .850 Not
teacher and below Significant
sends
student on 6-10years 2.10
suspensio 11-15 2.12
n. years
16-20years 2.00
21 years 2.00
and above
Total 2.10
Overall 5 years 3.13 .794 .536 Not
and below Significant
6-10years 3.46
11-15 3.36
years
16-20years 3.21

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21 years 3.33
and above
Total 3.33
Significant at alpha 0.05

Table 4.6 shows the one way ANOVA of coping styles and

management strategies in terms of years of service. The teachers are

grouped according to their years of experience. The significance

column, it is noticeable that the entire significance levels between

the years of service are greater than 0.05 of the statistic significant

level. It can be deduced that the years of service factor in coping

styles and management strategies is not significantly different from

another. Thus, the years of service does not have a significant effect

nor can be a determinant for coping styles and management

strategies.

Table4.7 Differences: Rating on Coping Styles and Management


Strategies based on a Grade Level

Coping Styles and Grade Mean F Sig. Remark


Management Level
Strategies
1. The teacher Grade 1 3.63 .200 .961 Not
plans Grade 2 3.50 Significant
appropriate Grade 3 3.66
and clear Grade 4 3.66
consequences. Grade 5 3.50
Grade 6 3.71

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Total 3.62
8. The teacher Grade 1 3.09 2.07 .087 Not
consistently Grade 2 3.33 4 Significant
applies
consequences Grade 3 3.66
with students Grade 4 3.55
who break the Grade 5 3.00
rules.
Grade 6 3.57
Total 3.36
15. The Grade 1 3.63 .312 .903 Not
teacher Grade 2 3.83 Significant
advises parent
know the Grade 3 3.77
classroom Grade 4 3.77
rules and Grade 5 3.62
consequences.
Grade 6 3.85
Total 3.74
22. The Grade 1 3.81 1.33 .268 Not
teacher Grade 2 3.83 3 Significant
organizes
class meeting Grade 3 4.00
to discuss Grade 4 3.88
vital Grade 5 3.62
behaviour
Grade 6 3.57
lessons with
students. Total 3.80
29. The Grade 1 3.36 1.98 .100 Not
teacher listens Grade 2 3.50 3 Significant
to the student Grade 3 3.77
to understand Grade 4 3.88
what make
Grade 5 3.37
them believe.
Grade 6 3.71
Total 3.60
36. The Grade 1 3.72 .645 .667 Not
teacher guides Grade 2 3.83 Significant
student to Grade 3 4.00
make good Grade 4 3.88
behaviour. Grade 5 3.75
Grade 6 3.85
Total 3.84

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43. The Grade 1 3.36 .148 .979 Not


teacher gives Grade 2 3.50 Significant
reward to the Grade 3 3.44
students for Grade 4 3.33
their good Grade 5 3.25
behaviour. Grade 6 3.28
Total 3.36
50. The Grade 1 3.09 .172 .972 Not
teacher Grade 2 3.00 Significant
singles out Grade 3 3.22
students when Grade 4 3.11
they are
Grade 5 2.87
disrupting in
the class. Grade 6 3.00
Total 3.06
57. The Grade 1 2.81 .667 .651 Not
teacher sends Grade 2 2.50 Significant
the student to Grade 3 2.88
the guidance Grade 4 2.88
office. Grade 5 2.87
Grade 6 3.28
Total 2.88
64. The Grade 1 2.00 .729 .606 Not
teacher sends Grade 2 2.16 Significant
student on Grade 3 1.77
suspension. Grade 4 1.88
Grade 5 2.25
Grade 6 2.57
Total 2.08
Overall Grade 1 32.54 .565 .726 Not
Grade 2 33.00 Significant
Grade 3 34.22
Grade 4 33.88
Grade 5 32.12
Grade 6 34.42
Total 33.34
Significant at alpha 0.05

Table 4.7 shows the one way ANOVA of coping styles and

management strategies in terms of grade level. The teachers are

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grouped according to grade level. The significant level of the

indicators according to grade level is greater than 0.05 of the

statistic significant level. This implies that the coping styles and

management strategies have no significant difference with the grade

level. Thus, regardless of the grade level, most teachers the same

coping styles and management strategies.

INTERVIEW
Table 4.8 Public Teachers Response regarding the Pupils
Misbehaviour in the Classroom

THEME RECCURENCE INTERPRETATION


1. Shifts chair 3 Teacher C One of the
and chat problems is student talking
with other with seatmate while the
students teacher discusses.
Teacher D The pupils
always transfer from one chair
to another and chat with one
another.
Teacher F The pupils change
seat always and chats with

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other students.

The most recurring theme obtained from the interviews was

students shifting from one chair to another and chat to other

students while the teacher discusses; which supports the survey

data. Teacher C One of the problems is student talking with

seatmate while the teacher discusses. Teacher D The pupils

always transfer from one chair to another and chat with one

another. Teacher F The pupils change seat always and chats with

other students.

Table 4.9 Public Teachers Response regarding the Coping Styles


and Management Strategies

THEME REOCCURENCE STATEMENTS


1. Class 3 Teacher B Teacher should
meetings to organize class meeting to
discuss the discuss behavior with
rules and parents.
regulations Teacher C Teacher should
make sure that the rules are
clear with the pupils and
pupils should know the
consequences.
Teacher F Teacher should
organize class meeting to

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discuss the rules and


regulations in the
classroom.
2. Guide the 2 Teacher D Teacher should
Students listens to the pupils
feelings and guide them to
what is right not right to do.
Teacher E Teacher must
guide the students and set a
good example.

The most recurring themes obtained from the interview

include teacher organizing class meetings to discuss the rules and

regulations in the classroom; guiding the students to make good

behavior. The statements stated by the interviewed teachers support

the survey data for on coping styles and management strategies.

Teacher B Teacher should organize class meeting to discuss

behavior with parents. Teacher C Teacher should make sure that

the rules are clear with the pupils and pupils should know the

consequences. Teacher F Teacher should organize class meeting

to discuss the rules and regulations in the classroom.

Table 4.10 Public Teacher Response regarding the Effectiveness of


the Coping Styles and Management Strategies.

THEME REOCCURENCE STATEMENTS


1. Creating 3 Teacher B Creating class
Rules and rules for the students is
Consequenc very effective because
es pupils know what should be
done and not to be done in
the classroom and help

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them to be responsible in
their behavior.
Teacher E Creating rules
for the students is a must
because pupils must be
responsible for their action.
Teacher F Rules and
Regulations is the most
important thing to be
discussed with pupils from
the start because this will
guide them to do what is
right and avoid what is
wrong.
2. Guiding and 2 Teacher C It is important
counseling for teachers to talk with the
students students whenever they
misbehave and guide them
to change it to a good
behavior.
Teacher D Guiding pupils
and counseling them about
their behavior will help
them change the bad
behavior to good behavior.

The most recurring themes include creating rules and

consequences plays a vital role in coping and managing pupils

misbehavior, and guiding and counseling students help students be

responsible for their own action. The results also match the survey

data. Teacher B Creating class rules for the students is very

effective because pupils know what should be done and not to be

done in the classroom and help them to be responsible in their

behavior. Teacher E Creating rules for the students is a must

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because pupils must be responsible for their action. Teacher F

Rules and Regulations is the most important thing to be discussed

with pupils from the start because this will guide them to do what is

right and avoid what is wrong.

CHAPTER V

SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS

AND RECOMMENDATIONS

This chapter presented the summary of findings, conclusions

and recommendations. The sequencing were based on the

presentation of chapter 4.

Summary

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The following are the summary of findings gathered based

from the analyzed and interpreted data presented in chapter 4.

1. The data analyzed and interpreted in this study were gathered

from the 50 public elementary school teachers handling grade 1

to grade 6 levels. The grade one level has a total number of 11

teachers; grade two level has a total number of 6 teachers; grade

three level has a total number of 9 teachers; grade four level has

a total number of 9 teachers; grade five level has a total number

of 8 teachers; and grade six level has a total number of 7 teachers

from varied sections. The majority of the respondents in terms on

the total number of years served as professional teachers were

11-15 years and 21 years and above. The total number of

teachers with 11- 15 years of experiences were 16 and the total

number of teachers with a 21 years and above were 13. This

implies that most of the respondents have a sufficient experience

in teaching. On the other hand, the remaining respondents had a

16-20 and 10 and below years of experience. The total numbers

of teachers with 16-20 years of experience were 8. The total

numbers of teachers with 6-10 years of experience are 10. The

total numbers of teachers with 5 years and below experience were

3.

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2. In the study the respondents answers based on the mean of the

listed pupils misbehavior were dominantly rarely in which there

were 12 responses. The top 5 indicators of students misbehavior

according to the data are: the student consistently reports others

for their misbehavior or mistake, with mean of 2.90 and ranked

1 s t ; the student shifts from one chair to another, gathered a mean

of 2.82 and 2 n d in rank; the student repeatedly makes complaints

against other students, with a mean of 2.74 and 3 r d in rank; the

students chat with one another while the teacher discusses, with a

mean of 2.59 and 4 t h in rank; and the student ignites quarrel

among the other students, gathered a mean of 2.36 and ranked

5 t h . The indicators that received rarely gathered a mean ranging

from 2.32 to 1.80 and never gathered a mean ranging from 1.70

to 1.46.
3. The respondents answers based on the mean of the listed coping

styles and management strategies were dominantly strongly agree

in which there were 7 responses. The top five coping styles and

management strategies they strongly agreed were; the teacher

guides student to make good behavior, gathered a mean of 3.84

and ranked 1 s t ; the teacher organizes class meeting to discuss

vital behavior lessons with students, gathered a mean of 3.80 and

2 n d in rank; the teacher advises parent to know the classroom

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rules and consequences, gathered a mean of 3.74 and 3 r d in rank;

the teacher plans appropriate and clear consequences, gathered a

mean of 3.62 and ranked 4 t h ; and the teacher listens to students

to understand what make them believe, gathered a mean of 3.60

and ranked 5 t h . On the other hand 2 indicators gathered 2 agree

responses with a mean of 2.90 and 3.04 and 1 indicator gathered

a disagree response with a mean of 2.10.


4. The respondent answers on the effectiveness of strategies were

entirely very effective with a mean ranging from 3.78 to 3.58 and

with a total mean score of 3.62.

5. The results that were analyzed and presented on the significance

of grade level and years of experience shows that there no

significant difference on pupils misbehavior, coping styles and

management strategies and effectiveness of strategies. It implies

that teachers in the levels grade 1 to 6 and teachers with a years

of service 5 years and below, 6-10 years, 11-15 years, 16-20 and

21 years and above all have the same perception on pupils

misbehavior in the classroom, management strategies and coping

styles and effectiveness of strategies.

6. There were 6 teachers from grade one to six interviewed about

their point of view in pupils misbehavior in the classroom,

coping styles and management strategies and the effectiveness of

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strategies. The result of the interview support the claim of the

survey result since most of the teachers surveyed and

interviewed have the same point of view on the stated issues.

Conclusion

The researchers therefore conclude that:

1. The indicators shows that the pupils misbehavior are rarely

encountered by the teachers with a total mean score of 2.12.

2. The coping styles and the management strategies are strongly

agreed by the respondents based on the total mean score of

3.33.

3. The management strategies were very effective based on the

total mean score of 3.62.

4. The evidences show that there is no significant difference on

grade level and years of service to the pupils misbehavior,

coping styles and management strategies and effectiveness of

strategies. Hence, this implies that pupils misbehavior is the

same regardless of what level they are in and teachers at all

level and teachers with different years of experience faced the

mostly the same pupils misbehavior uses the mostly the same

coping styles and management strategies. The themes obtained

from qualitative data support the descriptive data.

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Recommendation

The following recommendations are presented:

For Schools

1. that schools staff and administrators may be given more

trainings and workshops annually to produce a comprehensive

coping styles and management strategies, which would help

them to become more informed on the use of coping styles and

management strategies that work effectively; and them to

learn a better way of applying them in the classroom.


2. that the public schools may provide guidelines for teacher to

proper coping and management on pupils misbehavior to be

used in schools and facilitate teacher training to design

coping styles and strategies to help them implement it

effectively.

For Teachers

1. that teacher may need to be given new behavior coping styles

and management strategies to deal with the students

misbehaviors within the classroom setting.

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2. that the teachers may organize guidance consultation hours for

students for social and self-awareness in the classroom

annually to help them in becoming more responsible toward

their action.

For Future Researchers

1. that the researchers may further studies since this study only

dealt on teachers view on the different coping styles and

management strategies it is necessary that further studies

should look also look at both the teachers and pupils view on

the coping styles and management strategies used in the

classroom.

College
57 of Education and Liberal Arts